• Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Birmingham | Bristol | Sheffield | Liverpool | Edinburgh

University of London International Programmes Featured Masters Courses
Barcelona Technology school Featured Masters Courses
University of Bedfordshire Featured Masters Courses
University of Cambridge Featured Masters Courses
University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
United Kingdom ×
0 miles
Languages, Literature & Cu…×

Masters Degrees in East Asian Languages & Literature, United Kingdom

We have 22 Masters Degrees in East Asian Languages & Literature, United Kingdom

  • Languages, Literature & Culture×
  • East Asian Languages & Literature×
  • United Kingdom ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 22
Order by 
This interdisciplinary programme will provide you with in-depth knowledge of the politics, economies and societies of East Asia as well as allowing you to learn, or develop your knowledge of, an East Asian language. Read more

This interdisciplinary programme will provide you with in-depth knowledge of the politics, economies and societies of East Asia as well as allowing you to learn, or develop your knowledge of, an East Asian language.

Taught by leading researchers in our world-class facilities, you’ll apply academic analysis to your experience of the region, or convert past training in another academic discipline to apply it to the Asian context. You’ll also learn Chinese, Japanese or Thai at a level appropriate for you.

A wide range of optional modules will give you the chance to focus on topics such as business practices, the role of China or Japan in international development or the complex politics of the Asia Pacific.

Whether you’re entering a professional career and want to gain regional expertise, want to build on your experience of living and working in an Asian context or you’re preparing for further research, you’ll gain an insight into a complex and fascinating part of the world alongside valuable language skills.

By choosing to study East Asian Studies at Leeds you will be joining a leading centre for research in the region, with over 50 years of history. In addition to the academic strengths that have accrued over this time, we have developed an extensive and active international network of alumni. Leeds is also home to very substantial and world-renowned specialist library collections.

If you would like to study East Asian cultures and societies without learning a language, you may be interested in our East Asian Cultures and Societies MA.

Course content

A core module will give you an understanding of research methods in the humanities and social sciences, allowing you to develop your skills. This will culminate with your dissertation – an independent research project on a topic of your choice that allows you to demonstrate the knowledge and skills you’ve acquired.

Throughout the year you’ll also undertake intensive language classes in Chinese, Japanese or Thai. We teach all three languages from beginner level, but if you already have some knowledge of a language you can study at a level appropriate for you, right up to advanced classes equipping you to use primary sources and literature in your research.

To complete the programme, you’ll select from a range of optional modules allowing you to focus on topics that interest you, from China’s links with the developing world to political economy around the Pacific Rim.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation 45 credits
  • Principles and Practices of Research 30 credits 

For more information on typical modules, read East Asian Cultures and Societies (Language Pathway) MA in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods to help you benefit from the expertise of our tutors, including lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops. Language classes may also include practicals and computer classes to develop your skills. However, independent study remains an important element of this degree as a chance for you to develop your skills and explore topics that interest you.

Assessment

You’ll also experience a range of assessment methods, depending on the modules you choose. These may include exams and essays as well as presentations, project work and in-course assessment among others. Language modules may also include different forms of assessment such as translation tests.

Career opportunities

This programme will suit you whether you’re just starting your professional career, you’re a mid-career professional who has lived and worked in an Asian context, or you’re seeking to develop skills to equip you for further research.

You’ll gain subject knowledge as well as transferable skills in topics such as analysis, research, communication, presentations and cultural awareness. Language skills are also increasingly attractive to international employers.

All of these are valuable in a wide range of professions across different sectors and industries, including business, public and third sectors. Graduates from our School have developed exciting careers in the UK and worldwide, as diplomats, educators, and policy-makers, to name just a few.

The programme will also prepare you for PhD study, providing a good stepping stone towards an academic career.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.




Read less
If you’re a native speaker or you have substantial training in Chinese, Japanese or Thai, this programme will prepare you for a career in research with an area specialism. Read more

If you’re a native speaker or you have substantial training in Chinese, Japanese or Thai, this programme will prepare you for a career in research with an area specialism.

Half of the programme will give you a solid foundation in East Asian studies and research methodologies, equipping you with a range of subject knowledge, consolidating your language skills and preparing you to conduct independent, theory-driven research. In the other half, you’ll apply all of this to your own research project comprising 50% of the MRes, supervised by a member/members of the Faculty.

You’ll study in a stimulating research environment with plenty of opportunities to attend research events and conferences, not just within East Asian Studies but also at School and University level.

Our tutors are conducting world-class research in diverse fields across East Asian Studies, and you’ll benefit from teaching that’s informed by their own work. It’s a great opportunity to prepare for a career in academic or professional research.

By choosing to study East Asian Studies at Leeds you will be joining a leading centre for research in the region, with over 50 years of history. In addition to the academic strengths that we have accrued over this time, we have developed an extensive and active international network of alumni. Leeds is also home to very substantial and world-renowned specialist library collections.

Course content

The programme is divided in half, with 50% advanced research training and 50% independent research on a specialist topic of your choice.

Advanced methodological training will cover the key stages of the research process and equip you to conduct independent research informed by a sound theoretical understanding. You’ll also practice skills such as writing abstracts, papers and proposals as well as verbal presentations and group discussions, preparing you to present and share your research.

The remainder of the programme will be spent working with a supervisor in the faculty on your own research project, focusing on a topic that interests you perhaps laying the foundations for future academic research.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Principles and Practices of Research 30 credits
  • Dissertation 90 credits

Optional modules

  • Chinese Politics 15 credits
  • China's Development 15 credits
  • China and the Developing World 15 credits
  • Japan in the Discourse of International Development 15 credits
  • Japan: Politics and International Relations 15 credits
  • Political Economy of the Pacific Rim 15 credits
  • International Politics of the Asia Pacific Region 15 credits
  • Modern Documentary Chinese: Politics and Law 15 credits
  • Post-Cultural Revolution Chinese Literature 15 credits
  • Contemporary Chinese Literature 15 credits
  • Chinese Literature 1912 - 1949 15 credits
  • Japanese 3A: Written Communication Skills 30 credits
  • Advanced Japanese in Context 1: Politics and International Relations 15 credits
  • Advanced Japanese in Context 4: Literature 15 credits
  • Advanced Japanese in Context 5: Japanese Diplomacy and Foreign Policy in Historical Context 15 credits
  • Advanced Japanese in Context 6: Japanese Religion and Culture in Historical Context 15 credits
  • Advanced Japanese in Context: Culture and Identity 15 credits
  • Specialised Readings 15 credits
  • The Rise of China 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read East Asian Studies MRes in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods such as lectures and seminars. You’ll be expected to participate fully in these by giving presentations and conducting your own research and reading before taught sessions. Of course, independent research is vital to this programme, allowing you to develop your skills and explore your own ideas and interests.

Assessment

You’ll also experience a range of assessment methods, depending on the taught modules you choose. These may include exams and essays as well as presentations, literature reviews, project work and in-course assessment among others. Language modules may also include different forms of assessment such as translation tests. Your dissertation will be assessed based on the final, submitted piece of work.

Career opportunities

The emphasis on independent research and advanced methodological training on this programme means it offers ideal preparation for PhD study, or professional research roles in government, media, business or the charity and voluntary sectors.

You’ll also gain important skills such as analysis, problem-solving, oral and written communication as well as cultural awareness, all of which are valuable in a wide range of careers in different sectors.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
The opportunity to move from the familiar Euro-American literary canons into the fresh but less well known worlds of African and Asian literature is what attracts most students to this popular MA. Read more
The opportunity to move from the familiar Euro-American literary canons into the fresh but less well known worlds of African and Asian literature is what attracts most students to this popular MA.

At SOAS, students benefit from the unique expertise in this vast field possessed by the school’s faculty.

This expertise is available to students interested in studying these literatures through English - including both original English language literatures of Africa and Asia and literature written in African and Asian languages presented through English translations.

While exploring new horizons and breaking out of the Euro-centric space in which comparative literature has developed so far, the course covers the major theoretical contributions made by Western scholars.

In doing so, it constructs a unique multi-cultural domain for the study of literature and its location in culture and society.

A prior knowledge of an African or Asian language is not a requirement for admission to this degree.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/degrees/macomplit/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time). Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

All students are required to take the core course in their first year. Two other courses, one major, one minor, plus a dissertation of 10,000 words must also be completed.

MA Comparative Literature Programme Specification 2012/13 (pdf; 35kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/degrees/macomplit/file39752.pdf

Teaching & Learning

The taught part of the programme consists of core lectures introducing basic concepts, theory and methodology; and additional seminars that extend the core material into other areas. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

A 10,000-word dissertation written over the summer offers students the opportunity to develop original research in an area of special interest.

- Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A postgraduate degree in Comparative Literature (Africa/Asia) provides students with competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the selected region will have been developed through a combination of the study of it's literature and exploration of contemporary literary theories. Some graduates leave SOAS to pursue careers directly related to their study area, while others have made use of the intellectual training for involvement in analysing and solving many of the problems that contemporary societies now face.

Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers in the business, public and charity sectors. They leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
This programme offers those with an interest in Korean language learning and teaching extensive practical and rigorous theoretical training. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

This programme offers those with an interest in Korean language learning and teaching extensive practical and rigorous theoretical training. The programme provides you with the skills and knowledge to succeed, whether you are interested in pursuing a career in linguistic research or Korean teaching.

You will study general areas of linguistic inquiry and study how they relate to the study of second language acquisition and language teaching. You will also learn about teaching Korean in higher education.

Throughout the degree, you will evaluate published materials (e.g. textbooks) and research papers related to Korean language teaching, conduct pedagogical research, and design teaching materials and lesson plans.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/ma-korean-language-learning-and-teaching/

Structure

Students take core courses up to the value of three full units plus a 10,000-word dissertation. This includes two core compulsory courses, Language Pedagogy and Korean Language Learning and Teaching. For those who have not previously studied linguistics an introductory course, Introduction to the Study of Language (ISL), is required. Students that have studied Linguistics before are required to take, History and Structure of the Korean Language.

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Department of Linguistics

The department is a centre for linguistic study in an unparalleled range of languages, many of which we are documenting for the first time. They include languages of Africa, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, Central Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and Siberia. The department has close academic ties to the rest of our faculty, the Departments of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, as well as the Language Centre.

The research interests of members of staff cover a wide range of theoretical and applied aspects of linguistics, including syntax, phonology, semantics, information structure, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, linguistic typology, language documentation and description, language contact and multilingualism, language support and revitalisation, language archiving, lexicography, language pedagogy, translation studies, and the studies of individual languages and language families.

View Degree Programmes - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The MA in Korean Literature aims to. - provide extensive, critical knowledge of pre-modern and modern Korean literary traditions;. Read more
The MA in Korean Literature aims to:

- provide extensive, critical knowledge of pre-modern and modern Korean literary traditions;

- develop advanced competency in reading and understanding literary works in Korean, and literary translation skills into English;

- develop advanced skills in research, analysis, and critical method in the study of Korean literature, with consideration to socio-historical context and comparative approaches;

- serve as a foundation for students who wish to pursue further research or work in the fields of literary translation, writing and publishing.

The programme suits anyone interested in the literary cultures of Korea, as well as students of literature with no prior knowledge of Korean literature who are looking for new areas of inquiry.

Incoming students will be expected to have completed at least the equivalent of two years of undergraduate Korean language study. Students with knowledge of classical Chinese (hanja) will be encouraged to read pre-modern texts in the original classical Chinese.

The programme will benefit anyone wishing to pursue a research degree (MPhil/PhD) afterwards. It also provides a solid basis for anyone wishing to pursue a career in literary translation or publishing.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/makorlit/

Structure

Students are required to take three taught units and to write a dissertation of 10,000 words. Two of the taught units are compulsory; the third is selected from the list of optional units below. Students with no prior background in literary studies are strongly advised to select the first optional unit, Theories and Techniques of Comparative Literature. The Directed Readings course [as directed by the supervisor] must not cover the same subject matter as one of the compulsory courses.

In very exceptional cases (and if the student has sufficient background in literary studies AND an advanced knowledge of Korean), students may be permitted to take a course from other East Asian (Korean, Chinese, or Japanese) programmes as a minor provided that the course is directly relevant to the candidate’s dissertation

Programme Specification

MA Korean Literature- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 30kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/makorlit/file80728.pdf

Teaching & Learning

The taught part of the course consists of core lectures introducing basic concepts, theory and methodology; and additional seminars that extend the core material into other areas. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

A 10,000-word dissertation written over the summer offers students the opportunity to develop original research in an area of special interest. The course is formulated within two tracks:

- Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in MA Korean Literature from SOAS provides students with competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, history, cinema, politics, economics or law. Graduates of this programme will develop their ability to engage with and explore relationships between indigenous aesthetics of the region and contemporary literary theories. Some graduates leave SOAS to pursue careers directly related to their study area, while others have made use of the intellectual training for involvement in analysing and solving many of the problems that contemporary societies now face.

Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers in the business, public and charity sectors. They leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. A postgraduate degree in Korean Literature is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
This degree is designed either to prepare the student for advanced graduate work in a wide range of subjects related to Korea or as an end/qualification in itself. Read more
This degree is designed either to prepare the student for advanced graduate work in a wide range of subjects related to Korea or as an end/qualification in itself.

The programme explores the history, politics, art, music and literature of Korea, as well as providing opportunities to study the languages of the region.

The MA in Korean Studies consists of four components. Students choose one major course and two minor courses from the lists on the Course Detail page.

Students who plan to go on to further research can take a higher-level Korean language course as a minor.

Students take three taught courses and must also complete a 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/makorstud/

Programme Specification

MA Korean Studies - Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 27kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/makorstud/file80729.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Students are exposed to a wide range of topics through participation in the seminars, general lectures and specialised workshops.

- Lectures and Seminars

In most courses there is one 2-hour class each week. This may be an informal lecture followed by a discussion or student presentation.

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

- Dissertation

The 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic linked with one of the taught courses.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Employment

As a student specialising in Korean, you will gain competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature and culture (which can include literature, film, music, art and religion) of various parts of Korea.

Graduates leave SOAS not only with linguistic and cultural expertise, but also with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers in both business and the public sector. These include written and oral communication skills, attention to detail, analytical and problem-solving skills, and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
This will suit students wishing to embark on research degrees with a focus on Korea. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

This will suit students wishing to embark on research degrees with a focus on Korea. Also, professionals wishing to pursue careers directly related to Korea, including government departments (of both the UK and other countries), and in firms requiring particular skills and knowledge related to trading, investment and promotional interests outside Europe.

The two-year language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with Korea in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course would enable them to reach a high level of Korean language proficiency.

This two-year programme (or four years part-time) will provide students with the opportunity to combine Masters’ level training with intensive Korean language study in order to acquire the skills necessary for future professional or research careers. The programme will enable students to engage with the subjects of their Masters’ programme in the context of Korea through Korean, to engage with primary Korean sources and data and to conduct research and professional work in Korea.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/ma-and-intensive-language-korean/

May be combined with

- MA Korean Studies
- MA Japanese Studies
- MA Historical Research Methods
- MA History
- MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia
- MA Religions of Asia and Africa
- MA Medical Anthropology
- MA Anthropological Research Methods
- MA Migration and Diaspora Studies

Once you have checked the structure for this programme via the structure tab, please click into the above discipline that you would like to study. You will then see the full list of optional courses available to you.

Structure

Students will take 4 course units of language over the two-year period, alongside the 3 units plus 1 unit of dissertation of their concurrent Masters programme. (Or the programme can be taken part-time over four years.) Progression can only be made if all language units are passed. If language units are failed, students are recommended to pursue the discipline only pathway.

In the two-year language pathway, the intensive language courses will be assessed by a combination of exams and continuous assessment, involving in-class tests. The assessment in the summer school is handed over to the Korean partner university but will be counted as one unit.

MA ... and Intensive Language (Korean) (pdf; 148kb) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/ma-and-intensive-language-korean/file93939.pdf)

Knowledge

To acquire/develop skills in Korean language to higher intermediate level.

Intellectual (thinking) skills

To demonstrate awareness of the conceptual and communicative underpinnings of Korean and through this interlinguistic and intercultural understanding.

Subject-based practical skills

Communicate in written and spoken medium in contemporary Korean.

Transferable skills

Engage with people from different linguistic and cultural backgrounds, understand the role of different frames of reference.

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
This programme is aimed at students who see China’s role as a rising economic super power as both an opportunity and a challenge, and who want to ensure they are ‘China ready’. Read more

This programme is aimed at students who see China’s role as a rising economic super power as both an opportunity and a challenge, and who want to ensure they are ‘China ready’.

Taught by the School of Languages, Cultures and Societies and Leeds University Business School, you’ll gain intensive research training and study modules in business and management studies.

You’ll also take Chinese language classes at a level appropriate for you and choose from a range of optional modules to develop your knowledge of China, the wider East Asian region and the international business world. You could study Chinese politics, human resource management, Japanese business and much more.

This programme will suit both UK and non-UK students wanting to engage with the growing markets in which Chinese interests are present, as well as Chinese students seeking practical and strategic management expertise alongside an insight into how China is perceived by the outside world.

Leeds University Business School and East Asian Studies are leading centres for research, offering complementary expertise in the region. East Asian Studies has enjoyed over 50 years of history at Leeds. In addition to the academic strengths that have accrued over this time, we have developed an extensive and active international network of alumni. Leeds is also home to very substantial and world-renowned specialist library collections.

Course content

A core module will provide you with intensive research training, developing your understanding of research methods and building the skills to complete your dissertation. You’ll work with your supervisor(s) – specialists member of our teaching staff – to complete this independent research project which focuses on a topic of your choice.

You’ll also take intensive language classes at the right level for you in Chinese, Japanese or Thai – we teach all three languages from beginner level, but if you already have some knowledge of the language you’ll be able to study at a more advanced level. If you’re a native Chinese speaker, you’ll be exempt from this requirement and choose extra modules in East Asian Studies instead.

To complete the programme, you’ll select from a wide range of optional modules to explore topics that suit your interests or career plans. You’ll maintain some variety with modules in business and management studies as well as Chinese culture, politics or history – you could study topics as diverse as cross-cultural management, Japanese politics, China’s relationship with the developing world and gender and equality.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation 45 credits
  • Principles and Practices of Research 30 credits 

Optional modules

Please see the website for a list of the optional modules available on this course

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods to help you benefit from the expertise of our tutors, including lectures, seminars, online learning, tutorials and workshops. Language classes may also include practicals and computer classes to develop your skills.

However, independent study remains an important element of this degree as a chance for you to develop your skills and explore topics that interest you.

Assessment

You’ll also experience a range of assessment methods, depending on the modules you choose. These may include exams and essays as well as presentations, literature reviews, project work and in-course assessment among others. Language modules may also include different forms of assessment such as translation tests.

Career opportunities

Whether you’re already an established professional or just launching your career, the programme will give you valuable knowledge and skills to develop an international career.

You’ll have advanced skills in research, analysis and written and oral communication, as well as a greatly expanded cultural awareness. All of these are valuable in a wide range of careers – and your language skills will make you even more attractive to employers worldwide – in business, public and third sectors.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
The programme is tailored for students who wish to proceed to further research on the doctoral level on a topic related to the history of the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, East Asia and Africa, but it also makes sense as a stand-alone programme for those who wish to explore a specific topic or question within a shorter period of time. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is tailored for students who wish to proceed to further research on the doctoral level on a topic related to the history of the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, East Asia and Africa, but it also makes sense as a stand-alone programme for those who wish to explore a specific topic or question within a shorter period of time.

The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course would enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

Career opportunities include:

- Further historical research (PhD)
- Research positions in government institutions, NGOs, journalism, etc.

This is the only Master-level programme in Historical Research Methods focusing on the study of Asia and Africa in the UK. It provides the unique opportunity to develop and carry out a research project under the guidance of regional specialists and thus an ideal preparation for a research degree. It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

Please see the webpage for the Japanese pathway of the programme, and contact the MA convenor of that pathway for further information on the language component. Further information on entry level language requirements can be found on the programme page.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Email:

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/history/programmes/ma-historial-research-methods-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Students take 4 course units over the period of their programme of study (i.e. 2 or 4 years). This includes the core course Sources and Research Design in Historical Research (1 unit), which is taught on a one-to-one basis by the dissertation supervisor, the compulsory course Research Methods in History with Special Reference to Asia and Africa (1 unit), a minor course or courses (to the value of 1 unit) from a list of approved options and/or a language course from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures, and a 10,000 word dissertation (1 unit).

In the intensive language pathways, students take 2 intensive language units and one history unit in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad (location dependant on language). Upon their return, they will take 1 language unit and 2 history units and complete work on their dissertation (1 unit). For example, Year 1: 2 intensive language units + compulsory course Research Methods in History with Special Reference to Asia and Africa; Year 2: 1 intensive language unit + core course Sources and Research Design in Historical Research (1 unit) + minor courses to the value of 1 unit + dissertation.

Aims and Outcomes

- Knowledge of a variety of theoretical issues and methodological approaches relevant for the study of historical problems

- Practical research and writing skills, developed through the study of primary and secondary sources related to Asian and African history

- A sound grounding for further research, either in a doctoral programme or in a professional environment

- A near proficient ability in the a language.

Knowledge:
1. How to locate materials and use research resources (particularly research library catalogues, archival hand lists, and digital resources), assess data and evidence critically from manuscripts, printed, and digital sources, and solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations.

2. How to formulate and carry out a research project, based on a thorough knowledge and understanding of the particular field of study chosen by the student, the relevant literature and current debates.
3. Language skills appropriate to chosen region of study.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:
1. Students should become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence and understand what the different types of historical sources can and cannot tell us.

2. Students should question interpretations, however authoritative, maintain an open-minded attitude to interpretations that challenge older interpretations, and reassess evidence for themselves.

3. Students should be able to think critically about the nature of the historical discipline, its methodology, historiography, and openness for interdisciplinary approaches.

4. Students should be able to reflect about the potential of historical research on non-Western societies and civilizations for the advancement of the historical discipline and human civilization in general.

Subject-based practical skills:
1. Effective writing and referencing skills, attention to detail and accuracy in presentation.

2. Effective oral presentation of seminar papers, articulation of ideas, and constructive participation in seminar discussions.

3. Ability to retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources, effective note-taking, record keeping and planning of projects.

4. Effective use of relevant professional databases.

5. In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language

Transferable skills:
1. Critical thinking.

2. Ability to communicate effectively in oral and written forms.

3. Information gathering skills from conventional and electronic sources.

4. Effective time-management, writing to word limits, and meeting deadlines.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
This is a highly flexible course that offers a large range of modules in the social sciences that may be combined with Japanese language tuition at a range of levels. Read more

About the course

This is a highly flexible course that offers a large range of modules in the social sciences that may be combined with Japanese language tuition at a range of levels. The course will cover topics including international relations in Japan, Japanese media, public relations, and business and work culture in Japan. At the end of the course you will have a deep understanding of life in modern Japan.

Your career

Our graduates hold influential positions in business, government, the arts and academia. Some of them are journalists, television producers, interpreters and translators. Others are city brokers and analysts. They work for organisations such as the BBC World Service, BNP Paribas, British Council, British Museum, Deloitte, HarperCollins, Jaguar Land Rover, Lloyds Banking Group, Nintendo, Siemens, Sony, Toyota and the World Food Programme.

Our expertise

We are one of Europe’s leading centres for the study of China, Japan and Korea. We have links with partner universities in East Asia that support our dynamic research culture. Our academics bring theories, methods and findings from their research to their teaching.

All four of our interdisciplinary research clusters inform what we teach. They are: East Asian Business Environment; East Asian Text and Culture; Human Movement and Development in East Asia; Power, Cooperation and Competition in East Asia.

The Sheffield Confucius Institute, which was named Global Confucius Institute of the year in 2015, explores Chinese language and culture. The Institute offers many opportunities for students to get involved in its activities which will help enhance their learning and deepen their cultural understanding of China.

Develop your skills

You’ll learn how to research and analyse, manage projects, write reports and give effective presentations. You will also have the opportunity to take language modules in Chinese, Japanese or Korean if you wish. Your in-depth knowledge of East Asian countries and your understanding of the region will give you an edge in the careers market.

Specialist resources

Our postgrads have their own study space and IT facilities at the Sir Sze-yuen Chung Resource Centre. The University’s libraries have an extensive selection of texts and online resources in Chinese, Japanese and Korean.

Options

You can study a shorter course for a Postgraduate Certificate (four months, 60 credits) or Postgraduate Diploma (nine months, 120 credits). You’ll need 180 credits to get a Masters degree, including 60 credits from your extended project.

Core modules

Media and Public Communication in Japan: Global Governance and Japan: Project.

Examples of optional modules

Choose from a range of modules which may include: Work and Organisation in East Asia; Investing in East Asia; International Business and East Asia; Postwar Japanese Politics; Business and the Economy of Japan; Japanese language modules (of the appropriate level); Project (core).

Teaching and assessment

There are lectures and small-group seminars. You’re assessed on your essays, exams, presentations and an extended project.

Read less
This is a highly flexible course that offers a large range of modules in the social sciences that may be combined with Chinese language tuition at a range of levels. Read more

About the course

This is a highly flexible course that offers a large range of modules in the social sciences that may be combined with Chinese language tuition at a range of levels. The course will cover topics including the Chinese economy, business culture, media, and the politics of the country. At the end of the course you will have a deep understanding of life in modern China.

Your career

Our graduates hold influential positions in business, government, the arts and academia. Some of them are journalists, television producers, interpreters and translators. Others are city brokers and analysts. They work for organisations such as the BBC World Service, BNP Paribas, British Council, British Museum, Deloitte, HarperCollins, Jaguar Land Rover, Lloyds Banking Group, Nintendo, Siemens, Sony, Toyota and the World Food Programme.

Our expertise

We are one of Europe’s leading centres for the study of China, Japan and Korea. We have links with partner universities in East Asia that support our dynamic research culture. Our academics bring theories, methods and findings from their research to their teaching.

All four of our interdisciplinary research clusters inform what we teach. They are: East Asian Business Environment; East Asian Text and Culture; Human Movement and Development in East Asia; Power, Cooperation and Competition in East Asia.

The Sheffield Confucius Institute, which was named Global Confucius Institute of the year in 2015, explores Chinese language and culture. The Institute offers many opportunities for students to get involved in its activities which will help enhance their learning and deepen their cultural understanding of China.

Develop your skills

You’ll learn how to research and analyse, manage projects, write reports and give effective presentations. You will also have the opportunity to take language modules in Chinese, Japanese or Korean if you wish. Your in-depth knowledge of East Asian countries and your understanding of the region will give you an edge in the careers market.

Specialist resources

Our postgrads have their own study space and IT facilities at the Sir Sze-yuen Chung Resource Centre. The University’s libraries have an extensive selection of texts and online resources in Chinese, Japanese and Korean.

Options

You can study a shorter course for a Postgraduate Certificate (four months, 60 credits) or Postgraduate Diploma (nine months, 120 credits). You’ll need 180 credits to get a Masters degree, including 60 credits from your extended project.

Modules

Choose from a range of modules which may include: Political Economy of China; Contemporary Chinese Society and Media; Chinese Cities in Transition; Contemporary Chinese Business and Management; International Business in East Asia; Work and Organisation in East Asia; China and Korea in the Modern World; Chinese language modules (of the appropriate level) Project (core).

Teaching and assessment

There are lectures and small-group seminars. You’re assessed on your essays, exams, presentations and an extended project.

Read less
On this course we focus on business practices and systems in East Asia, namely China, Japan and Korea. You’ll develop a thorough understanding of the Asian business environment and how it is shaped by domestic and social change, globalisation and political developments. Read more

About the course

On this course we focus on business practices and systems in East Asia, namely China, Japan and Korea.

You’ll develop a thorough understanding of the Asian business environment and how it is shaped by domestic and social change, globalisation and political developments. Through optional modules you will have the opportunity to focus your studies on one particular East Asian country if you wish or keep your knowledge broad depending on your interests and career goals.

Your career

Our graduates hold influential positions in business, government, the arts and academia. Some of them are journalists, television producers, interpreters and translators. Others are city brokers and analysts. They work for organisations such as the BBC World Service, BNP Paribas, British Council, British Museum, Deloitte, HarperCollins, Jaguar Land Rover, Lloyds Banking Group, Nintendo, Siemens, Sony, Toyota and the World Food Programme.

Our expertise

We are one of Europe’s leading centres for the study of China, Japan and Korea. We have links with partner universities in East Asia that support our dynamic research culture. Our academics bring theories, methods and findings from their research to their teaching.

All four of our interdisciplinary research clusters inform what we teach. They are: East Asian Business Environment; East Asian Text and Culture; Human Movement and Development in East Asia; Power, Cooperation and Competition in East Asia.

The Sheffield Confucius Institute, which was named Global Confucius Institute of the year in 2015, explores Chinese language and culture. The Institute offers many opportunities for students to get involved in its activities which will help enhance their learning and deepen their cultural understanding of China.

Develop your skills

You’ll learn how to research and analyse, manage projects, write reports and give effective presentations. You will also have the opportunity to take language modules in Chinese, Japanese or Korean if you wish. Your in-depth knowledge of East Asian countries and your understanding of the region will give you an edge in the careers market.

Specialist resources

Our postgrads have their own study space and IT facilities at the Sir Sze-yuen Chung Resource Centre. The University’s libraries have an extensive selection of texts and online resources in Chinese, Japanese and Korean.

Options

You can study a shorter course for a Postgraduate Certificate (four months, 60 credits) or Postgraduate Diploma (nine months, 120 credits). You’ll need 180 credits to get a Masters degree, including 60 credits from your extended project.

Core modules

Work and Organisation in East Asia; Investing in East Asia; Project; International Business and East Asia.

Examples of optional modules

Choose from a range of optional modules which may include Business and Management in Contemporary Korea; Contemporary Chinese Business and Management; Business and the Economy of Japan; International Human Resource Studies; International Management; Negotiation and Intercultural Communication.

Teaching and assessment

There are lectures and small-group seminars. You’ll be assessed on your essays, exams, presentations and an extended project.

Read less
The MA provides advanced training in the field of Language Pedagogy with a specialization in Chinese, Japanese, Korean or Tibetan. Read more
The MA provides advanced training in the field of Language Pedagogy with a specialization in Chinese, Japanese, Korean or Tibetan. The programme provides an appreciation of the concepts, modes of analysis and theoretical approaches in the area of Language Pedagogy, including second language learning theories and teaching methodologies. Students will also be familiarised with the general areas of linguistic inquiry (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics and discourse structure) and how they are relevant to the study of second language acquisition.

Read less
Staff supervise research in the following areas. Read more
Staff supervise research in the following areas: African literature in English and in translation, Caribbean literature, African-American and Native American literatures, Australian literature, New Zealand and South Pacific literature since 1800, Indian and South-East Asian literature in English and in translation, middle-eastern literature and mediterranean literature, postcolonial women writers, theory, and travel writing.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/236/postcolonial-studies

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Course structure

As a research student, you meet regularly with your supervisor, and have the opportunity to take part in informal reading groups and research seminars to which students, staff and visiting speakers contribute papers. You also benefit from a series of research skills seminars that run in the spring term, which gives you a chance to share the research expertise of staff and postdoctoral members of the department.

As a basis for advanced research, you must take the School and Faculty research methods programmes.

Study support

- Postgraduate resources

The Templeman Library is well stocked with excellent research resources, as are Canterbury Cathedral Archives and Library. There are a number of special collections: the John Crow Collection of Elizabethan and other early printed texts; the Reading/Raynor Collection of theatre history (over 7,000 texts or manuscripts); ECCO (Eighteenth-Century Collections Online); the Melville manuscripts relating to popular culture in the 19th and early 20th centuries; the Pettingell Collection (over 7,500 items) of 19th-century drama; the Eliot Collection; children’s literature; and popular literature. A gift from Mrs Valerie Eliot has increased the Library’s already extensive holdings in modern poetry. The British Library in London is also within easy reach.

Besides the Templeman Library, School resources include photocopying, fax and telephone access, support for attending and organising conferences, and a dedicated postgraduate study space equipped with computer terminals and a printer.

- Conferences and seminars

Our research centres organise many international conferences, symposia and workshops. The School also plays a pivotal role in the Kent Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, of which all graduates are associate members. The Institute hosts interdisciplinary conferences, colloquia, and other events, and establishes international links for all Kent graduates through its network with other advanced institutes worldwide.

School of English postgraduate students are encouraged to organise and participate in a conference which takes place in the summer term. This provides students with the invaluable experience of presenting their work to their peers.

The School runs several series of seminars, lectures and readings throughout the academic year. Our weekly research seminars are organised collaboratively by staff and graduates in the School. Speakers range from our own postgraduate students, to members of staff, to distinguished lecturers who are at the forefront of contemporary research nationally and internationally.

The Centre for Creative Writing hosts a very popular and successful weekly reading series; guests have included poets Katherine Pierpoint, Tony Lopez, Christopher Reid and George Szirtes, and novelists Abdulrazak Gurnah, Ali Smith, Marina Warner and Will Self.

The University of Kent is now in partnership with the Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA). Benefits from this affiliation include free membership for incoming students; embedded seminar opportunities at the ICA and a small number of internships for our students. The School of English also runs an interdisciplinary MA programme in the Contemporary which offers students an internship at the Institute of Contemporary Arts.

- Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. They also edit several periodicals including: Angelaki: Journal of the Theoretical Humanities; The Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature: 600-1500; The Dickensian; Literature Compass; Oxford Literary Review; Theatre Notebook and Wasafiri.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Read less
This Masters is designed for students wishing to pursue a PhD in social anthropology. The programme might also be taken as a stand-alone MA for those wanting training in anthropological research methods for professional development or practical application. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

This Masters is designed for students wishing to pursue a PhD in social anthropology. The programme might also be taken as a stand-alone MA for those wanting training in anthropological research methods for professional development or practical application.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Students who would like to take this path must demonstrate a solid grounding in the discipline as well as the regional and language expertise necessary for continuing onto a PhD.

Exceptionally this course may be taken as a conversion MA. Students wishing to take this path must demonstrate a solid grounding in the discipline as well as the regional and language expertise necessary for continuing onto a PhD.

The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MA Res) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training programme]. In the latter case, the MA Res therefore serves as a shortcut into the PhD. It is designed to train students in research skills, including language training, to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines.

Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree.

The Japanese pathway is available for students who have an intermediate level of Japanese. Students will be required to take a placement exam in the week before classes begin in order to determine if their level is suitable. Please contact Professor Drew Gerstle () for further information.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropological-research-methods-and-intensive-language/

Structure

The student must successfully complete the following core course:

Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011)
This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15 PPO H035, a 0.5 unit course, offered by the Department of Politics and International Studies).

MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal.

The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration.

A typical program of study would involve enrolling and passing three full units (this includes the two half units on research methods) and submitting a dissertation.

In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and Research Methods in Anthropology (1 unit) in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad. Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two optional anthropology units. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA.

Students can choose to study any African or Asian language that is normally available to students taking one of the taught masters programs.

The two-year Intensive Language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course will enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

MA Anthropological Research Methods and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 277kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropological-research-methods-and-intensive-language/file93546.pdf

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X