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Masters Degrees in Scholastic Philosophy, United Kingdom

We have 15 Masters Degrees in Scholastic Philosophy, United Kingdom

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Your programme of study. This is an interdisciplinary programme which allows you to connect our contemporary world with the past. Read more

Your programme of study

This is an interdisciplinary programme which allows you to connect our contemporary world with the past. You can study a great range in terms of courses that make up your programme and you have the ability to really understand ancient kingdoms and civilisations from the past. You may want to study further after this programme or you may be able to advise within heritage tourism, museums and tourist sites. You may also like to get involved in writing and publishing or a wide range of other careers. Aberdeen provides you with a great teaching experience in an even greater setting which is medieval in origin.

The campus and university were initiated in 1495 so there are plenty of architectural wonders and history to interest you whilst you study in 'Old Aberdeen.'  The architecture is truly stunning and totally unexpected as you enter the university from the centre of Aberdeen. As you would expect in a university of this age and rich heritage there are also special collections hosting a variety of cultural artefacts. If you haven't visited University of Aberdeen it is well worth a tour to understand just how much history you get whilst you study. There are obvious connections from the university with many of the periods of medieval and early modern eras you study. 

The courses reflect research interests drawn from various disciplines including History, Church History and Divinity, Celtic, English, French, History of Art, Law, Philosophy and Scottish and Irish Studies and is supported by highly specialised teaching and research staff. The MLitt provides ample opportunity to use the large depository of late medieval and early modern materials in the University's Special Collection, which has new state of the art rooms in the new Library.

Courses listed for the programme

Introduction

You must acquire 180 credits (105 courses, 75 dissertation)

Optional Potential areas for study:

  • The Enlightenment in Comparison: Scotland, Ireland and Central Europe 
  • The Scottish Wars of Independence
  • The Three Kingdoms of The Seventeenth Century
  • Crime and Society in Early Modern England and Scotland
  • Back in the Viking Homelands
  • Jacobites: War, Exile and Politics of Succession in Britain
  • Celtic and Anglo-Saxon Manuscript Studies
  • Introduction to Old English Language
  • Controversy and Drama: Marlowe to Revenge Tragedy
  • Art and Society in Eighteenth-Century England
  • Seventeenth-Century Netherlandish Art
  • Medieval Manuscripts: Illustration of Medieval Thought
  • Kant's Critique of Pure Reason
  • Scottish Legal history, 14th - 18th century

Optional Courses

  • Special Subject
  • Engaging with Historiography
  • Old Norse1: Language, Literature and Culture
  • Palaeography
  • Latin 1

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/degree-programmes/183/medieval-and-early-modern-studies/

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You develop a strong understanding of culture and history within the UK and Scotland joining a lively research environment
  • You are taught by experts in their specialist areas of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, if you specialise in renaissance and early modern periods you can attend seminars from the Centre of Early Modern Studies

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • Full Time or Part Time
  • 12 Months or 24 Months
  • September

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees:

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/tuition-fees-and-living-costs-287.php

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/finance-funding-1599.php

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/funding/

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

•            Your Accommodation

•            Campus Facilities

•            Aberdeen City

•            Student Support

•            Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen:

https://abdn.ac.uk/study/student-life

Living costs

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/finance.php



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Programme description. This programme introduces the main fields, topics and research methods in ancient philosophy. It is appropriate for applicants who have previously studied philosophy and classics, or have backgrounds in history, political theory, science and literature. Read more

Programme description

This programme introduces the main fields, topics and research methods in ancient philosophy. It is appropriate for applicants who have previously studied philosophy and classics, or have backgrounds in history, political theory, science and literature. The programme is appropriate for applicants who have previously studied philosophy and classics, as well as those with backgrounds in history, political theory, science and literature.

The degree provides a necessary preparation for further postgraduate research towards a doctoral degree or an academic background to a professional career outside academia.

You will be exposed to the main doctrines and texts of ancient philosophy – including Pre-Socratics, Plato and Aristotle, Hellenistic philosophy and Late Antiquity – mastering analytical skills pertaining to philosophical arguments and to historical (textual) sources.

You will develop the ability to reconstruct, analyse and critically assess philosophical arguments and doctrines based on a careful study of the texts.

Programme structure

You study two semesters of taught courses followed by a dissertation.

Compulsory courses:

  • Ancient Philosophy Seminar I and II
  • Methodology Seminars in Classics

Option courses may include:

  • Ancient Ethics
  • Ancient Theories of Knowledge
  • History of Science and Religion in the Christian Tradition
  • Christian-Muslim Relations and the Relationship Between the World of Islam and the West
  • Ancient Theories of Existence
  • Ancient Theories of Mind
  • Topics in Hellenistic Philosophy

Other option courses can be chosen from outside Philosophy and Classics with permission from the Programme Director.

You are encouraged to take at least one course outside the ‘ancient’ curriculum, such as:

  • Introduction to Philosophical Method
  • Introduction to Mind, Language, and Embodied Cognition
  • Free Will and Moral Responsibility
  • Advanced Philosophical Method
  • Advanced Topics in Mind, Language & Embodied Cognition
  • Value Theory

Learning outcomes

You will enhance your knowledge and understanding of the main broad areas of ancient philosophy (Pre-Socratics, High Classics (Plato and Aristotle), Hellenistic philosophy, Late Antiquity) and medieval philosophy, specific types of philosophical thought (idealism, corporealism, naturalism, rationalism, skepticism) in their historical context.

An important goal of the programme is to develop the ability to reconstruct, analyse and critically assess philosophical arguments and doctrines on the basis of a careful study of the text.

For those planning to go on to a PhD in Ancient Philosophy, there will be an opportunity to enhance your knowledge of classical languages by studying the course texts in the original language. Up to 40 credits in ancient Greek, Latin or Arabic can be taken at introductory, intermediate or advanced level.

Career opportunities

This programme aims to improve your analytical skills and give you a solid background in core areas of humanities useful for careers in professional fields such as law, education or public policy.



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Philosophy is about critically thinking through the assumptions of the age. Our programmes are delivered by staff with strong research profiles in modern European philosophy and an interest in interdisciplinary research and collaboration. Read more
Philosophy is about critically thinking through the assumptions of the age. Our programmes are delivered by staff with strong research profiles in modern European philosophy and an interest in interdisciplinary research and collaboration. We have a thriving research culture, with postgraduates working in philosophy or with colleagues in other disciplines.

Our lecturers have broad philosophical interests and specialise in modern European thought.

You can choose between standard academic dissertations or the more flexible context-based learning approach. Your personal interest will drive your context based learning. You will engage philosophically with an object or aspect of reality.

Research and supervision areas

MPhil and PhD supervision is available in the following areas:
-Continental philosophy and the history of European ideas
-Aesthetics
-Ethics
-Social and political philosophy
-Philosophy and religion

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The Warburg Institute MA in Cultural and Intellectual History aims to equip students for interdisciplinary research in Medieval and Renaissance studies and in the reception of the classical tradition. Read more
The Warburg Institute MA in Cultural and Intellectual History aims to equip students for interdisciplinary research in Medieval and Renaissance studies and in the reception of the classical tradition. Students will become part of an international community of scholars, working in a world-famous library. They will broaden their range of knowledge to include the historically informed interpretation of images and texts, art history, philosophy, history of science, literature, and the impact of religion on society. Students will improve their knowledge of Latin, French and Italian and will acquire the library and archival skills essential for research on primary texts.

This twelve-month, full-time course is intended as an introduction to the principal elements of the classical tradition and to interdisciplinary research in cultural and intellectual history from the late Middle Ages to the early modern period. Although it is a qualification in its own right, the MA is also designed to provide training for further research at doctoral level. It is taught through classes and supervision by members of the academic staff of the Institute and by outside teachers. The teaching staff are leading professors and academics in their field who have published widely. Research strengths include: the transmission of Arabic science and philosophy to Western Europe; the later influence of classical philosophy (Aristotelianism, Platonism, Epicureanism and Stoicism); and religious nonconformism in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Europe. For further details on the research interests of teaching staff please visit the Warburg website:
http://www.warburg.sas.ac.uk/home/staff-contacts/academic-staff

Structure

Core courses (courses may vary from year to year)

Iconology: Mythological painting, allegorical figures, historical subjects, altarpiece - Dr Paul Taylor
Religion and Society - Dr Alessandro Scafi
Optional Courses (courses may vary from year to year)

Artistic Intentions 1400 - 1700 - Dr Paul Taylor
Islamic Authorities and Arabic Elements in the Renaissance – Professor Charles Burnett
Music in the Later Middle Ages and the Renaissance - Professor Charles Burnett
New Worlds, Ancient Texts: Renaissance Intellectual History and the Discovery of the Americas - Dr Philipp Nothaft
Renaissance Philosophy – Dr Guido Giglioni
Renaissance Art Literature – Dr François Quiviger
Renaissance Material Culture – Dr Rembrandt Duits and Dr François Quiviger
Sin and Sanctity in the Reformation – Professor Alastair Hamilton
All students take two compulsory core courses and two optional subjects. The core courses are taught in the first term and the optional subjects in the second term and the options available vary from year to year. In addition, there is a regular series of classes throughout the three terms on Techniques of Scholarship. Subjects dealt with include: description of manuscripts; palaeography; printing in the 15th and 16th centuries; editing a text; preparation of dissertations and photographic images. Some of these classes are held outside the Institute in locations such as the British Library or the Wellcome Library.
Reading classes in Latin, Italian and French are provided and are offered to all students. Students are also encouraged to attend the Director’s weekly seminar on Work in Progress and any of the other regular seminars held in the Institute that may be of interest to them. These at present include History of Art and Maps and Society. The third term and summer are spent in researching and writing a dissertation, under the guidance of a supervisor from the academic staff.

Assessment

The normal format for classes is a small weekly seminar, in which students usually discuss texts in their original languages. In most courses, students also give short presentations of their own research, which are not assessed. The emphasis is on helping students to acquire the skills necessary to interpret philosophical, literary and historical documents as well as works of art. Each compulsory or optional module will be assessed by means of a 4,000 word essay to be submitted on the first day of the term following that in which the module was taught. A dissertation of 18,000 – 20,000 words, on a topic agreed by the student and supervisor, has to be submitted by 30 September. The course is examined on these five pieces of written work, and on a written translation examination paper in the third term. Students are allocated a course tutor and, in addition, are encouraged to discuss their work with other members of the academic staff. Because of our relatively small cohort, students have unusually frequent contact, formal and informal, with their teachers.

Mode of study

12 months full-time only.

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This interdisciplinary programme is designed to allow students to undertake sustained and focused study in the disciplines of Philosophy and Religion. Read more
This interdisciplinary programme is designed to allow students to undertake sustained and focused study in the disciplines of Philosophy and Religion. It encourages study which relates to the interface of Philosophy and Religion. Students take five taught modules each assessed by a 5,000 word essay.

Core Modules
• What is Philosophy? Methods, Aims, Debates
• Studying Religion
• Theory and Methods in Postgraduate Studies
• Dissertation (20,000 words)

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This course is based on King's expertise in the history of philosophy. King's Philosophy department is probably the only department in the world that can teach Western philosophy from the pre-Socratics to the present day with no gaps. Read more
This course is based on King's expertise in the history of philosophy. King's Philosophy department is probably the only department in the world that can teach Western philosophy from the pre-Socratics to the present day with no gaps.

The course is designed for students with an undergraduate degree in which philosophy was a major component, who want to focus more the history of philosophy. It offers a broad range of options, spanning two and a half millennia of philosophy.

Key benefits

- Possibly the widest selection of optional MA courses in the history of philosophy available anywhere in the world.
- Opportunity for training in a foreign language relevant to your main area of interest.
- Located in the heart of London.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/history-of-philosophy-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Our History of Philosophy MA draws on our unrivalled expertise in this field: offering coverage of Western philosophy from the pre-Socratics to the present with no gaps. If you have an undergraduate degree in which philosophy was at least a major component, and you now wish to focus more narrowly on the history of philosophy – particularly to provide a firm basis for subsequent research – this course is ideal for you.

At this advanced level a dissertation is a requirement but beyond that you are free to choose from our exceptional list of optional modules. While these focus primarily on the history of philosophy, you may also choose some from other related fields, including a language that will help you in your studies and research.

All students, including part-time students, should ensure that they are available to attend seminars at least two days a week.

- Course purpose -

This programme is based on King's unrivalled expertise in the history of philosophy: we are probably the only department in the world that can teach Western philosophy from the pre-Socratics to the present with no gaps. It is designed for students with an undergraduate degree in which philosophy was at least a major component, who now wish to focus more narrowly on the history of philosophy, to provide a firm basis for subsequent research.

- Course format and assessment -

Full time: 6 hours of teaching a week through lectures and seminars.
Part time: 2-4 hours of teaching a week through lectures and seminars.

We will assess our modules through a combination of coursework and exams. You will also write a 12,000-word dissertation.

Career prospects

Usually to further research; also to teaching, management, the financial or the public sector.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The School of Philosophy and Religion at Bangor University offers the opportunity to study some of the most important and challenging philosophical ideas that have shaped Western culture, and to consider how they interrelate with Western religious thought. Read more
The School of Philosophy and Religion at Bangor University offers the opportunity to study some of the most important and challenging philosophical ideas that have shaped Western culture, and to consider how they interrelate with Western religious thought. The School has developed out of a longstanding tradition in these subject areas within the Universtiy since the 19th century, and you will find here a friendly and informal atmosphere that will help you to cultivate the skills of debate and independednt thinking.
Course Structure

The Philosophy and Religion MRes is taught in two parts.

Part 1:

This is a taught component comprising 60 credits. You will be expected to take one compulsory module (‘Texts in Context’) and one optional module.

Compulsory module:

his course is a research degree that can be studied through distance learning. It has a duration of one year (full-time) or three years (part-time). The programme is tailor-made to suit your interests in consultation with the areas of expertise offered by the School. It comprises one dissertation of 50,000 words (180 credits).

You will be assigned a supervisor, who will advise you on your choice of subjects and on any questions related to your academic work. Teaching is by means of regular individual supervision, which can include face-to-face supervision at Bangor, supervision via Skype and telephone, and e-mail.

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Depending on your module choices you could become critically acquainted with the ‘sources’ of theology, such as scriptural writings, historical traditions and theologies and ethics issues. Read more
Depending on your module choices you could become critically acquainted with the ‘sources’ of theology, such as scriptural writings, historical traditions and theologies and ethics issues.

You will also examine the importance of the sociological and cultural background; for example, in terms of new ‘readings’ of theology that have emerged out of gendered and ethnic contexts, and new insights into biblical scholarship which have arisen from contemporary culture.

You will also be encouraged to interrogate and critically analyse your own, and others’, presuppositions and approach your studies in ways that show sensitivity to the multi-disciplinary nature of the issues under discussion.

You will study one core module - Research Methods - and five optional modules, in addition to completing a 15,000-word dissertation.

About the School of Philosophy, Theology and Religion

The School of Philosophy, Theology and Religion offers a variety of forward-thinking postgraduate study opportunities and is home to a dynamic and friendly community of staff and students, pursuing original research on a wide range of topics.
The School is made up of the Department of Philosophy and the Department of Theology and Religion, both of which were ranked second among other departments in the country in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework exercise.
The Departments are closely linked, providing opportunities for interdisciplinary study, but have also developed links more widely, in order to explore synergies with other disciplines.
The Department of Philosophy has links with the College of Medical and Dental Sciences, the International Development Department, the Birmingham Business School, the School of Psychology and the Birmingham Law School. In addition, the Department includes the Centre for the Study of Global Ethics, which was founded in 2001 to address the practical and theoretical issues raised by globalisation. Global Ethics has natural affinities with Political Science and International Studies, as well as the Institute of Applied Social Studies.
The Department of Theology and Religion has extensive formal and informal links with a wide range of academic and religious institutions across five continents. It has also built up excellent relationships and partnerships with Birmingham’s many different faith communities; this offers an ideal context to study religion in its contemporary as well as its ancient cultural contexts. These relationships, coupled with our large international community of postgraduates, means you will be studying in a diverse, yet well-connected environment.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This programme is intended for students who hold a BA (Honours) degree or equivalent in another discipline, but who wish to acquire a knowledge of Theology and Religion at a level which would permit them to undertake further study in the subject. Read more
This programme is intended for students who hold a BA (Honours) degree or equivalent in another discipline, but who wish to acquire a knowledge of Theology and Religion at a level which would permit them to undertake further study in the subject.

Course structure

Four option modules; dissertation.

Core Modules

-Graduate Diploma dissertation

Optional Modules

-Optional Modules in previous years have included (2 choices from):
-Landscapes of Worship in Contemporary South Asia
-Literature and Theology of the Old Testament
-New Testament Theology
-Topics in Christian Ethics
-Death, Ritual and Belief
-The Making of Modern Christianity: Medieval and Reformation Europe
-Christian Theology: Essential Questions I
-Christian Theology: Essential Questions II
-God, Freedom and the Soul
-Philosophy and the Christian Tradition
-One further 20 credit module offered by the Department of Theology & Religion at Levels 1 or 2

Plus 2 choices from:
-Aramaic
-Biblical Theology
-Advanced Greek Texts
-Religious Innovations
-New Testament Ethics
-Issues in Old Testament Studies
-The Cross in the Shadow of the Crescent
-The First Urban Churches
-Religion and Film
-Religious Violence in the Reformation Era
-Emotion and Identity in Religion
-The Sociology of Conservative Protestantism
-The Postmodern God
-1 Peter and the Petrine Tradition (English)
-1 Peter and the Petrine Tradition (with Greek)
-The Theology of Thomas Aquinas
-Marriage and Family in Christian Social Teaching
-War and Peace in the Orthodox Tradition
-Gospel, Mission and Empire
-The Letters of John and the origins of Gnosticism (English)
-The Letters of John and the origins of Gnosticism (Greek)
-The Historical Jesus
-Reading Greek Sources about the Historical Jesus
-Jesus Christ in the Twentieth Century
-Faith and the Experience of War in the Christian World
-Religions in Sub-Saharan Africa
-Religious Difference in the Reformation World
-The Doctrine of the Church from the Fathers to the Present

Learning and Teaching

As a student on the Graduate Diploma, you will receive on average 7.5 hours of timetabled contact per week. This will include a combination of lectures, seminars, and tutorials. Timetabled contact is only the beginning of your learning. It provides a starting point for your development as an independent learner. Typically, classroom teaching and learning will form nearly 25% of the time you will spend on your studies; you will be expected to spend the remaining 75% of your time on independent research.

The culmination of the process of your becoming an independent researcher is the Dissertation, a large research project that counts for one third of your marks. This gives you the opportunity to engage at an advanced level with creative cutting-edge research at the forefront of the discipline, working on a topic of your choice. For the dissertation you will have a supervisor who will guide and discuss your research with you. The dissertation represents the cumulative development of skills in analysis, synthesis, presentation and interpretation that the degree programme aims to foster.

In addition to all this the Department also has an extensive programme of research-related activities that you are warmly encouraged to attend. These include several research seminar series and public lectures from high-profile guest speakers and visiting scholars; the University also frequently hosts eminent and well-known visiting speakers.

Other admission requirements

It is also ideal if you have already studied theology and religion to first degree level in another country, and wish to become familiar with the critical approach to these subjects that is typical in British public universities. When applying, please ensure that your two chosen referees send their confidential academic references (using the reference form [Word]) to us in a timely manner. Please note that we are unable to accept ‘open’ references submitted by yourself. The referees may send the references by email directly from their institutional email addresses to provided they are signed, or by post to the address provided on the reference form.

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The Studies in Philosophy and Religion MRes Distance Learning Programme is scheduled for a duration of one year (full-time) or three years (part-time). Read more
The Studies in Philosophy and Religion MRes Distance Learning Programme is scheduled for a duration of one year (full-time) or three years (part-time). It is tailor-made to suit your interests in consultation with the areas of expertise offered by the School. It is designed also to suit the needs of those who are unable to attend time-tabled sessions at Bangor. It comprises two parts.)

Part 1:

Students will write two essays, each of 5000 words (30 credits each). The essay titles and content will be decided in consultation with your supervisor. However, they will follow any two topics listed below. Students will have full support from a supervisor (via e-mail, telephone, Skype, or any other means that is mutually convenient).

Topic List:

Eastern Philosophy and Religion (Hinduism, Sikhism, Shinto and Confucianism
Islamic Philosophy and ethics
Religious fundamentalism
Political Philosophy (including social theory such as Marx, Weber, Rawls etc.)
Globalization (including, multiculturalism)
The Enlightenment
Democratic theory
The Philosophy of Nietzsche
Psychoanalytic Studies
Jungian Theory
Old Testament
Ethical Theory
Applied Ethics
Religious Experience
Part 2:

Part 2 is a supervised dissertation of 40,000 words (120 credits). The subject of the dissertation will be decided by you in consultation with your supervisor. It is usually expected that the subject will relate to the broad range of topics listed above.

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Do you want to explore deeper the key issues in the field of philosophy of religion and ethics?. Are you looking to develop your professional or academic career path?. Read more
Do you want to explore deeper the key issues in the field of philosophy of religion and ethics?

Are you looking to develop your professional or academic career path?

On the MA Philosophy of Religion and Ethics programme you will explore a variety of questions - for example: Are there shared human values? How do we negotiate different belief systems in pluralistic societies? Is there a conflict between science and religion? Do people with different religious views have the same morals? Is life without God meaningless? You will be taught by a vibrant community of philosophers, pursuing original research on a wide range of topics on which expert supervision is available.

We also offer this programme by distance learning.

Taught by experts – you will study alongside some of the finest minds in Philosophy. We are ranked second among all Philosophy departments in the UK in the Research Excellence Framework 2014.

Friendly and relaxed atmosphere – staff within the Department of Philosophy are very approachable and happy to offer additional advice on academic performance.

Small classes – teaching on the masters-level modules involve mainly small-group seminars allowing you to really get to grips with the learning material.

Be a part of an active postgraduate community – you will join a lively and stimulating Department where you can contribute to on-going research activities, including research seminars and events such as our weekly speaker series and various workshops, reading groups and conferences throughout the year.

Access to a wide range of services – as a postgraduate student you will have access to services such as the Academic Writing Advisory Service and the Bank of Assessed Work which will aid your transition from undergraduate to postgraduate level, or back into academia after a time away.

About the School of Philosophy, Theology and Religion

The School of Philosophy, Theology and Religion offers a variety of forward-thinking postgraduate study opportunities and is home to a dynamic and friendly community of staff and students, pursuing original research on a wide range of topics.
The School is made up of the Department of Philosophy and the Department of Theology and Religion, both of which were ranked second among other departments in the country in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework exercise.
The Departments are closely linked, providing opportunities for interdisciplinary study, but have also developed links more widely, in order to explore synergies with other disciplines.
The Department of Philosophy has links with the College of Medical and Dental Sciences, the International Development Department, the Birmingham Business School, the School of Psychology and the Birmingham Law School. In addition, the Department includes the Centre for the Study of Global Ethics, which was founded in 2001 to address the practical and theoretical issues raised by globalisation. Global Ethics has natural affinities with Political Science and International Studies, as well as the Institute of Applied Social Studies.
The Department of Theology and Religion has extensive formal and informal links with a wide range of academic and religious institutions across five continents. It has also built up excellent relationships and partnerships with Birmingham’s many different faith communities; this offers an ideal context to study religion in its contemporary as well as its ancient cultural contexts. These relationships, coupled with our large international community of postgraduates, means you will be studying in a diverse, yet well-connected environment.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The course's primary focus is on the way in which religious traditions represent strands of philosophical thought and its development. Read more
The course's primary focus is on the way in which religious traditions represent strands of philosophical thought and its development. A major concern is the interplay between secular philosophy and religious reflection and analysis. The balance of provision will enable you to develop your philosophical skills and understanding. A foundational feature of the course will be its engagement with you via the use of primary texts and a focus on developing you as a sophisticated reader and writer. This is partnered with an ongoing endeavour of promoting philosophy as transformational, as practical and as a living tradition of engagement with the wider world, an underlying ethos to which the teaching team are committed.

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First-year MLitt students are not registered for any degree and must undergo an examination at the end of their first year. If they successfully pass this then they will be registered for the MLitt degree. Read more
First-year MLitt students are not registered for any degree and must undergo an examination at the end of their first year. If they successfully pass this then they will be registered for the MLitt degree. Candidates submit a dissertation of not more than 80,000 words. The dissertation title must be approved by the Degree Committee. There is an oral examination on the dissertation and the general field of knowledge in which the dissertation falls.

The Divinity Faculty at Cambridge has distinguished international reputation for research, teaching and for the formation of graduate students in Theology and Religious Studies. Consistently rated as one of the top research units in the country in our subjects, it offers postgraduate training at an acknowledged world-class standard.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/dvdvmlltr

Specialisms

The teaching officers of the Faculty include leading experts in a wide range of fields:

- Biblical Studies;
- Ancient, Medieval and Modern Judaism;
- Patristics;
- History of Christianity;
- Christian Systematic Theology;
- Philosophy of Religion and Ethics;
- Religion and the Natural Sciences;
- Religion and the Social Sciences;
- Study of World Religions (with special reference to Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism).

Each major research area is centred on a senior seminar meeting fortnightly during term. In practice these seminars are often interdisciplinary in character (such as the D Society in Philosophy of Religion and Ethics and the Hebrew, Jewish and Early Christian Studies Seminar); and a variety of other informal graduate seminars and reading groups also helps to expand the repertoire of exchange. A number of named lectureships (the Stantons, the Hulseans etc) regularly bring international figures from outside Cambridge to contribute to the research culture.

First-year MLitt students are not registered for any degree and must undergo an examination at the end of their first year. If they successfully pass this then they will be registered for the MLitt degree. Candidates submit a dissertation of not more than 80,000 words. The dissertation title must be approved by the Degree Committee. There is an oral examination on the dissertation and the general field of knowledge in which the dissertation falls.

Learning Outcomes

Candidates submit a dissertation of not more than 80,000 words. The dissertation title must be approved by the Degree Committee. There is an oral examination on the dissertation and the general field of knowledge in which the dissertation falls.

Format

Supervisions are given on the dissertation, twelve hours per year full-time (reduced pro rata for part-time).

Feedback will be given by the supervisor in the course of supervisions and in termly reports. In addition, there will be a report from the assessors following the first-year examination.

Assessment

Dissertation of not more than 80,000 words with a compulsory viva.

A first-year examination for which students must submit the following:
- a summary of the scope, purpose, methodology and value of research project;
- a provisional outline of dissertation with a timetable for the conduct and completion of the research and writing;
- a bibliography of topic and its immediate intellectual context set out in accordance with the conventions current field of study;
- a sample of written-up research of no more than 10,000 words, with appropriate footnotes and bibliographical references (included in word-count).

Students will have a meeting with two assessors to discuss the submitted work.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Faculty Studentships:

- Burney & Gregg Bury Studentship (Philosophy of Religion & Christian Theology)
- Peregrine Maitland Studentship (Spread of Christian Religion, comparison between Christianity &other religions, the contact of Christian & other civilizations)
- Polonsky-Coexist Studentship in Jewish Studies
- Shapiro Fund (Jewish Studies0
- Theological Studies Fund Studentship

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This course addresses fundamental questions in philosophy of religion and ethics and will be taught entirely online. Drawing on the School’s outstanding research in philosophy of religion and ethics (PRE), you’ll use a variety of online learning resources to explore key issues in the field of PRE. Read more

This course addresses fundamental questions in philosophy of religion and ethics and will be taught entirely online.

Drawing on the School’s outstanding research in philosophy of religion and ethics (PRE), you’ll use a variety of online learning resources to explore key issues in the field of PRE. You’ll have the opportunity to consider themes such as: concepts of God; the nature of justice; religious experience; ethics of the environment; the religious and spiritual significance of the arts and our relationship to the natural world.

This programme is designed to be accessible to students from a variety of backgrounds. It will be of interest to students with a personal interest in philosophical and religious questions, and also to teachers who wish to deepen their knowledge of philosophy and religious studies for professional development purposes.

You can also study this programme for a PGDip or PGCert qualification. You’ll study the same content as the MA programme, but take fewer modules overall.

Course content

There are two modules in the philosophy of religion strand of the course: a module examining concepts of God, and a module examining religious and spiritual practice, and its significance for our understanding of the nature of a good human life. You choose one of these modules if studying the PGCert, and can take both modules if studying the Diploma or MA.

You also take a core module in ethical theory, and choose from optional modules on a range of ethical themes, such as life and death, the environment, and the nature of justice.

The dissertation enables you to investigate a topic of your choice at length with the support of a supervisor, and to apply the knowledge and skills in independent research that you have developed in the course. As an MA student, you have the option of taking fewer optional modules and writing an extended dissertation instead.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

For the MA, PGDip and PGCert, you take Introduction to Ethics and at least one philosophy of religion module, plus at least one optional module. MA students take a standard or an extended dissertation. PGDip students have the option of taking a standard dissertation.

  • Introduction to Ethics: Reasons, Motivation, Obligations and Happiness 15 credits

Optional modules

  • Philosophy and Spiritual Practice 30 credits
  • Concepts of God 30 credits
  • Justice: Fairness, Equality and Diversity 15 credits
  • Global Environmental Ethics 15 credits
  • Business Ethics 15 credits
  • Current Developments in Health Care Ethics 30 credits
  • Ethical Issues at the Beginning of Life 15 credits
  • Ethical Issues at the End of Life 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Philosophy of Religion and Ethics MA in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

This course is taught entirely online, so you can fit your studies around your social and professional life. You’ll be able to access a wide range of teaching and learning resources through our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) and use the University Library’s online resources for your own independent research. You’ll also be able to discuss issues arising from your studies with other students through our forums.

Assessment

For most modules, you keep a weekly log, in which you reflect on the study exercises for the week. In addition, you make regular contributions to discussion forums, and write one or more essays. The discussion forum contributions and essays determine the final module mark.

Career opportunities

The MA Philosophy of Religion and Ethics will be of interest to teachers of Philosophy and Religious Studies for professional development purposes. The course can also provide a route into a research degree in the fields of philosophy of religion and ethics. Equally, the important skills of argumentation and clear expression that are developed in the programme will be valuable in a wide range of work settings.



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This degree captures the distinctive approach to philosophy at Exeter, taking an interdisciplinary perspective on the some of the biggest questions facing mankind. Read more
This degree captures the distinctive approach to philosophy at Exeter, taking an interdisciplinary perspective on the some of the biggest questions facing mankind.

Topics covered include:

* the philosophical, social and ethical dilemmas posed by science and technology;
* the nature of the human mind and its relationship to culture;
* how can we better understand the way that societies function.

You will also explore a range of different philosophical methods such as conceptual analysis, phenomenology, naturalism, and historical and sociological approaches, and learn to apply these methods in your own research.

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