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Masters Degrees in South East Asian Languages & Literature

We have 8 Masters Degrees in South East Asian Languages & Literature

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The MA programme in Translation Theory and Practice (Asian and African Languages) combines training of practical translation skills with teaching of translation theories. Read more
The MA programme in Translation Theory and Practice (Asian and African Languages) combines training of practical translation skills with teaching of translation theories. It is unique in terms of the range of Asian/African language specializations and in collaborative teaching with University College London (SLAIS) and Imperial College. The aim of the programme is to enhance students' methodological and practical skills in translation, preparing them for the professional market as (freelance) translators or other language professionals, while providing an intellectual perspective on the discipline of translation studies, which could be the foundation for further MPhil/PhD research. Students have access to a wealth of resources for the study and practice of translation available in the SOAS Library and nearby institutions such as the University of London Library, the UCL Library, the British Library, as well as the BBC World Service and many others.

Languages:
Drawing on the expertise of highly qualified teachers and researchers at SOAS, the programme offers a range of languages to work with, including

Arabic
Chinese,
Japanese
Korean
Persian
Swahili

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/mathepratrans/

Structure

The programme may be taken over 12 months full-time, 24 months two-year part time, or 36 months three-year part time. The MA consists of taught courses and a dissertation. The assessment of most of the taught courses includes a written examination paper or papers, taken in June. The dissertation, of 10,000 words, is due by 15 September of the year in which it is taken.

The marking guidelines for MA Theory and Practice of Translation Studies dissertations are different to those for other programmes. Please refer to this PDF document. Marking Criteria for MA Translation Dissertations (pdf; 66kb) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/mathepratrans/file71240.pdf)

Programme Specification

MA Theory and Practice of Translation (Asian and African Languages) - Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 30kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/mathepratrans/file80775.pdf

Learning Outcomes

Students who successfully complete the Programme will:

- have competence in the practice of translation
- be familiar with the major theories of translation
- have some understanding of translation research and methods

Employment

Our graduates find employment both in the United Kingdom and around the world. They will work with:

- Translation agencies
- Multinational companies
- International organizations
- Education institutions

They can also pursue further MPhil/PhD research in translation studies at SOAS or other academic institutions.

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The region known as "Pacific Asia" can be defined in various ways, but the "core" countries are China, Japan, Korea and the ASEAN nations (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Brunei, Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar and the Philippines). Read more
The region known as "Pacific Asia" can be defined in various ways, but the "core" countries are China, Japan, Korea and the ASEAN nations (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Brunei, Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar and the Philippines). Together, they make up one of the most diverse and important regions in the world.

SOAS has more expertise in this part of the world than any other institution in Western Europe; indeed there are very few places anywhere in the world that can boast the same range of expertise.

This degree is a way of bringing together the large number of modules on Pacific Asia currently on offer in SOAS Masters programmes for Chinese Studies, Japanese Studies, South East Asian Studies, and Korean Studies.

The modules chosen must cover three of the four regions of China and Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/sea/programmes/mapacasstud/

Structure

Students take modules to the value of three taught units, one of which is considered a major, and complete a 10,000-word dissertation related to the major.

As a Regional Studies programme students will be expected to select their modules from more than one discipline, The two minor units can be taken from the same discipline (but different to that of the major) or two different ones. The modules chosen must cover three of the four regions of China and Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia.

Programme Specification

MA Pacific Asian Studies- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 33kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/sea/programmes/mapacasstud/file80829.pdf

Teaching & Learning

- Lectures and Seminars

For most modules there is one 2-hour class each week. This may be an informal lecture followed by a discussion or student presentation. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

- Dissertation

The 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic linked with one of the taught modules.

- Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Employment

As a student specialising in Pacific Asia, you will gain competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature and culture (which can include literature, film, music, art and religion) of various parts of Pacific Asia.

Graduates leave SOAS not only with linguistic and cultural expertise, but also with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers in both business and the public sector. These include written and oral communication skills, attention to detail, analytical and problem-solving skills, and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The opportunity to move from the familiar Euro-American literary canons into the fresh but less well known worlds of African and Asian literature is what attracts most students to this popular MA. Read more
The opportunity to move from the familiar Euro-American literary canons into the fresh but less well known worlds of African and Asian literature is what attracts most students to this popular MA.

At SOAS, students benefit from the unique expertise in this vast field possessed by the school’s faculty.

This expertise is available to students interested in studying these literatures through English - including both original English language literatures of Africa and Asia and literature written in African and Asian languages presented through English translations.

While exploring new horizons and breaking out of the Euro-centric space in which comparative literature has developed so far, the course covers the major theoretical contributions made by Western scholars.

In doing so, it constructs a unique multi-cultural domain for the study of literature and its location in culture and society.

A prior knowledge of an African or Asian language is not a requirement for admission to this degree.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/degrees/macomplit/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time). Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

All students are required to take the core course in their first year. Two other courses, one major, one minor, plus a dissertation of 10,000 words must also be completed.

MA Comparative Literature Programme Specification 2012/13 (pdf; 35kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/degrees/macomplit/file39752.pdf

Teaching & Learning

The taught part of the programme consists of core lectures introducing basic concepts, theory and methodology; and additional seminars that extend the core material into other areas. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

A 10,000-word dissertation written over the summer offers students the opportunity to develop original research in an area of special interest.

- Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A postgraduate degree in Comparative Literature (Africa/Asia) provides students with competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the selected region will have been developed through a combination of the study of it's literature and exploration of contemporary literary theories. Some graduates leave SOAS to pursue careers directly related to their study area, while others have made use of the intellectual training for involvement in analysing and solving many of the problems that contemporary societies now face.

Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers in the business, public and charity sectors. They leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Introduction. The course is delivered in English by Stirling academics with teaching assistantship by Western-educated local media specialists, which involves both intensive face-to-face teaching and online instruction. Read more

Introduction

The course is delivered in English by Stirling academics with teaching assistantship by Western-educated local media specialists, which involves both intensive face-to-face teaching and online instruction. Throughout the course, students will attend lectures, seminars and discussions by/with leading media personalities in Vietnam. The full-time course takes 16 months to complete and the part-time version takes 27 months. Students completing the course will be awarded a University of Stirling’s MSc in Media and Communications Management degree. We are currently recruiting for the next intake, to be started in October 2015.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc

- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time

- Duration: The full-time course takes 16 months to complete and the part-time version takes 27 months.

- Start date: April/October

- Course Director: Dr Eddy Borges Rey

Course objectives

Students completing the course will be awarded a University of Stirling’s MSc in Media and Communications Management degree (180 Scottish Qualifications Framework points [SCQF]). We also offer the Diploma for those who successfully complete six modules (120 SCQF) and the Certificate for those who successfully complete three modules (60 SCQF). Internationally oriented and comparative in approach, the learning outcomes include:

- a theoretical and case study-based foundation in communications management, including marketing, branding, internal and crisis management; media economics, finance and business management strategy

- appropriate management skills and an analytical perspective on the communications and media industries

- training in appropriate research methodologies, both quantitative and qualitative

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:

- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill

- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C

- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component

- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

The Media and Communications Management course includes six face-to-face and two online courses, plus a dissertation of 12,000 words at the end of the coursework period. Dedicated UK-based academics will visit Vietnam at regular intervals to lecture students. Western-educated local academics will conduct tutorials and moderate guest lectures and seminars. Leading the course will be Professor Matthew Hibberd.

Why Stirling?

- REF2014

In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

- Rating

Communications, Media and Culture rapidly developed into a major centre for research and learning after its foundation in 1978. Its research arm, the Stirling Media Research Institute, is internationally renowned, attracting many doctoral students, visiting scholars, and practitioners, from across the world. The department consistently draws high ratings for its teaching at all levels. We are ranked top in Scotland, 12th in UK, by the most recent Research Assessment Exercise. 95% of our research is classed as of international standard, with 70% in the top two categories, 'world-leading' or 'internationally excellent'.

Career opportunities

Many Film, Media and Journalism graduates are successful practitioners, entrepreneurs and executives in the media and communications industries, and active in numerous other occupations. They regularly return to share their professional experience with current students. The department’s strong relationships with screen industries, public relations and journalism professionals are among its core strengths, along with its high-profile activities within international research communities.



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The master’s programme in Asian Studies at Leiden University offers an outstanding qualification from one of the leading centres for Asian studies in Europe. Read more

The master’s programme in Asian Studies at Leiden University offers an outstanding qualification from one of the leading centres for Asian studies in Europe.

Choose from eight specialisations

The Asian Studies master's programme offers one-year specialisations on East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, the History, Arts and Culture of Asia and the Politics, Society and Economy of Asia and two-year specialisations on China, Japan, Korea.

Learn from internationally-acclaimed scholars

Expertise on Asia at Leiden University is internationally renowned and spans the whole of Asia. Small classes give you direct and regular contact with your lecturers. You will learn from some of Europe's best scholars in the field, many of whom are at the leading edge of Asia-related research.

Customise your degree

With an expansive curriculum and flexible programme formats, you may tailor the curriculum to reflect your interests or career ambitions. You can choose to focus on a language and a single country, or on a specific discipline and region. You can also choose from a broad range of electives.

Develop your language fluency

During your studies you will have the opportunity to develop your fluency in a classical or modern language. You also have the option of taking an intensive modern Indonesian language course.

Benefit from our unique resources

All of the Asian Studies programmes make the most of Leiden University's world-class resources, including its famous collections of Asian artifacts.



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The aim is to equip students to carry out independent academic work, including training in how to use Japanese-language sources for research purposes, which lies at the heart of the programme. Read more
The aim is to equip students to carry out independent academic work, including training in how to use Japanese-language sources for research purposes, which lies at the heart of the programme. Our guiding principle is to ensure that each student receives the best possible education, providing a coherent course but with the flexibility to cater for individual needs.

All students in the year group attend the Theories and Methodologies in Japanese Studies Seminar, at which they meet regularly and are introduced to various disciplinary approaches in Japanese Studies. In addition they are guided through the various steps of academic research, writing, presentation and career development. They are free to choose two courses from a variety of options so that each student receives a tailor-made education. Approximately half of the time is allocated to individual research and the writing of a dissertation under the guidance of leading scholars.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/amammpjps

Course detail

At the end of the MPhil programme, students will be expected to have:

- acquired the ability to read, interpret and translate primary sources in Modern and/or Classical Japanese;
- acquired a good knowledge of the general scholarship on Modern and/or Classical Japanese culture(s);
- acquired an in-depth knowledge of the secondary literature relevant to the subject of their dissertation;
- developed the ability to formulate original research questions and produce a well-constructed, argument to answer them, in the form of an independent piece of research based on the use of primary and secondary sources;
- acquired the skills to use library and internet resources independently.

Format

1: Dissertation (50 % of the grade)

In their dissertation, students will be required to demonstrate research competence using Japanese-language sources, and to conduct research that addresses contemporary and/or historical issues of relevance to Japan. Prospective students are asked to contact potential supervisors before applying to Cambridge to ensure that an appropriate supervisor is available.

2: Three papers (50% of the grade)

Each of the three papers (a paper is an exam for which teaching is provided) is assessed either by a research essay of maximum 5,000 words or an alternative exercise agreed by the Degree Committee and counts for one sixth of the total grade (i.e. 16.67 percent). Please note that papers are usually only offered if there are at least two takers.

2.1: MPhil in Japanese Studies - Theories and Methodologies in Japanese Studies

The theory and methodology seminar meets throughout the first two terms, connecting Japanese Studies to various disciplinary approaches and theories. Students will also receive training on sources and resources, library searches, academic writing, analysis and presentation skills, writing a research proposal or grant application, career planning etc., and will have opportunities to engage in peer review as they present their dissertation proposals.

2.2 Two from the following four groups of papers (A-D):

A: Graduate papers in Japanese Studies

- Historical Narratives of Ancient and Medieval Japan
- New Approaches in Early-modern Japanese Literature
- Asia in Theory
- Topics in modern Korean history: Japanese imperialism in Korea

B: Advanced research seminar papers in Japanese Studies (maximum one of these papers)

- Classical Japanese Texts
- Modern Japanese Cultural History
- Contemporary Japanese Society
- The East Asian Region

C: Language options (maximum one of these papers)

- Modern Japanese Texts
- Literary Japanese
- Classical and Literary Chinese
- Readings in Elementary Korean

D: Theory and methods, papers borrowed from other faculties (maximum one of these courses)

Papers in the discipline related to the research topic of the dissertation. These papers will be mainly borrowed from other faculties, e.g. Anthropology, Literature Studies, History, Politics, Gender Studies.

Assessment

- For the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Japanese Studies), students will submit a thesis of not more than 15,000 words, including footnotes and appendices but excluding bibliography on a subject approved by the Degree Committee. All MPhil dissertations must include a brief Abstract at the start of the dissertation of no more than 400 words.

- For the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Japanese Studies), students submit essays as part of their degree:

Most papers are assessed by essay, as described in Form and Conduct. Essays are not more than 5,000 words, including footnotes, but excluding bibliography. Candidates may apply to the Degree Committee for approval of an equivalent Alternative Exercise.

- For the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Japanese Studies), students may take examinations as part of their degree:

Some courses may be assessed by written examination, as described in Form and Conduct. With the approval of the Degree Committee, a candidate may offer, in place of one or more of those papers, the same number of essays, each of not more than 5,000 words, or equivalent Alternative Exercises approved by the Degree Committee.

Continuing

Those who would like to apply for the PhD after the MPhil will be expected to have scored at least 67% or above (or the equivalent from an overseas University) in their Master's degree which should be related to the PhD programme they wish to pursue. All applicants should submit with their GRADSAF (graduate application) a workable and interesting research proposal and demonstrate that they have the required academic knowledge and skills to carry out their project.

Admission is at the discretion of the Degree Committee, which judges each graduate applicant on his or her own merits and in accordance with its own set rules and regulations.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

- Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) -

NB: Applicants should check the Faculty's website before the academic year 2016 - 2017 is due to start to see if AHRC funding is available to apply for. Home PhD and MPhil students and EU students who satisfy home residency criteria may be eligible for a full studentship which covers the University Composition Fee and College Fees plus an annual maintenance stipend. EU students are eligible for a fees-only award.

Further information: http://www.cambridgestudents.cam.ac.uk/fees-and-funding/funding/ahrc-funded-students

- Faculty Funding Opportunities -

Further information: http://www.ames.cam.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding/faculty

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This programme is aimed at students who see China’s role as a rising economic super power as both an opportunity and a challenge, and who want to ensure they are ‘China ready’. Read more

This programme is aimed at students who see China’s role as a rising economic super power as both an opportunity and a challenge, and who want to ensure they are ‘China ready’.

Taught by the School of Languages, Cultures and Societies and Leeds University Business School, you’ll gain intensive research training and study modules in business and management studies.

You’ll also take Chinese language classes at a level appropriate for you and choose from a range of optional modules to develop your knowledge of China, the wider East Asian region and the international business world. You could study Chinese politics, human resource management, Japanese business and much more.

This programme will suit both UK and non-UK students wanting to engage with the growing markets in which Chinese interests are present, as well as Chinese students seeking practical and strategic management expertise alongside an insight into how China is perceived by the outside world.

Leeds University Business School and East Asian Studies are leading centres for research, offering complementary expertise in the region. East Asian Studies has enjoyed over 50 years of history at Leeds. In addition to the academic strengths that have accrued over this time, we have developed an extensive and active international network of alumni. Leeds is also home to very substantial and world-renowned specialist library collections.

Course content

A core module will provide you with intensive research training, developing your understanding of research methods and building the skills to complete your dissertation. You’ll work with your supervisor(s) – specialists member of our teaching staff – to complete this independent research project which focuses on a topic of your choice.

You’ll also take intensive language classes at the right level for you in Chinese, Japanese or Thai – we teach all three languages from beginner level, but if you already have some knowledge of the language you’ll be able to study at a more advanced level. If you’re a native Chinese speaker, you’ll be exempt from this requirement and choose extra modules in East Asian Studies instead.

To complete the programme, you’ll select from a wide range of optional modules to explore topics that suit your interests or career plans. You’ll maintain some variety with modules in business and management studies as well as Chinese culture, politics or history – you could study topics as diverse as cross-cultural management, Japanese politics, China’s relationship with the developing world and gender and equality.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation 45 credits
  • Principles and Practices of Research 30 credits 

Optional modules

Please see the website for a list of the optional modules available on this course

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods to help you benefit from the expertise of our tutors, including lectures, seminars, online learning, tutorials and workshops. Language classes may also include practicals and computer classes to develop your skills.

However, independent study remains an important element of this degree as a chance for you to develop your skills and explore topics that interest you.

Assessment

You’ll also experience a range of assessment methods, depending on the modules you choose. These may include exams and essays as well as presentations, literature reviews, project work and in-course assessment among others. Language modules may also include different forms of assessment such as translation tests.

Career opportunities

Whether you’re already an established professional or just launching your career, the programme will give you valuable knowledge and skills to develop an international career.

You’ll have advanced skills in research, analysis and written and oral communication, as well as a greatly expanded cultural awareness. All of these are valuable in a wide range of careers – and your language skills will make you even more attractive to employers worldwide – in business, public and third sectors.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Students in the MA in Asia Pacific Studies (MAPS) program develop valuable cultural competency of the Asia Pacific region. Reflecting the diversity and innovative spirit of San Francisco, the program offers a wide range of courses in the history, literature, politics, business, and culture of Asian regions. Read more

Students in the MA in Asia Pacific Studies (MAPS) program develop valuable cultural competency of the Asia Pacific region. Reflecting the diversity and innovative spirit of San Francisco, the program offers a wide range of courses in the history, literature, politics, business, and culture of Asian regions.

The interdisciplinary curriculum is designed to give students the flexibility and independence to pursue their passions. Separate concentrations — humanities/social sciences and business — allow students to take courses that align with their professional or academic goals after graduation.

You can find more information on our website

Program Learning Outcomes

Students completing the MAPS Program will be able to demonstrate:

  • an ability to apply research tools and methods to analyze critically topics within class disciplines and contemporary interdisciplinary fields of Asia Pacific Studies.
  • an understanding of sociocultural histories and traditions, political and economic patterns of development, organizational practices and behaviors, and contemporary events as evidenced in the Asia Pacific region.
  • oral and written proficiency in an Asian language corresponding to the fourth semester of USF undergraduate courses, or the equivalent level in languages not taught at USF.
  • practical experience in Asia-Pacific related contexts via opportunities for academic and professional development such as internships, fieldwork, conferences, symposia, public programs, class excursions and other types of experiential learning.

Job Search Training

MAPS students may request training and advice on pursuing a job in an international field, including resume design, mock interviews, and other job training skills.

San Francisco Advantage

San Francisco is a nucleus for opportunities that connect the city with the Asia Pacific region. MAPS students take full advantage of San Francisco’s location and resources to gain career and research experience, immersing themselves in the city’s vibrant and diverse Asian Pacific communities through internship and networking opportunities.



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