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Masters Degrees in Anthropology, USA

We have 19 Masters Degrees in Anthropology, USA

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The study of anthropology draws freely on various fields of study in the humanities and in the social and natural sciences, and its diversity today is such that no single central mission earns a wide consensus. Read more
The study of anthropology draws freely on various fields of study in the humanities and in the social and natural sciences, and its diversity today is such that no single central mission earns a wide consensus.
To this end, the department of anthropology at Binghamton University offers students training in the four traditional subfields of archaeology, biological anthropology, linguistic anthropology, and social/cultural anthropology, while encouraging students to specialize along tracks that cross these sub-disciplinary boundaries.
Recent doctoral graduates are employed in positions at the New York State Department of Health, the National Geographic Society, Museum of International Folk Art, Purdue University, and the University of Tennessee.

Anthropology seeks to understand the nature and origins of human biological variability, cultural diversity and social formations through systematic exploration, scientific examination and the application of theory to human populations and their artifacts, including their social configurations, past and present.
Although anthropology has historically been most successful in the analysis of small sociocultural systems, its current challenge is to situate the direct objects of study in their global contexts in both space and time. The discipline draws freely on various fields of study in the humanities and in the social and natural sciences, and its diversity today is such that no single central mission earns a wide consensus.
While training in the traditional four subfields of archaeology, biological anthropology, linguistic anthropology and social/cultural anthropology are offered in the department at Binghamton, students are encouraged to specialize along tracks that cross these sub-disciplinary boundaries.
A central objective of graduate training in anthropology is the ability to develop an original research design and to communicate the research findings in a research paper, thesis or dissertation of publishable quality. All recipients of graduate degrees submit and defend formal, written demonstration of their ability to apply appropriate analysis to an original research project, except for the MS degree for which an oral demonstration of ability is required.

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university which you attended
- Three letters of recommendation
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

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Biological anthropology is undergoing rapid and significant change in the 21st century. Biological anthropologists are developing broader interests beyond traditional themes in academic departments of anthropology, and finding new job opportunities in and outside of academia. Read more
Biological anthropology is undergoing rapid and significant change in the 21st century. Biological anthropologists are developing broader interests beyond traditional themes in academic departments of anthropology, and finding new job opportunities in and outside of academia. Biological anthropologists can be found in medical schools, schools of public health, many companies producing pharmaceuticals and dietary items, and at major government research organizations such as the Smithsonian Institution, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Biological anthropology draws its students from a wide variety of disciplines that include the natural sciences, social sciences and the humanities.

Biomedical anthropology is an emerging subdisciplinary area within biological anthropology. It represents the interface between biomedicine and the behavioral and social sciences that shape health status. As such, it does more than give lip service to integrating cross-disciplinary approaches. It represents an educational philosophy that has been recommended as part of an innovative graduate training initiative (1995 Reshaping the Graduate Education of Scientists and Engineers, National Academy Press) implemented by the National Science Foundation (NSF Announcement 98:96).

Biomedical anthropology emphasizes biomedical, biobehavioral, epidemiological and evolutionary approaches to understanding the transmission and dissemination of disease, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis, and the dynamic interaction of biological and sociocultural factors that shape health outcomes.

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university which you attended
- Three letters of recommendation
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

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Graduate students at. The New School for Social Research. ask the kind of questions that challenge the status quo across the social sciences and humanities. Read more

Graduate students at The New School for Social Research ask the kind of questions that challenge the status quo across the social sciences and humanities.

Guided by rigorous scholarship and a desire to apply academic discourse and discovery to current social problems, they critically examine interdisciplinary fields to become a force of new knowledge and ideas in the world.

All graduate programs at The New School for Social research can be completed full-time or part-time on our New York City campus. Competitive merit-based scholarships are available in all departments -- in recent years, 85% of master’s students have received merit scholarships at The New School for Social Research.

Change begins with a question. What will you ask?

Program Highlights

  • 30-credit MA, 60-credit PhD.
  • Combine basic concepts of anthropology with critical exploration of the nature and role of ethnography in this leading graduate program.
  • Recent courses include Anthropology and Time; Epidemiology of Belief, Ethnography, and Writing; and In Search of the Political.

Why the New School?

The New School for Social Research was founded in 1919 as a home for progressive thinkers, and housed the University in Exile in 1933, providing an academic haven for scholars persecuted in Nazi Europe. The school became the foundation for a comprehensive university – The New School – and continues the legacy of critical thought, civic engagement, and academic freedom today.



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A letter of intent that expresses professional and educational goals as it relates to the program. Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form. Read more
• A letter of intent that expresses professional and educational goals as it relates to the program.
• Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form.
• Résumé or curriculum vitae.

E-mail: • Phone: 315-267-2165

Visit http://www.potsdam.edu/graduate to view the full application checklist and online application.

The Master of Science in Community Health prepares public health professionals to address public health issues in diverse popula- tions. The curriculum fosters development of core public health competencies, training students to plan, implement, and evaluate rural health initiatives. Through coursework, research, and community engagement, students will acquire the practical skills necessary to respond to public health needs in rural settings. Program start date: Fall

Required Program Courses

Minimum of 45 credit hours

HLTH 600, Social/Behavioral Determinants
HLTH 605, Biostatistics HLTH 610, Epidemiology
HLTH 620, Current Topics in Rural Health
HLTH 625, Research and Assessment
HLTH 630, Health Disparities
HLTH 640, Program Planning
HLTH 645, Program Evaluation
HLTH 651, Environmental and Occupational Health
HLTH 655, Health Policy and Administration
HLTH 690, Internship I
HLTH 691, Internship II
HLTH 696, Professional Project I
HLTH 697, Professional Project II

Electives: 3-6 credit hours

Uniqueness of Program

Graduates of the M.S. program will be prepared to identify, prevent and solve health problems as well as develop and evaluate health-related programs and policies, especially those affecting rural health populations. The curriculum is designed to meet the needs of both part-time and full-time students. Many of our graduates will serve as managers, administrators, re- searchers, and educators. The MS offers graduates a breadth of knowledge they can apply to almost any public health topic, such as: STI prevention; promotion of breast or other cancer screenings; substance abuse prevention; or the promotion of physical activity and nutrition.

Testimonials

“Interning at Cornell Cooperative Extension has given me a look at what Community Health is all about. To work directly with the population in need is not only eye-opening, but extremely rewarding. I really feel that I have grown from this experience in a number of ways.” —Emily Nye, CCE Intern

“My internship at Hospice and Palliative Care of St. Lawrence Valley provided me with unforgettable memories and experiences. The projects I was able to complete while interning at Hospice were things I never dreamed possible. The amazing and courageous staff deserves all the thanks in the world for what they do on a day-to-day basis. This internship was truly a once in a lifetime experience.” —Kaley Arsenault, Hospice Intern

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Program Overview. Read more

Program Overview

The interdisciplinary Master of Arts in Applied Liberal Studies (MAALS) program meets the needs of liberal arts and sciences graduates by providing an effective bridge between rich backgrounds in the sciences, social sciences, fine arts and humanities and the challenging world of professional employment. Through coursework, internships and a capstone experience, students work with faculty from a variety of fields as they build the advanced communication, research and leadership skills sought by employers in the private, public and non-profit sectors. The program facilitates the development of the cultural competency, financial literacy, and information technology knowledge students need to navigate today's complex economies.

Professional Development

Students complete two internships, one in the greater Binghamton community and one in another region of the state, country or world. Students work with the Fleishman Center for Career and Professional Development to identify interests, explore opportunities and secure internship placements. At the end of the program, students participate in a capstone colloquium and a capstone project, in which students review and analyze their internship experiences and connect their findings to the issues facing practitioners and researchers in their fields. 

After You Graduate

Employers have already lauded this innovative program, noting that they seek applicants with the refined skills, interdisciplinary perspectives and professional experiences emphasized throughout the MAALS curriculum. Graduates of this program are prepared for a wide range of careers and positions in many of today's growing fields, including the healthcare, service and technology industries.



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There are two tracks in our American Studies MA program. Read more

There are two tracks in our American Studies MA program. The General Track prepares those students who may wish to go on to a PhD in American Studies or another field through classes in the history, theories, and methods of American Studies and an original research project. The Public Humanities track is designed to ground students in the history, theory and methods of the public humanities, and in a foundation in nonprofit management, and bring it all together with project-based courses, an internship and capstone, preparing students for careers in cultural and community institutions.

Masters General Track Graduation Requirements:

  • Concepts and Interpretations of American Studies (3 credits)
  • Methodological Approaches to American Studies (3 credits)
  • One course in public humanities, chosen in consultation with the program director (3 credits)
  • Major Interdisciplinary Area (12 credits)
  • Elective work in other disciplines or interdisciplinary fields (6 credits)
  • Thesis Option: (6 credits) or an additional 6 credits in electives

Public Humanities Track Graduation Requirements:

 Year 1

  • Introduction to American Studies (3 cr)
  • Public Humanities or Public History course (3 cr)
  • Introduction to Nonprofit Management (3 cr)
  • Additional Nonprofit Management course (e.g. Introduction to Nonprofit Budgeting, Grantwriting and Grant Management, Fundraising, chosen in consultation with advisor) (3 cr)
  • Project-based elective (e.g. Introduction to Digital Public Humanities, Murals, Street Art and Graffiti: Power and Public Art in Contemporary Urban America, Oral History class, chosen in consultation with advisor) (3 cr)

Year 2

  • Electives (content or method specific) (6 cr)
  • Internship (3 cr)
  • Capstone Project (6 cr)

To apply, you will need to submit: 

  • A personal statement of up to 1500 words describing your interest in the public humanities, including and especially any personal or professional experience in the field.
  • Writing or Work Sample. Applicants must submit an academic or professional writing sample up to 6,000 words long, or, for those with professional experience in public history or the public humanities, a work sample (such as an exhibit plan, program planning materials, websites, etc) accompanied by a brief cover letter that explains the applicant’s role in its creation.
  • 3 letters of rec and official transcripts. 

The GRE is not required.

We welcome students who are already employed in public history and public humanities into our program. Depending on your professional experience, it may be possible to waive one or both nonprofit management courses and the internship, at the discretion of the program chair and with the support of a faculty advisor.

Policies and Procedures for All MA Students:

A maximum of 12 graduate credits may be transferred from another institution toward the completion of the M.A. degree. Acceptance of these credits will be at the discretion of the Program Director in consultation with the Graduate School and will depend on the field of the student's Master's degree, the appropriateness to American Studies of specific courses taken, and the rules of the Graduate School.

 With the advance approval of the Program Director, the student’s academic advisor, and the course instructors, up to three Rutgers University-Newark undergraduate courses at the 300 or 400 level may be counted toward the completion of the M.A. Degree. No more than one undergraduate course may be taken per semester. To receive graduate credit, the student must have been assigned and successfully completed significant additional work in the undergraduate course.

 With the approval of the Program Director and the student’s academic advisor, up to six credits in directed readings may be counted toward the completion of the M..A. Degree.

Notwithstanding the above options, at least five courses (15 credits) must be taken as master’s seminars.

Students choosing the thesis option must signal their intention and identify a thesis advisor no later than after having completed 18 credits.

Upon admission to the Master’s program, each student will be assigned an academic advisor from the American Studies faculty. Students are free to change advisors at the end of their first year. Every year, however, students must submit to the Program Director a form identifying their advisor.



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