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Masters Degrees in Educational Psychology, USA

We have 7 Masters Degrees in Educational Psychology, USA

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Master the study of the social, cognitive, emotional, and educational development of children and young adults with this one-year (fall, spring, summer) master of education degree program in Educational and School Psychology. Read more
Master the study of the social, cognitive, emotional, and educational development of children and young adults with this one-year (fall, spring, summer) master of education degree program in Educational and School Psychology.

While designed for students who plan to pursue certification in school psychology after the master’s degree, this program is also for those who want to take on entry-level professional careers as practitioners or administrators.

All students start as a cohort group in the fall and graduate at the end of summer – a great way to develop relationships with your peers.

As a student, you will:
-Discover instructional methods and cognitive and behavioral theories of learning
-Gain a broad theoretical and practical background in the areas of education and psychology
-Broaden your understanding of human development and learning
-Learn about educational evaluation, research and how to develop evidence-based interventions

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See the department website - https://www.rit.edu/cla/psychology/graduate/ms-school-psych/overview. The master of science degree in school psychology is approved by the National Association of School Psychologists and prepares students for provisional New York state certification as school psychologists. Read more
See the department website - https://www.rit.edu/cla/psychology/graduate/ms-school-psych/overview

The master of science degree in school psychology is approved by the National Association of School Psychologists and prepares students for provisional New York state certification as school psychologists. Designed to provide students with a strong background in psychological foundations, the program develops professional skills and competencies in assessment, counseling, consultation, and program evaluation.

A school psychologist works with young children (birth to age five); elementary, junior high, and high school students; teachers and administrators; parents; and professionals to offer services that lead to the amelioration of existing student difficulties and attempts to prevent school problems. Through diagnostic testing, counseling, consultation, and intervention, school psychologists help students deal with learning and behavioral difficulties and help improve students’ adjustment to school and their community.

The master of science degree is awarded after students have completed all course work, an internship, and have passed a portfolio review.

Plan of study

A minimum of 66 semester credit hours are required for completion of the program. Before registering for the internship, students must pass a portfolio review. A cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above is required.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS program in school psychology, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree at an accredited college or university,

- Have a minimum undergraduate cumulative GPA of 3.0,

- Have completed at least 18 semester hours in behavioral sciences with a grade of B (3.0) or above,

- Have completed prerequisite undergraduate courses in general psychology, elementary statistics, child or developmental psychology, and abnormal psychology,

- Submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE),

- Submit letters of reference,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work,

- Submit an essay outlining the candidate's goals and related experience that shows evidence of a professional commitment and the potential for developing effective relationships with children, youth, and adults,

- Complete an individual interview, and

- Complete an application for graduate study.

- International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. A minimum score of 580 (paper-based) is required. This requirement is waived for native speakers of English and those submitting transcripts from American universities.

All credentials must be submitted and reviewed before the student completes 9 semester credit hours of graduate work in the program. Applications are due by February 1. Later applications will be reviewed on a space-available basis.

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Grounded in critical thinking and positive action, this program provides a rigorous human rights education in the classroom and community. Read more

Grounded in critical thinking and positive action, this program provides a rigorous human rights education in the classroom and community. You'll graduate prepared to tackle—and to teach about—inequities based on race, class, gender, sexual identity, religion, and nation.

Program Details

Designed to support teachers of early childhood through college, as well as educators working in non-formal settings such as community organizations, Human Rights Education (HRE) entails understanding the promise of rights guarantees and the gap between rights and actual realities.

Courses examine the right to education, schooling with dignity and rights, and curricular efforts towards social justice and comprehensive human rights. Students engage with issues in local and global contexts, with emphasis on globalization, migration, social movements, and transnationalism.

Transformation is an essential element of HRE, and is done through a process of education that empowers people to make changes in their own lives, as well as in their families, communities, and institutions.

Program Delivery

The program follows a schedule of alternate weekend classes that convene nine times a semester (Friday evenings and all day Saturdays). See Teaching Weekend dates.

A hallmark of the Masters in Human Rights Education program is its flexibility to work with diverse students. Students can complete the coursework requirements in as few as 18 months (two academic year semesters plus the summer term) and can extend the program as long as needed (up to 5 years). Most students complete the Masters program in 2 academic years with summer coursework often included.

COURSE DETAILS

The Master of Arts in Human Rights Education (HRE) consists of 30 credits. Requirements include 15 credits of core coursework, 9 credits of elective coursework, and 6 credits of Culminating Project. All classes are 3 credits, unless otherwise noted.

HRE FOUNDATIONS COURSES | 9 CREDITS

  • IME 618 - International Human Rights Law for Educators (3)
  • IME 620 - Human Rights Education: Pedagogy and Praxis (3)
  • IME 621 - Human Rights Education: History, Philosophy and Current Debates (3)

HRE TOPIC COURSES | 9 CREDITS (SELECT 3 OF 4 COURSES)

  • IME 616 - Social Movements and Human Rights (3)
  • IME 617 - Tools for Human Rights Practice (3)
  • IME 619 - Gender and Globalization (3)
  • IME 640 - Immigration and Forced Displacement (3)

HRE ELECTIVES | 6 CREDITS (SELECT 2 COURSES)

  • IME 602 - Linguistic Rights and Bilingual Education (3)
  • IME 605 - Re-conceptualizing Multicultural Education (3)
  • IME 606 - Critical Analysis of Urban Schooling (3)
  • IME 612 - Critical Race Theory and Praxis (3)
  • IME 625 - Contemporary International Issues (3)
  • IME 636 - Human Rights and Media (3)
  • IME 637 - Critical Pedagogy (3)
  • IME 639 - Cross-Cultural Literacy (3)

CULMINATING PROJECT | 6 CREDITS

  • GEDU 603 - Methodology of Educational Research (3)
  • IME 649 - MA Thesis/Field Project (3)

The Human Rights Education Program Learning Outcomes:

The goal of the HRE program is to develop professional practitioners with expertise in the following key areas:

  • Analyze the gap between universal rights and grassroots realities in local, global, and transnational contexts, with attention to issues of power, privilege, and marginalization. Explore the conditions and dimensions of empowering and transformative learning processes.
  • Describe and critique the differing approaches, perspectives, and models toward human rights education and how they impact the ways in which HRE is carried out in diverse settings.
  • Drawing on critical pedagogies, produce advocacy tools and curricular resources to be used in formal or non-formal educational contexts to address human rights violations.
  • Design, conduct, analyze and present findings from interviews, using diverse methods, such as oral history, in order to raise awareness about human rights issues.
  • Identify diverse methodological tools and skills needed to conduct ethical research in a range of contexts such as classroom teaching, community organizing, and curriculum development, among others.
  • Synthesize contextual understandings, reflective analysis, theoretical frameworks, and methodological training to inform either the production of a thesis or research-based field project.


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The Master's in Counseling Psychology program with a concentration in Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) prepares students to be socially and culturally responsive relationship and family therapists and mental health counselors. Read more

The Master's in Counseling Psychology program with a concentration in Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) prepares students to be socially and culturally responsive relationship and family therapists and mental health counselors. At its core, the MFT’s clinical training program upholds values of equity, social justice, community and cultural wealth, and collaborative problem solving.

MFT Program Strengths

  • Curriculum attends to the mental health needs of diverse cultures and communities.
  • A focus on a community mental health recovery and wellness approach to serving clients and providing treatment options.
  • Three-course cognitive behavioral therapy sequence that includes theory, skill building, and practice of broad treatment interventions.
  • Courses that integrate a life-span development, family systems, multicultural, and social justice perspective in mental health practice.
  • Small class sizes with faculty who are invested in student growth and learning.
  • Many instructors are practicing mental health clinicians.
  • Emphasis on incorporating evidence-based practices and client strengths.
  • University-wide supportive services and opportunities to collaborate with instructors and students.
  • Collaborative cohort learning model facilitates future support, resources, and continued networking opportunities after graduation and licensure.

PROGRAM DELIVERY

  • 60-credit program with classes in the fall, spring, and summer semesters.
  • Cohort-based model with fall (eight semesters) and spring (seven semesters) entry dates.
  • Late afternoon (3:45-6:15 p.m.) and evening (7:20-9:50 p.m.) weekday classes with some Saturday sessions during fall and spring semesters.
  • Intensive summer sessions starting no earlier than 3:45 p.m. on weekdays with some Saturday sessions.

Program Learning Outcomes

Self-Awareness and Contextual Understanding: The MFT program will prepare students to become culturally competent therapists who can critically analyze themselves and their clients across ecological contexts. Students will be able to:

  • Develop a practice of cultural self-awareness and reflectiveness that critically evaluates how one’s beliefs, values, behaviors, personal experiences and cultural context affect one’s approach towards providing mental health treatment with clients of diverse backgrounds, belief systems, and relationship constellations.
  • Identify the ways in which the surrounding socio-political, historical, and cultural contexts impact the mental health experiences of individuals and communities of diverse identities and cultural backgrounds.
  • Explore and analyze power, privilege, and marginalization, as it relates to therapy practice, through multiple perspectives, worldviews, and epistemologies

Theoretical Grounding: The MFT program will prepare students to identify and critically analyze theory to address a wide range of clinical counseling and mental health issues, such that students will be able to:

  • Identify the legal and ethical standards related to marriage and family therapy and professional clinical counselor practice and understand how they apply in various service contexts and with diverse populations.
  • Understand the major theoretical concepts of counseling and mental health treatment to address a variety of mental health concerns and diagnoses from a strengths-based and culturally inclusive perspective.

Diagnosis, Assessment, and Research: The program will prepare students to become culturally competent therapists who understand socio-cultural complexities associated with diagnosis, assessment, and research. As culturally responsive therapists, students will be able to:

  • Conduct culturally sensitive clinical and diagnostic assessments of clients’ mental health functioning that account for the influences of relationships, cultural backgrounds, identity, biological determinants, historical context, and developmental variables.
  • Conceptualize psychopathology and psychiatric diagnosis in a way that recognizes the impact of environmental variables, social norms, cultural values, physiological and biological determinants, and relationship dynamics as variables that influence the presence of pathology.
  • Develop foundational crisis assessment and intervention strategies that promote stabilization, utilize community resources and strengths, and respects clients’ unique cultural, developmental, mental health needs.
  • Understand concepts of psychological trauma, including the range of traumatic experiences, symptomatology, and issues related to diagnosis, developmental impacts, and counseling treatment.
  • Understand ethical research, procedures and practices, such as reflexivity in the role of the researcher, and what methods align with distinct forms of inquiry.
  • Understand how to be a consumer of research in marriage and family therapy and how to use research to inform and improve culturally competent practice.

Therapeutic Interventions and Clinical Practice: Students in the program will be able to understand, develop, identify, and demonstrate the foundational components of culturally competent counseling in marriage and family therapy, clinical counseling, and relationship therapy. As practitioners, students will be able to:

  • Understand the components of collaborative treatment planning, employing a client-centered and strengths-based approach.
  • Identify culturally accountable, strengths-based evidence-based treatment interventions for application to diverse populations with a variety of mental health diagnoses.
  • Provide effective, evidence-based, and culturally responsive therapy and counseling treatment for individuals, children, groups, families, couples, and diverse relational constellations dealing with mild to severe mental health issues under appropriate supervision of trained mental health practitioners.
  • Demonstrate culturally responsive, evidence-based counseling and psychotherapy skills necessary for working with a wide range of individuals, families, couples, groups, and other relationship constellations across the lifespan.


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