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Sociology×

Nova Southeastern University Masters Degrees in Sociology

We have 4 Nova Southeastern University Masters Degrees in Sociology

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The M.A. in Cross-disciplinary Studies is multidisciplinary, experiential, and allows students to self-design their graduate studies. Read more

The M.A. in Cross-disciplinary Studies is multidisciplinary, experiential, and allows students to self-design their graduate studies. The program is designed to meet the needs of students who are seeking a broader learning forum and who appreciate the unique self-design of cross-disciplinary studies. The M.A. program provides intellectual advancement and the opportunity to expand and enrich educational horizons in keeping with the liberal studies traditions. The M.A. program utilizes a multidisciplinary approach and variety of perspectives for observing, analyzing, and addressing contemporary social issues. Students focus on systemic approaches and methodologies when studying human challenges. The M.A. utilizes experiential learning to provide students with hands-on training where theory and practice are integrated.

The M.A. consists of an 11-course (33 credits) sequence that includes core classes, practicums, and a 12-credit concentration track.

Program Formats

The M.A. aims at convenience and accommodation by utilizing online course delivery format and self-designed programs. The students enrolled in the M.A. programs are afforded the greatest flexibility in self-selecting and self-directing their concentrated areas of interest, while at the same time retaining and reinforcing an emphasis on general professional skills. Students can complete the program completely online, but have a large selection of on-campus courses from which to choose.

Students may enroll full or part time, taking six to nine credit hours per term. Students who attend full-time can expect to complete the program in 19 months. Part-time students may complete the program in 2 ½ years. Summer attendance is mandatory.

Curriculum

The Master of Arts in Cross-Disciplinary Studies (MACS) degree program requires an 11-course (33 credits) sequence that includes core classes, practicums, a 12-credit concentration track and 1 elective.

Core courses:

  • MACS 5020 Theories and Philosophies of Conflict and Peace
  • MACS 5200 Research Design and Program Evaluation
  • MACS 5310 Introduction to Systems Theories
  • MACS 5400 The Interdisciplinary Writer
  • MACS 6130 Practicum I: Supervised Field Experience
  • MACS 6160 Practicum II: Supervised Field Experience

Concentration tracks

Culture and Society: Explore conflict resolution in diverse world cultures, business, and public service. Gain professional skills for communication, client support, counseling, crisis management, mediation and conflict resolution.

Health and Society : Manage data and research to meet the challenges of today's health care administration system. Develop skills to mediate between the medical establishment, the patient community, and the insurance community. In partnership with the College of Allied Health and Nursing.

Information Systems and Society: Appreciate technology-based solutions to leadership challenges, bridge the gap between corporate technology specialists and management staff, and mediate between technophiles and technophobes. In partnership with the Graduate School of Computer and Information Sciences.

Coastal Environment and Society: Discover environmental data and research as a source of political conflict, while addressing the need to work comfortably within a diversity of local, national, and international cultures and boundaries. In partnership with the Oceanographic Center.

Education and Society: Investigate pedagogy and leadership in the diverse systems of education. Establish skills to manage conflict in learning environments. In partnership with the Fischler College of Education and Human Services.

Institutional Assessment: Research student-learning outcomes and prepare to lead academic organizations in assessment. Practice techniques to evaluate academic programs and curricula, respond to academic accreditation bodies, and create a "culture of evidence" at academic organizations.

Practicum

Students complete two practicums during their course of study. Practicum placements have been established in an array of settings depending on student's areas of study. Students are also encouraged to explore and initiate a practicum setting specific to their own individual interests. For more information please http://cahss.nova.edu/departments/ms/graduate/macs/practicum.html

Master's Thesis

Option Students who wish to complete a 6-credit Master's Thesis may do so by completing in 3 additional credits. Students must request permission from the Director before enrolling for the Master's Thesis.



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The M.S. in Conflict Analysis & Resolution is designed to train reflective professionals in the practice, design, and evaluation of a variety of conflict resolution applications. Read more

The M.S. in Conflict Analysis & Resolution is designed to train reflective professionals in the practice, design, and evaluation of a variety of conflict resolution applications. The M.S. program focuses on pragmatic approaches to solving problems inherent in human social relations. Students are exposed to a wide array of techniques and strategies to help people achieve nonviolent, non-litigious solutions for conflicts that arise in many personal, professional, organizational, and social environments. The M.S. program consists of a 12-course (36 credits) sequence that includes conflict resolution theory, practice skills, field placement, research design, and program evaluation.

Transferring Credits

Graduates of our Master's program in Conflict Analysis and Resolution who decide to continue their studies and are accepted into our Ph.D. program in Conflict Analysis and Resolution, can transfer up to 15 credit hours to the Ph.D. program, thereby reducing the total number of credits for the doctoral program.

Program Formats

The M.S. program is offered in both residential and distance learning formats. These flexible formats allow mid-career working adults and those unable to attend the on-campus program, to study conflict resolution in a creative, rigorous, and structured fashion.

Students may enroll full or part time, taking six to nine credit hours per trimester. Students who attend full-time can expect to complete the program in 15 months. Part-time students will complete the program in 2 years. Summer attendance is mandatory.

Students taking online classes are required to attend 2 Residential Institutes (RI) per academic year. Each RI is 5 days. Currently the RIs are held in February and October. Please visit the Residential Institute for current information.

Master's students are provided NSU computer accounts including email and Blackboard, but must obtain their own Internet service providers, use their own computer systems and have a usable web camera. Online students use the web to access course materials, announcements, email, distance library services, subscription library databases, and other information, and for interaction with faculty and fellow students. Online, interactive learning methods are based on the use of Blackboard as a course management system. Online activities facilitate frequent student-to-faculty and student-to-student interaction. They are supported by threaded discussion boards, white boards, chat rooms, email, and multimedia presentations. In addition, Blackboard enables students to submit assignments online in multimedia formats and to receive their professors' reviews of assignments online in the same formats.

Curriculum

Masters students must complete a minimum of 36-credits; successfully pass a field practicum and a Comprehensive Examination or an optional thesis to be eligible for the degree. Students must also maintain a 3.0 GPA through completion of the degree. Some courses have specific prerequisite requirements that students must meet; these should be checked to ensure compliance. If a student chooses to they may opt to do the master's thesis.

Core Courses

  • CARM 5000 - Foundations and Development of Conflict Resolution & Peace Studies (3 credits)
  • CARM 5040 - Communication Dynamics in Dispute Resolution: The Human Factor (3 credits)
  • CARM 5100 - Mediation Theory and Practice (3 credits)
  • CARM 5140 - Negotiation Theory and Practice (3 credits)
  • CARM 5200 - Research Design and Program Evaluation (3 credits)
  • CARM 6120 - Culture and Conflict: Cross-cultural Perspectives (3 credits)
  • CARM 6130 - Practicum I: Supervised Field Experience (3 credits)
  • CARM 6140 - Facilitation Theory and Practice (3 credits)
  • CARM 6150 - Professional Practice and Ethics (3 credits)
  • CARM 6450 - M.S. Capstone (3 credits)

Masters Theses Option

The student may write a research thesis. The thesis is 6 credits and counts as two electives. Instead of the electives offered in the fall and winter trimesters of the second year, thesis students register for Master's Thesis. Entrance into the thesis track is not automatic; students must meet eligibility requirements. For details regarding the Master's, please visit Conflict Analysis and Resolution Student Resources for the Master's Thesis handbook.

Practicum

Practicum is a student centered learning experience that is supervised by professionals at a variety of local, regional, national, and international organizations, as well as monitored by the practicum coordinator and guided by faculty teaching the practicum sequence. Practicum I and II are offered both residentially and online, during the fall, winter and summer terms. Doctoral students do have the option of doing Teaching and Training which is offered in the fall, followed by a Teaching and Training practicum in the winter term. Students may follow either of these tracks.

Practicum provides opportunities that you must be active in creating. It provides the chance to explore employment settings and obtain a realistic feel for your level of expertise in conflict analysis and resolution. Practicum also offers you a preview of locations where conflict resolution is currently being used or where it can be introduced. Practicum essentially allows you to explore the field in an individually focused, yet supervised manner. Take advantage of this opportunity to explore and to appreciate the new contacts you make. Experiences like these can help establish your personal and professional reputation within the community.

Please visit Student Resources for the Practicum Handbook and forms.



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A Master of Science in Developmental Disabilities is designed to prepare researchers, advocates, administrators and policy makers to be leaders in community-based or governmental agencies that address the confluence of issues associated with developmental disabilities throughout the life span. Read more

A Master of Science in Developmental Disabilities is designed to prepare researchers, advocates, administrators and policy makers to be leaders in community-based or governmental agencies that address the confluence of issues associated with developmental disabilities throughout the life span. This degree program's body of knowledge will allow graduates of the M.S. program to pursue doctoral-level training in human services, counseling, and public policy, among others. In addition, this degree will provide professionals from disciplines such as nursing and education with the necessary skills to be effective leaders and advance in the field.

The successful graduate of the M.S. in Developmental Disabilities program is expected to:

  • Apply knowledge of effective administrative and other leadership skills in the field of developmental disabilities through the use of case study analyses, research papers, and in-class assignments.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the different developmental disabilities and the challenges faced by these individuals across the lifespan.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of the family, the educational system, and community services on the successful integration of individuals with developmental disabilities into the community.
  • Apply ethical and legal principles related to working with individuals who have developmental disabilities to real-world cases and settings.
  • Apply knowledge of developmental disabilities, organizational behavior, and strategic planning to the design and/or administration of human services organizations which provide services to individuals and families with developmental disabilities. 
  • Demonstrate research, analytic thinking, and writing skills when creating a program design or evaluation project on a relevant topic in the field.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the impact of health disparities experienced by individuals with developmental disabilities and the implications for healthcare and human services organizations.

This program is designed for individuals seeking a career in or as:

  • Program Director (non-profit)
  • Program Coordination
  • Early Childhood Interventionist
  • Transition Specialist
  • Job Coach
  • Child Life Specialist (with Child Life Specialist concentration)
  • Developmental Specialist
  • Case Manager
  • Vocational Counselor
  • Advocate
  • Behavior Analyst or Assistant Behavior Analyst (with ABA concentration)

Program Format

The master's program is offered entirely online. The online format allows for students to participate in courses from anywhere in the world where Internet access is available. In addition, it allows for the flexibility of completing your master's degree without interrupting your career.

Master's students are provided NSU computer accounts including email and Blackboard, but must obtain their own Internet service providers, use their own computer systems and have a usable web camera. Online students use the web to access course materials, announcements, email, distance library services, subscription library databases, and other information, and for interaction with faculty and fellow students. Online, interactive learning methods are based on the use of Blackboard as a course management system. Online activities facilitate frequent student-to-faculty and student-to-student interaction. They are supported by threaded discussion boards, white boards, chat rooms, email, and multimedia presentations. In addition, Blackboard enables students to submit assignments online in multimedia formats and to receive their professors' reviews of assignments online in the same formats.

Curriculum

Students enrolled in the Masters of Science in Developmental Disabilities are required to complete 18 credit hours of foundational coursework, 9 credit hours in one of the Concentrations, and 3 credit hours of a Developmental Disabilities Master's Research Project.

Foundational coursework:

  • HSDD 5000: Survey of Developmental Disabilities (3 credits)
  • HSDD 5100: Program Design and Evaluation (3 credits)
  • HSDD 5200: Disability and the Family Life Cycle (3 credits)
  • HSDD 5300: Legal and Ethical Issues in Disability (3 credits)
  • HSDD 5400: Healthcare Issues in Developmental Disabilities (3 credits)
  • HSDD 5500: Disability Services Administration (3 credits)
  • HSDD 6000: Developmental Disabilities Masters Project (3 credits)

Concentrations



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The Master of Human Services in Child Protection will provide competency-based child protective services instruction aimed at closing the gap between ground level, on-the-job training and scientifically grounded best-practices. Read more

The Master of Human Services in Child Protection will provide competency-based child protective services instruction aimed at closing the gap between ground level, on-the-job training and scientifically grounded best-practices. It will develop the critical knowledge, values, and skills necessary for child protection professionals to respond effectively to complex problems confronting children and families in the child protective services system.

The program prepares students through the core curriculum and allows for specialty training through various tracks. This facilitates choice for students and fosters the development of specialized expertise.

Students will complete the 33 credit hour program that includes core courses, specialty track, and electives courses.

This program is designed for individuals seeking careers in or as:

  • child protective services/case workers/child advocates for foster care children
  • child protective services supervisors/managers/administrators
  • child protective investigators with the local law enforcement agency
  • mental health workers with foster care children on their caseload
  • foster care service providers
  • Guardian Ad Litems advocating for foster care clients
  • Juvenile justice workers with foster care clients on their caseload
  • Mentors such as Big Brothers/Big Sisters who support a foster child
  • Professionals in other fields who find increasing numbers of their clients are in foster care and/or who may wish to specialize their practice (school system, medical, counseling/psychology)

Program Formats

Online

The master's program is offered entirely online. The online format allows for students to participate in courses from anywhere in the world where internet access is available. In addition, it allows for the flexibility of completing your master's degree without interrupting your career.

Master's students are provided NSU computer accounts including email and Blackboard, but must obtain their own Internet service providers, use their own computer systems and have a usable web camera. Online students use the web to access course materials, announcements, email, distance library services, subscription library databases, and other information, and for interaction with faculty and fellow students. Online, interactive learning methods are based on the use of Blackboard as a course management system. Online activities facilitate frequent student-to-faculty and student-to-student interaction. They are supported by threaded discussion boards, white boards, chat rooms, email, and multimedia presentations. In addition, Blackboard enables students to submit assignments online in multimedia formats and to receive their professors’ reviews of assignments online in the same formats.



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