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Masters Degrees in Ancient Languages, United Kingdom

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The SOAS MA in Ancient Near Eastern Languages offers an intensive programme of text-reading and language-learning for those who already have a good knowledge of the Akkadian language - usually at least two years' experience. Read more
The SOAS MA in Ancient Near Eastern Languages offers an intensive programme of text-reading and language-learning for those who already have a good knowledge of the Akkadian language - usually at least two years' experience. The degree is intended to widen the student's experience in the vast legacy of written documentation in Akkadian and other languages from ancient Mesopotamia and Anatolia. The programme is tailor-made to serve as an intermediate level between SOAS's three-year BA in Ancient Near Eastern Studies (or an equivalent qualification) and postgraduate Assyriological research at the level of MPhil and PhD. It can, of course, be taken for its own sake.
Email:

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maanel/

Structure

The degree comprises three taught courses chosen from the MA list and a dissertation on an agreed subject. The courses that are avaliable at SOAS in Akkadian, Sumerian and Hittite are in the list below.

Instead of one of these SOAS courses candidates may, if qualified, take one of the following topics from MA programmes run by University College London:

- Hebrew and other North-West Semitic languages (MA in Hebrew and Jewish Studies)
- Ancient history, currently Change and Continuity in the Ancient Near East (MA in Ancient History, 91AHG003)
- Archaeology (MA in Archaeology of the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East)

Not all the courses listed are available every year. Entry to courses run by University College is subject to the approval of the academic department in question (the Department of Hebrew and Jewish Studies, the Department of History, and the Institute of Archaeology).

Courses avaliable at SOAS
- Mesopotamian Languages and Literature A: the third millennium - 15PNMC021 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
- Mesopotamian Languages and Literature B: the second millenium BC - 15PNMC022 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
- Mesopotamian Languages and Literature C: the first millenium bc - 15PNMC023 (1 Unit) - Full Year
- Sumerian Language - 15PNMC024 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
- Christians and Muslims in Syriac Texts - 15PSRC175 (1 Unit) - Full Year
- Hittite Language - 15PNMC025 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017

MA Ancient Near Eastern Languages- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 24kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maanel/file80794.pdf

Teaching & Learning

- Course Information
Courses are listed under the menu item Programme Structure on the left-hand side of this page. Each course is taught two or three hours weekly in small classes of usually one to five students. Courses in language and literature comprise the reading, translation and discussion of set texts. Thorough preparation is essential.

- Dissertation
The dissertation will be on a topic agreed with the student's teachers and will extend to about 10,000 words. It may take the form of an extended essay on an approved topic or an edition with introduction and commentary of a previously unedited text or group of texts. The deadline for submission is 15 September in the year of examination.

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This programme provides an introduction to the Akkadian and Sumerian languages and to the cuneiform script within the context of the history and culture of the Ancient Near East. Read more
This programme provides an introduction to the Akkadian and Sumerian languages and to the cuneiform script within the context of the history and culture of the Ancient Near East.

It comprises a major individual research project, supervised by a specialist in the field of study, and taught modules.

Classics, Ancient History and Archaeology at the University of Birmingham has been ranked among the top five departments of Classics in the Research Excellence Framework 2014.

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Combining the best of traditional classics with innovative research, this new MRes allows you to engage critically with the texts and lived experience of Greek and Roman antiquity, as well as the ways in which later societies have received and used the classical past. Read more

Combining the best of traditional classics with innovative research, this new MRes allows you to engage critically with the texts and lived experience of Greek and Roman antiquity, as well as the ways in which later societies have received and used the classical past.

You’ll gain a foundation in Graeco-Roman culture to consolidate your skills and explore a variety of topics across the field of classics. From there, you’ll choose the periods, authors and disciplines you want to research until you focus on a single topic to produce a substantial piece of independent research in your dissertation.

Intensive research training will allow you to develop your skills under the supervision of leading researchers in the field, and you’ll have the chance to learn or develop your knowledge of Latin and/or ancient Greek. You’ll gain a range of skills and valuable experience for a career in academic or professional research.

You’ll study in a supportive and stimulating environment driven by research at the forefront of classical studies. You’ll have the chance to develop your knowledge and skills in a truly interdisciplinary subject.

We also have excellent facilities to support your studies, including our world-class Brotherton Library. Its Special Collections house a range of facsimiles of Latin and Greek manuscripts, texts of ancient classical literature from the seventeenth century onwards and the Brotherton Ovid Digital Resource.

Course content

The MRes begins with two core modules, Principles and Practices of Research in Classics and Using the Past, both taught in weekly lectures and seminars. The study of research principles and practices spans from the transmission of texts in early history to current questions of the shape and purpose of classical study in the 21st century and includes a practical introduction to digital research tools and resources in classics. Using the Past will give you a foundation in Graeco-Roman culture, the ways in which classical writers used their own past and how the classics have been received over time to the present day.

From there you’ll shape your own studies, selecting the classical eras, authors, and disciplines you want to focus on, and conduct supervised research in these areas to prepare for your dissertation.

Study of the classical languages is strongly encouraged: you’ll have the chance to learn Latin and/or Greek from beginners level, or at a more advanced level if you already have knowledge of either language. Supervised research modules allow for either linguistic or non-linguistic study of ancient literature, history and culture.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation 90 credits
  • Principles and Practices of Research in Classics 30 credits
  • Using The Past 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Beginners Ancient Greek 30 credits
  • Intermediate Latin 30 credits
  • Intermediate Ancient Greek 30 credits
  • Beginners Latin 30 credits
  • Classical Commentary 30 credits
  • Researching the Ancient World: Literature, History and Culture 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Classics MRes Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Classics MRes Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll be taught using a variety of teaching methods including lectures, seminars, tutorials and supervisions. Independent research is vital to this programme to develop your skills and help you develop your own ideas and interests.

Assessment

In addition to your dissertation, which will account for half of the assessed work for the programme, a variety of other methods, such as commentaries, essays, examinations and oral presentations will be used to assess the full range of programme learning outcomes.

Career opportunities

The heavy emphasis on research skills means this course is excellent preparation for PhD study and an academic career. However, you’ll also develop important transferable skills including oral and written communication, analysis and problem-solving which are valuable across a wide range of roles in different sectors, including education and the creative and heritage industries.

Careers support

We run a full programme of events in the School to enhance the employability of our graduates.

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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This Biblical Studies MA provides a focus either in biblical literature, with an opportunity to learn Greek and/or Hebrew, or in Christian theological interpretation. Read more
This Biblical Studies MA provides a focus either in biblical literature, with an opportunity to learn Greek and/or Hebrew, or in Christian theological interpretation. You will be introduced to a wide range of interpretive approaches in the core module, and then choose from a range of optional modules taught by leaders in the field. In addition, a dissertation allows you to engage in depth in a subject of your choosing.

Key benefits

• Diverse approaches to studying the Bible: in its ancient context, as literature, and as generative source of centuries of theological reflection.
• Optional training in biblical languages. Student with prior knowledge of Hebrew and or Greek can extend their understanding of the languages and the range of texts they work with. Introductory modules are available for those with no prior experience.
• A combined and integrative approach to Hebrew Bible/Old Testament and New Testament.
• Teaching in the theory and practice of biblical hermeneutics.
• Optional instruction in the methodology and content of Christian theology with particular attention to the importance of biblical literature in the development of Christian doctrine.
• A strong background for those wishing to go on to research or an excellent independent higher qualification.
• Regular seminars (in both Systematic Theology and Biblical Studies) with papers given by nationally and internationally renowned speakers.
• Unrivalled location gives access to the British Library and the British Museum, as well as the excellent Maughan Library at King's.
• A supportive educational environment within a department that specialises in the three 'Abrahamic' faiths.

View the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/biblical-studies-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The MA in Biblical Studies can be pursued via two pathways. The Language and Literature Pathway includes critical study of the Hebrew Bible and/or New Testament in the historical and literary contexts out of which they arose, engaging in questions at the forefront of the scholarly discipline. A biblical language is compulsory and can be studied at introductory or advanced level. The Theology Pathway includes engagement with the theological interpretation of the Bible, and the study of Christian doctrine as it has developed in constant interplay with biblical interpretation.

The two pathways share a compulsory module, Interpreting the Bible, which involves engagement with biblical texts through a wide range of ancient and modern commentaries and interpretations. Students will learn how analyse and evaluate the exegetical methods employed, to negotiate between conflicting interpretations, and to reflect on the hermeneutical issues that arise. In addition, students will undertake a range of individual module options and pursue in-depth study through a supervised research dissertation.

- Course purpose -

Postgraduate level study of the Bible, enabling students to specialise either in its language and literature or in its theological reception and interpretation.

- Course format and assessment -

Taught compulsory and optional modules assessed by coursework and/or examination plus a dissertation.

Career Prospects:

Further research, teaching; journalism; media; museum work; the church or other religious institutions.

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

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The Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma in Latin provide a self-contained period of structured but challenging study for anyone who wishes to pursue their interest in Latin language and literature. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma in Latin provide a self-contained period of structured but challenging study for anyone who wishes to pursue their interest in Latin language and literature.

Course Overview

These programmes offer students the opportunity to focus exclusively on the acquisition and/or development of Latin and can be started at beginners, intermediate or advanced level depending on their linguistic ability.

The PGDip is a postgraduate degree comprised of 120 credits (six taught modules) of postgraduate study. The PGCert is a postgraduate degree comprised of 60 credits (three taught modules) of postgraduate study.

Modules

Our language system covers two main levels: Intensive and Advanced.

There are two Intensive modules for Latin. Intensive I always runs in the first semester (September to January) and starts from complete beginners level, hence is the natural starting point for anyone who has no or very little knowledge of the language. Intensive II is the continuation of Intensive I and always runs in the second semester (February to May). Upon successful completion of both Intensive modules, a student is ready to go on to Advanced level and work directly with unadapted Latin texts. The Intensive modules are designed to provide you with high level knowledge of grammar and syntax, and a good vocabulary. Each Intensive module is worth 30 credits, and you need to commit at least 23 hours per week (throughout the semester, so over 15 weeks, including examinations) to your language learning.

Advanced-level modules are in three separate levels: Advanced, Further Advanced and Higher Advanced. As you progress through the advanced-level modules, you will read a greater quantity of ancient texts, and be asked to complete more challenging work in terms of the literary and linguistic investigation of the text. Every year there are two texts/authors chosen for Latin: one text is prose, the other is verse. The texts and authors change every year, and students have the opportunity to read both canonical and non-canonical authors. Over the last few years, we have read Petronius, Columella, Ovid, Claudian and Statius.

Key Features

The PG Diploma and Certificate in Latin are mainly of interest to those who want to learn Latin to advanced level and beyond. One can start on either of the two programmes from complete beginners’ level, intermediate or advanced, based on their existing qualifications and knowledge. For those who have been studying Latin privately, we offer a test to place them in the correct level of language learning. PhD candidates, or those planning to embark on a PhD, can use these degrees to increase their competency in Latin. For those interested in teaching Latin at any level, the degrees can provide an internationally recognised qualification. The degrees in Latin are available only as part-time options.

Specifically for language learners who study at a distance, the School provides the support of dedicated distance language tutors for all its language modules. The distance language tutors provide assistance and support to language learners, as well as interim feedback on assessment. The distance learning tutors work alongside the module lecturers in providing material for language study to distance learners. All language modules include an examination; examination arrangements are communicated to distance learners by the TSD Registry, and distance learners can ask for the support of the School in making arrangements for examinations.

Assessment

Our language degrees in Latin involve a wide range of assessment methods. In addition to traditional essays and exams, you will be assessed through commentaries and in-class tests. This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in clear, professional and a lucid manner, whether orally or in writing.

Career Opportunities

The programme provides a strong foundation for postgraduate work, by laying particular stress on the languages. The course also provides a professional qualification for teachers or others seeking Continuing Professional Development.

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The Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma in Ancient Greek provide a self-contained period of structured but challenging study for anyone who wishes to pursue their interest in Ancient Greek language and literature. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma in Ancient Greek provide a self-contained period of structured but challenging study for anyone who wishes to pursue their interest in Ancient Greek language and literature.

Course Overview

These programmes offer students the opportunity to focus exclusively on the acquisition and/or development of ancient Greek and can be started at beginners, intermediate or advanced level depending on their linguistic ability.

The PGDip is a postgraduate degree comprised of 120 credits (six taught modules) of postgraduate study. The PGCert is a postgraduate degree comprised of 60 credits (three taught modules) of postgraduate study.

Modules

Our language system covers two main levels: Intensive and Advanced.

There are two Intensive modules for ancient Greek. Intensive I always runs in the first semester (September to January) and starts from complete beginners level, hence is the natural starting point for anyone who has no or very little knowledge of the language. Intensive II is the continuation of Intensive I and always runs in the second semester (February to May). Upon successful completion of both Intensive modules, a student is ready to go on to Advanced level and work directly with unadapted ancient Greek texts. The Intensive modules are designed to provide you with high level knowledge of grammar and syntax, and a good vocabulary. Each Intensive module is worth 30 credits, and you need to commit at least 23 hours per week (throughout the semester, so over 15 weeks, including examinations) to your language learning.

Advanced-level modules are in three separate levels: Advanced, Further Advanced and Higher Advanced. As you progress through the advanced-level modules, you will read a greater quantity of ancient Greek texts, and be asked to complete more challenging work in terms of the literary and linguistic investigation of the text. Every year there are two texts/authors chosen for Greek: one text is prose, the other is verse. The texts and authors change every year, and students have the opportunity to read both canonical and non-canonical authors. Over the last few years, we have read the Homeric Hymns, Plato, Diodorus, Sophocles and Euripides.

Key Features

The PG Diploma and Certificate in Greek are mainly of interest to those who want to learn ancient Greek to advanced level and beyond. One can start on either of the two programmes from complete beginners’ level, intermediate or advanced, based on their existing qualifications and knowledge. For those who have been studying Greek privately, we offer a test to place them in the correct level of language learning. PhD candidates, or those planning to embark on a PhD, can use these degrees to increase their competency in Greek. For those interested in teaching Greek at any level, the degrees can provide an internationally recognised qualification. The degrees in Greek are available only as part-time options.

Specifically for language learners who study at a distance, the School provides the support of dedicated distance language tutors for all its language modules. The distance language tutors provide assistance and support to language learners, as well as interim feedback on assessment. The distance learning tutors work alongside the module lecturers in providing material for language study to distance learners. All language modules include an examination; examination arrangements are communicated to distance learners by the TSD Registry, and distance learners can ask for the support of the School in making arrangements for examinations.

Assessment

Our language degrees in Greek involve a wide range of assessment methods. In addition to traditional essays and exams, you will be assessed through commentaries and in-class tests. This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in clear, professional and a lucid manner, whether orally or in writing.

Career Opportunities

The programme provides a strong foundation for postgraduate work, by laying particular stress on the Greek language. The course also provides a professional qualification for teachers or others seeking Continuing Professional Development.

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Note. this MPhil can be developed into a PHD. You'll be required to write a thesis of up to 60,000 words (exclusive of appendices, footnotes, tables and bibliography). Read more
Note: this MPhil can be developed into a PHD.

You'll be required to write a thesis of up to 60,000 words (exclusive of appendices, footnotes, tables and bibliography). Work for this degree can be done in any of the areas where the Centre can offer expert supervision. Please consult the staff list to see current research interests.

Please note that all doctoral students are first registered as MPhil students. There is an upgrade procedure in the third term of the first year (for full-time students) or the first term of the second year (for part-time students), in order to register for a PhD degree.

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