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Sociology×

London South Bank University, Full Time Masters Degrees in Sociology

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Taught by internationally recognised members of staff with a range of innovative research experiences, the course is interdisciplinary. Read more
Taught by internationally recognised members of staff with a range of innovative research experiences, the course is interdisciplinary. It requires the use of theoretical and methodological insights, knowledge and perspectives of different disciplines. This provides opportunities for in-depth understanding and explanation of the problem of Forced Migration and its interface with other social science disciplines, such as development studies, law, sociology, anthropology, political science and psychology.

Starting in either January or September this programme aims to develop your critical engagement with the theories and practices of forced migration and development studies. In-depth knowledge of both disciplines is critical to understand and explain the causes and consequences of forced migration, analyse, critique and evaluate host governments, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNCHR) and NGO's policies on protection, reception and settlement strategies, as well as the short and long-term responses of inter and non-governmental organisations.

MSc Refugee Studies is led by Professor Gaim Kibreab, an internationally recognised expert on forced migration, resettlement, repatriation and development, conflict, environment, water resources governance, post-conflict reconstruction, gender and development, livelihoods, governance and civil society.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/refugee-studies-msc

Modules

- International refugee law

- Asylum policy in the EU and member states
This module begins with a brief history of the EU and traces trends and transformations in the post-war period, before focusing on five case studies and then examining of the different but related processes of harmonisation and convergence between EU member states. The links between sending and receiving counties and new initiatives linking development (aid) and asylum policy will also be considered. The course will also spend several weeks examining the asylum policies of the Americas and Africa. We will look into the differences between the systems and the causes behind those differences. Are those systems better than the Common European Asylum System? If so, why? Can we learn from other systems or are there too many fundamental differences.

- Forced migration and human rights
This module examines the inter-relationship between international human rights standards and forced migration. It will familiarise the student both with internationally and regionally protected human rights standards (civil and political, economic social and cultural) whose violation gives rise to forced migration and with the human rights issues in the host states to which the forced migrants move. It will introduce students to the UN and regional systems governing these issues and to specific themes which bring human rights and forced migration together.

- Forced migration and development
The module introduces the key concepts in Forced Migration and Development and different categories of forced migrants--asylum-seekers, refugees, IDPs, oustees and disaster victims. It examines the multiple and complex nature of Forced Migration, evaluates the responses of the international, inter-governmental, non-governmental and governmental responses to the short-medium and long-term needs of forced migrants and the poor sections of the host population. It critically analyses and evaluates the positive and negative impacts of forced migrants on host commmoduleies. How forced migrants (re)-construct their commmoduleies and livelihoods in countries of asylum and places of destination, as well in countries and places of origin in the context of post-conflict reconstruction are also examined in detail.

- Contemporary issues in development
The module aims to provide a comprehensive and detailed introduction to the contemporary challenges facing developing countries in the coming years. Topics vary from one year to the next, but currently the focus is on issues of poverty and poverty reduction; aid and its effectiveness; debt and debt servicing; governance and transparency; the environmental impact of development; patterns of inequality; the impact of urbanisation; and more generally, on changing economic relations within the world economy following the 2008-9 global crisis and subsequent events. The module also assesses the main developing strategies followed by selected middle and low-income countries, with detailed case studies drawn from Asia, Africa and Latin America. It also examines these topics from a gender perspective.

- Research methods for development
A series of lectures introduces students to the main epistemological approaches to research and key research strategies, and focuses on mixed-methods research (MMR). In parallel, students will participate in tutor-led workshops to develop data summary and analysis skills with specific computer-based packages.

- Dissertation (triple module)

Employability

The course is interdisciplinary and designed for graduates who wish to pursue careers with governments (eg immigration authorities), immigration lawyers, lobbying groups, national and international NGOs, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, and other international humanitarian and development organisations.

Some graduates of the MSc Refugee Studies programme have established their own NGOs and are serving asylum seekers, refugees and internally displaced persons in their countries of origin.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

You'll be taught by academic staff with a wide range of theoretical, practical and research experiences of refugee studies in the EU, Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean.

Teaching and learning

Study hours:
Year 1 class contact time is typically 16 hours per week plus individual tutorial time and independent study. This accumulates to typically two days and two evenings a week.

Assessment

All modules apart from the dissertation are assessed by 5,000 word pieces of coursework.

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The focus of this programme is on contemporary substantive issues in criminology and criminal justice and on criminological research methods. Read more
The focus of this programme is on contemporary substantive issues in criminology and criminal justice and on criminological research methods. It is particularly appropriate for those engaged in criminal justice policy analysis and development or similar work in allied fields.

The programme develops a theoretical, policy and technical understanding of key issues within criminology, criminal justice and research methods. More specifically, it aims to develop an advanced understanding of the complex nature of crime, harm and victimisation together with an appreciation of the role of the state/criminal justice system in the regulation of human behaviour, deviance and crime. The programme will equip you to design and implement social scientific research using a broad range of methodologies, consider research ethics, analyse and present the material such research generates.

Through combining criminology and research methods, the programme enables you to think logically and in an informed manner about criminological issues. The programme fosters a critical awareness of the relationship between theory, policy and practice and enables you to utilize your research knowledge of research skills and translate these into research practice in the field of criminology and broader social science research professions.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/criminology-social-research-methods-msc

Modules

You'll undertake modules from a broad base of subject areas including:

- Criminological theory
This module charts the development of criminological thinking from the onset of modernity through to the present day. It will place discrete theories in their proper sociological, historical, political and cultural contexts. It will seek to establish the implications and relationships of various theories to criminal justice policy. A number of contemporary issues (terrorism, urban disturbances, and gang culture) will be explored with a view to critically evaluating the value of competing theoretical frameworks.

- Crime, harm and victimisation
The module aims to deconstruct the fundamental elements of criminology: the crime, the criminal and the victim. It begins by examining historical and contemporary patterns of crime and criminality, as officially measured, within the UK and beyond. It then engages with more critical academic debates about defining and measuring crime, considering definitions of crime as: a breach of criminal law; a violation of collective conscience; a product of conduct norms; a social construct; ideological censure; a gendered reality; a violation of human rights, and; social or environmental harm. The module engages with critical deconstructions of the 'offender' and the 'victim', considering how these are socially constructed and how our understanding of these, like of 'crime', has changed and continues to change in late-/post-modern society.

- Responding to crime: justice, social control and punishment
This module explores some of the key issues and controversies in the delivery of justice, social control and punishment. It begins with a critical consideration of the concept of justice and emphasises the significance of this in relation to how the state responds to various forms of crime. It encourages you to think critically about the role of the state in the regulation of behaviour and provides an overview of key changes that have occurred in the field of crime control and criminal justice. One of the key features of contemporary crime control discourse is the rise of risk management and the pursuit of security. This module outlines the ways in which such a discourse has transformed criminal justice thinking and practices of both policing and penal policy, and also of crime (and harm) prevention.

- Criminological research in practice
This module uses examples from recent and current research conducted by members of the Crime and Justice Research Group at LSBU and external guest speakers to develop both the research training and subject understanding elements of the MSc, demonstrating how research becomes knowledge – generating theoretical advances, policy initiatives, new research questions and university curricula. Lectures/seminars will take the form of a research commentary, talking you through a research project from idea inception through research design, fieldwork, analysis and dissemination and, where appropriate, on to the influences research has had (or could have) on subsequent academic works and policy developments. Particular emphasis will be placed on challenges peculiar to criminological research.

- Methods for social research and evaluation: philosophy, design and data collection
This module introduces you to core concepts in social research and shows how they can be used to address social scientific questions and practical issues in policy evaluation. You'll be introduced to central topics in the philosophy of social sciences and the effect they have on research choices. You are then introduced to different ways research can be designed and the ways design affects permissible inferences. You are then introduced to the theory of measurement and sampling. The final third of the module focuses on acquiring data ranging from survey methods through qualitative data collection methods to secondary data.

- Data analytic techniques for social scientists
You are introduced to a range of analytic techniques commonly used by social scientists. It begins by introducing you to statistical analysis, it then moves to techniques used to analyse qualitative data. It concludes by looking at relational methods and data reduction techniques. You'll also be introduced to computer software (SPSS, NVivo and Ucinet) that implements the techniques. Students will gain both a conceptual understanding of the techniques and the means to apply them to their own research projects. An emphasis will be placed on how these techniques can be used in social evaluation.

- Dissertation
The dissertation is a major part of your work on the MSc, reflected in its value of 60 credits. The aim of the dissertation is to enable students to expand and deepen their knowledge of a substantive area in criminology, whilst simultaneously developing their methodological skills. You'll choose an area of investigation and apply the research skills of design and process, modes of data generation and data analysis techniques to undertake a 15,000 word dissertation. You'll be allocated a dissertation supervisor from the departmental team and will meet regularly for personal supervision meetings.

Employability

This MSc will enable you to pursue a range of professional careers in criminal justice related work in statutory, commercial or community voluntary sectors and operating at central, regional and local government levels, for example, the Home Office; police forces; local government; crime and disorder reduction partnerships and their equivalencies throughout the world.

The acquisition of specific criminological and research methods knowledge will also enhance the career opportunities if you are currently working in the field. The specialist focus on research methods also offers an excellent foundation for those interested in undertaking subsequent doctoral research in the field.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

The Crime and Criminal Justice Research Group, (CCJRG), at LSBU has developed a strong national and international reputation for delivering high quality and real life impact research. It has worked closely with a range of government agencies, including the Office for Criminal Justice Reform (Ministry of Justice); Government Office for London; the Scottish Executive, Northern Ireland Office and the Equalities and Human Rights Commission. It has also undertaken extensive research in collaboration with various London local authorities together with a range of voluntary and charity-based agencies.

Placements

Our criminology programme also has a strong voluntary work scheme.You're encouraged to undertake voluntary work in a variety of criminal justice related agencies. Recent positions have been within the police service, the prison service, legal advice, victim support, domestic violence and child abuse agencies and youth offending and youth mentoring schemes.

Teaching and learning

Study hours:
Year 1 class contact time is typically 6 hours per week part time and 12 hours per week full time plus individual tutorial and independent study.

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Good quality housing is one of the most basic necessities in producing thriving communities and ensuring the health and wellbeing of individuals, so the job market around housing provides plenty of opportunities to graduates. Read more
Good quality housing is one of the most basic necessities in producing thriving communities and ensuring the health and wellbeing of individuals, so the job market around housing provides plenty of opportunities to graduates.

This professionally-oriented course will extend your professional knowledge and ability to perform at a senior level in the housing and housing-related professions.

The Masters element requires the submission of a 20,000 word dissertation in the third year. You'll be expected to attend a series of three research workshops (as well as individual supervision). The learning style is designed to provide tutor group support through discussion, as well as directed reading and regular progress meetings between students and supervisors.

You'll study different planning systems and develop your planning skills within a comparative context and visit a European country to investigate its planning practices - currently students visit Amsterdam in the Netherlands. In the past visits have included Barcelona, Bucharest and Venice.

The course is professionally accredited by the Chartered Institute of Housing.

Housing Studies PgDip

You can also choose to study the PgDip for six modules; Full-time (12 months) or part-time (24 months).

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/housing-studies-ma

Modules

The first year concentrates on housing policy and the changing role of the housing professional. You'll examine housing and planning issues, and running the social business.

In the second year you'll explore housing economics and finance; housing law; and the interrelationship of housing and health. During the second year students you'll complete a comparative study of the UK and Dutch housing systems on a European study visit to the Netherlands.

Year 1:
- The new housing professional
- Housing law
- Running the social business
- Planning for housing

Year 2:
- Housing, health and social care
- Comparative housing and study visit
- Economy and housing finance

Year 3:
- Dissertation

Award

The PgCert award requires completion of 60 credits, which you'll complete in the first year. For PgDip, an additional 60 credits are required in the second year. For full MA award, you'll complete the dissertation during your third year, achieving 180 credits.

Assessment

Modules are assessed by a range of coursework, design and practice based projects, presentations and a dissertation. There are no exams on this programme.

Professional links

The full Masters course is accredited as fulfilling the academic requirements for the Chartered Institute of Housing. Our students can register as student members and go on to become full members after completion of the Institutes' professional experience requirements. Students applying for full membership of the CIH must have work experience in a housing related field. This is included in the course fees.

The Chartered Institute of Housing was granted a Royal Charter in 1894, it provides opportunities for learning about and improving housing.

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