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Masters Degrees in Composition, United Kingdom

We have 56 Masters Degrees in Composition, United Kingdom

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Study areas currently offered. Composition; Electroacoustic Composition; Composing Film Music. The course (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of area of composition, including Electro-acoustic Composition, Sonic Art and Composing for Film. Read more
Study areas currently offered:

Composition; Electroacoustic Composition; Composing Film Music
The course (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of area of composition, including Electro-acoustic Composition, Sonic Art and Composing for Film.

All the training will be centred on the student’s main area, aided by a broader look at compositional techniques and approaches as a whole (through the core module in Composition).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4045, 60 credits) in a chosen area of composition. Another aspect of the same area or a different approach to composition will be explored in the Independent Special Study (WMP4049, 20 credits).

WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

Additionally students will attend a core module in composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

Focuses on studies in composition and/or electroacoustic composition and/or sonic art.

(Total of 120 credits)

Part 2 (MMus):

Consists of a portfolio comprising at least one substantial composition (with or without electroacoustics) or work of sonic art.

(Total of 60 credits)

Compulsory modules:

Principal Subject Module: either Composition, Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts or Composing for Film (60 credits)
Compulsory Core Module: Concepts of Composition (30 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Independent Special Study in either Composition, Composing for Film or Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts (20 credits)

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Join one of the UK’s leading university environments for the study of Music, combining world-leading research, exceptional teaching and a vibrant musical community in the heart of global London. Read more
Join one of the UK’s leading university environments for the study of Music, combining world-leading research, exceptional teaching and a vibrant musical community in the heart of global London.

Who is it for?

The programme provides ideal training for those wishing to enter the professional world of composition and/or proceed to a research degree.

We welcome students from all over the world and from a range of backgrounds.

Objectives

The MA Composition develops skills in the broad field of contemporary composition, encompassing notated and digital music, sound art, improvisation and interdisciplinary practices.

The course provides a critical context for exploring key topics and issues in contemporary composition as well as a platform for presenting your own work to an audience of peers.

Engagement with professional creative practice is at the core of the MA Composition. Students have the opportunity to receive tuition from world-renowned composers external to the department. There are also opportunities to work with City’s professional ensembles-in-residence, Plus Minus and EXAUDI.

We have an outstanding reputation for dynamic, inspring and rigorous postgraduate eduation and offer exceptional support to our students Our students come from all over the world and benefit from our location in the heart of London, one of the world’s greatest cultural hubs.

Academic facilities

Department facilities include advanced recording and composition studios, a professional performance space, computer laboratories, rehearsal rooms, practice rooms and world music instruments.

Our composition studios include three surround (8.1/ 5.1) studios, one of which is dedicated to film and live electronics work, and three stereo composition studios. All of the studios are equipped for sound editing, processing and mixing. As well as general software such as Logic, Sibelius and Pro Tools, these studios are equipped with Native Instruments Komplete.

The recording studio is equipped to deliver multitrack recording and mixing to a professional standard.

Teaching and learning

Teaching delivery is through a combination of lectures, group seminars, interactive sessions, practical workshops, one-to-one tutorials and a high level of individual learning. Students also have the opportunity to receive tuition from world-renowned composers external to the department.

The Department of Music provides a stimulating environment with abundant opportunities for composers and sound artists and there are also plenty of opportunities for involvement in our many ensembles. The department’s concert series features contemporary classical music, world music, electronic music and multimedia work and an annual music festival in May and June provides opportunities for students to receive public performances of their work.

In addition to our many ensembles at City, MA students are also eligible to audition for the University of London Symphony Orchestra.

Assessment

We use a range of assessment methods, including projects, portfolio submissions and extended creative tasks and accompanying commentary.

Modules

On City's MA Composition, you will take three core modules (30 credits each) in which you will enhance your understanding of creative practice and engage critically with compositional techniques, theoretical concepts and current issues in contemporary composition.

Term one
-Compositional Materials and Technique (30 credits)
-Contexts of Composition (30 credits)

Term two
-Interdisciplinary and Collaborative Process (30 credits)

You will also take a 90-credit Composition Portfolio, which runs through terms two and three.

Career prospects

Our MA programmes have excellent employment statistics. Students have gone on to teach, compose and perform in a wide variety of settings, and are also employed in areas such as music publishing, broadcasting, music management, arts administration and further musical study at MPhil or PhD level.

Our alumni include award-winning composers such as film sound designer Chris Reading and Nico Casal, composer for the winner of the Best Short Film at the 2016 Oscars.

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The MA Music Composition degree programme offers you the opportunity to investigate the interrelationships between your own practice and questions arising about knowledge in and through art, composition, and dissemination in performance. Read more
The MA Music Composition degree programme offers you the opportunity to investigate the interrelationships between your own practice and questions arising about knowledge in and through art, composition, and dissemination in performance. Aimed at graduates and practitioners in music composition, this MA will allow you to build a strong and increasingly confident practice through awareness and interaction with current contexts of professional practice and research.

Course detail

The MA Music Composition shares delivery of core curriculum regarding practice-led research methodology with parallel MA degrees in Applied Theatre, Theatre & Performance and Fine Arts. Whilst your focus will be on Music Composition, there will also be opportunities for cross-disciplinary study and collaborative practice.

The programme will provide you with the opportunity to develop your compositional practice and thinking, and provide you with a platform from which to disseminate your work.

The curriculum, which also supports awards at Postgraduate Certificate and Postgraduate Diploma levels, is uniquely designed and focused on developing artists' abilities and capacities for professional and academic innovation. We emphasise relationships between composition, reflection, practice and dissemination. Teaching, learning and research on the programme will enable discovery of the variety of ways in which composition, creation and dissemination in music composition has evolved into its present media and forms.

This degree enables students who already have some experience of music composition to expand their artistic horizons, develop their reflective abilities and expand their portfolio as thinking practitioners.

Format

- Practice, Reflection, Dissemination -

This strand, consisting of two 40-credit modules, is designed to enhance your abilities as a self-reflective practitioner. It recognises the deep interrelationship between composition, reflection and dissemination, in terms of the development of an artist's work and its function and operation within critical and public domains. You will be introduced to the variety of ways in which composition, creation, dissemination has evolved into its present media and forms. These modules will be primarily focused around your own practice, contextualised by examination of various key practitioners, modes or theories.

- Creativity & Knowledge -

This strand, consisting of two 20 credit modules, is designed to deepen your understanding of key interdisciplinary questions, concepts and methodologies in the arts.

• Creativity and Knowledge 1 invites you to interrogate a range of key themes relating to the relationship between art and the wider cultural, social, economic circumstances of its production and reception.

• Creativity and Knowledge 2 consists of investigation into concepts of practice-based research in the arts and the examination of the epistemological and ideological implications of the widening of traditional concepts of research that such developments entail.

This strand of modules is taught cross-disciplinarily with students on the MA programmes within Creative Practice.

- Masters Independent Project -

Together these taught elements lead MA candidates into the final Independent Project module, where you will undertake an extended period of supervised practice-based research which is expected to draw together and implement the resources provided earlier in the programme.

For information on how to apply, please see the following link:
https://www.yorksj.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/how-to-apply

Other sources of funding

Information on alternative sources of funding can be found here:
https://www.yorksj.ac.uk/student-services/money/funding-my-course/postgraduate-/postgraduate-funding-/

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Why you should choose this course. -You're looking for a course offering an-depth study of cutting-edge compositional techniques, methodologies and associated aesthetics. Read more
Why you should choose this course:
-You're looking for a course offering an-depth study of cutting-edge compositional techniques, methodologies and associated aesthetics
-You want to learn in state-of-the-art facilities, including our £2.5 million electroacoustic studio complex
-You want to pursue a career as a composer working with technology and audio-media, or a PhD in electroacoustic composition

Course description

This course provides an in-depth knowledge of cutting-edge compositional techniques, methodologies and associated aesthetics in creative work that intersects with technology and other artistic or scientific forms. It serves as excellent preparation for a career as a composer working with technology and audio-media, and it provides all the training necessary for embarking on and envisioning novel strands for a PhD in electroacoustic composition, including those informed by other scientific and arts form.

All teaching, research and compositional work is carried out in the NOVARS Research Centre for Electroacoustic Composition, Performance and Sound Art with its state-of-the-art £2.5 million electroacoustic studios. Opportunities for the performance of new works are offered using the 55-loudspeaker sound diffusion system of MANTIS (Manchester Theatre in Sound) and through events such as the Locativeaudio Festival (locativeaudio.org) and Sines and Squares Festival for Analogue Electronics and Modular Synthesis (sines-squares.org). Acousmatic, mixed, live electronic and multimedia works are all possible, with composers able to incorporate the spatialisation of sound and interactive new game-audio media into the presentation of their work.

In addition to the final portfolio, all electroacoustic music and interactive media composition students take the compulsory course unit Composition Project and the further compulsory taught course unit, Fixed Media and Interactive Music . Optional course units normally include Aesthetics and Analysis of Organised Sound, Interactive Tools and Engines, Contemporary Music Studies, Advanced Orchestration, and Historical or Contemporary Performance. There are also choices outside the MusM Composition (subject to course director approval), such as Computer Vision, Mobile Systems, Mobile Communications, Ethno/Musicology in Action: Fieldwork and Ethnography , and Work Placement (Institute of Cultural Practices).

Aims

This programme aims to:
-Build on undergraduate studies, developing skills in electroacoustic composition to Master's level.
-Increase knowledge and a systematic understanding of electroacoustic music.
-Foster the particular creative talents of each individual student.
-Provide all the training necessary for embarking on a PhD in electroacoustic composition.
-Prepare students for a career as a composer and in the wider music industry where critical judgement and developed powers of communication are needed.

Special features

The NOVARS studio complex supports a broad range of activities in the fields of electroacoustic composition and new media. The studios incorporate the newest generation of Apple computers, Genelec, PMC and ATC monitoring (up to 37-channel studios) and state-of-the art licensed software (including Pro Tools HD, Max MSP, GRM Tools, Waves, Ircam's Audiosculpt and Reaper and, for Interactive Media work, Oculus Rift, Unreal Engine 4, Unity Pro and open-source Blender3D). Location and performance work is also supported by a new 64-channel diffusion system.

Postgraduate students at the NOVARS Research Centre play an active role in the planning, organisation and execution of performance events such as the Sines & Squares Festival and MANTIS Festival (over 20 editions since 2004), and projects such as LocativeAudio and our regular Matinée presentations. Relevant training, including rigging and de-rigging the MANTIS system, health and safety, sound diffusion workshops, organisation of Calls for Works when needed, etc., is an important part of the course.

Career opportunities

Graduates of this programme have pursued successful careers in musical and non-musical fields. Some continue to further study via a PhD before securing an academic position. Some go on to teach in schools or further education, both in the UK and overseas. Other areas of work for which advanced compositional training has been directly relevant include recording studios, entrepreneurships, the creative industries, music publishing, music journalism and performance. Careers outside of music have included computer programming, theatre, accountancy, law, social work and human resources.

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Develop your creativity and technical fluency with this specialised programme, which allows you to specialise in composition while maintaining an interest in different aspects of music. Read more

Develop your creativity and technical fluency with this specialised programme, which allows you to specialise in composition while maintaining an interest in different aspects of music.

Core modules will allow you to create your own portfolio of original compositions – which can include electro-acoustic work – underpinned by your study of the principles of composition and aesthetic theory. You’ll look at orchestration, arrangement and remix. Then you’ll choose from optional modules allowing you to explore different aspects of music – you could choose electronic and computer music, musicology, performance, editing and source studies, psychology of music or more to inform your own creative work.

Guided by expert researchers and experienced composers and performers, you’ll have access to a wide range of facilities to explore your own ideas. You could even have some of your work performed by our ensemble, LS2, or benefit from the many opportunities you’ll find in the city’s vibrant live music scene.

We have a variety of excellent facilities to support your learning, including rehearsal, performance and practice spaces, a lab for studying the psychology of music and studios for sound recording, software development and computer music composition. We also have good working relationships with a range of prestigious arts organisations: we host BBC Radio 3 concerts, Leeds Lieder and the Leeds International Pianoforte Competition, as well as enjoying a close partnership with Opera North and many others in a city with a thriving music and cultural scene.

Course content

You’ll work on your own compositions throughout the year, developing a portfolio of original work supported and informed by a range of learning opportunities, from tutorials and lectures through to workshops with guest artists.

Throughout the year you’ll take a combination of core modules that allow you to develop your skills as a musician and composer. You’ll develop your academic skills, including research and presentation skills, as well as studying the principles of composition and different professional contexts.

You’ll develop an awareness of broader topics in the study of music to help inform your practice. Central to this is the core module in Semester Two that introduces you to aesthetic theory.

In addition, you’ll choose from the range of optional modules on offer across the School of Music depending on your individual interests and experience: options include performance, editing and archival studies, musicology, computer music, psychology of music and more.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Professional Studies 30 credits
  • Composition Studies 30 credits
  • Portfolio of Original Composition 60 credits
  • Aesthetic Theory 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Individual Project 30 credits
  • Short Dissertation 30 credits
  • Instrumental or Vocal Recital 30 credits
  • Concerto/Song-Cycle/Extended Work 30 credits
  • Applied Performance Studies 30 credits
  • Editing and Archival Studies 30 credits
  • Issues in Critical Musicology 30 credits
  • Electronic & Computer Music Practice 30 credits
  • Electronic & Computer Music Contexts 30 credits
  • Case Studies in the Applied Psychology of Music 30 credits
  • Audience Engagement and Impact 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Critical and Experimental Composition MMus Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Critical and Experimental Composition MMus Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Most of our taught modules will use seminars and tutorials, as well as lectures and instrumental or vocal lessons, depending on the modules you choose. However, independent study is the backbone of this programme, allowing you to build your skills and express your own creativity.

Assessment

Obviously, you’ll submit original compositions as an important part of your assessment. You will also write commentaries on your own work — drawing on musical/theoretical contexts — and more theoretical modules are likely to make use of written tasks such as essays and reports. Optional modules may also involve assessment through recitals, transcriptions or critical editions, presentations or other forms of assessment.

Career opportunities

Composition tutors have connections with performers, ensembles, and festivals in all corners of the globe. These relationships can be useful for your professional development, giving you an insight into issues such as funding, publicity and other aspects of working life for professional freelance composers.

Many of our graduates choose to continue and refine their research by applying for PhD level study. Several of our existing PhD students also completed their Masters programmes here at Leeds.

We have other resources to support you as you develop your career plans too – the School of Music boasts a unique Alumni Mentoring Network, where you can be supported by past students as you plan your next steps.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Why Surrey?. Our MMus programme is distinctive in its range of musicological, compositional and performance-based elements. Read more

Why Surrey?

Our MMus programme is distinctive in its range of musicological, compositional and performance-based elements.

You will benefit from the diversity of our research strengths, numerous ensemble performance opportunities and expertise in a range of musical fields, including contemporary music for the concert hall, popular music, film music, opera, acoustic, electronic and computer-generated music.

The Composition pathway of the MMus Music programme is designed to develop your individual compositional style and technique through tutorial guidance and opportunities for performances, workshops and recordings.

Various stylistic and generic strands can be pursued individually or in combination, including jazz, music for screen and multimedia, contemporary music for the concert hall and computer sound design.

You will take two compulsory research training modules followed by a combination of composition-related options. Having completed the Postgraduate Diploma stage of the programme, you will progress to Masters stage and submit a composition folio.

The programme provides ideal preparation for future research work at PhD level.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Short-course opportunities

The School welcomes applications from students who wish to undertake one module of study from the Masters programme.

Selection process

Potential applicants may make an appointment for an informal interview with the Programme Director if practicable. All applicants will be asked either to submit a sample of written work, a DVD of their performance, or samples of their compositional work, or to sit an audition depending on their chosen specialism.

Research

Our work achieves wide international circulation, both through established scholarly channels and, distinctively, through broadcast media (such as BBC TV, Channel 4, BBC Radio 3 and Radio 4, and National Public Radio in the USA).

School staff are much in demand for pre-concert talks at venues such as London’s South Bank and Barbican centres. The research environment at Surrey is sustained by open discussion and debate, and through the regular airing of work-in-progress.

Our work is strengthened by the ready input of our peers and research students at various stages allowing collective engagement to foster innovation.

Educational aims of the programme

The MMus (Composition) programme aims to provide students with a high quality education in the creative, re-creative, technical, critical, vocational and academic areas of the subject. It aims to provide students with the necessary skills, techniques and methodologies to work at an advanced level with a critical awareness of the discipline.

The programme aims to reflect current developments within the theory and practice of music composition and, in so doing, to educate students so that they may work confidently and constructively within the musical culture of the present.

The programme aims to offer the necessary preparation for students wishing to undertake doctoral level study in practice-based areas.

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • Research methods and resources and how these may be used to interpret knowledge
  • Interdisciplinarity within music and arts research
  • The broad range of approaches to the present day theory and practice of music to the level necessary for their original application

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Frame research questions
  • Critically assess, respond to and operate in current areas of musical research and practice
  • Reflect critically on and contextualise personal practice

Professional practical skills

  • Produce stylistically original and technically professional compositions

Key / transferable skills

  • Communicate subject knowledge clearly
  • Self-direction and autonomy
  • Originality in problem solving
  • Work in and manage groups
  • Efficient time management

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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This programme provides professional training in composition for screen media. Taught by staff and guest composers from the professional world, you will develop a strong technological foundation in the subject, along with specialist understanding of television and screen scoring. Read more
This programme provides professional training in composition for screen media. Taught by staff and guest composers from the professional world, you will develop a strong technological foundation in the subject, along with specialist understanding of television and screen scoring.

The MA is taught within our high-specification composition and recording studios, which have full-time technical support. Students are actively encouraged to build opportunities and networks, within and beyond the University, for projects in film, animation, documentary and more.

In the first semester, you will study Professional Techniques, an introduction to working and recording in studios, and Media Composition, focusing on TV and documentary work. You will also take one elective unit. In the second semester, the programme moves on to Critical Analysis of Media Music and Film Scoring, with an emphasis on longer-term projects for film and TV work. This work feeds into original collaborations that you may choose to include in your final portfolio.

The vibrant musical life of the Department of Music provides opportunities for student and professional performance, and we are located at the heart of one of the UK’s leading cities for broadcast, commercial and creative screen media.

Programme structure

Core units
-Media Composition
-Professional Techniques
-Critical Analysis of Media Music
-Film Scoring

Optional units
Optional units can vary each year. You will be able to choose two units from a wide spectrum that address further compositional skills - such as orchestration, sound design or pastiche composition - research skills for musicians, writing and directing for film and television, and how film and television programmes work.

Media composition portfolio/dissertation
-Either a substantial portfolio of original music for new collaborative films and/or extracts (music totalling 15-25 minutes).
-Or music to one new collaborative film of 10-12 minutes and a critical dissertation of 10,000 words on an agreed film or topic.

Careers

Students who completed the MA programme in Composition of Music for Film and Television have taken up careers as music composers, recording managers and compositing supervisors within animation studios.

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The course is aimed equally at composers of electronic music in the traditional sense, and contemporary artists who may combine the role of composer with producer, engineer, musician and DJ. Read more
The course is aimed equally at composers of electronic music in the traditional sense, and contemporary artists who may combine the role of composer with producer, engineer, musician and DJ. London College of Music (LCM) at the University of West London is at the forefront of the academic study of music technology in general - and popular electronic music composition in particular.

Course detail

The course encompasses a broad range of electronic music, from popular electronic dance music styles to art forms such as electroacoustic music. It assumes you have a level of competence in composition or music sequencing and production. Composition studies include one-to-one tutorials in an area of electronic music that you will negotiate with your lecturer.

You will also examine the history and concepts of electronic music, the creation of sound installations and live performances, together with options that include the theory and practice of sequencing, sound synthesis, sampling, production techniques and the use of Max/MSP.

This course helps you build a wide range of skills, knowledge and creative strategies essential for a successful career in the contemporary, fast-changing music industry - or as a springboard to further postgraduate study at PhD level.

Modules

Depending on the route you choose, the core modules you study will be:

• Practical Composition one and two
• Orchestration and Arranging
• Conducting

Or

• Electronic Music Composition one and two
• Developing your Career
• Interactive Music Technology
• Research Methods
• Dissertation or Project

Optional modules include:

• Stylistic Composition (pre 1900)
• Stylistic Composition (post 1900)
• Multi-track Recording and Mixing for Surround
• Film and TV Score Production
• Advanced Non-linear Recording
• Combining Sounds
• Digital Audio Interface Design for Music
• The Development of Audio Technology
• Manipulating Sounds.

Format

The department's extensive research in this subject area means our teaching is informed directly by the world's most up-to-date ideas on the academic study of record production. Also, our teaching staff are renowned for their professional expertise.

Teaching involves a combination of lectures, practical workshops, seminars and tutorial discussions. Our teaching rooms are equipped with ProTools HD systems, Audient mixing consoles and C24 control surfaces, and lectures involve frequent practical demonstrations and examples.

The contact hours for the course are concentrated into two days for full-time and one day for part-time students. For the rest of week you will book your own studio and computer time to complete your assignments and develop your composing skills, network, create music with other LCM students and engage in self-directed study. The course runs for a complete year - normally September to September - in full-time mode and two years for part-time.

Career and study progression

This course will equip you with an enviable set of skills that will enable you to succeed in the fast-changing music industry.

Some examples of the professional roles graduates have progressed to after completing the course include:
• Composer
• Sound Designer
• Remixer.

After completing the course you can continue your studies with either a PhD or DMus at the University of West London.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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Studying Composition at Bath Spa University will develop your skills as a composer and deepen your understanding of current new music contexts, both artistically and professionally. Read more
Studying Composition at Bath Spa University will develop your skills as a composer and deepen your understanding of current new music contexts, both artistically and professionally.

Through weekly seminars and tutorials, supported by workshops with musicians, you’ll work on your creative and technical skills, commenting critically on your own and others’ work.

For information on interview guidance, please visit the course webpage: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-composition/

OVERVIEW

You’ll graduate as a skilled composer with a deep understanding of contemporary music context. You’ll develop creative and technical skills, throughout the course, alongside the ability to think critically about composition.

You’ll have opportunities to collaborate with other creative artists, such as choreographers, filmmakers, and theatre practitioners through joint projects and seminar discussion. These developments in your creative practice are supported by practical consideration of your professional and academic skills.

COURSE STRUCTURE

We aim to provide a foundation for your work as a composer. We’ll help you improve the way you promote your work and plan projects, as well as understand the academic disciplines to which it relates.

We’ll meet with you on a one-to-one basis through weekly tutorials to help develop your work. This support focuses on technical and aesthetic development, and we’ll work with you on specific questions arising from your current project and its wider context.

We’ll discuss broader issues with you and the other MMus composers through weekly seminar sessions. These can include case studies of particular composers or approaches, technical work in relation to specific compositional problems, or exploration of professional contexts.

For specific composition projects we organise rehearsals and workshops with visiting professional musicians and fellow students.


For information on modules, please view the course handbook via our website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-composition/

TEACHING METHODS

Each module has a weekly seminar which is either specific to the MA Composition or, for core skills, shared with the other courses. You’ll also have a weekly tutorial during teaching weeks. Throughout the year we bring in visitors to talk about their work, and a professional ensemble join us to play one of your compositions.

ASSESSMENT

The majority of the assessment is based on your creative work, including compositions for specified visiting musicians and projects where you decide what to write.You’ll also produce work that assesses your professional and academic skills, including making a website, preparing a funding application, and research into an area of practice that links to your work.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

You’ll develop a broad range of intellectual, practical and transferable skills. We’ll help you develop a portfolio career built around your creative practice, drawing in other related areas of work such as:
• Teaching
• Editing
• Performing
• Work in other areas of the creative industries

On graduation from the programme, we aim for you to develop core problem-solving, analytical and critical skills to support you in the changeable and unpredictable work environment.

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The Master of Music in Composition and Creative Practice is designed to enable students to develop their compositional practice in a dynamic, rigorous and supportive creative environment. Read more
The Master of Music in Composition and Creative Practice is designed to enable students to develop their compositional practice in a dynamic, rigorous and supportive creative environment. It aims to provide training in a range of approaches, introducing tools and techniques relevant to today’s music making, and encouraging exploration, innovation and experimentation.

Why this programme

◾Students undertake a major portfolio of creative practice with an accompanying critical commentary, preparing them for compositional and musical careers.
◾Students have the opportunity of a placement with a musical or arts organisation, when available, and up-to-date research skills provision in digital arts.
◾We offer the opportunity to have your work performed by a professional ensemble, including an annual showcase of postgraduate work SoundThought.
◾Our facilities include a Concert Hall, three studios, an audio lab, and practice rooms.
◾Provision of specialist tuition in creative industries and cultural policy at the Centre for Cultural Policy Research.
◾We have a range of modern and historical keyboard instruments including two Steinway Model D grand pianos, an 1840s Broadwood grand piano, a Classical forte-piano, and two harpsichords.
◾Other instruments owned by the School include a selection of percussion instruments, a consort of viols, Baroque strings, recorders, crumhorns and other wind instruments.
◾The Concert Hall is equipped with a diffusion system for the performance of electroacoustic music.
◾As a UNESCO City of Music, Glasgow has thriving music, performance and contemporary arts scenes. It is home to numerous orchestras and ensembles including the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra and Royal Scottish National Orchestra, making it an outstanding place for compostional study.

Programme structure

The programme is comprised of three core courses (Composition, Digital and Creative Skills, Individual Creative Practice, and Composition Portfolio) as well as a series of optional courses to allow you to tailor our own bespoke structure. Options will include:
◾Creating with technology
◾Historically Informed Performance Practice
◾Introduction to Popular Music
◾Sonic Arts Aesthetics and Criticism
◾Music, Sound and Screen

There will also be opportunities to engage with interdisciplinary study, with courses available from other subjects within the School:
◾Creative Industries and Cultural Policy (Centre for Cultural Policy Research)
◾Festivals (Film and Television Studies)
◾Making Time: performing and thinking temporalities in the creative arts (History of Art)

Core teaching will be delivered during semesters 1 and 2. Over the summer months you will complete the core Composition Portfolio, to be submitted at the end of August.

A variety of teaching methods will be used, including seminars, one-to-one tutorials, and project work.

Career prospects

This programme prepares students for careers in composition as well as equipping students more generally with skills necessary for careers in cultural industries (eg. arts administration and management). Additionally, this programme provides the necessary foundation for pursuing further research in composition in the form of a PhD.

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The MMus in Composition fosters your ability to compose and notate music, and to develop your own personal musical language- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mmus-composition/. Read more
The MMus in Composition fosters your ability to compose and notate music, and to develop your own personal musical language- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mmus-composition/

You explore a wide range of technical procedures for contemporary composition and engage intellectually and critically with related theories and concepts.

There are many practical opportunities to work with performers, including the Department of Music's ensemble-in-residence, and other artistic collaborators.

The composition pathway appeals to composers interested in a wide range of contemporary music including Boulez, Stockhausen, Birtwistle, Carter, Xenakis, spectral music and improvised music.

There's a focus on fundamental issues concerning pitch, time and pulse, and covers topics such as orchestration, advanced instrumental techniques, large-scale structure.

Composers taking this pathway may elect to take options in studio-based composition, providing they have the requisite prior experience.

There are also opportunities to work with visiting professional musicians and meet visiting composers, which have included Harrison Birtwistle, Michael Finnissy, Brian Ferneyhough and Jonathan Harvey.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Roger Redgate.

Modules & Structure

Core modules:
Compositional Techniques- 30 credits
Material, Form and Structure- 30 credits

Choose two modules from a selection that currently includes:

Composition and Moving Image Media- 30 credits
Interactive and Generative Music- 30 credits
Contemporary Music: Practices and Debates- 30 credits
Post-Tonal Theory and Analysis- 30 credits
Sound Agendas- 30 credits
Studio Practice- 120 credits

Creative project:
Creative Project- 60 credits

Skills

You'll develop strategies and methodologies for creative practice, critical reflection and evaluation and skills in the contextualisation of creative work.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Programme description. In this dynamic programme you’ll build on your existing musical skills and develop a greater understanding of the theories and techniques of digital composition and performance. Read more

Programme description

In this dynamic programme you’ll build on your existing musical skills and develop a greater understanding of the theories and techniques of digital composition and performance.

A focus of the programme is bridging the gap between the musical vision and its performance. With this in mind, you will be encouraged to perform your own music in live situations and take your place at the forefront of your music’s realisation.

An emphasis is also placed on the field of digital composition within a wider context, which you will address through seminar work. You’ll learn how to plan a technological project and translate your musical ideas into interactive computer music programmes and/or scores.

Programme structure

Your study will take the form of weekly lectures or seminars, as well as at least 10 hours a week on project work.

You will complete six courses.

In semester 1:

  • Real-Time Performance Strategies and Design
  • Composers’ Seminar A
  • a choice of Sound Design Media, Compositional Practice A, Principles of Composition for Screen or another course as agreed with the Programme Director

In semester 2:

  • Non Real-Time Systems
  • Composers’ Seminar B
  • a choice of Digital Media Studio Project, Compositional Practice B or another course as agreed with the Programme Director

In addition, over the spring and summer, you will prepare a final digital composition and performance project.

Learning outcomes

Students will gain in-depth knowledge of:

  • how to make music with computers
  • the combination of hardware and software systems in music performance
  • music programming both in real-time (e.g. Max/MSP) and non-real-time e.g. slippery chicken
  • audio production and post-production
  • how to plan, execute, realise, and document a musical-technological project
  • how to translate musical ideas into fully-functioning interactive music software
  • their own creative practice in the context of past and present cultural developments

Career opportunities

As this programme involves a wide range of disciplines both technical and artistic, you will gain a number of transferable skills ranging from the core matters of composition, audio production and music programming to more indirect but highly employable skills such as research, documentation, critical thinking, oral presentation, teamwork and software development.

Our graduates have gone on to be employed as composers, performers, researchers, Cirque du Soleil sound technicians, university lecturers, software engineers, BBC sound recordists, web designers, multimedia/ video streaming engineers, and DJs.

See our alumni webpage for details of the careers of recent graduates:



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https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/. The MA in Music at the University of Kent gives you the opportunity to develop an area of specialism alongside rigorous training in key professional and academic skills. Read more

This course will be held at the Medway Campus

https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/

The MA in Music at the University of Kent gives you the opportunity to develop an area of specialism alongside rigorous training in key professional and academic skills. In studying for the MA you will choose one of three pathways:

- Research (Musicology or Ethnomusicology)
- Composition
- Performance,

which allow you to undertake two large-scale projects (Specialist Project and Dissertation). Regular one-to-one tutorials and work in small seminar groups enable you to gain confidence and expertise in both theoretical and practical work. Option modules support the development of your specialism. Studies in areas such as composition techniques, musicology and ensemble performance provide an important grounding in relevant fields of inquiry and creative practice.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/354/music-research-composition-or-performance#!structure

Course detail

Our students explore both the creative and technical aspects of music and its related technologies and also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with practitioners from other arts subjects. You take common modules in research methods and postgraduate study skills, while giving you the opportunity to foster your subject skills in specialist modules. Work is developed through individual enquiry as well as sharing and critiquing ideas through group seminars, designed to provide a forum for debate as well as practical instruction.

Our specialist facilities include a large recording studio, a Foley recording space, surround-sound studio and post-production rooms. All have been designed to the highest standard in order to provide an excellent environment for postgraduate work. We have an array of loudspeakers for electroacoustic performance, live sound and collaborative arts projects. Students are encouraged to participate in these music concerts and interdisciplinary events, becoming part of the exciting artistic environment here at the University of Kent.

Purpose

The programme aims to:

- enable students to develop an advanced understanding of music theory and practice taking into account developments in scholarship over the past few decades. In achieving this aim, students will focus upon theoretical and/or practice-based research methods and, in all cases, will engage a range of current research practices that address music critically.

- provide opportunities for students to develop their work through individual enquiry and through sharing and critiquing ideas

Format and assessment

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

- Specialist Project (60 credits)
- Advanced Audio Skills (30 credits)
- Critical and Historical Perspectives on Music (30 credits)
- Composition Techniques (30 credits)
- Collaborative Project (30 credits)
- Popular and World Music (30 credits)
- Interdisciplinary Project (30 credits)
- Technology in Performance (30 credits)
MU622 - Ensemble Performance (30 credits)
MU898 - Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment is by a range of coursework, including individual projects, skills-based tasks, seminar presentations and written work.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in the area of music and audio arts is a valuable and flexible qualification, which can lead to career opportunities within the creative industries, music recording and production, audio software development, sound for film, composition and academic careers.

These possibilities are augmented by work in video games, the Internet, live sound for theatres and festivals, audio installations for museums, sonic arts and computer music. Postgraduates interested in a research career are supported by the University’s Graduate School Research Development Programme. The University’s Employability Weeks can also provide valuable support in terms of planning future careers.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Read more
Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Like all our courses, the DMus reflects the mission and values of University of West London. It enhances progression and quality in education, and encourages widening participation.

Its emphasis on creative research, and its 'submission pathway' attracts recently qualified postgraduates and professional musicians who want doctoral recognition of their skills and experience - and this is sympathetic with the School's academic plan to attract mature and part-time students, together with the University's vision to reach out to students of all ages through flexible education.

The DMus extends the rich and eclectic musical experience our students enjoy at undergraduate and Masters level, to doctoral level, and enhances the London College of Music's growing postgraduate community. The DMus also maximises our research strengths in composition, performance and music technology.

Course detail

The DMus is a practice-led doctorate, and an alternative to the traditional PhD for experienced practitioners who wish to show an outstanding and innovative contribution a specific area of expertise.

MPhil

After a year of full-time study or two years of part-time study, You will have completed:

• a portfolio of notated music composition, 30 to 40 minutes in performance duration - you may submit a recording of the portfolio piece, but this is not compulsory

• a critical commentary of at least 5,000 words.

The MPhil portfolio may comprise several pieces to show a range of contrasting abilities, or just one structurally ambitious work. It may be part of an even larger work, which you can use for the DMus portfolio. Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice.

DMus

After approximately three years of full-time study or six years' part-time study, you will have completed:

• a portfolio of notated music composition, 75 to 90 minutes in performance duration - of which the MPhil portfolio forms the first 30 to 40 minutes. You may submit a recording of the portfolio piece, but this is not compulsory

• a critical commentary of at least 20,000 words, of which the first 5,000 words will be your MPhil critical commentary.

The DMus portfolio may comprise several pieces to show a range of contrasting abilities, but must include one structurally ambitious work lasting 20 to 30 minutes. Alternatively, you may submit just one extended structurally ambitious piece, which your MPhil portfolio may be part of. Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice.

Proposal

Your proposal must not exceed 4,500 words. Unless you are studying for your DMus by Direct Entry or Submission, you will complete this proposal as part of the assessment regime for the Level 7 Research Methods module.

The proposal for the MPhil/DMus in Composition is different from a proposal for a PhD. The core of the proposal will be a list of works you intend for portfolio submission. It should also include the anticipated duration of and instrumentation for each piece. Proposals for DMus by Submission should also append the compositions, and you may choose to discuss the artistic ambition of each work. You must indicate, through backdated registration, the pieces intended for inclusion.

Although most of the pieces will be based on original ideas, you can also submit works developed from pre-existing material - for example, a folk-song arrangement or a fantasia on a theme.

Your proposal may discuss current musical or extra-musical influences on your work, and should explain how your portfolio constitutes an original and substantial contribution to the area of practice. For this, you should include:
• a 'literature review' of contemporary practice in the same field
• an analysis and explanation of existing techniques in the field
• an explanation of how the creative work represents an extension of, or reaction to, contemporary practice.

Your proposal should also include a timescale for each part of the project, and append an outline bibliography. You may also identify areas of technical development, analysing how your portfolio pieces might enable this transition.

You may also include a CV with your proposal.

Assessment

This will involve an oral examination, conducted in much the same way as a traditional PhD. A viva voce will also be necessary when you 'exit' with the MPhil qualification.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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This programme offers a variety of practice-based opportunities, which may be combined with a range of academic modules as appropriate- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/music/. Read more
This programme offers a variety of practice-based opportunities, which may be combined with a range of academic modules as appropriate- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/music/

Awards available are:

–MMus (Composition)
–MMus (Creative Practice)
–MMus (Performance)
–MMus (Popular Music)
–MMus (Sonic Arts)

Programme aims:

The MMus programme accords with Goldsmiths’ declared aims to work beyond the boundaries of preconceptions, provide freedom to experiment, encourage individuality and nurture talent. It is designed with careful consideration of the opportunities, challenges and intellectual demands presented by careers in music and the creative industries in general, such as professional performance, composition, film/TV composition, sound design, teaching, broadcasting and arts administration. The MMus is closely linked with the department’s research strategy, and the wide-ranging research and practice-based activities of academic staff.

The programme addresses the evolving challenges presented in creating music, sound art and technology, and/or concert performances. You develop systematic, critical and technical approaches to practice and research, exploring, as appropriate, contemporary or historical understandings of creative practice and musical performance. You investigate and appraise the contextual and technical basis of artistic and musical aims, helping you formulate an independent and original approach to your own work as a composer and/or performer. The programme explores the complex interrelationships between music and other disciplines, between theory and creative expression, and between composition, musical realisation and reception. It references a diverse range of music, focussing as appropriate upon contemporary and historical Western art music, popular music, the music of other cultures, and computer music.

Programme Structure and Requirements:
Each Master’s degree is awarded after the accumulation of 180 CAT (Credit and Transfer) points. You must take four modules (30 CATs each) and the portfolio or recital option (60 CATs) designated for your pathway. Each pathway comprises: 1. Core modules. 2. Options. 3. Portfolio or Recital. The specialism of your portfolio/recital should be closely allied to the specific programme outcomes of your pathway and its core modules, and agreed with the relevant pathway coordinator. The options provide you with a choice of modules most relevant to your chosen pathway. You will receive advice from the department at interview and/or enrolment about your choices. Please note that choices may be affected by the department timetable.

Further information:
Detailed information about the structure and content of each pathway can be found on the Goldsmiths website.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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