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Masters Degrees in Computational Mathematics, USA

We have 2 Masters Degrees in Computational Mathematics, USA

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The M.S. in Applied and Computational Mathematics program is designed to prepare students to join the workforce as a consulting mathematician or to pursue doctoral study in computational and industrial mathematics or other computationally-intensive field of study. Read more
The M.S. in Applied and Computational Mathematics program is designed to prepare students to join the workforce as a consulting mathematician or to pursue doctoral study in computational and industrial mathematics or other computationally-intensive field of study. 

Distinctive features include:

• Project-oriented approach in all courses - real-world industrial problems motivate coursework
• Team problem-solving practica emulate an industrial microcosm in which undergrads, grads, faculty, and industrial partners work together to study real-world problems
• Dual emphasis is placed on computational mathematics in the study of all real-world projects in each course of the curriculum

Students who complete the proposed program will:

• Acquire advanced knowledge of a wide variety of topics that span the realm of applied mathematics, including differential equations, discrete mathematics, probabilistic modelling, optimisation and statistical analysis. 
• Become adept at employing all steps of the mathematical modelling process in the analysis of real-world phenomena.
• Acquire expertise in using various forms of technology and in using, modifying, and creating numerical algorithms used in the analysis of real-world phenomena,
• Develop the valuable intuition of using the right tool for the right job.

Curriculum

Required modules:

MAT 500 Fundamentals of Applied Mathematics
MAT 548 Industrial Mathematics - Continuous Models
MAT 549 Industrial Mathematics - Discrete Models
MAT 552 Operations Research
MAT 553 Stochastic Modelling
MAT 554 Scientific Computing
MAT 555 Industrial Practicum - Continuous Models
STA 505 Mathematical Statistics I
MAT 556 Industrial Practicum - Discrete Models
STA 511 Intro Stat Computing & Data Management

Electives:

One three-credit elective must be chosen from one of the following

MAT 514 Theory Of Numbers
MAT 515 Algebra I
MAT 516 Algebra II
MAT 532 Geometry I
MAT 533 Geometry II
MAT 535 Topology
MAT 545 Real Analysis I
MAT 546 Real Analysis II
MAT 575 Complex Analysis I

An additional three credit elective must be chosen from any 500-level mathematics or statistics course not completed from the above list.

Collaborators and Local Industry

Representatives from the private sector consisting of mathematicians and scientists from large companies such as Vanguard, and PrimePay; employees of up-and-coming software companies such as iPipeline; and representatives of small privately-owned consulting firms and hedge fund companies, such as Wagner Associates and TFS Capital were consulted in the creation of this program.  We are continually expanding our network of collaborators within the private sector, with our newest collaborator being Stroud Preserve in West Chester.

Vastly different types of mathematical problems are studied by the members of this group.  Many have agreed to contribute to this M.S. program by way of delivering colloquium talks about their experiences in industry, and by creating and investigating real-world problems in our practicum courses.

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The ideas of applied mathematics pervade several applications in a variety of businesses and industries as well as government. Sophisticated mathematical tools are increasingly used to develop new models, modify existing ones, and analyze system performance. Read more

Program overview

The ideas of applied mathematics pervade several applications in a variety of businesses and industries as well as government. Sophisticated mathematical tools are increasingly used to develop new models, modify existing ones, and analyze system performance. This includes applications of mathematics to problems in management science, biology, portfolio planning, facilities planning, control of dynamic systems, and design of composite materials. The goal is to find computable solutions to real-world problems arising from these types of situations.

The master of science degree in applied and computational mathematics provides students with the capability to apply mathematical models and methods to study various problems that arise in industry and business, with an emphasis on developing computable solutions that can be implemented. The program offers options in discrete mathematics, dynamical systems, and scientific computing. Students complete a thesis, which includes the presentation of original ideas and solutions to a specific mathematical problem. The proposal for the thesis work and the results must be presented and defended before the advisory committee.

Curriculum

Several options available for course sequence:
-Discrete mathematics option
-Dynamical systems option
-Scientific computing option

See website for individual module details.

Other entry requirements

-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit a personal statement of educational objectives.
-Have an undergraduate cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
-Submit two letters of recommendation, and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose primary language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). A minimum score of 550 (paper-based) or 79-80 (Internet-based) is required. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) scores are accepted in place of the TOEFL exam. Minimum scores vary; however, the absolute minimum score required for unconditional acceptance is 6.5. For additional information about the IELTS, please visit http://www.ielts.org. Those who cannot take the TOEFL will be required to take the Michigan Test of English Proficiency at RIT and obtain a score of 80 or higher.
-Although Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores are not required, submitting them may enhance a candidate's acceptance into the program.
-A student may also be granted conditional admission and be required to complete bridge courses selected from among RIT’s existing undergraduate courses, as prescribed by the student’s adviser. Until these requirements are met, the candidate is considered a nonmatriculated student. The graduate program director evaluates the student’s qualifications to determine eligibility for conditional and provisional admission.

Additional information

Student’s advisory committee:
Upon admission to the program, the student chooses an adviser and forms an advisory committee. This committee oversees the academic aspects of the student’s program, including the selection of a concentration and appropriate courses to fulfill the program’s requirements.

Cooperative education:
Cooperative education enables students to alternate periods of study on campus with periods of full-time, paid professional employment. Students may pursue a co-op position after their first semester. Co-op is optional for this program.

Part-time study:
The program is ideal for practicing professionals who are interested in applying mathematical methods in their work and enhancing their career options. Most courses are scheduled in the late afternoon or early evening. The program may normally be completed in two years of part-time study.

Nonmatriculated students:
A student with a bachelor’s degree from an approved undergraduate institution, and with the background necessary for specific courses, may take graduate courses as a nonmatriculated student with the permission of the graduate program director and the course instructor. Courses taken for credit may be applied toward the master’s degree if the student is formally admitted to the program at a later date. However, the number of credit hours that may be transferred into the program from courses taken at RIT is limited for nonmatriculated students.

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