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Masters Degrees in Computer Science, USA

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The Department of Computer Science at Binghamton University aims to provide all graduates with a strong foundation in computer science while also offering the opportunity to pursue specific interests within computer science and/or interests in other disciplines. Read more
The Department of Computer Science at Binghamton University aims to provide all graduates with a strong foundation in computer science while also offering the opportunity to pursue specific interests within computer science and/or interests in other disciplines. The program provides students with an understanding of the theory and practice of automating the representation, storage and processing of information, while emphasizing experimental research to design and engineer a wide variety of computer and information systems.

The Master of Science in Computer Science (MSCS) is intended for students with a strong background in computer science and a desire to prepare for research studies or professional practice. If you have bachelor's degree in computer science or a related field, you're invited to apply for admission to our MSCS program.

The doctoral program leads to a PhD in Computer Science. Students admitted into the program typically have a master's degree in computer science or a closely related discipline. Students with a bachelor's degree and a strong academic record may also be directly admitted.

Recent doctoral graduates have gone on to careers in as software engineering at Intel, eBay, Cisco Systems, positions at Hewlett Packard, Microsoft, Twitter, Bloomberg, the Air Force Research Lab, and the U.S. Census. Academic placements include assistant professorships at California State University at Fullerton, Valdosta State University, and Harran University, Turkey.

The Master's program leads to a Master of Science in Computer Science. It is intended for students with a strong background in computer science and a desire to prepare for research studies or professional practice. Holders of the baccalaureate degree in computer science or a related field are invited to apply for admission to the MSCS program. Students whose undergraduate degree is not in computer science may be required to complete some preparatory work in addition to fulfilling the requirements listed below.
Program requirements include four core courses taken over the first two semesters of study. These courses are Computer Organization and Architecture, Operating Systems, Programming Languages and Design & Analysis of Computer Algorithms. Three graduating options are offered: a thesis option, a project option and a comprehensive exam. Beyond the 4 core courses, these options require students to complete 4, 5 and 6 elective courses, respectively, chosen from a broad set of courses offered by the Department.

Applicant Qualifications

- Undergraduate major in computer science or related field desirable for admission
- Applicants are additionally expected to have completed coursework in the following areas:
*Algorithms and data structures
*Computer organization and architecture
*Operating systems
*Programming languages
*Discrete mathematics

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university you have attended
- Two letters of recommendation (three letters of recommendation for PhD applicants)
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

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The Master of Science is intended for those who have a Bachelor's degree in Computer Science or related field, or have sufficient preparation. Read more
The Master of Science is intended for those who have a Bachelor's degree in Computer Science or related field, or have sufficient preparation.

The purpose of the programs is to provide the intellectual and practical tools that professionals will need either to pursue or further careers as computer scientists in industry or to pursue a doctorate degree in computer science.

Curriculum

The Master's curriculum is designed with these goals in mind:

• The core modules provide a solid foundation in the fundamental principles of computer science.
• The 500-level electives give exposure to a variety of Computer Science subject areas.
• The 600-level advanced courses give exposure to research topics of current interest and provide in-depth knowledge.

Core: All four modules (12 credits – 3 credits each)

CSC520 — Foundations of Computer Science
CSC530 — Data Structures
CSC540 — Programming Languages
CSC560 — Analysis of Algorithms

Electives: At least four 500-level electives (at least 12 credits – 3 credits each)

CSC525 — Operating Systems
CSC535 — Networks and Data Communications
CSC545 — Database System Concepts
CSC555 — Software Engineering
CSC565 — Compiler Design
CSC570 — Computer Architecture
CSC573 — Graphics and User Interfaces
CSC575 — Artificial Intelligence
CSC581 — Topics in Computer Science
CSC582 — Topics in Information Systems
CSC583 — Topics in Computer Security
CSC584 — Topics in Web Technology
CSC585 — User Interfaces in Java
CSC586 — System Administration and Security
CSC587 — Web Services
CSC588 — Wireless Programming and Security
CSC589 — UML and Pattern Design

Advanced: At least two 600-level (at least 6 credits – 3 credits each)

CSC600 — Advanced Seminar
CSC603 — Advanced Seminar in Computer Security
CSC604 — Advanced Seminar in Web Technology
CSC605 — Internship
CSC610 — Independent Research
CSC620 — Master's Thesis

To find out more information about the curriculum please visit the website:

http://www.cs.wcupa.edu/grad/masters.html

Internships

West Chester University students may register for a Computer Science Internship and work part time or full time in Summer II or during regular semesters. Students who are not Computer Science majors should use CSC300 (3 credits). Computer Science majors should use CSC400 (6 credits); of the 6 credits, 3 credits can be used to satisfy the major requirements, and the other 3 credits satisfy general electives. Computer Science graduate students should use the course number CSC605 (3 credits).

For more information please visit the website:

https://www.wcupa.edu/internships/

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The computer science program is designed for students who have an undergraduate degree (or minor) in computer science, as well as those who have a strong background in a field in which computers are applied, such as engineering, science, or business. Read more

Program overview

The computer science program is designed for students who have an undergraduate degree (or minor) in computer science, as well as those who have a strong background in a field in which computers are applied, such as engineering, science, or business.

The degree is offered on a full- or part-time basis. Courses are generally offered in the afternoons and evenings to accommodate part-time students. Full-time students take three or four courses per semester and may be able to complete the course work in three semesters. Full-time students who are required to take additional bridge courses may be able to complete the course work in four semesters. Part-time students take one or two courses per semester and may be able to complete the course work in four to five semesters. The time required to complete a master's project is one semester, but can vary according to the student and the scope of the topic. Two semesters is typical.

Plan of study

The program consists of 30 credit hours of course work, which includes either a thesis or a project. Students complete one core course, three courses in a cluster, four electives, and a thesis. For those choosing to complete a project in place of a thesis, students complete one additional elective.

Clusters

Students select three cluster courses from the following areas (see website for individual area information):
-Computer graphics and visualization
-Data management
-Distributed systems
-Intelligent systems
-Languages and tools
-Security
-Theory

Electives

Electives provide breadth of experience in computer science and applications areas. Students who wish to include courses from departments outside of computer science need prior approval from the graduate program director. Refer to the course descriptions in the departments of computer science, engineering, mathematical sciences, and imaging science for possible elective courses.

Master's thesis/project

Students may choose the thesis or project option as the capstone to the program. Students who choose the project option must register for the Project course (CSCI-788). Students participate in required in-class presentations that are critiqued. A summary project report and public presentation of the student's project (in poster form) occurs at the end of the semester.

Curriculum

Thesis/project options differ in course sequence, see the website for a particular option's modules and a particular cluster's modules.

Other admission requirements

-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam.
-Have a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (B), and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants, whose native language is not English, must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. A minimum score of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) is required.
-Applicants must satisfy prerequisite requirements in mathematics (differential and integral calculus, probability and statistics, discrete mathematics, and computer science theory) and computing (experience with a modern high-level language [e.g., C++, Java], data structures, software design methodology, introductory computer architecture, operating systems, and programming language concepts).

Additional information

Bridge courses:
If an applicant lacks any prerequisites, bridge courses may be recommended to provide students with the required knowledge and skills needed for the program. If any bridge courses are indicated in a student's plan of study, the student may be admitted to the program on the condition that they successfully complete the recommended bridge courses with a grade of B (3.0) or better (courses with lower grades must be repeated). Generally, formal acceptance into the program is deferred until the applicant has made significant progress in this additional course work. Bridge program courses are not counted as part of the 30 credit hours required for the master's degree. During orientation, bridge exams are conducted. These exams are the equivalent to the finals of the bridge courses. Bridge courses will be waived if the exams are passed.

Faculty:
Faculty members in the department are actively engaged in research in the areas of artificial intelligence, computer networking, pattern recognition, computer vision, graphics, visualization, data management, theory, and distributed computing systems. There are many opportunities for graduate students to participate in these activities toward thesis or project work and independent study.

Facilities:
The computer science department provides extensive facilities that represent current technology, including:
-A graduate lab with more than 15 Mac’s and a graduate library.
-Specialized labs in graphics, computer vision, pattern recognition, security, database, and robotics.
-Six general purpose computing labs with more than 100 workstations running Linux, Windows, and OS X; plus campus-wide wireless access.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students. Read more
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students.

- Master of Science–Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#thesis)
- Master of Science–Non-Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#nonthesis)
- Timetable for the Submission of Graduate School Forms for an MS Degree (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#timetable)

Visit the website http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MASTER OF SCIENCE–THESIS OPTION (PLAN I):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 24 semester hours of credit for coursework, plus a 6-hour thesis under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

Credit Hours
The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research: Thesis Research.

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory). These courses must be taken within the department and selected from the following:
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, including the following courses completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

MASTER OF SCIENCE–NON-THESIS OPTION (PLAN II):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit for coursework, which may include a 3-hour non-thesis project under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory).
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, as follows:

- The following courses will be completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

TIMETABLE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF GRADUATE SCHOOL FORMS FOR AN MS DEGREE
This document identifies a timetable for the submission of all Graduate School paperwork associated with the completion of an M.S. degree

- For students in Plan I students only (thesis option) after a successful thesis proposal defense, you should submit the Appointment/Change of a Masters Thesis Committee form

- The semester before, or no later than the first week in the semester in which you plan to graduate, you should “Apply for Graduation” online in myBama.

- In the semester in which you apply for graduation, the Graduate Program Director will contact you about the Comprehensive Exam.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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USF offers a three-year MS in Computer Science Bridge program that provides a unique opportunity for motivated students from a non-computer science background to pursue a Master's in Computer Science. Read more
USF offers a three-year MS in Computer Science Bridge program that provides a unique opportunity for motivated students from a non-computer science background to pursue a Master's in Computer Science. Students who successfully complete the first year of preparatory classes then continue in the standard two-year MS in Computer Science program.

Real-World Experience - By completing an internship at a technology company, working on a faculty research project, or contributing to an open-source project, the practicum course helps students gain real world experience.

San Francisco Advantage - Located in the heart of San Francisco and close to Silicon Valley, which boasts more tech companies than any other region in the US.

Faculty - Comprising of distinguished researchers and accomplished experts from the Bay Area’s tech companies, the MSCS faculty bring real world computing experience into the classroom.

Small Classes - Close interaction with full-time faculty is a hallmark of the program. Our cohort model enhances the experience during our students’ first year, allowing them to take core courses at the same time.

International Students - may be eligible to work for 36 months in the U.S. after completion of the MSCS program via the OPT program and STEM extension.

Who Can Apply?

Applicants with basic introductory programming background in variables, control structures, structured data types, and functions are eligible to apply. These prerequisites can be completed through introductory programming courses at a local community college, university, online, or through self-study.

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The Computer Science program will introduce you to core areas of advanced computing architecture, advanced operating systems and theories and algorithms used in computing. Read more
The Computer Science program will introduce you to core areas of advanced computing architecture, advanced operating systems and theories and algorithms used in computing. You will conduct advanced research in software engineering, systems or artificial intelligence as you learn high-demand skills sought by industry.

Program Highlights

State-of-the-art computing facilities including the Integrated Engineering Science and Laboratory Facility (ISELF) Visualization Lab, Sunfire 280R running Solaris, several workstations running Windows and Linux and supercomputing facilities in the Twin Cities.
Five to seven graduate assistantship positions each year.
Research and project labs are equipped with Sun, Silicon Graphics and DEC Alpha workstations.
Program is offered on a part-time or full-time track.

Program Distinctions

Graduates have gone on to work for Amazon, Google, Guidant, Medtronics, IBM, Beckman Coulter and Thomson Reuters among others. They have also continued on to Ph.D. programs where they have been awarded assistantships.
Taught by 13 internationally-recognized faculty members.

Requirements and Details

The GRE is required.

A strong showing (more than 75th percentile) in the quantitative GRE score is essential.
A strong score in the verbal section is also important.
Admission is competitive.

Positive letters of recommendation are important, as is a solid undergraduate academic record.

Lack of a computer science background is usually not a major concern, since prerequisite courses are prescribed. However, a background in the sciences and mathematics is essential.

Admission decisions are made at specific times associated with the application deadlines, usually in the week following the deadlines.

A final admission decision may take up to three weeks to receive from the application deadline and up to ten weeks for I-20s to be issued to international students.

Fully-qualified applicants will have taken courses that cover the following topics:

Non-linear data structures: sorting and searching algorithms.
Computer architecture: hardware organization, I/O interface, interrupt mechanisms and pipeline processor design.
File systems; hashed indexed, ISAM files; B-trees; external sorting.
Programming languages: design and implementation.
Operating systems: process, memory and file system management, device handlers.
Finite mathematics and modern algebra.

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The Master of Science in Computer Science (MSCS) program provides students with a broad background in software development and other core disciplines of computer science, ranging from systems, networking, and distributed programming to algorithms and theory. Read more
The Master of Science in Computer Science (MSCS) program provides students with a broad background in software development and other core disciplines of computer science, ranging from systems, networking, and distributed programming to algorithms and theory.

Program Highlights

Real-world experience - By completing an internship at a technology company, working on a faculty research project, or contributing to an open-source project, the practicum course helps students gain real world experience.

San Francisco Advantage - Located in the heart of San Francisco and close to Silicon Valley, which boasts more tech companies than any other region in the US.

Faculty - Comprising of distinguished researchers and accomplished experts from the Bay Area’s tech companies, the our faculty bring real world computing experience into the classroom.

Small Classes - Close interaction with full-time faculty is a hallmark of the program. Our cohort model enhances the experience during our students’ first year, allowing them to take core courses at the same time.

International Students - may be eligible to work for 36 months in the U.S. after completion of the MSCS program via the OPT program and STEM extension.

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The Professional Development Certificates are intended for those who would like to obtain certification in the certain specific areas without having to undertake the preparatory work for a Master's degree. Read more
The Professional Development Certificates are intended for those who would like to obtain certification in the certain specific areas without having to undertake the preparatory work for a Master's degree.

The department of computer science offers a graduate certificate (consisting of four courses each) in Information Systems.

Students will select three or four of the following courses:

STA 511 Intro Stat Computing & Data Management
CSC 545 Database Systems Concepts
CSC 555 Software Engineering
CSC 582 Topics in Information Systems
CSC 586 Sytem Administration and Security

If only three courses are selected, one additional course will need to be selected from the list below:

CSC 520 Foundations of Computer Science
CSC 525 Operating Systems
CSC 530 Data Structures
CSC 535 Networks and Data Communication
CSC 540 Programming Languages
CSC 560 Analysis of Algorithms
CSC 565 Compiler Design
CSC 575 Artificial Intelligence
CSC 581 Topics in Computer Science
CSC 583 Topics in Computer Security
CSC 584 Topics in Web Technology
CSC 585 User Interface In Java
CSC 587 Web Services using XML and SOAP
CSC 588 Wireless Programming and Security
CSC 600 Advanced Seminar
CSC 603 Advanced Seminar in Security
CSC 604 Advanced Seminar Web Technology

Please visit the website for more information about these modules:

http://catalog.wcupa.edu/graduate/sciences-mathematics/computer-science/#coursestext

The Computer Science Information Security Centre

The Computer Science Information Security Center (ISC) recognizes that no computer science graduate should be without information security knowledge. Toward this end, the Computer Science Department has introduced Information Security content such as computer and network security across the undergraduate and graduate curricula.

The curricula set forth by the ISC has been certified by the NSA to meet the National Training Standards for Information Systems Security Professionals (4011) and Systems Administrators (4013).

Career Prospects

Program graduates are employed in the following fields:

• Computer and Information Systems Managers
• Computer and Information Research Scientists
• Software Developers, Systems Software
• Software Quality Assurance Engineers and Testers
• Web Administrators
• Computer Science Teachers, Postsecondary

Read less
The Professional Development Certificates are intended for those who would like to obtain certification in the certain specific areas without having to undertake the preparatory work for a Master's degree. Read more
The Professional Development Certificates are intended for those who would like to obtain certification in the certain specific areas without having to undertake the preparatory work for a Master's degree.

The department of computer science offers a graduate certificate (consisting of four courses each) in Computer Security (IA).

Students will select four of the following courses:

CSC 525 Operating Systems
CSC 535 Networks and Data Communication
CSC 555 Software Engineering
CSC 583 Topics in Computer Security
CSC 586 Sytem Administration and Security
CSC 588 Wireless Programming and Security
CSC 603 Advanced Seminar in Security
CRJ 555 Topical Seminar in Criminal Justice

Please visit the website for more information about these modules:

http://catalog.wcupa.edu/graduate/sciences-mathematics/computer-science/#coursestext

The Computer Science Information Security Centre

The Computer Science Information Security Center (ISC) recognizes that no computer science graduate should be without information security knowledge. Toward this end, the Computer Science Department has introduced Information Security content such as computer and network security across the undergraduate and graduate curricula.

The curricula set forth by the ISC has been certified by the NSA to meet the National Training Standards for Information Systems Security Professionals (4011) and Systems Administrators (4013).

Career Prospects

Program graduates are employed in the following fields:

• Computer and Information Systems Managers
• Information Security Analysts
• Database Administrators
• Network and Computer Systems Administrators
• Computer Network Architects
• Telecommunications Engineering Specialists
• Computer Network Support Specialists

Read less
The Professional Development Certificates are intended for those who would like to obtain certification in the certain specific areas without having to undertake the preparatory work for a Master's degree. Read more
The Professional Development Certificates are intended for those who would like to obtain certification in the certain specific areas without having to undertake the preparatory work for a Master's degree.

The department of computer science offers a graduate certificate (consisting of four courses each) in Web Technology.

Students will select four of the following courses:

CSC 515 Introduction to Web Development
CSC 535 Networks and Data Communication
CSC 545 Database Systems Concepts
CSC 584 Topics in Web Technology
CSC 585 User Interface In Java
CSC 587 Web Services using XML and SOAP
CSC 588 Wireless Programming and Security
CSC 604 Advanced Seminar Web Technology

Please visit the website for more information about these modules:

http://catalog.wcupa.edu/graduate/sciences-mathematics/computer-science/#coursestext

The Computer Science Information Security Centre

The Computer Science Information Security Center (ISC) recognizes that no computer science graduate should be without information security knowledge. Toward this end, the Computer Science Department has introduced Information Security content such as computer and network security across the undergraduate and graduate curricula.

The curricula set forth by the ISC has been certified by the NSA to meet the National Training Standards for Information Systems Security Professionals (4011) and Systems Administrators (4013).

Career Prospects

Program graduates are employed in the following fields:

• Web Developers

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This comprehensive, interdisciplinary program will prepare you as an expert in information assurance. You will be equipped with information security technologies and knowledge to support and protect the nation's information infrastructure and conduct advanced research. Read more
This comprehensive, interdisciplinary program will prepare you as an expert in information assurance. You will be equipped with information security technologies and knowledge to support and protect the nation's information infrastructure and conduct advanced research. You will develop skills in both management and technical areas.

Program Highlights

Students eligible to apply for the ​​Scholarship for Service ​scholarship from the National Science Foundation and the Department of Homeland Security, a two-year grant that includes a $64,000 stipend, tuition, books, health insurance and travel to a cybersecurity job fair.
Offered as a five year undergraduate/graduate combined program through the Information Systems Track.
Designed for part-time or full-time students.
Pre-requisite courses are available for those lacking an information systems or computer science background.
Offered through the Department of Information Systems together with the Department of Computer Science and Information Technology.
Five-year track students are eligible to apply for one of 45 National Science Foundation STEM scholarships, a two-year grant that includes a $12,000 stipend.

Program Distinctions

All faculty hold a Ph.D. in their field.
Designated as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance/Cybersecurity by the National Security Agency and the Department of Homeland Security.
Designed using the Association for Computing and Machinery Model Curriculum and Guidelines and the National Security Agency Guidelines and Requirements.

Requirements and Details

A baccalaureate degree in information systems, computer science, computer engineering, computer networking, telecommunication or related programs is preferred.

Lack of an information systems or computer science background is usually not a major concern, since prerequisite courses are available if needed.

A background in the sciences and mathematics is essential.

Strong communication skills, verbal and written are needed for coursework demands.

Fully-qualified applicants will have taken courses that cover the following topics:

Database modeling, network structure/architecture
Operating systems, theory
Discrete structures and one year of programming
Statistics

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See the department website - http://www.se.rit.edu/grad. The master of science in software engineering is designed to attract professionals with a formal undergraduate background in software engineering, computer science, or computer engineering and at least one year of professional experience. Read more
See the department website - http://www.se.rit.edu/grad

The master of science in software engineering is designed to attract professionals with a formal undergraduate background in software engineering, computer science, or computer engineering and at least one year of professional experience. The program’s core content ensures that graduates will possess both breadth and depth of knowledge in software engineering. Specialization tracks in software quality and design provide students with the opportunity to match their graduate education with their professional goals.

Plan of study

The program comprises 36 semester credit hours, anchored by either a thesis or a capstone project.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS program in software engineering, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution,

- Have a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher (Prospective students from institutions that do not use the GPA scale are expected to demonstrate an equivalent level of academic accomplishment. Formal academic background in software engineering, computer science, or computer engineering is a plus.),

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work,

- Submit a professional essay (1-4 pages) describing current job (if applicable), relevant experience, and career plans,

- Submit a current resume (including descriptions of significant software projects in which the candidate participated),

- Submit two letters of recommendation, and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) are required. International applicants must provide Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores. Domestic students are encouraged to provide GRE scores.

Professional experience developing software is preferred, but candidates without a background in computing will be considered. Additional bridge course work will be required, and may extend time to graduation.

Additional information

- Bridge courses

Based on the evaluation of academic and relevant experience, the graduate program director may require some applicants to successfully complete bridge courses to fill in any gaps in their background. Successful completion of bridge courses is necessary for registration in graduate-level courses.

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Human-computer interaction (HCI) addresses the design, evaluation, and implementation of interactive computing and computing-based systems for the benefit of human use. Read more

Program overview

Human-computer interaction (HCI) addresses the design, evaluation, and implementation of interactive computing and computing-based systems for the benefit of human use. HCI research is driven by technological advances and the increasing pervasiveness of computing devices in our society. With an emphasis on making computing technologies more user-friendly, HCI has emerged as a dynamic, multifaceted area of study that merges theory from science, engineering, and design––as well as concepts and methodologies from psychology, anthropology, sociology, and industrial design––with the technical concerns of computing.

The master of science degree in human-computer interaction provides the knowledge and skills necessary for conceptualizing, designing, implementing, and evaluating software applications and computing technologies for the benefit of the user, whether the user is an individual, a group, an organization, or a society. Human, technological, and organizational concerns are interwoven throughout the curriculum and addressed in team- and project-based learning experiences.

Plan of study

The program is comprised of four required core courses, up to three program electives (depending upon capstone option chosen), two application domain courses, and a capstone project or thesis.

Core courses

The core courses provide knowledge and skills in the conceptual and methodological frameworks of HCI and HCI research. Emphasis is on understanding human cognition as it applies to information systems plus interaction design, interface prototyping, and usability evaluation.

Electives

Student choose up to three electives, depending on which capstone option they choose to complete.

Program electives

Students will select two courses from the program electives list. In select cases, students can petition for approval to include a course complementray to the degree program as a program elective. See website for further details of available electives: https://www.rit.edu/programs/human-computer-interaction-ms

Application domain courses

To gain breadth in a technical area to which HCI concepts can be applied, students complete two courses in any of the following application domain areas. A special topics option is also available, with faculty approval, for individuals with interest in other HCI-related areas. See website for further details of available domain courses: https://www.rit.edu/programs/human-computer-interaction-ms

Thesis/Capstone project

Students may complete a thesis or capstone project. (Student who choose the capstone will complete one additional elective.) This experience is meant to be an empirical study of a HCI problem, which can be the development of a software product through user-centered design processes. The results are either published in a peer-reviewed journal or publicly disseminated in an appropriate professional venue.

Curriculum

Course sequence differs according to selected thesis/project option, see website for further details of a particular option's modules and electives: https://www.rit.edu/programs/human-computer-interaction-ms

Other admission requirements

-Have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0* (B average).
-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Have prior study or professional experience in computing; however, study in other disciplines will be given consideration.
-Complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) are required.
-Applicants with undergraduate degrees from foreign universities are required to submit GRE scores.

*Applicants with a GPA below 3.0 may be considered, but are required to submit standard Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores.

Additional information

Prerequisites:
The program requires strong technical and social science skills. Knowledge of quantitative statistical methodologies is important since students review research studies as well as analyze the results of their own usability evaluations. Students are also expected to have a solid background in computer programming. These competencies may be demonstrated by previous course work, technical certifications, or comparable work experience. Bridge courses are available to fulfill any gaps in an applicant's qualifications. Applicants will be made aware of any areas where additional course work may be necessary.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

Online option:
The program can be completed on campus or online.

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USF’s Master of Science in Health Informatics program is focused on training the next generation of informaticists in the art and science of health data analytics. Read more

The Art and Science of Health Data Analytics

USF’s Master of Science in Health Informatics program is focused on training the next generation of informaticists in the art and science of health data analytics. Healthcare and technical professionals learn everything from the basics of programming to cutting-edge statistical and machine learning methods in interprofessional, project-based classrooms.

Two tracks are available for students to pursue. Students may follow a track, or take any combination of courses that best suit their goals:

• Health Data Analytics - for students who want advanced training in data science
• Clinical Informatics - for clinicians and executives who are preparing for leadership positions

We seek highly motivated students who have a passion for improving healthcare through the application of data science and information technology. Our ideal student will have either:

• Clinical background (e.g., MD, RN, DPT, PsyD, PharmD, Allied Health, other post-baccalaureate clinical degree, or equivalents)
• Science or Engineering background with an interest in healthcare
• Healthcare Executives, Health IT leaders, and others involved in healthcare that wish to gain broad and deep knowledge in Health Informatics.
• Strong academic background, passion for healthcare, and quantitative aptitude

Program Features

REAL-WORLD PROBLEMS IN THE CLASSROOM

Classroom projects engage interdisciplinary teams of students to tackle real-world problems from faculty research or industry partners.

PROGRAMMING AND DATA ANALYTICS SKILLS

All students, regardless of background, learn programming skills in the context of working with healthcare data.

ENTREPRENEURIAL PERSPECTIVE

Located in the epicenter of the global digital revolution, our program engages with the Silicon Valley startup community. Interested students are given startup mentoring opportunities.

INTERNSHIP AND PRACTICUM OPPORTUNITIES

Students are required to complete a Capstone Experience consisting of original research, substantial project in health and biomedical informatics, or an internship with industry partner. We provide support for students in finding their internships and projects.

ADVANCED CLINICAL TRAINING

Clinically trained students are able to take graduate level nursing courses that fully count toward an advanced nursing degree including Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) or Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) at USF.

Job Outcomes

Our graduates are well-prepared for current and future challenges in this field. Importantly, our graduates have the technical skill to work with computer scientists and programmers, and a deep understanding of the healthcare environment to work with doctors, nurses, psychologists, and other healthcare professionals.

Our graduates have found opportunities in large hospitals or medical centers, research institutions, startups, government health agencies, and global health organizations. Positions have included Clinical Data Analyst, Director of Clinical Informatics Research, Statistical Analyst, Senior Programmer Analyst and Advanced Research or Clinical training (MD, DNP, PhD in Biomedical Informatics).

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Developers of computing systems and practitioners in all computing disciplines need an understanding of the critical importance of building security and survivability into the hardware and software of computing systems they design, rather than trying to add it on once these systems have been designed, developed, and installed. Read more

Program overview

Developers of computing systems and practitioners in all computing disciplines need an understanding of the critical importance of building security and survivability into the hardware and software of computing systems they design, rather than trying to add it on once these systems have been designed, developed, and installed.

The MS in computing security gives students an understanding of the technological and ethical roles of computing security in today's society and its importance across the breadth of computing disciplines. Students can develop a specialization in one of several security-related areas by selecting technical electives under the guidance of a faculty adviser. The program enables students to develop a strong theoretical and practical foundation in secure computing, preparing them for leadership positions in both the private and public sectors of the computing security industry, for academic or research careers in computing security, or to pursue a more advanced degree in a computing discipline.

Plan of study

The program is designed for students who have an undergraduate computing degree in an area such as computing security, computer science, information technology, networking, or software engineering, as well as those who have a strong background in a field in which computers are applied, such as computer or electrical engineering. The curriculum consists of three required core courses, up to 6 technical electives (depending on the capstone option chosen), and a capstone thesis, project, or capstone course for a total of 30 semester credit hours.

Electives

Students are required to choose up to six technical electives, from:
-Advanced Computer Forensics
-Web Server and Application Security Audits
-Mobile Device Forensics
-Information Security Risk Management
-Sensor and SCADA Security
-Computer System Security
-Computer Viruses and Malicious Software
-Network Security
-Covert Communications
-Information Security Policy and Law
-Information Assurance Fundamentals
-Secure Data Management
-Secure Coding
-Foundations of Cryptography
-Foundations of Security Measurement and Evaluation
-Foundations of Intelligent Security Systems
-Advanced Cryptography
-Hardware and Software Design for Cryptographic Applications

Curriculum

Thesis/project/capstone course options differ in course sequence, see the website for a particular course's module information.

Other admission requirements

-Have a minimum grade point average equivalent to a 3.0/4.0.
-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit a minimum of two recommendations from individuals who are well-qualified to assess the applicant's potential for success, and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) are required. Applicants who have completed undergraduate study at foreign universities must submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores. GRE scores are also recommended for applicants whose undergraduate GPA is below 3.0.
-Applicants must satisfy prerequisite requirements in mathematics (integral calculus, discrete mathematics), statistics, natural sciences (physics, chemistry, etc.), and computing (programming, computer networking theory and practice, and systems administration theory and practice).

Bridge program

Students whose undergraduate preparation or employment experience does not satisfy the prerequisites required for the program may make up deficiencies through additional study. Bridge course work, designed to close gaps in a student's preparation, can be completed either before or after enrolling in the program as advised by the graduate program director. Generally, formal acceptance into the program is deferred until the applicant has made significant progress through this additional preparation.

If completed through academic study, bridge courses must be completed with a grade of B (3.0) or better. Courses with lower grades must be repeated. Bridge courses are not counted toward the 30 credit hours required for the master's degree. However, grades earned from bridge courses taken at RIT are included in a student's graduate grade point average. A bridge program can be designed in different ways. Courses may be substituted based upon availability, and courses at other colleges may be applied. All bridge course work must be approved in advance by the graduate program director.

Additional information

Study options:
Students may pursue the degree on a full-time basis, on-campus only.

Faculty:
The program faculty are actively engaged in consulting and research in various areas of secure computing and information assurance, such as cryptography, databases, networking, secure software development, and critical infrastructure security. There are opportunities for students to participate in research activities towards capstone completion or as independent study work.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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