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Rutgers, State University of New Jersey Masters Degrees

We have 18 Rutgers, State University of New Jersey Masters Degrees

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There are two tracks in our American Studies MA program. Read more

There are two tracks in our American Studies MA program. The General Track prepares those students who may wish to go on to a PhD in American Studies or another field through classes in the history, theories, and methods of American Studies and an original research project. The Public Humanities track is designed to ground students in the history, theory and methods of the public humanities, and in a foundation in nonprofit management, and bring it all together with project-based courses, an internship and capstone, preparing students for careers in cultural and community institutions.

Masters General Track Graduation Requirements:

  • Concepts and Interpretations of American Studies (3 credits)
  • Methodological Approaches to American Studies (3 credits)
  • One course in public humanities, chosen in consultation with the program director (3 credits)
  • Major Interdisciplinary Area (12 credits)
  • Elective work in other disciplines or interdisciplinary fields (6 credits)
  • Thesis Option: (6 credits) or an additional 6 credits in electives

Public Humanities Track Graduation Requirements:

 Year 1

  • Introduction to American Studies (3 cr)
  • Public Humanities or Public History course (3 cr)
  • Introduction to Nonprofit Management (3 cr)
  • Additional Nonprofit Management course (e.g. Introduction to Nonprofit Budgeting, Grantwriting and Grant Management, Fundraising, chosen in consultation with advisor) (3 cr)
  • Project-based elective (e.g. Introduction to Digital Public Humanities, Murals, Street Art and Graffiti: Power and Public Art in Contemporary Urban America, Oral History class, chosen in consultation with advisor) (3 cr)

Year 2

  • Electives (content or method specific) (6 cr)
  • Internship (3 cr)
  • Capstone Project (6 cr)

To apply, you will need to submit: 

  • A personal statement of up to 1500 words describing your interest in the public humanities, including and especially any personal or professional experience in the field.
  • Writing or Work Sample. Applicants must submit an academic or professional writing sample up to 6,000 words long, or, for those with professional experience in public history or the public humanities, a work sample (such as an exhibit plan, program planning materials, websites, etc) accompanied by a brief cover letter that explains the applicant’s role in its creation.
  • 3 letters of rec and official transcripts. 

The GRE is not required.

We welcome students who are already employed in public history and public humanities into our program. Depending on your professional experience, it may be possible to waive one or both nonprofit management courses and the internship, at the discretion of the program chair and with the support of a faculty advisor.

Policies and Procedures for All MA Students:

A maximum of 12 graduate credits may be transferred from another institution toward the completion of the M.A. degree. Acceptance of these credits will be at the discretion of the Program Director in consultation with the Graduate School and will depend on the field of the student's Master's degree, the appropriateness to American Studies of specific courses taken, and the rules of the Graduate School.

 With the advance approval of the Program Director, the student’s academic advisor, and the course instructors, up to three Rutgers University-Newark undergraduate courses at the 300 or 400 level may be counted toward the completion of the M.A. Degree. No more than one undergraduate course may be taken per semester. To receive graduate credit, the student must have been assigned and successfully completed significant additional work in the undergraduate course.

 With the approval of the Program Director and the student’s academic advisor, up to six credits in directed readings may be counted toward the completion of the M..A. Degree.

Notwithstanding the above options, at least five courses (15 credits) must be taken as master’s seminars.

Students choosing the thesis option must signal their intention and identify a thesis advisor no later than after having completed 18 credits.

Upon admission to the Master’s program, each student will be assigned an academic advisor from the American Studies faculty. Students are free to change advisors at the end of their first year. Every year, however, students must submit to the Program Director a form identifying their advisor.



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The 30 credit MS program in applied physics offers graduate courses in physics in collaboration with the New Jersey Institute of Technology. Read more

The 30 credit MS program in applied physics offers graduate courses in physics in collaboration with the New Jersey Institute of Technology. The program is designed to meet the demands of modern industry for young researchers with a basic knowledge of quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics and electrodynamics that they can apply it to problems in laser spectroscopy, photonics, magnetic resonance and surface physics.

Learning goals and assessment

Learning Goal 1 for Students: Master the fundamental knowledge of the field.

Assessment of student achievement of Goal 1:

  • Performance on homework, examinations and class participation in courses
  • Comprehensive qualifying examination to assess basic knowledge in physics
  • Essay on a current topic in the field or a research thesis evaluated by faculty
  • Placement in a career or a continuation of graduate study that requires ability in applied physics.

Role of the program in helping students to achieve Goal 1:

  • Assure that students are being prepared in a coherent and academically rigorous fashion
  • Effective monitoring of student progress
  • Evaluations of teaching effectiveness of instructors in graduate courses
  • If effectiveness is below expectations, work with instructors to improve
  • Periodic review of curriculum offerings and assessment tools

Learning Goal 2 for Students: Engage in and conduct original research (for Master’s degrees with thesis)

Assessment of graduate student achievement of Goal 2:

  • Assessment of quality of Master’s thesis
  • Public defense of thesis
  • Critical reading of thesis by a committee of graduate faculty members
  • Submission and acceptance of conference papers and of peer reviewed articles based on the thesis
  • Achievement of students as evidenced by professional placement, selection for conference presentations, peer-reviewed publications, and the awarding of individual grants

Role of graduate program in helping students achieve Goal 2:

  • Provide an early introduction to research methods and opportunities for research
  • Provide opportunities and support to present research and receive feedback

Learning Goal 3 for Students: Prepare professionals working in applied physics

Assessment of graduate student achievement of Goal 3:

  • Evaluations of teaching effectiveness of graduate student instructors
  • Collection of placement and awards data

Role of the program in helping students achieve Goal 3:

  • Host professional development and career exploration activities
  • Acquaint students with non-academic career opportunities

The leadership of the Graduate Program of the Department of Applied Physics will regularly review the structure and content of the program and feedback received from assessments, surveys and students. These reviews are used to improve the program to achieve the goal of providing the best possible education for students.

Programs and Facilities

Students in the graduate program in applied physics have access to many resources, including far-infrared free electron laser, laser spectroscopy laboratory, surface science laboratory, biosensor laboratory, and a Microelectronics Research Center with class 10 clean room facility for CMOS technology and micromachining research. Other available technology includes molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) for III-V optoelectronic materials and device research, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and physical vapor deposition (PVD) materials synthesis, ultrafast optical and optoelectronic phenomena, ultrathin film and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), Electronic Imaging Center, rapid thermal annealing, infrared optoelectronic device laboratory, and various materials- and device-characterization facilities.

Interdisciplinary applied physics research is carried out in collaboration with electrical engineering, chemistry, biological sciences, and geological sciences faculty members, as well as with the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ). There also is extensive cooperative research with the National Solar Observatory, Bell Laboratories, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, and other industrial and federal research laboratories.



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The Master of Science in Biology is designed to provide students with advanced knowledge of both plant and animal biology and microbiology. Read more

The Master of Science in Biology is designed to provide students with advanced knowledge of both plant and animal biology and microbiology. The program requires a minimum of 30 credits of graduate work. These must include at least one 3-credit course in four of the following five areas: cell biology/biochemistry, molecular biology, computational biology, ecology/evolution, and plant biology.

To fulfill the written thesis requirement, students may conduct laboratory, field work, or bibliographic research. Students selecting the experimentally-based research thesis option must complete a minimum of 24 credits of course work and 6 credits of research with a graduate faculty member of the department. Students choosing the bibliographic-based research thesis option are required to take 27 credits of course work and 3 credits of independent study with a graduate faculty member of the department. For both experimentally-based and bibliographic-based research thesis options, the thesis will be defended publicly followed by a question-and-answer session with the thesis committee. The thesis committee must be approved by the Graduate Program Director and consist of the primary advisor and at least one other reader who is a member of the graduate faculty.



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The goal of the Chemistry M.S. Program is to provide students with professional knowledge and technical skills above the B.S. level which will enhance their career potential and opportunities for advancing in their field. Read more

The goal of the Chemistry M.S. Program is to provide students with professional knowledge and technical skills above the B.S. level which will enhance their career potential and opportunities for advancing in their field. The structure of the M.S. program is geared to suit the needs of a part-time student who is already employed in industry or education. Two tracts towards the M.S. degree are offered: (1) coursework only based M.S. degree; (2) coursework and research based M.S. degree. The first option is usually favored by the part-time and non-traditional students while the second one is more popular with the full-time students.

  • Learning Goal 1: Acquisition of fundamental knowledge of modern chemistry.
  • Learning Goal 2: Engagement in the conduct of individual research.
  • Learning Goal 3: Preparation for an independent research career.

Part-Time Graduate Study

All of the program courses and requirements are arranged to allow working scientists to pursue a graduate degree on a part-time basis. Courses, qualifying examinations, and all general program requirements are offered during the evening or on weekends.

Part-time students often begin graduate study by taking graduate courses on a non-degree basis. The non-degree application process is minimal, and up to 6 credits of courses can be applied to degree requirements once a student is accepted to a degree program.

Most part-time students complete a M.S. degree before deciding to applying to the Ph.D. program

The New Jersey/New York Metropolitan Area

Situated in the business and financial center of New Jersey, Rutgers University-Newark is within 15 minutes of all major transportation systems, including Newark International Airport, New Jersey Transit, PATH, and Amtrak railroad lines. Surrounding areas include Manhattan (20 minutes by rail), Philadelphia (1 hour by rail), and Washington, DC (3 hours, Amtrak).



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A minimum of 30 credits is required for the degree, excluding bridge courses. The graduate curriculum consists of seven core courses and additional elective courses, with an optional thesis (six credits) or research project (three credits). Read more

A minimum of 30 credits is required for the degree, excluding bridge courses. The graduate curriculum consists of seven core courses and additional elective courses, with an optional thesis (six credits) or research project (three credits).

Required Courses

  • Critical Thinking for the Life Sciences
  • Numerical Methods for Computation
  • Linear Algebra and Applications
  • Analytical Computational Neuroscience
  • Introduction to Biostatistics or Approaches to Quantitative Analysis in the Life Sciences
  • Computational Ecology
  • Foundations of Bioinformatics
  • Master's Project or Masters Thesis

Electives

Select two of the following:

  • Foundations of Mathematical Biology
  • Regression Analysis Methods
  • Design and Analysis of Experiments
  • Advanced Physical Chemistry
  • Cell Biology: Methods & Appl
  • Cell Surface Recept
  • Computational Biology
  • Systems Neuroscience
  • Systems Computational Neuroscience
  • Comparative Animal Physiology
  • Intermediate Differential Equations
  • Biomathematics I: Biological Waves and Oscillations


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The Rutgers University-Newark MFA Program is a nationally ranked, 36 credit hour, studio/research program, which means that our writers study literature as they endeavor to write it. Read more

The Rutgers University-Newark MFA Program is a nationally ranked, 36 credit hour, studio/research program, which means that our writers study literature as they endeavor to write it. The program focuses strongly on 12 credit hours of Writing Workshop in a declared genre (one workshop, with permission of the department, may be cross-genre), and requires 6 thesis hours in which students work one-on-one with their mentor professors. We also require 18 credit hours of graduate courses in literature. Students may take up to two undergraduate courses for graduate credit with additional requirements assigned by professor and with permission by the department. Applicants who have completed graduate level English Literature courses may transfer up to 12 credit hours (grades of B or above) with permission of the department. While some MFA grads go on to law or business school or into publishing, many seek teaching jobs. The MFA is the terminal degree in creative writing, which allows graduates to teach at the university level, and the Rutgers-Newark MFA offers our students the essential advantage of substantial coursework in literature.

At Rutgers University-Newark, students may choose six courses (18 credit hours) from a long and exciting list of graduate literature courses taught by important scholars. Study Shakespeare with Professor Ameer Sohrawardy. Read Samuel Johnson with Professor Jack Lynch, nationally renowned Johnson scholar. Study the proletarian novel with Marxist theorist Professor Barbara Foley, or “Women in Literature” with feminist scholar Professor Fran Bartkowski. Explore the still unresolved Vietnam era with Professor H. Bruce Franklin. Discover Victorian literature with Professor Janet Larson, discuss Latino literature and culture with Professor Laura Lomas.

Deepen and specify still more: MFA students will fulfill 6 of the required 18 elective hours by choosing one of three unique Electives Concentrations. Virtually no other program in the country gives students the opportunity to work in such a wide range of genres for elective credits. Those who choose Literature/Book Arts will work with photographer Nick Kline to design and publish a chapbook of their own work. Performance/Media Studies allows students to study writing for television or the stage with playwright Michele Rittenhouse, urban and narrative journalism with Professor Rob Snyder, or jazz influences with Lewis Porter Cultural/Political/Ethnic Studies allows students to choose courses in History, Liberal Studies, American Studies, Urban Education, Political Science, Global Affairs, African-American Studies, or Women’s and Gender Studies. RU-N’s Electives Concentration is designed to support our MFA students in their completion of courses that specifically contribute to the fiction, poetry or nonfiction works they will turn in as Theses.

Rutgers University-Newark MFA students may also make use of resources provided by theInstitute for Jazz Studies, the Institute for Ethnicity, Culture, and the Modern Experience, the Paul Robeson Gallery, Dana Library and its Book Arts program, and the Cornwall Center for Metropolitan Studies. The RU-N MFA Program also enjoys affiliations with The Newark Museum, the New Jersey Historical Society, the Newark Public Library, and Aljira, a Center for Contemporary Art, all a short walk from campus.

Rutgers University-Newark is developing a respected and exciting MFA Program that will attract national and international applicants, yet we feel strongly about maintaining and deepening the University’s commitment to the diversity and flavor of the Rutgers University-Newark community. Our MFA Program is influenced and inspired by Newark, a community of long and remarkable history now enjoying a political and cultural Renaissance. We describe our program as Rutgers University-Newark Real Lives, Real Stories cause we’re interested in the real world experience of our applicants as well as in their creative work and intellectual rigor.

The Rutgers University-Newark MFA can be completed in a two or three year time frame. Most of our classes, workshops and readings will begin at 5:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, allowing students to commit to rigorous daily writing schedules, work day jobs, or raise families. Though we live in the real world more affordably than in Manhattan, Rutgers-Newark MFA faculty and students also comprise an arts community. Workshops are encouraged to adjourn at 8:30 for drinks and refreshments at chic local eatery 27 Mix, Art Kitchen, or at one of many inexpensive Portuguese restaurants in the Ironbound. Newark is changing and thriving, and Rutgers University-Newark is changing with it. The residence dorm at University Square is just one of the University’s commitments to a burgeoning campus whose expansion will eventually reach the shores of the Passaic River.

Courses & MFA Concentrations

Students entering the Master of Fine Arts Program at Rutgers University-Newark will complete a 36 credit hour program in four to six semesters, as follows: 18 hours of writing credits, including 12 hours of Workshop in a specific genre (one workshop per semester for 4 semesters); 6 thesis hours in a specific genre (including 3 hours of mentored "Thesis in Conference"); 18 hours of Elective courses (6 courses, 3 credit hours each). Two of the Elective courses, or 6 hours, comprise an Electives Concentration: Literature/Book Arts, Cultural, Political, Ethnic Studies, or Performance/Media Studies. Electives may include graduate lit courses, graduate courses in other disciplines, or MFA elective courses such as Craft of Fiction, Craft of Poetry, Editing and Publishing, a Nonfiction workshop offered each Spring, or Writers At Newark: Contemporary American Lit. The [email protected] Reading Series comprises part of our core curriculum; MFA students study the works of writers visiting each semester as textbooks on craft.



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The MA program in Economics began in 1972, predating the creation of the Graduate School Newark by 3 full years. As such, it is one of the oldest and most successful graduate programs at Rutgers-Newark. Read more

The MA program in Economics began in 1972, predating the creation of the Graduate School Newark by 3 full years. As such, it is one of the oldest and most successful graduate programs at Rutgers-Newark.

The program accepts both full-time and part-time graduate students. Well-qualified full-time students may be able to complete the degree requirements within three semesters. Most part-time students should expect to take two or three years. We strongly suggest that part-time students take no more than two classes per semester. All matriculated students must complete their degree within four years of entering the program. Some graduate courses in economics are also open to non-matriculated students. But please note that non-matriculated students will not be allowed to take graduate classes unless they have taken undergraduate Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, Statistics and Calculus.

All entering students are required to have undergraduate classes in micro and macro theory, one semester of statistics, and at least one semester of calculus. Intermediate Micro Theory Calc II and Econometrics are strongly recommended.

The MA Degree in Economics requires the successful completion of 10 three-credit courses, for a total of 30 graduate credits. Starting Fall 2014, all students must complete six core courses with an average grade of B or better:

  • Microeconomic Theory I (220:501)
  • Microeconomic Theory II (220: 502)
  • Macroeconomic Theory I (220:503)
  • Macroeconomic Theory II (220:504 )
  • Statistical Analysis (220:506)
  • Econometrics I (220:507)

The remaining 12 credits may be earned in any other graduate courses in economics or, with the consent of the graduate program director, in related disciplines (such as statistics and mathematics, public administration, global affairs, urban systems and business).



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Rutgers University offers a 30-credit general Master’s Degree in English on the Newark campus, an urban yet intimate and leafy environment near downtown easily accessible by public transportation. Read more

Rutgers University offers a 30-credit general Master’s Degree in English on the Newark campus, an urban yet intimate and leafy environment near downtown easily accessible by public transportation. Our students take six electives in addition to four required courses: Introduction to Graduate Literary Study, two in pre-1800 literatures, and one in American literature. Those choosing to concentrate in Women’s and Gender Studies take two interdisciplinary core courses in feminist theory and methods (see separate description) and two W&GS-designated literature courses in the English Program (such as Women in Medieval Literature, Jane Austen, Autobiography and Gender, or Race, Gender, and the Holocaust, three recent offerings by our strong women’s studies faculty in the English Department). All must pass an examination on a common reading list, offered in March, and a one-hour translation test, rendering a passage of literary biography or history written in a foreign language into idiomatic English. These tests are scheduled throughout the year during Department office hours at the individual’s convenience. 

Course offerings

We mount 14-16 courses a year in the literatures and cultures of the Americas, Britain, and the English-speaking world as well as literature in translation. Besides more traditional courses (Chaucer) and innovative versions of traditional subjects, like Race and Gender in the Renaissance, or Global Romanticism, we offer considerable topical variety: for example, Transnational Muslim Fiction; The Vietnam War and American Culture, 1945-2009; African Diaspora Literature; The Gilded Age; Harlem Renaissance; Empire and the Spy Novel; War Stories; various film offerings; and courses on postcolonial, feminist, marxist, narrative, or other critical theories. Courses in Rhetoric and the Teaching of Writing, in Advanced Research and Archives, and in Editing and Publishing offer professional development. We also have occasional graduate Summer Session courses.

Degree students may arrange with a professor for Independent Study or a course of Advanced Readings tailored to their interests; some choose the two-semester Master’s Thesis,although this is not required for the degree. (Tailored studies must be arranged with the professor a semester in advance.) Seminarsare small (8-15), allowing for personal attention from professors and lively exchange with peers. Three classes constitute full-time status; given their busy lives, most students are part-time, registering for one or two courses per term. Each class is held once a week, 5:30 to 8:10, Monday through Thursday, allowing people to attend school after work. Occasionally we schedule a Saturday class. Degree students who need to take time out from their studies register for Matriculation Continued, which holds their place in the Program.

Who we are

Even though most students are part-time and commute, we form a surprisingly close-knit community of 21 graduate English faculty and more than 40 students, diverse in age, interests, ethnicities, and nationalities. Some students live on campus. Our faculty are serious research scholars and writers who publish regularly, participate actively in professional organizations, receive national and international recognition for their work, and love to teach. Two of our Full Professors hold University Chairs; other colleagues both teach and provide administrative direction for other campus units, such as the M.F.A. Program in Creative Writing, Women’s and Gender Studies, and African American Studies. 

  Film and other courses are sometimes taught by experts from the Metropolitan area. A distinct advantage of studying here is the prospect of being helped along with recommendation letters, introductions, and publication advice from well-connected professionals.

Our students’ statistical profile:  In case you’re wondering, in a typical semester our degree students are 65% female; about evenly divided between the age groups of 21-34 and 35-44, with a handful of older students. In 2004, 50 identified themselves on their applications as Caucasian, 10 as Black, 3 as “Other Hispanic,” 4 as Asian, the rest unidentified. 90% or more of our degree students live in New Jersey, with some having moved here to establish NJ residency. We are also pleased to welcome international students–recently, from Japan, Turkey, France, South Africa, Syria, Saudi Arabia, and Iran. Overall R-N is the most diverse university campus in the nation.

Students’ vocational plans and interests:  The fact that our students arrive with a variety of agendas makes for an interesting mix in the classroom, and for reasons we can’t claim to understand completely, diversity really ‘works’ in our Program.

Those planning on doctoral study choose courses that ground them in literary theory and find Rutgers–Newark a superior place for conducting serious research, given the resources of the University’s many libraries, including the Dana and Rutgers Law Libraries on our campus, networked with hundreds of others nationwide. Graduates also choose to study library science or earn education Ph.D’s in Rutgers-New Brunswick’s highly-regarded graduate schools in these field.

Graduates often find college teaching work without the Ph.D.; a few find it even before they receive the M.A. A strong presence among us are seasoned, beginning, or aspiring high school teachers, who come to deepen literary learning, enhance their options in their institution, and enjoy intellectual exchange among peers. We also attract students who are pivoting for career changesworking journalists and professionals in other media fields who are hungry for literary study, people who seek intensive study of literature to feed their own creative writing, late bloomers, and the recently unemployed who’ve decided to return to school.

We do admit applicants who weren’t college English majors or are working in various business fields, computer science, public relations, or law but have been reading literature extensively on their own. Introduction to Graduate Literary Study helps all students make the transition with instruction and practice in the latest scholarly research methods and literary theories.



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The M.S. Program in Environmental Geology Graduate work leading to the M.S. Read more

The M.S. Program in Environmental Geology Graduate work leading to the M.S. degree in Environmental Geology is offered in Newark for full- and part-time students in collaboration with the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Rutgers-New Brunswick and the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at NJIT.

Certificate in Environmental Geology at Rutgers-Newark is offered to graduate students admitted to the Rutgers-New Brunswick Geological Sciences Graduate Programs and to students admitted to the NJIT Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Graduate Programs or other NJIT environmental science or engineering graduate programs provided these students successfully complete 9 credits from the following 3-cr. graduate courses offered at Rutgers-Newark:

  • Environmental Geology
  • Seminar in Environmental Geology
  • Hydrogeology
  • Environmental Geophysics
  • Soil Geochemistry; Geomorphology
  • Analytical Methods in Environmental Geology

Learning goals

The Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences (DEES) Graduate Program in Environmental Science strives to have students complete degrees that allow them to become leaders in their areas of expertise in governmental agencies, non-governmental organizations (NGO’s) and industry. The MS program in Environmental Geology and Environmental Science at Rutgers-Newark focuses on the following three learning goals.

Learning Goal 1 for Students: Obtain advanced knowledge in geoscience and environmental science

Upon graduation:

  • MS students will have acquired advanced knowledge in earth sciences, particularly biogeochemistry, geochemistry and geophysics.
  • MS students will have developed theoretical or practical research skills in biogeochemistry, geochemistry and geophysics.

Learning Goal 2 for Students: Engage in and conduct original, publishable research (for those students pursuing the thesis option only)

Upon graduation:

  • MS students will have completed a dissertation, or equivalent, demonstrating personal integration of, and original intellectual contribution to, a field of knowledge.
  • MS students will have made an original research contribution
  • MS students will have submitted for publication one international journal subject to rigorous peer review.

Learning Goal 3 for Students: Professional career preparation

Upon graduation:

  • MS students will have presented their research to a scientific audience.
  • MS students will have participated in professional organizations and activities.
  • MS students will find employment in the professional sector based on their degree.


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A minimum of 30 degree credits are required to obtain an MS degree in Enviornmental Science. Candidates must consult with the Graduate Program Director (GPD) in designing appropriate programs of study. Read more

A minimum of 30 degree credits are required to obtain an MS degree in Enviornmental Science. Candidates must consult with the Graduate Program Director (GPD) in designing appropriate programs of study. Otherwise, candidates can choose a thesis instead of 6 credits of course work. In this case, the program of study is designed in consultation with the candidate’s Main Research Advisor (MRA). The thesis option is required for those students who receive departmental or researched-based support. If candidates choose a thesis, the procedure is similar to the Ph.D. program.

Core courses

  • EM 631 Legal Aspects in Environmental Engineering or 26:380:576 Environmental Geology
  • EvSc 610 Environmental Chemical Science
  • EvSc 612 Environmental Analysis
  • EvSc 616 Toxicology for Engineers and Scientists
  • 26:120:604 Microbiology: Principles and Applications or
  • EvSc 627 Environmental Microbiology

Elective courses (9-15 credits) may be chosen from among all graduate courses offered at Rutgers-Newark Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences, Rutgers-New Brunswick Departments of Geological Sciences and Environmental Sciences or from among selected graduate courses offered at NJIT. There are a wide range of courses offered outside Rutgers-Newark that are used to satisfy degree requirements (with approval of the GPD in the case of a non-thesis student, and the MRA in the case of a thesis student). The list of courses is available each semester and is posted on the department webpage.

Thesis

A thesis is required for those receiving departmental or research-based support. Register under EvSc 701 or 26:375:701 Master’s Thesis (6). Others may choose 6 credits of approved course work instead of a thesis. In addition to the minimum 30 degree credits required (i.e thesis option), all students who receive departmental or research-based awards must enroll each term in EvSc 600 Environmental Science Seminar when offered. 



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The Division of Global Affairs (DGA) offers a Master of Science (M.S.) degree in Global Affairs in residence. It may be taken on a full-time or part-time basis. Read more

The Division of Global Affairs (DGA) offers a Master of Science (M.S.) degree in Global Affairs in residence. It may be taken on a full-time or part-time basis. It is a multidisciplinary degree concerned with theoretically informed and problem-oriented approaches to transnational issues that interact with local issues. It is designed for practitioners in the Global Arena including business professionals, government employees, security professionals including the military, and those who are presently employed or plan careers with international governmental and non-governmental organizations. Forty (40) credits are required for the M.S. degree in Global Affairs. All students must complete:

  • Seven Areas of Inquiry (AIs) Courses with grades of B (3.0) or higher —21 credits​​​
  • One Research and Methodology Course —3 credits
  • Two Capstone Colloquia Series with grades of Pass (a colloquium is a lecture series of 5 to 6 presentations on a given topic organized by a core DGA faculty, which students must attend and write a 15 page paper on if they want to accumulate credit) —4 credits
  • One Foundation Course - (26:478:508; 26:790:508): Evolution of the Global System —3 credits
  • Three Elective Courses —9 credits; note: three electives may be joined with the applicable AI discipline to qualify for a certificate
  • Language Requirement— no credit; the language requirement is fulfilled by prior coursework, a major/minor, or demonstrated familiarity or fluency in another language. 

Core courses

Areas of Inquiry Courses (AIs)

The Division of Global Affairs requires that students complete seven Areas of Inquiry (AI) courses. These courses are geared towards giving students the foundation they will need for future Global Affairs courses and endeavors in the global affairs field. Students must complete seven (7) of the eight courses with a grade of a B or higher, and are encouraged to take the courses early on in their studies. Students who do not receive a grade of B or higher in any AI course must retake the course. All AI requirements must be completed in residence. Transfer credits may not be used in fulfillment of AI requirements. The AI courses are listed below alongside their course number. 

  • Ethics, Security, and Global Affairs 
  • Global Governance 
  • Human Security 
  • Global Political Economy
  • International Law 
  • History of International Business
  • Global Development
  • Human Rights and Mass Atrocities

NOTE #1: M.S. students are strongly encouraged to take both a qualitative and a quantitative methodology course.

NOTE #2: Interested students can consider Internships or Independent Study as additional requirements.

NOTE #3: M.S. students must maintain a grade-point average of 3.0 or higher in all non-language courses taken at Rutgers University. If a student's academic performance falls below the expected standard, the DGA and the Graduate School-Newark may refuse the student the right of future registration and terminate studies. Students with an insufficient grade-point average may submit an appeal to the DGA Director. 

Time Limits

Students must complete their degrees within six years of admission into the M.S. program, regardless of whether students are part time or full time and regardless of whether they entered DGA with or without transfer credits. Students who fail to meet this deadline may be forced to withdraw from graduate studies at DGA.



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Master of Arts (M.A.). Degree Requirements. Students must complete 30 credits of course work, which includes a major field (at least 18 credits). Read more

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Degree Requirements

Students must complete 30 credits of course work, which includes a major field (at least 18 credits). Students must take at least 6 credits outside of their major field, preferably but not necessarily all in the same field, as defined below. Within these credits, M.A. students must complete either a thesis (6 credits) or a Master's Essay (3 credits).

Major Fields

The M.A. program in history offers a choice of three major fields in areas that are particularly well supported by the research and teaching interests of the history faculty:

  •    American History
  •    World History
  •    History of Technology, Environment and Medicine/Health

To ensure a program of reasonable depth and coherence, each student takes at least 18 credits of course work in one of these major fields, chosen in consultation with the Graduate History Director or designated advisor. In a typical year, at least three or four courses are offered in each category, and there are additional opportunities to take independent reading and research courses, and courses at Rutgers-New Brunswick, in all three areas. A number of courses may fulfill requirements in more than one field.

Courses Outside the Major Field

To add breadth and diversity to the program of study, each student must take at least two courses (6 credits) outside of the chosen major field. These two courses should preferably both be in the same field, but this is not required.

Master of Arts for Teachers (M.A.T.)

The M.A.T. in history is a terminal degree for students who are preparing for - or are already engaged in - careers in secondary school teaching. It does not by itself provide certification for teaching in New Jersey public schools. However, M.A.T. students are usually permitted to earn a portion of their program credits in graduate or advanced undergraduate courses in an approved Education Department, thus securing some of the education credits needed for New Jersey certification.

Degree Requirements

The program consists of 30 credits, at least 18 of which must be in graduate history courses, and up to 12 of which may be in approved education courses.

M.A.T. students choose from among the same graduate history courses, and must meet the same class reading and writing requirements, as M.A. students. However, M.A.T. students:

  •    do not select a major field
  •    do not have a thesis option
  •    must write a Master's Essay

All M.A. and M.A.T. students are expected to maintain a "B" or better average through the duration of their studies; otherwise, they may not be allowed to remain in the program.

Certification to Teach in New Jersey

The M.A.T. Program does not provide certification. New Jersey certification requires 30 credits in particular education courses, 12 of which may be counted toward the M.A.T. Hence, a student wishing to pursue both the M.A.T. in History and certification would have to take a total of 48 credits (12 fewer than if the student pursued the M.A.T. and certification separately).

Please note that acceptance into the M.A.T. program does not guarantee acceptance into the Urban Teacher Education Program. Students who are interested in becoming certified to teach in New Jersey schools must satisfy the requirements for admission into the Urban Teacher Education Program.



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Founded in 1997, this unique program prepares people to do research, publishing and teaching; they rely on the renowned Institute of Jazz Studies (IJS), the largest public access jazz library in the world. Read more

Founded in 1997, this unique program prepares people to do research, publishing and teaching; they rely on the renowned Institute of Jazz Studies (IJS), the largest public access jazz library in the world. While there are many bachelor’s and master’s degrees elsewhere in jazz performance, and a few in composition and pedagogy, this is the only degree at any level anywhere to focus on the history and research of jazz. As such, many of the courses are also not offered anywhere else.

(Please note: The degree is offered by the Department of Arts, Media and Culture, not at the Institute. The institute is a library archive where students conduct research; the degree is administered by the university.)

The required 12 courses cover such topics as historiography, the literature about jazz, music theory and analysis, archival research, interviewing techniques, as well as in-depth studies on individual musicians, and topics such as “jazz and race,” and “jazz and world music.” Many students choose to take private lessons and to play in the jazz ensemble in addition to the 12 courses (these usually do not count towards the M.A. degree, but performance classes taken at nearby colleges can count). Also, private theory study, one-day writing workshops and/or a semester-long writing seminar my be required, at our discretion, in addition to the required 12 courses. At the end of the coursework each student takes a final comprehensive exam, usually in their fourth semester while putting finishing touches on the thesis.

The GRE is not required at present. Applicants should have a Bachelors’ in any field and competence in music reading and performing. Non-musicians who wish to go for the degree are now also welcome! You will be required to audit a basic course in music reading/writing, or to study on your own with a recommended book and pass the exam for that course. You will also learn how to follow sheet music, and how to represent music on graph paper. You will be exempted from the advanced graduate theory course. In every other way your program will be identical with that of the musicians. As always our other graduate students range from well-known performers to amateur musicians.

There are currently 25 students in the program (including first year, second year, and part-time students), with about 7 to 9 graduating each year. Students range in age from 22 to 61, and have backgrounds in jazz performance, free lance writing, jazz radio, history, etc. While in the program, about half of the students have published chapters in books, liner notes for CDs, and articles for websites. Opportunities like these become available to students while enrolled in the program. They are also teaching at colleges and universities, and of course some often continue to perform and to teach privately. Some graduates are now part-time faculty at other institutions or are attending Ph.D. programs.



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The Master of Business & Science degree at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey is a hybrid degree combining courses from an . Read more

The Master of Business & Science degree at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey is a hybrid degree combining courses from an MS and MBA. Students choose an applied science concentration and that is paired with a business curriculum. The business curriculum consists of core courses in finance and accounting, marketing, communication and leadership, management, policy, intellectual policy electives, ethics and a capstone course covering entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship. The Master of Business & Science is a (Professional Science Master's) STEM degree.

The degree can be done part-time for working professionals or full-time. All required courses are in the evenings, weekends or online. Graduate Certificates in cutting-edge fields are also available.

We accept applications for all semesters. Please see more information on our admissions page.

Concentrations

  • Life Sciences
  • Engineering
  • Computer & Information Sciences

Why pursue a Masters of Business & Science degree?

The Master of Business & Science (MBS) degree is a unique degree combining the science curriculum from a traditional science master's degree with a specialized set of business+ courses - including business, policy, and law. This combination prepares students with the necessary business acumen, entrepreneurial skills, and know how to translate scientific and technological ideas into profitable products and services.

What will I learn?

  • A fundamental and applied knowledge of a particular science/engineering/math discipline.
  • To recognizing the connection between technology and business and how scientific and technical work impacts the business of organizations.
  • The understanding of finance and accounting basics, and the ability to assess the financial aspects of a new scientific venture or project and make recommendations for investments and payback.
  • Understanding of the leadership skills needed to inspire, motivate, and coach individuals and work in diverse teams.
  • Knowing of the core elements of a business case/plan and how to plan, execute, and run a project that helps translate a real technology from idea to commercialization.

Professionally Guided Curriculum: 

The degree is a combination of an MS and MBA degree with 43 credits: 24 credits in the sciences and/or engineering and 19 credits in business. The science courses are taken within a specific concentration in areas such as the life sciences, engineering, mathematics, information technologies, and sustainability. The science concentrations are professionally focused and reflect industry in NJ/NY and nationwide. All of the students take a common business core including finance and accounting, marketing, communication, leadership, project management. In place of a thesis, students work in teams and develop a business plan around a technology in their field. Courses are a blend of traditional (evening), online, and executive education.



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The MPH program is the result of a longstanding collaboration between the Rutgers School of Public Health (SPH) and the Rutgers School of Public Affairs and Administration (SPAA). Read more

The MPH program is the result of a longstanding collaboration between the Rutgers School of Public Health (SPH) and the Rutgers School of Public Affairs and Administration (SPAA). The degree is conferred by the Rutgers School of Public Health. Individuals wishing admission to the MPH program must apply to the Department of Urban Health Administration in the Rutgers School of Public Health (SPH).

Students in this program take classes at both Newark-based schools. Candidates for the MPH degree complete 45 credits of coursework, which includes 21 credits taken in the School of Public Health (the MPH core), 12 specialization credits, 9 of which are taken at SPAA (specialization requirements in the SPH Department of Urban Health Administration), and 12 elective credits as approved by the student’s advisor.

The MPH program prepares students for leadership in the development, implementation, management, and evaluation of organizations and programs that address the public health needs of urban and disadvantaged populations. Students in this program receive a solid foundation in public health, and also learn best practices in public administration, gaining knowledge about the creation and maintenance of effective, efficient, responsive, and ethical public health organizations and programs.

Curriculum

Candidates for the MPH degree complete 45 credits of coursework, which includes 21 credits taken in the School of Public Health (the MPH core), 12 specialization credits, 9 of which are taken at SPAA (specialization requirements in the SPH Department of Urban Health Administration), and 12 elective credits as approved by the student’s advisor.

MPH Core Courses (15 credits/5 classes)

  • PHCO 0501: Health Systems and Policy (3 credits)
  • PHCO 0502: Principles and Methods in Epidemiology (3 credits)
  • PHCO 0503: Introduction to Environmental Health (3 credits)
  • PHCO 0504: Introduction to Biostatistics (3 credits)
  • PHCO 0505: Health Education and Behavioral Science in Public Health (3 credits)

Urban Health Administration Core Courses (12 credits)

  • URHA 1682 (20:834:582): Health Care Management, or
  • HPAA (20:834:570): Theory and Practice of Non-Profit Management (3 credits)
  • URHA 1543 (20:834:543): Public Financial Management, or
  • HPAA (20:834:571): Non-Profit Budgeting, or
  • HPAA (20:834:542): Public Budgeting Systems (3 credits)
  • URHA 1563 (20:834:562): Applied Research Design (3 credits)
  • QNME 0584: Computing II: Epi Info (1 credit)
  • QNME 0587: Introduction to SAS Data in Public Health (2 credits)

Urban Health Administration Elective Course (12 credits)

Students take elective courses in public health and public administration as approved by their advisor.

Fieldwork (6 credits)

  • FDWC 0600: Fieldwork I (1 credit)
  • FDWC 0601-0606: Fieldwork II (5 credits)


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