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Sociology×

University of Cambridge, Full Time Masters Degrees in Sociology

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This MPhil pathway is designed to give students a basic understanding of major themes and debates in political and economic sociology. Read more
This MPhil pathway is designed to give students a basic understanding of major themes and debates in political and economic sociology. There are four core substantive modules on political and economic sociology that students are expected to attend, taught by Dr. Manali Desai, Dr. Hazem Kandil, Prof. Lawrence King, and Dr. Jeff Miley.

Other substantive modules may also have an economic sociology component, and these would complement the core modules well. In addition, all students must attend the module on comparative historical research methods taught by Dr. Miley as well as one other methods module to be decided in consultation with their supervisor.

Students have the option of doing one of their coursework essays on a topic taught on any sociology MPhil module (for instance, media, culture, globalisation or reproduction); all of the rest of the coursework essays and the dissertation (based on original research) must relate to the political and economic sociology options.

Topics to be covered include: the Marxist critique of capitalism; Weber’s theory of legitimacy; the transition from feudalism to capitalism; the emergence of the modern state; theories of the capitalist state; class structure and class formation under capitalism; the rise of democracy and dictatorship; theories of revolution; the rise of the welfare state; social movement theory; theories of imperialism; theories of development and underdevelopment; gender and ethnicity in post-colonial states; nationalisms; war and militarism, and state violence and genocide.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hssomppes

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the programme students should have:

- an advanced understanding of current sociological research in selected topics;
- skills necessary to conduct independent social research and experience in their use;
- an ability to apply and develop modern social theory with respect to empirical topics;
- a deeper understanding of their chosen specialist area, including command of the literature and current research;
- the ability to situate their own research within current developments in the field.

Format

The course offers teaching on Social Theory, Substantive modules and Research Methods. Students work towards a written dissertation supported by supervisions and a dissertation workshop.

Students receive written feedback on each essay and the dissertation. Feedback is also given during the dissertation workshop on the direction and progress of the dissertation research.

Assessment

Students write a dissertation of not less than 15,000 and not more than 20,000 words on a subject approved by the Degree Committee.

Students write one methods essay of not less than 2,500 and not more than 3,000 words (or prescribed course work) and two substantive essays of not less than 4,000 and not more than 5,000 words.

Continuing

Students are encouraged to proceed to the Faculty's PhD programme, provided they reach a high level of achievement in all parts of the course. MPhil students who would like to continue to the PhD would normally need to have a final mark of at least 70% overall and 70% on the dissertation.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Sociology holds ESRC funding awards. Sociology is a recognised Doctoral Training Centre pathway toward a PhD. Therefore candidates for the MPhil in Sociology (Political and Economic Sociology) can apply for 1+3 ESRC funding.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This MPhil pathway is designed to give students a basic understanding of major themes and debates the sociology of reproduction and new reproductive technologies. Read more
This MPhil pathway is designed to give students a basic understanding of major themes and debates the sociology of reproduction and new reproductive technologies. Two core modules introduce key concepts and approaches to the sociology of reproduction, and core methodologies in this field. Other substantive modules can be chosen in consultation with the student's supervisor or the course director.

Topics to be covered include: core theories of gender, reproduction and kinship; the reproductive division of labour; social reproduction and the meaning of the 'mode of reproduction'; the sociology of new reproductive technologies; reproduction and globalisation; reproductive rights; media representation of reproduction and visual cultures of reproduction.

Background readings will be drawn from feminist science studies, the history of science and medicine, and the anthropology of reproduction as well as the sociology of reproduction.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hssompsrp

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the programme students should have:

- an advanced understanding of current sociological research in selected topics;
- the skills necessary to conduct independent social research and experience in their use;
- an ability to apply and develop modern social theory with respect to empirical topics;
- a deeper understanding of their chosen specialist area, including command of the literature and current research;
- the ability to situate their own research within current developments in the field.

Format

The course offers teaching on Social Theory, Substantive modules and Research Methods. Students work towards a written dissertation supported by supervisions and a dissertation workshop.

Students receive written feedback on each essay and the dissertation. Feedback is also given during the dissertation workshop on the direction and progress of the dissertation research.

Assessment

Students write a dissertation of not less than 15,000 and not more than 20,000 words on a subject approved by the Degree Committee.

Students write one methods essay of not less than 2,500 and not more than 3,000 words (or prescribed course work) and two substantive essays of not less than 4,000 and not more than 5,000 words.

Continuing

Students are encouraged to proceed to the Faculty's PhD programme, provided they reach a high level of achievement in all parts of the course. MPhil students who would like to continue to the PhD would normally need to have a final mark of at least 70% overall and 70% for the dissertation.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Sociology holds ESRC funding awards. Sociology is a recognised Doctoral Training Centre pathway toward a PhD. Therefore candidates for the MPhil in Sociology (Sociology of Reproduction) can apply for 1+3 ESRC funding.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MPhil in Sociology of Media and Culture pathway provides students with the opportunity to study the nature and transformation of media and cultural forms at an advanced level. Read more
The MPhil in Sociology of Media and Culture pathway provides students with the opportunity to study the nature and transformation of media and cultural forms at an advanced level. The programme gives students a firm grounding in the theoretical and empirical analysis of media and culture and enables them to study particular media and cultural forms in depth, examining their transformations over time and their impact on other aspects of social and political life. The programme consists of 4 components:

1. Theories of Culture and Media: all students taking this programme will be expected to follow this course of lectures that will cover some of the major theoretical contributions to the study of media and culture, ranging from Adorno and Habermas to Bourdieu and Becker and from medium theory to Castells and more recent theoretical work on new media and the internet. Students are also strongly encouraged to follow the course of lectures on social theory.

2. Substantive modules: there will be at least three core substantive modules taught by Prof John Thompson, Prof Patrick Baert and Dr Ella McPherson. The modules will be research-led and will reflect the research being undertaken by members of the Department. The content of specific modules may vary from year to year but topics covered will typically include the nature of the digital revolution and its impact on the media and creative industries; the changing nature of news and journalism in the digital age; the role of new media in the development of social movements and new forms of political mobilization and protest; the uses of social media and the internet and their impact on everyday life and culture; the role of ideas, intellectuals and media forms in processes of social and political change. Students in this programme will be expected to take at least three of these modules; they may also take the fourth module in this programme, or they may substitute one of these modules with a module taken from another MPhil programme offered by the Department (Modern Society and Global Transformations, Political and Economic Sociology, Sociology of Reproduction).

3. Research Methods: all students will take a course on research methods which includes sessions on philosophical issues in the social sciences; research design; data collection and analysis in relation to quantitative and qualitative methods; reflection on research ethics and practice; library and computer skills.

4. Dissertation: all students will write a dissertation on a topic of their choice that allows for theoretically informed empirical analysis of some aspect of media or culture in contemporary societies. The choice of dissertation topic is made in consultation with your supervisor, who can advise you on the suitability and feasibility of your proposed research and on research design. A dissertation workshop provides the opportunity to present aspects of your dissertation work and to receive constructive feedback from course teachers and fellow students.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hssompsmc

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the programme students should have:

- an advanced understanding of current sociological research in selected topics;
- skills necessary to conduct independent social research and experience in their use;
- an ability to apply and develop modern social theory with respect to empirical topics;
- a deeper understanding of their chosen specialist area, including command of the literature and current research;
- the ability to situate their own research within current developments in the field.

Format

The course offers teaching on Social Theory, Substantive modules and Research Methods. Students work towards a written dissertation supported by supervisions and a dissertation workshop.

Students receive written feedback on each essay and the dissertation. Feedback is also given during the dissertation workshop on the direction and progress of the dissertation research.

Assessment

Students write a dissertation of not less than 15,000 and not more than 20,000 words on a subject approved by the Degree Committee.

Students write one methods essay of not less than 2,500 and not more than 3,000 words [or prescribed course work] and two substantive essays of not less than 4,000 and not more than 5,000 words.

Continuing

Students are encouraged to proceed to the Faculty's PhD programme, provided they reach a high level of achievement in all parts of the course. MPhil students who would like to continue to the PhD would normally need to have a final mark of at least 70% overall and 70% on the dissertation.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Sociology holds ESRC funding awards. Sociology is a recognised Doctoral Training Centre pathway toward a PhD. Therefore candidates for the MPhil in Sociology (Media and Culture) can apply for 1+3 ESRC funding.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This pathway enables you to study social changes at an advanced level. It provides an opportunity for in-depth study of some key dimensions of modern society. Read more
This pathway enables you to study social changes at an advanced level. It provides an opportunity for in-depth study of some key dimensions of modern society. The scope of this pathway is deliberately broad to allow students to study any area of sociology where the department has the expertise to supervise dissertations.

It aims to integrate the consideration of themes in social theory with the study of substantive topics, as well as give a thorough grounding in research methods. There are four elements:

1. Social theory: This course aims to stimulate a critical, globally conscious theoretical reflexivity. Above all, it provides students with the tools for a wide range of social interpretation and analysis, particularly of the contemporary social world.

2. Modern society: This part of the course has a modular structure. Modules consider a series of key dimensions or institutions of modern society with particular emphasis on current changes resulting from the interaction of global forces and national institutions. All of the modules being taught on all of the sociology MPhil pathways are available to students doing this pathway, as well as several other modules on topics such as ‘health and illness’ and ‘globalisation’.

3. Research methods: This includes sessions on philosophical issues in the social sciences; research design; data collection and analysis in relation to quantitative and qualitative methods; reflection on research ethics and practice; library and computer skills. Your dissertation supervisor will advise you on which courses to take.

4. Dissertation: A dissertation on a topic of your choice but broadly related to one of the Modern Society modules. A research supervisor will assist you in refining your research topic, conducting the research and writing the dissertation. A dissertation workshop provides the opportunity to present aspects of your dissertation work and to receive constructively critical feedback from course teachers and fellow students.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hssompsgt

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the programme students should have:

- an advanced understanding of current sociological research in selected topics;
- skills necessary to conduct independent social research and experience in their use;
- an ability to apply and develop modern social theory with respect to empirical topics;
- a deeper understanding of their chosen specialist area, including command of the literature and current research;
- the ability to situate their own research within current developments in the field.

Format

The course offers teaching on Social Theory, Substantive modules and Research Methods. Students work towards a written dissertation supported by supervisions and a dissertation workshop.

- Students typically receive bi-weekly supervisions over 8 weeks
- Modern Society modules 12 hours x 4 modules; Research Methods 12 hours x 2 modules; 72 hours hours per year.
- Social Theory 8 hours hours per year.
- Dissertation workshop 10 hours hours per year.
- Within the Department various journal clubs are offered 8 hours per week.
- Students conduct a critical appraisal as part of the training.
- The Department runs a dissertation workshop in the first term.

Students receive written feedback on each essay and the dissertation. Feedback is also given during the dissertation workshop on the direction and progress of the dissertation research.

Assessment

Students write a dissertation of not less than 15,000 and not more than 20,000 words on a subject approved by the Degree Committee.

Students write one methods essay of not less than 2,500 and not more than 3,000 words (or prescribed course work) and two substantive essays of not less than 4,000 and not more than 5,000 words.

Continuing

Students are encouraged to proceed to the Faculty's PhD programme, provided they reach a high level of achievement in all parts of the course. MPhil students who would like to continue to the PhD would normally need to have a final mark of at least 70% overall and 70% on the dissertation.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Sociology holds ESRC funding awards. Sociology is a recognised Doctoral Training Centre pathway toward a PhD. Therefore candidates for the MPhil in Sociology (Modern Society and Global Transformations) can apply for 1+3 ESRC funding.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MPhil in Health, Medicine, and Society is a full-time 9-month course that provides students with the opportunity to carry out focused research under close supervision by senior members of the University. Read more
The MPhil in Health, Medicine, and Society is a full-time 9-month course that provides students with the opportunity to carry out focused research under close supervision by senior members of the University. Students will acquire or develop skills and expertise relevant to their research interests, as well as a critical and well-informed understanding of the roles of the history, philosophy, sociology and anthropology of health and medicine.

Those intending to go on to doctoral work will learn the research skills needed to help them prepare a well planned and focused PhD proposal. During the course students gain experience of presenting their own work and discussing the issues that arise from it with an audience of their peers and senior members of the Department; they will attend lectures, supervisions and research seminars in a range of technical and specialist subjects central to research in the different areas of history, philosophy, sociology and anthropology of health and medicine.

The MPhil is jointly run by the Departments of History and Philosophy of Science, Sociology and Social Anthropology. It is a full-time course and introduces students to research skills and specialist knowledge. Its main aims are:

- to give students with relevant training at first-degree level the opportunity to carry out focussed research in Health, Medicine and Society (HMS) under close supervision;
- to give students the opportunity to acquire or develop skills and expertise relevant to their research interests;
- to enable students to acquire a critical and well informed understanding of the roles of the history, philosophy, sociology and anthropology of health and medicine; and
- to help students intending to go on to doctoral work to acquire the requisite research skills and to prepare a well planned and focussed PhD proposal.

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Understanding -

By the end of the course, students will have:

- Developed a deeper knowledge of their chosen areas of history, philosophy, sociology and social anthropology of health and medicine and of the critical debates within them;
- Acquired a conceptual understanding that enables the evaluation of current research and methodologies;
- Formed a critical view of the roles of the health, medicine and society.

Skills and other attributes -

By the end of the course, students should have:

- Acquired or consolidated methodological, linguistic, technical and ancillary skills appropriate for research in their chosen area;
- Demonstrated independent judgement, based on their own research;
- Presented their own ideas in a public forum and learned to contribute constructively within an international environment.

Continuing -

Students admitted for the MPhil can apply to continue as PhD students. The usual preconditions for continuing to the PhD are an overall first class mark in the MPhil, a satisfactory performance in an interview and agreement of the PhD proposal with a potential supervisor.

Teaching

The course is overseen by a Manager who takes responsibility for day-to-day oversight of the course and liaison with staff and students. Students choose a ‘home’ subject (History, Philosophy, Sociology or Social Anthropology), and the Advisor for that subject guides them in formulating a programme of study. Students work with supervisors in writing their essays and dissertation.

The core modules are the main teaching resource for this course. All students attend all core modules which run twice a week during Michaelmas term and are led by different senior members of teaching staff and focus on selected readings. Eight optional modules run during Lent term, and students are advised to attend at least two of these. In Easter term students attend Dissertation seminars which provide opportunities for them to present their own work. Students receive two one-to-one supervisions on the modules on which they choose to write essays and four on their dissertations.

The Advisors assist students in the identification of a topic and a supervisor for their dissertation during Michaelmas term. Students will be expected to start work on their dissertation during Michaelmas and continue working on it throughout the course of the year.

See more on the website - http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hphpmphms/study

Assessment

Thesis:
Students submit a dissertation of up to 15,000 words.

Essays:
Students submit three essays, one of which is up to 3000 words and two of which are up to 5000 words.

How to Apply

Please see details of this on the website here - http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hphpmphms/apply

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The one year MPhil programmes in Criminology and Criminological Research regularly recruit around 40 students each year. Read more
The one year MPhil programmes in Criminology and Criminological Research regularly recruit around 40 students each year. The programmes have a high national and international standing, and the MPhil in Criminological Research is a recognised Doctoral Training Centre pathway towards a PhD and so candidates can apply to the Institute of Criminology for Economic and Social Research Council 1+3 funding.

The MPhil programmes consist of core modules and seminars on topics in key areas. The core modules are compulsory and familiarise students with current criminological thinking and research. The other seminars cover a range of topics which include criminal justice, comparative criminology, mental health and crime, a sociology of punishment, developmental criminology, a sociology of prison life, policing, social contexts of crime and crime prevention (please note that not all optional courses are run each year).

The MPhil in Criminological Research includes compulsory participation in the Social Sciences Research Methods course (which provides additional research methods training).

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lwcrmpcmr

Course detail

The basic aims of the MPhil programme are:

1. to offer an up-to-date and high-quality course, introducing students to some of the most important theory and research in criminology
2. to offer a sound foundation for more advanced work, such as that involved in research and teaching careers in criminology, and in particular for progression to the Institute’s PhD in Criminology
3. to provide those who wish to proceed to careers beyond academic or research contexts with a sound foundation of knowledge and methodological skills, which can be used effectively in relation to work in criminal justice agencies, the legal profession or other professional or voluntary organisations.

Learning Outcomes

Students should acquire:

- an understanding of core criminological and criminal justice theories; a critical awareness of current problems and debates within the field; originality in application of knowledge to current issues; and skills in critical evaluation of theoretical and empirical literature relevant to criminological and criminal justice research;

- a comprehensive understanding of qualitative and quantitative research methods used in criminology; the ability to use acquired knowledge to propose new hypotheses and address research problems; the ability to organise research; the ability to independently acquire and interpret additional knowledge needed for their own research; and an understanding of the quality of work required to satisfy peer review;

- the ability to use national data banks and develop competencies in devising and implementing surveys, active mastery of advanced statistics; the ability to use a range of qualitative methods such as interviews, observation and ethnography, and documentary and discourse analysis, and the ability to apply those research techniques to current research questions; students should also acquire the ability to use theoretical knowledge creatively and independently in order to be able to handle practical issues arising in empirical work; to understand the problems of knowledge transfer to non-specialist audiences, and develop skills in communicating criminological knowledge to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Continuing

For progression from the MPhil to the PhD: the Institute strongly recommends that students who intend to register for the PhD apply for the MPhil in Criminological Research in the first instance. Progression to the PhD is dependent on a good performance on the MPhil programme.

Continuation to the PhD programme will involve a separate application process, undertaken during the MPhil year. Prospective PhD students are encouraged to discuss their plans with their MPhil supervisor as early as possible during the MPhil year. Please see our web pages at: http://www.crim.cam.ac.uk/courses/phd/prospective/#applications

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Institute of Criminology is pleased to be able to offer a number of Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) 1+3 or +3 studentships. Each of the studentships covers the cost of the University Composition Fee for four years, together with a maintenance stipend for each year. Where appropriate, the Institute can apply for an enhanced stipend for anyone wishing to pursue research which is likely to involve advanced quantitative research. The studentship enables each successful applicant to study for the M.Phil. in Criminological Research in the first year, followed by three years of doctoral research leading to the award of a Ph.D.

For further information on the ESRC studentships, and other possible sources of funding, please see our funding pages.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MPhil programmes consist of core modules and seminars on topics in key areas. The core modules are compulsory and familiarise students with current criminological thinking and research. Read more
The MPhil programmes consist of core modules and seminars on topics in key areas. The core modules are compulsory and familiarise students with current criminological thinking and research. The other seminars cover a range of topics which include criminal justice, comparative criminology, mental health and crime, a sociology of punishment, developmental criminology, a sociology of prison life, policing, social contexts of crime and crime prevention (please note that not all optional courses are run each year).

The MPhil in Criminology runs from 1 October to 30 June.

Key benefits

- The programmes have a high national and international standing.

- We regularly recruit around 40 students each year from all around the world.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lwcrmpmcr

Course detail

On completion, students should acquire:

- an understanding of criminological and criminal justice theories; a critical awareness of current problems and debates within the field; originality in application of knowledge to current issues; and skills in critical evaluation of theoretical and empirical literature relevant to criminological and criminal justice research;

- a comprehensive understanding of qualitative and quantitative research methods used in criminology; the ability to use acquired knowledge to propose new hypotheses and address research problems; the ability to organise research; the ability to independently acquire and interpret additional knowledge relating to research, and an understanding of the quality of work required to satisfy peer review.

- the ability to use theoretical knowledge creatively and independently; apply research competencies to practical issues, and develop skills in communicating criminological knowledge to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Format

The basic aims of the MPhil programme are:

- to offer an up-to-date and high-quality course, introducing students to some of the most important theory and research in criminology

- to offer a sound foundation for more advanced work, such as that involved in research and teaching careers in criminology, and in particular for progression to the Institute’s PhD in Criminology

- to provide those who do wish to proceed to careers beyond academic or research contexts with a sound foundation of knowledge and methodological skills, which can be used effectively in relation to work in criminal justice agencies, the legal profession or other professional or voluntary organisations.

Assessment

A dissertation of not more than 18,000 words (including footnotes or endnotes, but excluding appendices and bibliographical references) on a criminological topic chosen by the student and approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculty of Law. Students are expected to demonstrate, via the dissertation, a critical understanding of research principles. Each student is required to make a presentation on the topic of the candidate’s dissertation. The dissertation accounts for 35% of the assessed coursework, and the dissertation presentation accounts for 5% of the assessed coursework.

Four essays, each of not more than 3,000 words, on topics chosen by the candidate from lists of topics announced by the Examiners, provided that one such essay shall be from among the topics relating to the core course in Criminological Theories; each essay accounts for 10% of the assessed coursework.

A methodological essay or exercise of not more than 3,000 words chosen by the candidate from a list announced by the Examiners relating to the core course in Criminological Research Methods (the exercise may comprise different elements); the methodological exercise accounts for 20% of the assessed coursework.

Continuing

For progression from the MPhil to the PhD: the Institute strongly recommends that students who intend to register for the PhD apply for the MPhil in Criminological Research in the first instance.

Continuation to the PhD programme will involve a separate application process, undertaken during the MPhil year. Prospective PhD students are encouraged to discuss their plans with their MPhil supervisor as early as possible during the MPhil year. Please see our web pages at http://www.crim.cam.ac.uk/courses/phd/prospective/#applications

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Institute offers funding from the Wakefield Scholarship Fund (for applicants born or educated in Canada, Australia or New Zealand) and the Manuel López-Rey Studentship Fund (open to all applicants). In addition, the University offers a range of funding. For further information on sources of funding, please see our funding pages

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Epidemiology is study of the distribution and determinants of health-related states or events in specified populations, and the application of this study to control and prevent health problems at the population level. Read more
Epidemiology is study of the distribution and determinants of health-related states or events in specified populations, and the application of this study to control and prevent health problems at the population level. Recognition of the importance of these study areas has led to an increasing demand for professionals with formal training in epidemiology.

This full-time course is designed to provide successful students with the necessary knowledge and specialist skills to be able to design, conduct, critique and apply epidemiological research in either a service or an academic setting.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvphmpepi

Course detail

The course is open to medical and non-medical graduates and is aimed at:

- Graduate students who wish to pursue a career in epidemiological research
- Graduate students who wish to gain an advanced understanding of epidemiological and statistical principles to underpin future research interests.
- Public health professionals who wish to gain a fuller understanding of epidemiology and its application to public health in practice
A variety of teaching and learning methods are used during the course including lectures, practical exercises, one-to-one supervisions and self-directed learning. The level moves from basic to advanced epidemiology within the three terms.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course participants should:
- have an advanced understanding of epidemiological theory and be able to apply it in a practical setting;
- have knowledge of current developments in epidemiological research;
- be able to identify, synthesise and critique relevant published research literature;
- be able to interpret and apply the study findings;
- have developed a critical approach to the evaluation of their own and others research work.
- have the necessary skills to be able to be able to carry out epidemiological research including:
*selection of an appropriate study design
*development of a research protocol
*collection and management of epidemiological data
*application of appropriate statistical analysis;

Format

A variety of teaching and learning methods are used during the course including lectures, practical exercises, one-to-one supervisions and self-directed learning. The level moves from basic to advanced within the three terms.

Students provide feedback after each lecture and we also have three staff-student liaison meetings throughout the academic year.

Assessment

- Term 1 – Informal Epidemiology Assessment
- Term 2 – Informal Biostatistical Assessment

- A thesis not exceeding 20,000 words in length is required and is completed in the Easter Term.
- Two essays, each not exceeding 3,000 words in length are required.
- Two written papers, each of which may cover all the areas of study prescribed in the syllabus, are taken in the Easter Term.
- Written papers, both of 1.5 hours duration

The full-time components of the course are completed by the end of July. However, to complete the course, students will be required to attend a viva in person on a date to be set in August or early September.

Continuing

Students currently studying for the MPhil in Epidemiology in the Department, who wish to continue to a PhD, are required to achieve a minimum mark of 70%

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MPhil in Multi-disciplinary Gender Studies provides rigorous advanced training in the multi-disciplinary study of gender. Read more
The MPhil in Multi-disciplinary Gender Studies provides rigorous advanced training in the multi-disciplinary study of gender. The course is designed for those students who wish to prepare for PhD or further research and also, for those who want to enhance their understanding of 'gender' by undertaking a one-year MPhil only.

The primary objective of the course is to introduce students from a wide variety of academic, business and policy backgrounds to the traditions, methods and front-line research that shape an advanced gender analysis of human society. Over twenty different departments within the University of Cambridge come together on this course to address a range of topics such as Conflict; Globalization; Labour Market Inequality; Public Policy; Culture; Bio-medical advances, Experimental Psychology, Human Rights and Justice, Literature and the Arts, Culture and Antiquity. Graduates from this MPhil will emerge as highly desirable candidates for NGO, governmental, policy, business, and academic careers.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsgsmpmgs

Course detail

The course aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to:

1. use a range of methods for gathering, analyzing and interpreting research material.
2. apply normative theories to substantive research topics.
3. frame research questions, to construct appropriate research designs, and develop a thorough grasp of a wide range of methodological approaches.
4. interpret complex research publications effectively.
5. independently manage primary research, including data management and the writing up of research as well as understanding codes of research practice and research ethics.
6. research and also to make use of constructive criticism.

Learning Outcomes

The MPhil programme is designed to enable students to conduct independent research in the field of gender studies. The outcomes of the programme are achieved both through focused study of a wide range of selected specialised aspects of gender analysis, and through development of more general research skills and methods that enable the student to produce original, independent work. The course aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to:

1. use a range of methods for gathering, analysing and interpreting research material.
2. apply normative theories to substantive research topics.
3. frame research questions, to construct appropriate research designs, and develop a thorough grasp of a wide range of methodological approaches.
4. interpret complex research publications effectively.
5. independently manage primary research, including data management and the writing up of research as well as understanding codes of research practice and research ethics.
6. present research and also to make use of constructive criticism.

Format

Students will take the following:

1. Theory and Controversy (MGS 1)
2. Research Methodologies (MGS 2)
3. Multi-disciplinary Text Seminar (MGS 3)
4. Multi-disciplinary Gender Research Seminar
5. Multi-disciplinary Speaker Programme
6. Dissertation.

Courses and seminars will run for the first two terms (Michaelmas and Lent). Dissertations are expected to be completed throughout the third term (Easter) and the vacation under guidance from a supervisor.

Students are introduced to a wide range of disciplinary methods and research topics and are encouraged to debate ideas and concepts throughout the course. In addition, students will have the opportunity to interact with world-leading experts in gender theory hosted by the Centre throughout the year through the Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professorship. Group discussion, led by experts, forms the core of the MGS 1 and MGS 3 courses. In addition to the research dissertation, students are required to produce two unsupervised essays of not more than 5000 words. These essays are assessed to examine how well the student has understood the complex debates and theoretical ideas taught in MGS1, MGS2 and MGS3.

Assessment

- 20,000 word dissertation submitted in mid July.
- 2 essays of 5,000 words each submitted at the end of the second term and the beginning of the third term.

Feedback on each submitted essay and the dissertation will be provided.

Continuing

70% overall score in MPhil.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This course has run since 2011, previously being integrated with the MPhil TMAT courses and taken part-time over two years. It is being re-launched in 2015 as a full-time one year course, based in the Cambridge Institute of Public Health’s Department of Public Health and Primary Care. Read more
This course has run since 2011, previously being integrated with the MPhil TMAT courses and taken part-time over two years. It is being re-launched in 2015 as a full-time one year course, based in the Cambridge Institute of Public Health’s Department of Public Health and Primary Care. More than half of the curriculum is shared with the MPhils in Public Health and Epidemiology. The aim of the course is to provide students with theoretical knowledge and skills as well as practical research experience to launch an academic clinical career in primary care.

The course draws on local strengths in working with large databases, primary care-based clinical trials and a wide range of other appropriate methods of quantitative and qualitative data collection and analyses. Throughout the course students are able to draw on the research expertise within the Institute of Public Health and wider expertise in the University.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvphmppcr

Course detail

The aim of the course is to provide students with theoretical knowledge and skills as well as practical research experience to launch an academic clinical career in primary care. Specifically, the course aims to:

1. Contribute to the commitment of the Cambridge University Hospital’s NHS Foundation Trust (CUHNHSFT), Cambridgeshire Primary Care Trust/ Clinical Commissioning Group and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) to continuing professional development of NHS staff in an integrated academic and clinical environment;
2. Develop a cadre of primary care clinical research leaders who will pursue clinical Academic careers within academia, the NHS and industry;
3. Contribute to the commitment of the Health Education East of England to continuing professional development of GP Specialty Trainees in an integrated academic and clinical environment;
4. Expand critical and current knowledge of research methodologies through an academically vigorous education programme offered in a world-leading primary care clinical research environment;
5. Equip clinical researchers with knowledge about the complex issues associated with conducting sound translational research in general practice and community settings.

Learning Outcomes

Students who complete this programme successfully will have gained an understanding of the primary care research context, including the distinctive nature and contribution of primary care research, and the contribution of key underpinning methods. Specifically, graduates will possess a grounding in primary care-relevant epidemiological, psychological, sociological and health services research methods, statistical methods and data analyses including surveys, trials and evidence synthesis. Upon successful completion each student will be able to apply contemporary research tools to clinically relevant areas of investigation in primary care.

Successful completion of the MPhil will also equip students with the skills and knowledge defined by the Academy of Medical Sciences’ Supplementary Guidelines for the Annual Review of Competence Progression (ARCP) for Specialty Registrars undertaking joint clinical and academic training programmes (September 2011).

Michaelmas Term

This term focuses on epidemiological and biostatistical principles and procedures. Teaching sessions during this term will be shared with students from the MPhils in Epidemiology and Public Health course. The teaching in this term also includes training in basic data handling and analysis using the statistical package Stata.

The three modules are:

- Epidemiology
- Biostatistics
- Data handling and appraisal

During this term you will also complete an essay on the epidemiology of a chosen condition in a primary care population. This essay is a formal part of the MPhil examination and will contribute to your final mark. You should also begin to research an appropriate topic for your MPhil thesis. You should discuss this proposal with you Course Supervisor to assess the suitability of the topic and the availability of relevant data.

There will also be an assessment based on the epidemiological component of the first term. This assessment is informal and does not count towards your degree. The assessment provides your Course Supervisor and Course Directors with a guide to your progress. A guideline answer sheet will be provided at the end of the assessment.

Lent Term

This term includes modular-based lectures and seminars in more advanced aspects of epidemiological research and public health which are shared with students from the MPhils in Epidemiology and Public Health, and specific modules on Primary Care Research not shared with other MPhil students.

Modules shared with the MPhils in Epidemiology and Public Health:

- Health Policy
- Social Science
- Chronic disease epidemiology
- Genetic epidemiology and Public health genomics
- Health Promotion

Primary Care Research modules:

- Introduction to Primary Care Research
- Use of routine data in Primary Care
- Designing, delivering and analysing surveys in primary care
- Qualitative research

Please note some modules may move from term to term.

During this term you will also complete a second essay which should take the form of a protocol for your thesis research. This essay is a formal part of the MPhil examination and will contribute to your final mark. Before starting your protocol, the title of your thesis should be agreed with you Course and Thesis Supervisor. Both you Course and Thesis Supervisor should sign the thesis title form confirming the title. All students must have a designated Thesis Supervisor (in some cases this individual may also be the Course Supervisor).

Easter Term

This term includes a small number of modular-based lectures and seminars again shared with students from the MPhils in Epidemiology and Publich Health.

- Clinical Trials
- Health Economics
- Ethics and Law

The remainder of the term is dedicated to revision for the written examinations in June and thesis work. The term ends on the last business day of July 2016 with the hand-in of the thesis. If you leave the UK, you must be prepared to travel back to Cambridge for an oral examination, if required.

Assessment

A thesis not exceeding 20,000 words in length, including footnotes, but excluding tables, appendices, and bibliography, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculties of Clinical Medicine and Veterinary Medicine.

Two essays, each not exceeding 3,000 words in length, on subjects approved by the Degree Committee

Two written papers, each of which may cover all the areas of study prescribed in the syllabus.

The course components are completed by the end of July. However, to complete the course, students will be required to attend a viva in person on a date (to be announced) in late August or early September.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The course aims to provide students with an opportunity to study at an advanced level, recent social changes, and to enable students to integrate such knowledge with an understanding of theory and research methods, in preparation for research at doctoral level or its equivalent in other professional contexts. Read more
The course aims to provide students with an opportunity to study at an advanced level, recent social changes, and to enable students to integrate such knowledge with an understanding of theory and research methods, in preparation for research at doctoral level or its equivalent in other professional contexts.

The course thus aims to provide students, who already have a degree in social science, with in-depth knowledge of some key dimensions of modern society, in the context of globalization.

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