• Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Birmingham | Bristol | Sheffield | Liverpool | Edinburgh

Cranfield University Featured Masters Courses
University of Cambridge Featured Masters Courses
University of Reading Featured Masters Courses
Vlerick Business School Featured Masters Courses
Bath Spa University Featured Masters Courses
United Kingdom ×
0 miles
History & Archaeology×

Masters Degrees in Indian History, United Kingdom

We have 7 Masters Degrees in Indian History, United Kingdom

  • History & Archaeology×
  • Indian History×
  • United Kingdom ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 7 of 7
Order by 
This programme will allow you to take a broad approach to African, Indian, American, British and European history from the early modern period to the 21st century. Read more

This programme will allow you to take a broad approach to African, Indian, American, British and European history from the early modern period to the 21st century.

A core module will allow you to sharpen your research skills, and you’ll choose from a wide range of optional modules spanning nations, continents, periods and themes to explore topics that interest you. You could study black internationalism alongside early modern Europe, the Spanish state, Stalinism, political violence in India or apartheid.

You’ll be taught by leading researchers as part of a large and diverse School of History and Leeds Humanities Research Institute, supported by active research groups and extensive library resources. Our research interests range from social history and identity to political history, nationalism and internationalism, meaning this flexible programme offers plenty of opportunities to gain important skills while focusing on issues that suit your interests.

You’ll study in a supportive environment with a wide range of resources. The world-class Brotherton Library has one of the best history collections in the UK, ranging from monographs and journals to conference papers, theses and over 100 digital databases of primary sources and other materials for fundamental research. The Brotherton also has its own special collections including the Leeds Russian Archive and the Feminist Archive North.

The Alf Mattinson Collection is full of printed works and papers related to the history of the Labour Party, and the Romany collection and Liddle Collection offer insights into Romany culture and the First World War respectively.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

You’ll study one core module in your first semester, introducing you to different research methodologies in history and allowing you to develop your skills. You’ll also select from a wide range of optional modules throughout the year, allowing you to pursue topics that interest you such as the history of Yorkshire, the European Enlightenment or issues surrounding global security.

You’ll also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the ‘Making History: Archive Collaborations’ module.

This programme will equip you with in-depth subject knowledge, as well as high-level skills in research, interpretation and analysis. You’ll be able to demonstrate these when you complete your dissertation on a modern history topic of your choice, which you’ll submit by the end of the programme.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Research Methodology in History 30 credits
  • Dissertation (History) 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Making History: Archive Collaborations 30 credits
  • Secrecy and Espionage in Early Modern Europe 30 credits
  • Reformation(s): Belief and Culture in Early Modern Europe 30 credits
  • Approaches to Contemporary European History 30 credits
  • 'The continuation of war by other means? : Case Studies in Wartime Diplomacy 1931-1945 30 credits
  • Medicine and Warfare in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries 30 credits
  • Women, Gender and Sexuality: Archives and Approaches 30 credits
  • Defending the Nation: Britain during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, 1793 to 1815 30 credits
  • Stalinist Terror 30 credits
  • Black Internationalism 30 credits
  • India since 1947: Community, Caste and Political Violence 30 credits
  • Sexuality and Disease in African History 30 credits
  • Contesting Patriarchy: Debating Gender Justice in Colonial and Post-Colonial India.30 credits
  • The War on Terror 30 credits
  • Latin America and the Caribbean from Rebellion to Revolution, 1765-1845 30 credits
  • Guns and Global Security 30 credits
  • Britain and the Slave Trade 30 credits
  • Insurgency and Counterinsurgency 30 credits
  • The Fragility of the Spanish State: Identity, Conflict and Resistance, 1808-1939 30 credits
  • Anti-Apartheid: Cultures of the Struggle 30 credits
  • Race and Second Wave Feminism in the US30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Modern History MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Modern History MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods. The majority of your modules will be taught through weekly seminars, where you’ll discuss issues and themes in your chosen modules with a small group of students and your tutors. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, giving you the space to shape your own studies and develop your skills.

Assessment

We use different types of assessment to help you develop a wide range of skills, including presentations, research proposals, case studies and essays, depending on the subjects you choose.

Career opportunities

This programme will heighten your cultural and social awareness as well as allowing you to build your historical knowledge. You’ll also gain high-level research, analysis and communication skills that will prove valuable in a wide range of careers.

Graduates have found success in a wide range of careers in education, research and the private sector. Many others have continued with their studies at PhD level.

We offer different forms of support to help you reach your career goals. You’ll have the chance to attend our career groups, meeting students with similar plans, or you could become a paid academic mentor to an undergraduate completing their final-year dissertation. You could also apply for one of the internships we offer each year.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. This one-year part-time course offers a unique opportunity for students to combine focused study of key historical themes and concepts in British and Western European history with either a broad-based approach to history or with the opportunity to specialise by period or in a branch of the discipline (political, social, economic, art, architectural and local). The course culminates in the research and preparation of a substantial dissertation.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies forms part of a two-year Master's programme. Students who successfully complete the Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies are eligible to apply to the Master's of Study in Historical Studies (https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-historical-studies).

This Historical Studies course offers a stimulating and supportive environment for study. As a student of Oxford University you will also be entitled to attend History Faculty lectures and to join the Bodleian Library. The University’s Museums and Art Galleries are within easy walking distance.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/postgraduate-certificate-in-historical-studies

Course content

Unit 1: Princes, States, and Revolutions
The first unit examines the interaction between the state and the individual from medieval to modern times and focuses upon authority, resistance, revolution and the development of political institutions. It introduces the development of scholarly debate, key historical themes and the critical analysis of documentary sources. Students explore disorder and rebellion in medieval and early modern England; the causes and impact of the British Civil Wars; and the causes and impact of the French Revolution.

Unit 2: European Court Patronage c.1400
The second unit explores cultural patronage in late medieval Europe and examines the diverse courtly responses to shared concerns and experiences, including the promotion of power and status; the relationship between piety and power; and the impact of dominant cultures. It introduces comparative approaches to history, the critical analysis of visual sources and the methodological issues surrounding the interpretation of material culture and the translation of written sources. Students compare the courts of Richard II of England, Philip the Bold and John the Fearless of Burgundy, Charles V and Charles VI of France, and Giangaleazzo Visconti of Milan.

Unit 3: Religious Reformations and Movements
The third unit examines the role of organised religion and religious movements in the lives of people in the past. It utilises case studies from different historical periods to explore the impact of local circumstances upon the reception and development of new ideas and further encourages engagement with historical debate and the interpretation of documentary and visual sources. Students explore: medieval monasticism; the English and European reformations of the sixteenth century; and religion and society in nineteenth-century England, including the rise of nonconformity, secularism and the Oxford Movement.

Unit 4: Memory and Conflict
The fourth unit focuses upon a central theme in the study of twentieth-century European history: how societies have chosen to remember (and forget) violent conflicts, and the relationship between public and private memory. It explores the challenges faced by historians when interpreting documentary, visual and oral sources in the writing of recent history. Students examine the theoretical context and methodological approaches to the study of memory and consider two case studies: World War I and the Spanish Civil War.

Unit 5: Special Subjects
In the final unit, students study a source-based special subject and research and write a dissertation on a related topic of their own choice. A range of subjects will be offered, varying from year to year, allowing specialization across both time periods and the historical disciplines. Examples include:

- Visualising Sanctity: Art and the Culture of Saints c1150-1500
- The Tudor Court
- The English Nobility c1540-1640
- The Great Indian Mutiny and Anglo-Indian Relations in the Nineteenth Century
- The British Empire
- Propaganda in the Twentieth Century

The on-line teaching modules

The first module provides a pre-course introduction to history and post-graduate study skills. The second focuses upon the analysis and interpretation of material sources, such as buildings and images and the third upon the analysis and interpretation of a range of documentary sources. All include a range of self-test exercises.

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted.

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students' Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Course aims

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies course is designed to:

- provide a structured introduction to the study of medieval and modern British and European history;

- develop awareness and understanding of historical processes, such as continuity and change, comparative perspectives and the investigation of historical problems;

- provide the methodology required to interpret visual arts as historical evidence;

- equip students to evaluate and interpret historical evidence critically;

- promote interest in the concept and discipline of history and its specialisms;

- enable students to develop the analytical and communication skills needed to present historical argument orally and in writing;

- prepare students for progression to study at Master's level.

By the end of the course students will be expected to:

- display a broad knowledge and understanding of the themes and methodologies studied;

- demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of key topics, the historical interpretation surrounding them and the relationship between local case-studies and the national perspective;

- utilise the appropriate critical and/or technical vocabulary associated with the disciplines, periods and themes covered;

- identify underlying historical processes, make cross-comparisons between countries and periods and explore historical problems;

- assess the relationship between the visual arts and the cultural framework within which they were produced;

- evaluate and analyse texts and images as historical evidence and utilise them to support and develop an argument;

- develop, sustain and communicate historical argument orally and in writing;

- reflect upon the nature and development of the historical disciplines and their contribution to national culture;

- demonstrate the skills needed to conduct an independent research project and present it as a dissertation within a restricted timeframe.

Assessment methods

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies is assessed through coursework. This comprises: four essays of 2,500 words each, two source-based exercises of 1,500 words each and a dissertation of 8,000 words. Students will write one essay following each of the first four units and the dissertation following unit 5. There will be a wide choice of assignment subjects for each unit and students will select a dissertation topic relating to their special subject with the advice of the course team. Students will be asked to write a non-assessed book review following the first pre-course online module and the source-based exercises will follow the second and third online modules.

Assignment titles, submission deadlines and reading lists will be supplied at the start of the course.

Tuition and study

A variety of teaching methods will be used in both the face-to-face and online elements of the course. In addition to lectures, PowerPoint slide presentations and tutor-led discussion, there will be opportunities for students to undertake course exercises in small groups and to give short presentations on prepared topics.

University lectures

Students are taught by the Department’s own staff but are also entitled to attend, at no extra cost, the wide range of lectures and research seminars organised by the University of Oxford’s History Faculty. Students are able to borrow books from both the Department’s library and the History Faculty Library, and are also eligible for membership of the Bodleian Library.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

Read less
This unique interdisciplinary degree will allow you to study race and strategies of resistance from a variety of historical and theoretical approaches. Read more

This unique interdisciplinary degree will allow you to study race and strategies of resistance from a variety of historical and theoretical approaches.

A broad transnational framework allows you to combine African, U.S., Caribbean, British and Southeast Asian history under the guidance of leading researchers in English, History, Gender Studies, Spanish, and Latin American studies. You’ll be trained in historical research methods and use varied materials such as novels, films, speeches, newspapers and organisational records to explore issues of race and resistance across very different periods and cultures.

Supported by the Institute for Colonial and Postcolonial Studies, you could study the slave trade, Mexican-American identity, race and feminism in the US, political violence in India or apartheid, among many others. It’s a fascinating and vital opportunity to gain an understanding of the roles that race and resistance have played in shaping the modern world – and how this complex relationship is evolving.

More Information

We have a wide range of resources to help you explore the topics that interest you. Among our library resources are microfilm collections of American, Indian and South African newspapers as well as journals relating to US civil rights. British and US government papers are also on microfilm, and an extensive set of British documents on end of empire and foreign affairs.

The Church Missionary Society Archives, the Black Power Movement archive and the Curzon papers are all available, and we have access to extensive online resources to access original material for your independent research.

With the chance to participate in our active research groups – such as Identity, Power and Protest; Women, Gender and Sexuality; and Health, Medicine and Society – and benefit from an impressive range of expertise among our tutors, you’ll find that the University of Leeds is a fantastic place to gain the knowledge and skills you need.

This degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

The first semester will lay the foundations of your studies, introducing you to historical research methods and approaches to the study of race and resistance. You’ll explore issues such as diasporas and migration, the legacy of non-violence and sexuality and race.

In Semester Two, you’ll build on this knowledge with your choice from a wide range of optional modules across different subject areas, on issues such as the Black Atlantic, postcolonial literature, British settler colonies in Africa and more.

Throughout the programme, you’ll develop your knowledge across a variety of areas as well as key skills in research and critical analysis. You’ll showcase these when you complete your dissertation, which will be independently researched on a topic of your choice and submitted by the end of the programme in September.

You’ll also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the ‘Making History: Archive Collaborations’ optional module

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Research Methodology in History 30 credits
  • Approaches to Race 30 credits
  • MA Race and Resistance: Dissertation 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Caribbean and Black British Writing 30 credits
  • Something Rotten: Transatlantic Capitalism and the Literature of Waste 1945-Present 30 credits
  • Race, Empire, Romanticism 30 credits
  • Turks, Moors, and Jews: Staging the Exotic in the Renaissance 30 credits
  • Global Genders30 creditsMaking History: Archive Collaborations 30 credits
  • Women, Gender and Sexuality: Archives and Approaches 30 credits
  • Black Internationalism 30 credits
  • India since 1947: Community, Caste and Political Violence 30 credits
  • Sexuality and Disease in African History 30 credits
  • Contesting Patriarchy: Debating Gender Justice in Colonial and Post-Colonial India.30 credits
  • Latin America and the Caribbean from Rebellion to Revolution, 1765-184530 credits
  • Insurgency and Counterinsurgency 30 credits
  • Anti-Apartheid: Cultures of the Struggle 30 credits
  • Race and Second Wave Feminism in the US 30 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Race and Resistance MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Race and Resistance MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Independent study is an important part of this degree, allowing you to develop your own ideas and improve your skills in research and analysis. You’ll then come together with tutors and other students for weekly seminars where you’ll discuss issues and themes in each of your modules.

Assessment

All of the modules on this programme are assessed by coursework. This can take a range of forms, including essays, discursive writing, bibliographies, reviews and presentations among others. Optional modules are usually assessed by two 3,000-word essays.

Career opportunities

This MA will give you a deeper understanding of how conceptions of race have shaped and been shaped by the world we live in, as well as the ways in which individuals and communities have employed different strategies of resistance. Crucially, it will equip you with sound intercultural awareness and allow you to look at situations from different points of view, as well as advanced skills in research, analysis, interpretation and written and oral communication.

Graduates have found success in a wide range of careers where they have been able to use their knowledge. These have included teaching and education, research and policy work for NGOs, think tanks and the charity sector. Many others have pursued PhD level study in related fields.

We offer different forms of support to help you reach your career goals. You’ll have the chance to attend our career groups, meeting students with similar plans, or you could become a paid academic mentor to an undergraduate completing their final-year dissertation. You could also apply for one of the internships we offer each year.



Read less
This programme introduces you to a range of colonial and postcolonial discourse from countries and regions such as Africa, the Americas, Asia, Canada and Oceania. Read more

This programme introduces you to a range of colonial and postcolonial discourse from countries and regions such as Africa, the Americas, Asia, Canada and Oceania. You will explore a range of issues contingent upon colonisation, independence, and the formation of postcolonial diasporic communities.

You will be encouraged to develop a knowledge and understanding of the roles played by various forms of writing in the shaping and representation of postcolonial subjectivity and context, and to contextualise postcolonial writing in terms of its chronological and geographical specificities, deepening your knowledge and understanding of selected themes and topics in a way that will enable you to select and execute an independent piece of research.

We are the oldest department of English Literature in the world, and at the last Research Assessment Exercise were awarded the highest research rating possible, of 5*A. We have one of the largest graduate programmes in this area in the country and a rich research culture covering all aspects of literatures in English.

We offer supervision in all areas of postcolonial literature, and have particular strengths in African American and Chicana writing, black British writing, Canadian literature, Indian subcontinental and diasporic writing, New Zealand literature, and Pacific literature.

The research of staff has made valuable contributions to the areas of literature and philosophy, modernism/postmodernism, medieval and early modern literature, history of the book, romanticism, transatlantic studies and performance studies.

English Literature houses the Centre for the History of the Book and is one of the UK's leading forces in this area. It works closely with the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and with the National Library of Scotland. The latter's recently acquired Murray Archive is crucial for studies in Romanticism, Book History, Bibliography and Archive Studies.

Programme structure

The course includes a 15,000-word dissertation, completed under the supervision of one or more of the course tutors. Students will undertake a seminar based programme of research methods training in core research skills and subject specific methodologies. They will also take two option courses covering areas of postcolonial literature and culture related to their chosen fields, each consisting of a weekly two-hour seminar, and will write two extended essays in relation to these courses.

Training and support

The academic staff you will be working with are all active researchers or authors, many of them prize winners and leading scholars in their fields. As well as benefiting from their expert supervision, you will undertake a seminar-based programme of training in core research skills and subject-specific methodologies. You will also have the opportunity to develop other transferable skills through the University’s Institute for Academic Development

We encourage you to share your research and learn from the work of others through a vibrant programme of Work-in-Progress seminars, reading groups, visiting speakers and conferences.

Our postgraduate journal, Forum, is a valuable conduit for research findings, and provides an opportunity for editorial experience.

Facilities

On hand are all the amenities you would expect, such as computing facilities, study areas and a common room and kitchen. Our location gives you easy access to the University’s general facilities, such as the Main Library and our collections, as well as to the National Museum, National Library and National Galleries of Scotland at the heart of the city.

In addition to the impressive range of resources available at the University’s Main Library (more than two million printed volumes and generous online resources) and the nearby National Library of Scotland, we host a number of collections of rare and valuable archival materials, all of which will be readily available to you as a postgraduate student.

Among the literary treasures are the libraries of William Drummond, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Hugh MacDiarmid, Adam Smith, Dugald Stewart and Norman MacCaig, plus the WH Auden collection, the Corson Collection of works by and about Sir Walter Scott and the Ramage collection of poetry pamphlets.

Our cultural collections are highly regarded and include a truly exceptional collection of early Shakespeare quartos and other early modern printed plays, and world-class manuscript and archival collections.



Read less
Research profile. The MSc by Research is perfect if you have a specific topic of interest you wish to research in depth. In History, we can offer supervision across an exceptionally wide chronological and geographical range. Read more

Research profile

The MSc by Research is perfect if you have a specific topic of interest you wish to research in depth. In History, we can offer supervision across an exceptionally wide chronological and geographical range.

When applying, as for other research programmes such as a PhD, you must submit a research proposal explaining your plans and demonstrating your knowledge of the chosen field: this will be closely scrutinised as part of our admissions process. Two supervisors will be appointed to work with you on the project and it is a good idea to consult with prospective supervisors before applying.

Programme structure

This programme is assessed by means of a long dissertation of 30,000 words. You must also take the history skills courses: Historical Research: Skills and Sources; Historical Methodology.

Training and support

You will be assigned two supervisors who will provide expert academic guidance on your chosen research topic. You will meet regularly to discuss your progress and research plans, as well as drafts of your thesis/dissertation chapters, conference papers and potential articles.

In addition to individual supervision, you will also have access to research training and postgraduate seminars.

Facilities

Our building offers you exceptional, modern facilities, resources and study spaces, in a stunning location.

Our postgraduate students have access to:

  • A dedicated study and computing lab with printing, copying and scanning facilities, overlooking the Meadows, one of the city’s best-loved green spaces.
  • Two research rooms, shared with undergraduates, housing some of our impressive book collections and a small selection of computing facilities.
  • A large common room overlooking the Meadows, shared by students and staff.
  • Our PhD study room. Subject to available desk space, you may apply after semester one of your first year.
  • A number of small-scale teaching rooms, well-equipped with facilities such as data projection and smart boards.
  • Exhibition areas, filled with artefacts and artwork from our collections.

All of our facilities are in addition to the multiple libraries and computer labs provided across the University’s estate. Many of our rooms overlook the Meadows.

Our location, right in the heart of Edinburgh, means you will be based close to the city’s cultural attractions and facilities, including a wealth of libraries, archives, museums and galleries, which provide uniquely rich support for the disciplines we teach.

Career opportunities

Our students view the programme and a graduate degree from Edinburgh as an advanced qualification valued and respected by many employers, others are interested in pursuing long-term academic careers and therefore consider the MSc as preparation for a PhD. The combination of skills training courses, specialised seminars, and independent research provides you with transferable skills that will be beneficial whatever path you choose.

Graduates pursue work in related areas such as museums, policy think tanks, national and international civil services, non-governmental organisations, galleries, libraries and historic trusts while others build on the transferable skills gained and enter areas as diverse as business, media, public administration and marketing.



Read less
This innovative MA course is one of the first in the UK to focus specifically on global history, offering you the chance to investigate one of the most dynamic areas of current historical enquiry and debate. Read more

Introduction

This innovative MA course is one of the first in the UK to focus specifically on global history, offering you the chance to investigate one of the most dynamic areas of current historical enquiry and debate. At its centre is a core module exploring the way in which global history has emerged, the methods it adopts, the subject areas it addresses and the criticisms it has attracted.

Throughout, you are encouraged to explore how the global can be investigated in relation to the regional and the local, as part of wider debates on historical methods and interpretation. This provides a route into studying major regions of the globe, including Latin America, India and China. You’ll also benefit from the Department’s Global History and Culture Centre, with the option to participate in seminars, lectures and conferences arranged by the Centre.

The course offers an excellent route into PhD research in the emerging field of global history and culture. Recent postgraduates have also advanced into careers in the cultural sector, consultancy and teaching.

Course Overview

AUTUMN TERM

◾Core Module: Theory, Skills & Methods (HI989) (30 CATS)
A compulsory course designed to help students acquire the methodological skills needed to undertake an extended piece of historical research and writing.

◾Core Module: Themes in Early Modern History (HI992) (30 CATS)

Outline syllabus:

Week 1: Introduction
Week 2: Key Early Modern debates
Week 3: Religion
Week 4: Politics and state building or revolutions
Week 5: Global expansion/colonialism
Week 7: Science, tecnology & environment
Week 8: Society & culture
Week 9: The public sphere & communicative practices
Week 10: Comparative Early Modernities

SPRING TERM
◾Two Optional Modules: to be selected from options listed below (30 CATS each)

SUMMER TERM
◾Dissertation (15,000 words) (60 CATS)

Read less
The MRes in Humanities offers students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of independent research and writing, and to undertake wide-ranging, systematic training in research skills and project management. Read more

Overview

The MRes in Humanities offers students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of independent research and writing, and to undertake wide-ranging, systematic training in research skills and project management. Students will write a dissertation in a specific field or prepare a portfolio of compositions, recital or a media project with a named supervisor.

Supervision is available in all disciplines where the School has expertise:
- American Studies
- English
- History
- Media, Communications and Culture
- Music and Music Technology
- Philosophy
- Russian

You will be able to develop your research topic within the context of current debates and methodologies in relevant disciplines and within the humanities generally. The course will develop practical, critical and analytical research skills that can be deployed in a variety of professional and intellectual contexts. The programme is tailored to your research and career plans, and we recommend that you contact us before making a formal application.

The MRes degree is intended for applicants who already have a clear dissertation project (or equivalent, e.g. composition portfolio, performance or software development plan). In liaison with the supervisor and discipline lead, a plan of work in semester 1 and 2 is agreed and serves as preparation for the project as well as assessed work in its own right. When you submit your online application, please use your personal statement to describe the dissertation (or equivalent) project you intend to carry out (500-700 words). Include specific research questions and aims. What does the project intend to elucidate? Is any hypothesis proposed? How will the research be carried out (i.e. methodology)?

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/humanitiesmres/

History

The MRes in History introduces students to, and further develops their knowledge of methodological debates within the discipline of history, critical developments in the historiography, and most especially allows students to undertake a substantial piece of personal research under the supervision of an acknowledged expert. Supervision is offered in a wide range of topics, reflecting the expertise of scholars in History in more distant times and cultures, periods of revolutionary change and more recent themes including: Medieval church history and the crusades; Religion, print culture, gender in the Early modern era; the English civil war; the politics of Revolutionary France 1789-1871; modern Irish history; Eastern European Jewry; German occupation policy; Colonial and post-colonial India; the history of African Christianity; Local history, especially of the North Midlands from medieval to recent times; Genocide, political violence and terrorism; Gender and women's history; and the Social history of medicine.

The 2009 and 2010 groups include students working on district medical officers in Poor Law Unions and workhouses in North Staffordshire, the Isle of Man in the early middle ages, women murderers, the English crusaders, the creation of an independent Zambia, Polish holocaust trauma, and the Ukrainian famine.

Course Aims

To enable students to research and write an extended dissertation, whilst developing practical, critical and analytical research skills that can be deployed in a variety of professional and intellectual contexts. Students will develop an understanding of the place of a specific research topic within current debates and methodologies in relevant disciplines, and within the humanities generally. The course will promote the ‘project management skills’ of defining and planning a project, meeting deadlines, and recording and reflecting on outcomes.

Course Content

Students follow a tailor-made programme, comprising three components totalling at least 180 credits.
- A 20,000 word dissertation (or equivalent composition or artistic production) is at the heart of the programme (90 credits).

- Research Training covering research skills and reflective practice in the humanities (2 x 15 = 30 credits).

- Research methods in the field relevant to the thesis topic (30 credits)

- Individual Research Orientation: a module tailored to the needs of the student (30 credits).

Teaching & Assessment

Assessment is by coursework, culminating in the 20,000 word dissertation (or the equivalent composition or artistic production). Research Training is assessed by a portfolio consisting of an annotated bibliography, a project outline and a reflective diary. Each of the other modules will be examined through a 4,000-5,000 word essay or approved equivalent.

The pass mark is 50%. A merit will be awarded where students obtain 60% or over for the dissertation (or equivalent project or performance) and an average of 60% on their other coursework. A distinction will be awarded where students obtain 70% or over for the dissertation, (or equivalent project or performance) and an average of 70% in their other coursework.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Discretionary Award:
A sum of £6,250 has been made available to students enrolling on taught postgraduate course in History by a former member of Keele staff. The money will be distributed at the discretion of the relevant programme director(s) and is available to students entering the programme in 2015 and/or 2016. No application is required.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

Read less

  • 1
Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X