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Agriculture×

Masters Degrees in Rural Estate Management

Masters degrees in Rural Estate Management equip postgraduates with the necessary skills to manage large, rural properties. They offer training in areas such as farm diversification and woodland maintenance, as well as opportunities to work in tourism and heritage.

Masters degrees in this area are typically taught MSc degrees. Entry requirements normally include an undergraduate degree in a relevant subject, such as agriculture, geography, or environmental studies.

Why study a Masters in Rural Estate Management?

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The REALM (Rural Environment and Land Management) courses provide a first step on the route to qualification as a chartered surveyor. Read more
The REALM (Rural Environment and Land Management) courses provide a first step on the route to qualification as a chartered surveyor. All prospective chartered surveyors must complete the Assessment of Professional Competence (APC) offered by RICS (Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors), and the programmes provide the academic foundation for candidates wishing to pursue the rural APC.

The postgraduate diploma (PgD) and MSc programmes are both validated by RICS under the RICS-Harper Adams University Partnership agreement, recognising the high regard in which the courses are held.

The course

The REALM (Rural Estate and Land Management) courses provide a first step on the route to qualification as a chartered surveyor. All prospective chartered surveyors must complete the Assessment of Professional Competence (APC) offered by RICS (Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors), and the programmes provide the academic foundation for candidates wishing to pursue the rural APC.

The postgraduate diploma (PgD) and MSc programmes are both validated by RICS under the RICS-Harper Adams University Partnership agreement, recognising the high regard in which the courses are held. The PgD in particular, is one of a very small number of courses in the country to have this distinction with regard to the rural APC, which is why you are required to study 12 modules (180 credits) rather than eight (120 credits). The postgraduate certificate provides a route for students who may fall short of our exacting entry requirements to get up to speed before transferring to either the PgD or MSc programmes.

Modules cover the main areas required for professional practice, in particular providing the necessary legal foundations for practice, and covering the all-important areas of the UK planning system, land tenure, rural valuation, primary production in agriculture and forestry, countryside and environmental management. A wide choice of modules means that you can tailor the programme to your own requirements.

The PgD programme is particularly popular with part-time students, often graduates who are able to combine suitable employment with study and progression through the APC.

Employment prospects in rural practice are good, and successful graduates have gone on to a wide range of jobs in recent years on rural estates and with local and national firms of rural surveyors and agricultural valuers. Feedback from students shows that the intensive modular structure is well-received, along with the practical slant of many of the assignments. This is underpinned by the professional standing of many of the tutors, who are active with the profession at the highest levels nationally and act as Assessors for the APC.

How will it benefit me?

The MSc/PgD will enable you to analyse a range of stakeholder interests and their influence, generally and site specifically, in rural land management. You will become competent in a range of techniques for rural land management and appraisal, be able to appraise the value and worth of rural land, and review the role of property in organisations.

Students also become skilled at evaluating and exploiting the latest developments in technology, and developing performance indicators in rural estate management and strategy. You will learn to formulate land management strategies which meet objectives for sustainable management while taking into account legislature, regulations, ethics and morals, the environment, amenities and commercial needs.

You will also learn to evaluate how previously implemented land management strategies have achieved their objectives, and adapt them to new requirements within an evolving economic, social, legal and political framework, with due regard to developments in sustainable development and biodiversity. You will become competent in professional methodologies used by chartered surveyors to manage and appraise rural land and property.

MSc students carry out an independent research or development project to advance their understanding of a particular issue in rural land management, or to resolve a specific and novel technical problem facing rural land managers in practice.

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This is a highly-regarded course which equips graduates for a rewarding and challenging career in the management of land, property, and business in the countryside. Read more
This is a highly-regarded course which equips graduates for a rewarding and challenging career in the management of land, property, and business in the countryside. It is a fast-track route to qualification as a Chartered Surveyor. The course is accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors.

The Royal Agricultural University is in partnership with the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), which fully accredits this one-year Masters degree.

This course is a highly-regarded course which equips graduates for a rewarding and challenging career in the management of land, property, and business in the countryside. It is a fast-track route to qualification as a Chartered Surveyor.

This course is for graduates looking to acquire the specialist knowledge and skills necessary to work as a rural property manager. It also prepares graduates for qualification as a Chartered Surveyor and Fellow of the Central Association of Agricultural Valuers.

Structure

The course will be studied full-time over 12 months.

You will study eight modules in the autumn and spring terms, with final examinations taking place in May. The dissertation is typically undertaken between May and September.

You will attend lectures and group tutorials.There is also a range of practical sessions, and visits to local farms, commercial properties, and rural estates where owners, occupiers and their professional advisors provide additional insights into the management of rural property. Assessed coursework features strongly throughout the course.

Before starting the MSc, students receive reading lists and study material so that they can develop a basic grounding in study areas with which they are not familiar.

Modules

• 4002 Agriculture
• 4007 Dissertation
• 4015 Farm Business and Enterprise Management
• 4016 Rural Planning and Buildings
• 4019 Rural Property Law
• 4029 Environmental and Woodland Management
• 4031 Rural Policy and Implementation
• 4033 Rural Valuation
• 4043 Rural Asset Management

Career prospects

Our Rural Estate Management graduates are directly involved with managing all types of property. The professional work of the Rural Property Manager may include:

• Valuation, and the sale and purchase of land and rural property
• Management and letting of land and property
• Farm business planning and diversification
• Development of land and buildings and rural planning
• Management of woodlands and the environment
• Compulsory purchase (roads, pipelines cables etc) and compensation claims
• Tax and financial strategy

Types of employer include:

• National, international, regional, and small firms of chartered surveyors
• Private estates
• Large landowners such as the National Trust, county councils and utility companies
• Planning and environmental consultancy
• Research and education
• Leisure management
• Rrural conservation
• Investment management.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.rau.ac.uk/STUDY/POSTGRADUATE/HOW-APPLY

Funding

For information on funding, please view the following page: https://www.rau.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/funding

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Our highly regarded postgraduate course provides students with a fast track to a fascinating, challenging career in rural land management, an area where employers acknowledge an enduring demand for qualified graduate trainees. Read more
Our highly regarded postgraduate course provides students with a fast track to a fascinating, challenging career in rural land management, an area where employers acknowledge an enduring demand for qualified graduate trainees.

COURSE OVERVIEW

We aim to equip you with a detailed knowledge of business management, law, finance, tax and valuation, as well as the strategic decision-making ability you will need to build a successful career as a rural land or estate manager. Our course is fully accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors.

We will help you to develop an analytical, strategic approach to managing and advising on rural land and estates. We underpin this by developing your understanding of the legal, social, ecological and economic aspects that affect and govern the rural environment and also offer a selection of optional modules to enable you to personalise your degree.

Management case studies on local farms and rural estates allow you to apply knowledge and skills to real life problems. The programme culminates with either a project or dissertation, which is designed to consolidate your learning.

HOW WE TEACH YOU

Our programmes are designed and delivered by internationally-renowned experts, with a wealth of academic and professional experience. All of our programmes are regularly updated to maintain their relevance in a rapidly changing industry.

Our teaching received an excellent score in the most recent independent Teaching Quality Assessment (TQA), highlighting our commitment to maintaining a world-class learning environment. You will enjoy access to our cutting-edge research, ensuring that you remain at the forefront of the field.

We believe that our students should have access to good quality resources and, in addition to the facilities offered by the University, we fund a professionally staffed Resource Centre.

We aim to create a stimulating academic environment; you will be encouraged to develop individual interests and general skills as a basis for a career in the property industry, a related field or for further study.

EMPLOYABILITY

Students taking this degree programme usually find employment as trainee chartered surveyors with firms having a rural specialism or undertaking substantive rural work. Real Estate and Planning has long-standing links with a number of larger firms that regularly recruit from the University.

Our graduates tell us the content of the course is highly relevant to the profession, training them to be analytical thinkers and leaders. They have frequently progressed to become directors of landed estates or surveying firms. Some have secured posts in environmental organisations, government agencies, planning consultancies, or in academia. Some find this higher degree pathway an ideal entry qualification into wider management careers.

Most graduates complete the two years’ professional training required to become members of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors and many also become members of the Central Association of Agricultural Valuers.

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Specifically the course will. ■ Provide knowledge in a wide range of applied ecological areas. ■ Underpin this with a sound understanding of the quantitative aspects of this field including statistical analysis, expert system design and population modelling. Read more
Specifically the course will:
■ Provide knowledge in a wide range of applied ecological areas.
■ Underpin this with a sound understanding of the quantitative aspects of this field including statistical analysis, expert system design and population modelling.
■ Provide taught elements linked to academic applied research groups.
■ Offer a rich research training through access to project supervisors with different expertise and disciplines.
■ Provide training in crucial transferable skills in writing, presenting, discussing scientific material.

The course

This MSc serves to reinforce the relevance of ecology to a broad range of applications and trains students to apply ecological tools and understanding in a wide variety of contexts. The course draws on and complements the established and highly regarded MSc programmes taught at Harper Adams. Along with core ecological training, students will be allowed to select modules from a number of the MSc courses running at Harper Adams, including Conservation and Forest Protection, Entomology, Integrated Pest Management, Rural Estate and Land Management and Sustainable Agriculture.

Specifically the course will:
■ Provide knowledge in a wide range of applied ecological areas.
■ Underpin this with a sound understanding of the quantitative aspects of this field including statistical analysis, expert system design and population modelling.
■ Provide taught elements linked to academic applied research groups.
■ Offer a rich research training through access to project supervisors with different expertise and disciplines.
■ Provide training in crucial transferable skills in writing, presenting, discussing scientific material.

How will it benefit me?

Having completed the course you will be able to recognize the major entomological groups worldwide, understand how to apply a logical framework to demonstrate management priorities in different environments and have an understanding of individual, population and community ecology. You will be able to assess the economic and environmental costs of ecological applications and evaluate their effectiveness.

You will also have a clear understanding of the remit and function of ecosystems and a detailed knowledge and understanding of the essential facts, concepts, principles and theories relevant to your chosen area of specialization. You will receive training in how to communicate your ideas and findings related to applied ecology to a range of audiences. Although there are some compulsory modules there is considerable flexibility enabling each student to focus on specialist subjects consistent with their interests and future career intentions

For the MSc, you will also be able to test hypotheses relevant to applied ecological research by designing, carrying out, analysing and interpreting experiments or surveys. Finally, you will learn to evaluate and interpret data and draw relevant conclusions from existing case studies.

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Significant increases in the global human population, increasing climatic instability and a concurrent reduction in fossil fuel availability, impacting upon agricultural production and policy. Read more
Significant increases in the global human population, increasing climatic instability and a concurrent reduction in fossil fuel availability, impacting upon agricultural production and policy. Food production must increase without a simultaneous increase in resource use.

Improvements in crop yield and production efficiency often come through the utilisation of individual elements of new research. Integrated Crop Management (ICM) however utilises multiple facets of research simultaneously to bring about larger, more sustainable results. This course focuses on incorporating the latest research to develop students’ critical and analytical thinking in subjects such as pest dynamics, genetic improvement, crop technology, sustainable practice and soil management.

This MSc, delivered at Myerscough and awarded by the University of Central Lancashire will integrate these topics alongside a broader critical evaluation of crop sciences enabling you to design bespoke ICM programmes for given situations.
It is aimed at graduates in biological sciences who are looking to find employment as agronomists, farm advisors, agro-technical specialists particularly in allied agricultural industries. Successful completion of this MSc degree will also facilitate progression to PhD level research in food production science.

COURSE CONTENT:

Year 1

Integrated approaches in high-input cropping systems

High-input crop production systems typically focus on achieving both high yields and profitability. This module explores the science and agronomic principles of a range of crops under such management regimes as well as their associated problems and limitations. Consideration will be given to integrated management approaches currently being adopted by industry as well as the major drivers of these changing practices. These include legislation, resistance to agrochemicals and public acceptance.

Invertebrate Dynamics in Crop Production

Approximately 10-15% of global crop production is lost to invertebrate pests. Conversely, invertebrates constitute a significant ecosystem service through pest predation and pollination. In any integrated production system, the management of invertebrates is therefore fundamental to effective crop production. This module will focus on critical evaluation of current research on invertebrate ecology and dynamics and applying this to their potential impacts on conventional cropping systems. Concepts of pest population dynamics, herbivory and species life histories will be considered in relation to their effects on the crop. Alongside this, their ‘value’ as pollinators, predators, vectors and the effects of lethal and sub-lethal pesticide doses will be evaluated.

Contemporary agronomic research and development

Research into agronomy, technology and management is of critical importance if the industry is to continue to adapt to modern pressures and challenges worldwide. This module will explore the research path including laboratory to field trials and, ultimately, application into practice. Case studies will be explored where research and development has made or could make a significant impact to management practice.

Year 2

Integrated approaches in low-input cropping systems

Low-input cropping systems seek to optimise crop yields whilst using fewer inputs when compared to conventional crop production systems. In parts of the world this is due to a lack of financial and physical resources whilst in others this is due to perceived environmental benefits. This module explores the science of the integrated management of crops under such systems, including enhanced soil management and factors influencing nutrition and disease control. Limitations will also be considered as will approaches that conventional crop production could learn from low-input management systems.

Global Drivers for Agricultural Change

This module examines the global drivers behind the need to refocus agricultural production to meet the needs of the increasing world population and mitigate the impacts of climate change. It will focus on concepts such as the effects of globalisation; the economic issues with pesticide development; the globalisation and privatisation of agricultural technology and the use of targeted pest control techniques. Furthermore, the module will assess the impacts of corporate responsibility and the necessity of having sustainable global supply chains.

Research Methodology and Design

This module provides students with the essential personal, organisational, management, theoretical and statistical skills needed to work at Postgraduate Level. It will explore research philosophies, research process and design and the process of questionnaire development and design. The module will develop skills in advanced data organisation, presentation, dissemination and problem solving.

Year 3

Masters Dissertation

The dissertation is a triple module and allows students to design and conduct a substantial piece of independent, supervised research related to the field of study. The dissertation is an independent piece of academic work which allows the student to identify and work in an area of interest to them and manage the research process to agreed deadlines.

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The 'Viticulture & Enology. innovation meets tradition' program aims at addressing how vineyard and winery innovation is quickly becoming part of the Italian viticulture tradition. Read more
The 'Viticulture & Enology: innovation meets tradition' program aims at addressing how vineyard and winery innovation is quickly becoming part of the Italian viticulture tradition. Italy is now the largest wine producer in the world and boasts the greatest variety in terms of cultivars. The pecularities of Italian viticulture and chances to maintain a leading role are today bound to the ability to introduce sustainable innovation without losing its well-known appeal.

Learning objectives

The main goals of the program are:
● To acquire solid methodology and knowledge suitable to address innovation issues in vineyard and winery
● To achieve specific skills for new canopy management technique suitable to mitigate undesired climate-related effects, new sustain- able approaches for pest and disease control, precision viticulture and enology
● Develop the ability to diagnose limiting factors occurring in vine- yard and winery and to produce suitable solutions
● Learn to pro-actively take part in discussions dealing with viticulture and enology topics.

Career opportunities & professional recognition

The Master’s qualification in ‘Viticulture & Enology: innovation meets tradition’ will open up professional opportunities in the fields of Viticulture and enology chain; wine marketing and distribution; restaurants; large scale retail trade and freelancing.

A class that makes a difference

The Master in Viticulture & Enology will be comprised of international students and Cattolica’s domestic students.

Faculty & teaching staff

● Dr. Matteo Gatti - Research Assistant
● Prof. Gabriele Canali - Associate Professor
● Dr. Fabrizio Torchio - Research Assistant
● Prof. Stefano Poni - Full Professor
● Dr. Milena Lambri - Research Assistant
● Prof. Vittorio Rossi - Full Professor
● Dr. Emanuele Mazzoni - Research Assistant

Partner companies

Here are just a few names of prestigious wine estates that gave their preliminary acceptance in hosting internships: Mossi, Tenute Ruf- fino, Barone Ricasoli, Santa Margherita, Sella e Mosca, Mezzaco- rona, Contratto, Ca’ Del Bosco, Zonin, Res Uvae, Marchesi Mazzei, Cavalieri di Malta, Pico Maccario, and Marramiero.

Can I learn Italian while studying?

An intensive Italian course will be available to international students for the duration of the Master in Viticulture & Enology: innovation meets tradition.

Are there internships opportunities?

Students will need to carry out a mandatory internship for the duration of at least 450 hours (i.e. 18 ECTS) in a farm/wine estate/ institution.

A final exam is scheduled including a case study discussion and/or experimental activity carried out during the internship.

Can I work while studying?

Non-EU students entering Italy on a VISA are permitted to work part-time (20 hours per week).

Curriculum

● Vineyard variability: traditional and precision approaches
● Topics in wine-marketing
● Enhancing the wine quality: innovation in monitoring and controls
● Applied grapevine eco-physiology
● Advances in enology
● Disease and pest management toward a sustainable viticulture
● Seminars on sustainable pesticides use and genetic traceability will also be provided

ECTS of each course include also practical activities, wine tasting and field visits.

Tuition fees & scholarships

Tuition fee: €7.000

Scholarships will be available and assigned on a merit basis.

Application Deadlines?

● Priority consideration deadline 1: March 15, 2016
● Priority consideration deadline 2: April 15, 2016. Students wanting to be considered for the programme as well as for available scholarships are advised to apply by these deadlines as a majority of students will be selected within these first two deadlines.
● Priority consideration deadline 3: May 15, 2016. Some scholarships may still be available but very limited.
● Final deadline: June 30, 2016. No scholarships will be available.

How do I apply?

Applying is an easy five step process. The online application form, application instructions, and full admission guidelines are available at > http://www.ucscinternational.it

Cattolica will evaluate your academic and personal background and decide if you meet the specific conditions for admission to the graduate degree of your choice. If you are still studying, you must obtain your undergraduate degree by the end of July 2016 (September for EU students).

English language proficiency

For applicants whose first language is not English they will need to either have a TOEFL iBT overall score of at least 80 or an Academic IELTS overall score of at least 6.0, or have successfully completed a degree program taught in the English language. Cattolica’s TOEFL institution code is 2605.

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The M.S. degree in Sustainable Agriculture aims to provide advanced knowledge in the field of agricultural systems as well as skills to develop and manage sustainable production systems. Read more

Sustainable agriculture

The M.S. degree in Sustainable Agriculture aims to provide advanced knowledge in the field of agricultural systems as well as skills to develop and manage sustainable production systems.

Programme Summary

The context of the topics is international, having as its main area of investigation warm-temperate environments at a global level. The graduate in Sustainable agriculture must work to achieve food security objectives associated with improving the quality and wholesomeness of food products. The graduate must know the issues related to biodiversity, global change and ecosystem services, which are analyzed according to a systemic and adaptive approach, considering also the traceability of processes.
To address the global challenges, students are equipped with a wide learning platform, and are able to make comparisons between different production systems at the international level in terms of environmental, socio-economics, and regulatory environments.

Dual degree with USA

With the aim of strengthening this global approach to sustainability and food security, the degree program has been included in an internationalization project in collaboration with the University of Georgia, USA, which enables students to achieve a dual degree in "Sustainable Agriculture" (Italy) and "Crop and Soil Science" (USA).

Who is the MSc candidate?

The course is intended for highly-motivated national and international students and is conceived for Bachelor graduates with a main interest in agricultural and environmental sciences.

What career opportunities does the MSc provide?

The graduate in Sustainable Agriculture is able to perform a wide range of activities in a professional and efficient manner:
1) Operate internationally by conducting activities of planning, management, monitoring, coordination and training in agricultural production processes to meet the needs of the international market;
2) Be involved in activities of experimentation and research in both the public and private sectors (eg. Biotechnology companies);
3) Fill a position or interact with international organizations such as FAO, EU and World Bank;
4) Be involved in the transfer of technologies (innovation broker);
5) Manage technical and international business related to agricultural products and processing, and related to agricultural mechanization;
6) Play an active role in private and public structures aimed at land management and the management of water resources, including historical, cultural and landscape values of agricultural land;
7) Collaborate in the establishment and operation of projects in basic and applied research in the field of agricultural production in the international arena.

How is the programme organised?

The training course in Sustainable Agriculture, lasting two years, includes two main areas of study:
1) Production: training in the areas of agronomy, crop and animal productions, soil science, plant breeding, and integrated management of pests and diseases, all aimed at the sustainability of the production process and its social implications;
2) Technology: training in the areas of management and protection of air-soil-water, use of biomass of agricultural plants and animals, land management, and management of the production process (at different geographic scales) considering both innovative technologies and socio-economic aspects.
Learning is based on active studies covering activities in the classroom, in the laboratory and in the field as well as the possibility of using the contribution of Italian and foreign teachers, and industry experts that can provide specific case studies. The program offers intensive individual tutoring of students, as well as the opportunity to intern for six months, in companies in the public and private sectors, possibly abroad, for the study of cases of excellence in preparation of the thesis

Visit the MSc “Sustainable agriculture” page on the Università di Padova web-site http://www.unipd.it/en/educational-offer/second-cycle-degrees/school-of-agricultural-sciences-and-veterinary-medicine?ordinamento=2016&key=AV2293 for more details.

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In the future, agricultural and horticultural production will demand new intellectual and technological understanding and skills. Read more
In the future, agricultural and horticultural production will demand new intellectual and technological understanding and skills. The new technologies of sensors, computing, data analysis, remote sensing, robotics, drones and systems of data analysis and interpretation will allow new and sophisticated ways of managing both productive and natural environments.

The course will explore and study the high level of technical innovation currently being applied to agricultural and horticultural production, as will business management and the entrepreneurial skills that will be of fundamental importance to those entering this dynamic, technical based sector. Students will gain skills in data capture, processing, infographics, and the application of such technologies to all aspects of production and for the management of natural environments.

This course will be of relevance to those wishing to start a career in this emerging industry, join an established company, or looking to develop the skills needed to start their own enterprise.

Structure

The course may be studied full-time over 12 months. You will study six modules over the autumn and spring terms, followed by a Research Project, which is carried out over the summer to be submitted the following September. This may include a viva voce examination.

You will have the opportunity to engage with real-world problems, to find solutions to current issues and experience the working world of new technologies in animal and crop production, and the natural environment.

Modules are assessed primarily by coursework. Some modules have an examination as part of the assessment.

Modules

• 4230 Production Resource Management
• 4231 Research Project in Agricultural Technology and Innovation
• 4232 Business Development
• 4233 Computing and Information Technology in Precision Agriculture
• 4234 Livestock Production Technology
• 4235 Environmental Technology
• 4236 Crop Production Technology

Career prospects

Graduates are highly likely to go on to pursue a career within:

• The high-tech agricultural and environmental sectors
• Industries allied to crop and animal production
• Technical consultancy
• Government and international agencies
• The development of new companies through entrepreneurial initiatives

Potential job opportunities

• Agricultural and horticultural engineering
• Information technology
• Resource appraisal
• Agronomy
• Farm management

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.rau.ac.uk/STUDY/POSTGRADUATE/HOW-APPLY

Funding

For information on funding, please view the following page: https://www.rau.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/funding

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The MSc by Research in the Faculty of Social and Applied Sciences has been designed to offer a range of pathways for you to research your chosen subject interests within Social and Applied Sciences, whilst sharing in the multi-disciplinary nature of the taught component of the course. Read more
The MSc by Research in the Faculty of Social and Applied Sciences has been designed to offer a range of pathways for you to research your chosen subject interests within Social and Applied Sciences, whilst sharing in the multi-disciplinary nature of the taught component of the course.

You’ll share a breadth of experience – the multi-disciplinary nature of the taught component means you will share a broad experience of methodological and research issues. Allied with subject specific supervision, this will allow you to develop a unique awareness of knowledge and experiences across the natural and social sciences in addition to a focus on your own research topic.

Biosciences pathway:
Students pursuing the ecology pathway would be expected to have research which falls within the areas of the members of the ecology research group (ERG). Research within the ERG is organised into three research groupings:

*Animal behaviour, welfare and conservation.
*Pests, pathogens and crop protection.
*Applied ecology and environmental management.

Members also have collaborative interests with external partners including local schools and biotechnology businesses. For more information on member’s research activities or for contact details, please click on a member’s individual Staff Profile.

We are a close-knit community of academics, researchers and students dedicated to the study of Life Sciences. You would be joining an active and dynamic post-graduate community and would have the opportunity to contribute to and benefit from this community.

Find out more about the section of Life Sciences at https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/social-and-applied-sciences/human-and-life-sciences/life-sciences/about-us.aspx. You can also find out more about our research https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/social-and-applied-sciences/human-and-life-sciences/life-sciences/research/research.aspx.

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Ecological Economics focuses on how to make sustainability and environmental management work in practice by applying economic principles. Read more

Programme description

Ecological Economics focuses on how to make sustainability and environmental management work in practice by applying economic principles.

This programme is run in collaboration with Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC). Graduates with postgraduate training in this area are in greater demand than ever before in business, industry and government.

This programme is affiliated with the University's Global Environment & Society Academy.

Programme structure

You will learn through lectures, group work, informal group discussion and individual study, as well as the spring study tour. After two semesters of taught courses, you will begin work on your individual dissertations. You will be able to choose from a wide selection of option courses to suit individual interests and career goals.

Compulsory courses typically will be*:
•Foundations in Ecological Economics
•Applications in Ecological Economics
•Dissertation

Option courses:

In consultation with the Programme Director, you will choose from a range of option courses*. We particularly recommend:
•Human Dimensions of Environmental Change and Sustainability
•Principles of Environmental Sustainability
•Project Appraisal
•Ecosystem Dynamics and Functions
•Understanding Environment and Development
•Marine Systems and Policies
•Atmospheric Quality and Global Change
•Culture, Ethics & Environment
•Encountering Cities
•Frameworks to Assess Food Security
•Integrated Resource Management
•International Development in a Changing World
•Introduction To Spatial Analysis
•Principles of GIS
•Society and Development
•Soil Protection and Management
•Environmental Impact Assessment
•Climate Change and Corporate Strategy
•Participation in Policy and Planning
•Waste Reduction and Recycling
•Water Resource Management
•Political Ecology
•Case Studies in Sustainable Development
•Management of Sustainable Development
•Ecosystem Values and Management
•Forests and Environment
•Further Spatial Analysis
•Integrated Resource Planning
•Interrelationships in Food Systems
•Introduction to Environmental Modelling
•Sustainability of Food Production
•Understanding the City

*Please note: courses are offered subject to timetabling and availability and are subject to change each year.

Field trip

To experience and understand conflict between ecosystem conservation and human development needs at ground level, we typically offer a unique 7-10-day study tour, usually overseas and in the developing world (previous destinations have included South Africa, Kenya and Tanzania).

Career opportunities

Being able to identify ecological economic problems, and apply economic principles and methods to solve these problems is increasingly valued by employers.

Our graduates are working in a variety of sectors, including environmental consultancies; international and governmental agencies; NGOs; financial institutions; multinationals; environmental education and research.

Additionally around a quarter of our masters students go on to doctoral research programmes.

Student experience

Would you like to know what it’s really like to study at the School of GeoSciences?

Visit our student experience blog where you can find articles, advice, videos and ask current students your questions.
https://edingeoscistudents.wordpress.com/

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Working in European nature conservation increasingly requires an understanding of traditional conservation practices, as well as emerging techniques in restorative management and habitat creation. Read more
Working in European nature conservation increasingly requires an understanding of traditional conservation practices, as well as emerging techniques in restorative management and habitat creation. This course takes a pragmatic approach to the challenges posed by modern nature conservation,

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Society is increasingly sensitive to anthropogenic effects on the natural environment and the public perception is that we do not always weigh the benefits of activities against the associated environmental cost. Read more
Society is increasingly sensitive to anthropogenic effects on the natural environment and the public perception is that we do not always weigh the benefits of activities against the associated environmental cost. Such themes are significant with environmental management; the disciplines here help deal with many challenges facing our planet and locality.

Course Overview

Managing our environments in a sustainable way will help balance these concerns with our social and economic problems. Environmental conservationists have the knowledge and skills that is required to meet the many challenges our environment faces; this helps enhance societies by assisting decision makers in various disciplines. This postgraduate programme addresses environmental conservation in both a practical and holistic way, which is supported by geographical and governance academic knowledge, while also delivering a platform from which this knowledge can be disseminated to interested parties.

Candidates are welcomed from all social and educational backgrounds. Applicants will normally be expected to have a good degree in an associated subject. Students will be considered if vocational experience, relevant to the course, has been acquired and academic credibility demonstrated.

The School of the Built and Natural Environment has delivered this Environmental Conservation and Management programme since 1998.

Modules

PART 1
Compulsory Modules
-Environmental Planning and Policy
-Strategic Management for Environmental Conservat
-Sustainable Development
-Research Methodology
-Environmental Law

Elective Modules
-Energy: Issues and Concerns
-Waste and Resource Management
-Geographical Information Systems
-Coastal Zone Management
-Habitat Management
-The Workplace Environment

Electives Outside Programme
-Facilities Management and Sustainability
-Work Based Critical Reflection

PART 2
-Dissertation

Key Features

The School of Built and Natural Environment prides itself on providing a supportive learning environment, with personal attention afforded to all students. Delivering a successful and enjoyable learning experience is at the very core of our vision to produce first class professionals with high employability skills.

We are situated in an urban / maritime environment very close to Britain’s first designated ‘Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty’ and with many interesting buildings and cultural assets nearby. We are in close proximity to magnificent natural and physical resources of south, mid and west Wales and the University and its staff play a major role within the conservation and heritage management of these and other similar national assets.

As class sizes are generally less than 15, this engenders a culture and environment that listens to and supports individual student needs. Our teaching is informed by research in subjects that extend right across our portfolio, suitably supplemented by external experts from around the world. We believe in engaging with employers to develop, deliver and review courses that enhance our graduate’s employability credentials in a manner that is central to our vision for students, the city and region. This is further reflected by recent postgraduate success stories that include employment in international organisations, entrepreneurship and community engagement. Our commitment is demonstrated by recent investment in facilities, staff and engagement, which means the future for our alumni, is stronger than ever. We truly look forward to meeting you in person and helping you achieve your personal goals and ambitions.

Assessment

Assessments used within these Programmes are normally formative or summative. In the former assessment is designed to ensure students become aware of their strengths and weaknesses. Typically, such assessment will take the form of ‘life projects’ where a more hands-on approach shows student’s ability on a range of activities and includes engagement with employers.

Furthermore, much of the coursework requires that the student and lecturer negotiate the topic for assessment on an individual basis, allowing the student to develop skills appropriate to their employment goals. Some modules where the assessment is research-based require students to verbally/visually present the research results to the lecturer and peers, followed by a question and answer session. Such assessment strategies are in accord with the learning and teaching strategies employed by the team, that is, where the aim is to generate work that is mainly student-driven, individual, reflective and where appropriate, vocationally-orientated. Feedback to students will occur early in the study period and continue over the whole study session thereby allowing for greater value added to the student’s learning. The dissertation topic is developed and proposed by the student to help them refine their expertise in their chosen area.

Career Opportunities

This programme combines academic study with the application of professional skills and competencies. The student will acquire the highest transferable employment skills, which include: oral and visual presentations, environmental assessments, information dissemination, data analysis, and the ability to write reports. Students are particularly well suited to the increasingly important skills associated with environmental management, awareness raising and public participation forums. The Go Wales programme provides quality work experience for undergraduates to make students more attractive to potential employers. There is an optional ten week paid placement with local companies and a short term ‘work taster’ to help clarify student career choices. The scheme also provides a job shop for students seeking to work part-time to financially support their studies. A recent student survey showed that 53% of students worked part-time. Organisations contributing to the Industrial Liaison Committee that helped design the course content include: Natural Resources Wales (Environment Agency, Countryside Council for Wales and Forestry Commission), various local authorities, waste management companies, the renewable energy industry, RSPB etc.

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The international food and agribusiness industries continue to grow despite significant fluctuations in local and regional economic activity. Read more
The international food and agribusiness industries continue to grow despite significant fluctuations in local and regional economic activity. The rapid technological innovation pace, demographic shifts between urban and rural areas, immigration and access to skilled staff, climate change, water issues, and food security are among the topics studied in the International Food and Agribusiness MBA. Key areas include food processing and manufacturing, procurement, research and development, policy or government service, agricultural and food marketing, and supply chain management.

The MBA in International Food and Agribusiness is accredited by the Chartered Management Institute. Upon successful completion of the degree, you will be awarded CMI Level 7 Diploma in Strategic Management and Leadership and will therefore become a Member of the Chartered Management Institute (MCMI). You can then apply to the CMI for full Chartered Manager status if you wish.

Existing and aspiring multinational companies are looking for managers with transnational knowledge and linguistic skills, who are capable of functioning confidently in different regions of the world. Our business-minded graduates have gone on to pursue successful careers as food industry experts and consultants, Business Managers, and Project Managers for international organisations.

This MBA provides a unique opportunity for transatlantic study to put the management theories, concepts and strategies learnt into a European or USA context. You will have the chance to study the first term at the Utah State University or the Royal Agricultural University, with the remaining study periods undertaken at the RAU.

Structure

The MBA may be studied full-time over 12 months or part-time over two or three years.

You will study six business modules in the autumn term, plus four focus modules, and one or two elective module(s) in the spring term. The Research Project is carried out over the summer to be submitted in September.

You will learn through lectures, seminars, problem-based and experiential case studies, workshops, cooperative work, reflective reports, group project work, presentations, lectures, seminars, and industry visits. You will be given guided independent learning tasks and be encouraged to increase your knowledge and understanding through private study and the completion of assessments.

Modules will be assessed through professional reports, presentations, competitive reviews, reflective essays, case study analysis, critical academic papers, marketing plans, business evaluation projects, and written examinations.

Modules

• 4014 Food Chain
• 4023 Operations Management
• 4076 Financial Management
• 4095 International Agri-Food Marketing
• 4111 Critical Issues in Food Technology and Innovation
• 4214 Sustainable Business Strategy
• 4215 Agricultural Economics
• 4216 Leadership and Change
• 4217 International Marketing Management
• 4220 Applied Research Challenge
• 4221 International Agribusiness Finance and Investment

Plus ONE* further elective module(s) from:

• 3084 Entrepreneurship
• 3096 Wine Industry
• 3211 Practical E-Business and E-Commerce
• 4078 International Business
• 4080 Development Project Management
• 4205 Critical Issues in Ethical Leadership*
• 4223 Economics of the Environment*
• 4228 New Product Development in the Agri-Food Industry
• 4229 Adaptive Management in a Complex World

* Please note that to achieve full credits, students must select either ONE of the 15 credit electives or BOTH of the 7.5 credit electives

Undertaking Term One of study in Utah, USA

Applicants who wish to undertake their Term One modules at Utah State University (USU) will need to ensure that they have indicated this in their application by replying the specific question.

Applicants can participate in the US study only if they have paid the required fees (Home/EU: 1/3 of tuition fees, Overseas: 50% of tuition fees) and identified that they want to participate in the US study programme the latest by 30th June.

Please note that the term for the US study in Utah (USU) starts in the first week of August. Late applications for participation in the US term cannot be considered.

Career prospects

Our business-minded graduates progress into successful careers across all areas of the global food and agribusiness sectors, many of whom secure management positions at transnational companies:

• International food industry experts and consultants – for private companies, governments, and international organisations such as FAO, World Bank, European Commission
• Business management
• Import and export management
• Food processing, manufacturing, and supply chain management
• Procurement
• Project coordination – overseeing international projects and operations
• Operational support – building international relations for an organisation
• Research and development

Working for organisations such as:

• USDA National Agricultural Statistics Office
• Garrett Capital
• Agrimarc Ltd
• Schickelsheim
• Co-op farms
• Moet Hennessy
• NSF Agriculture

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.rau.ac.uk/STUDY/POSTGRADUATE/HOW-APPLY

Funding

For information on funding, please view the following page: https://www.rau.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/funding

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Part 1 (120 credits). runs from September to May and consists of four taught modules, a Field Visit, and a Research Methods module component. Read more
Part 1 (120 credits): runs from September to May and consists of four taught modules, a Field Visit, and a Research Methods module component. They must be completed successfully before proceeding to Part 2.

Part 2 (60 credits): is the dissertation phase and runs from end of May to September. This is a supervised project phase which gives students further opportunity for specialisation in their chosen field. Dissertation topics are related to the interests and needs of the individual and must show evidence of wide reading and understanding as well as critical analysis or appropriate use of advanced techniques. The quality of the dissertation is taken into account in the award of the Masters degree. Bangor University regulations prescribe a maximum word limit of 20,000 words for Masters Dissertations. A length of 12,000 to 15,000 words is suggested for Masters programmes in our School.

Summary of modules taken in Part 1:

All students undertake 6 modules of 20 credits each which are described below.

Conservation Science considers questions such as ‘in a post-wild world what should be the focus of conservation attention?’ ‘What are the relative roles of ecology, economics and social science in conservation?’ ‘What are the advantage and disadvantages of the introduction of market-like mechanisms into conservation policy?’ We look closely at the current and emerging drivers of biodiversity loss world-wide, while carefully analysing the range of responses.

Insect Pollinators and Plants is at the interface between agriculture and conservation, this module introduces students to plant ecology and insect pollinators. Students will gain unique understanding of the ecological interactions between plants and insect pollinators including honey-bees to implement more sensitive conservation management. The module explores the current conservation status of insect pollinators and their corresponding plant groups; how populations are monitored, and how interventions in the broader landscape can contribute to improving their conservation status. Module components relate specifically to ecosystem pollination services, apiculture and habitat restoration and/or maintenance. The module has a strong practical skills focus, which includes beekeeping and contemporary challenges to apiculture; plant and insect sampling and habitat surveying. Consequently, there is a strong emphasis on “learning by doing.

Agriculture and the Environment reviews the impact of agricultural systems and practices on the environment and the scientific principles involved. It includes examples from a range of geographical areas. It is now recognised that many of the farming practices adopted in the 1980’s and early 1990’s, aimed at maximising production and profit, have had adverse effects on the environment. These include water and air pollution, soil degradation, loss of certain habitats and decreased biodiversity. In the UK and Europe this has led to the introduction of regulatory instruments and codes of practice aimed at minimising these problems and the promotion of new approaches to managing farmland. However, as world population continues to rise, there are increased concerns about food security, particularly in stressful environments such as arid zones where farmers have to cope with natural problems of low rainfall and poor soils. Although new technologies including the use of GM crops have potential to resolve some of these issues, concerns have been expressed about the impact of the release of these new genetically-engineered crops into the environment.

Management Planning for Conservation provides students with an understanding of the Conservation Management System approach to management planning. This involves describing a major habitat feature at a high level of definition; the preparation of a conservation objective (with performance indicators) for the habitat; identification and consideration of the implications of all factors and thus the main management activities; preparation of a conceptual model of the planning process for a case study site and creating maps using spatial data within a desktop GIS.

Research Methods Module: this prepares students for the dissertation stage of their MSc course. The module provides students with an introduction to principles of hypothesis generation, sampling, study design, spatial methods, social research methods, quantitative & qualitative analysis and presentation of research findings. Practicals and field visits illustrate examples of these principles. Course assessment is aligned to the research process from the proposal stage, through study write up to presentation of results. The module is in two phases. The taught content phase is until the period following Christmas. This is followed by a project planning phase for dissertation title choice and plan preparation.

Field Visit Module: this is an annual programme of scientific visits related to Conservation and Land Management. The main purpose of the trip will be to appreciate the range of activities different conservation organisations are undertaking, to understand their different management objectives and constraints. Previous field trips have visited farms, forests and reserves run by Scottish Wildlife Trust, National Trust, RSPB, local authorities, community groups and private individuals.

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Can the world’s forests be managed sustainably? This one-year course will develop your understanding of forest ecosystems and their role in the global environment, and of the goods and services that forests can provide. Read more
Can the world’s forests be managed sustainably? This one-year course will develop your understanding of forest ecosystems and their role in the global environment, and of the goods and services that forests can provide.

The MSc Environmental Forestry course has been running for more than 25 years, and its graduates are now working in forestry all over the world. We have close links with forestry and environmental organisations in the UK and overseas, and staff of these organisations make regular contributions to the course. Lectures, seminars and independent learning are supported by an active programme of field practicals, forest visits and a week-long study tour, during which students discuss management and policy issues with forestry professionals.

ICF logoThis course is accredited by the Institute of Chartered Foresters and gives partial fulfilment of Professional Membership Entry.

Course Structure
The programme has two parts.

Part 1: runs from September to May and consists of four taught modules, a study tour, and a research planning module component. The taught part of the course is based on lectures, seminars, practicals and directed study, allowing an opportunity to examine a broad range of topics in detail and develop personal skills and expertise. A range of different assessment methods are used including reports, presentations, practical write-ups and online and written exams.

Part 1 must be completed successfully before proceeding to Part 2, the dissertation phase.

Part 2: June to September is set aside for production of a dissertation on a topic selected by the student in consultation with their academic supervisor. Dissertations can be in almost any aspect of forestry that interests you; they can have a temperate or tropical focus, and can include field work either locally, elsewhere in the UK, or overseas.

Part 1 Subjects:

Forest Resources & Assessment: This module provides an overview of the status of world forests, trends and causes of deforestation and degradation, consequences for ecosystem services, and policy responses. It then addresses the practical approaches required to assess the ecological condition of forests, which is necessary to inform appropriate forest management and conservation to meet these challenges.

Silviculture (Temperate or Tropical streams):This module develops an understanding of silviculture and forest management and the interaction of management systems with the physical environment. A common component explore the silvicultural systems and interventions used to realise desired future forest conditions, and the module then divides two streams, focussing on the specific practices of temperate or tropical regions.

Natural Resource Management gives students a theoretical understanding of the systems approach to managing natural resources, as well as a practical grounding in the ways in which natural resource managers can draw on different kinds of knowledge sources.

Management Planning: This module develops an understanding of the management planning process, and its use in the sustainable management of rural resources. Students develop management plans for real-world forestry situations which involves setting management objectives, considering landscape features, devising appropriate monitoring and evaluation techniques and quantifying the costs of management operations.

Research Methods: The module will form a foundation for the dissertation research project. This module will develop the basic numeracy, modelling, statistical, planning and optimisation methods, and GIS skills required to conduct research in a range of managed and un-managed ecosystems, and develop the skills required for future research and professional careers.

Study Tour: This module gives students the opportunity to see how the principles of natural resource management that are discussed in earlier parts of their course are put into practice. During visits to areas which are managed for a range of objectives (details vary between courses and from year to year) students meet resource managers working on behalf of different stakeholders and engage in discussion with them.

Part 2:

Dissertation: Execution and written presentation of a suitable scientific project which is devised by the student and an individual academic supervisor and validated by the Programme Director. A suitable project entails a worthwhile scientific question, of direct relevance to the degree programme being undertaken, established within the context of current knowledge and concepts that allows the formulation and testing of one or more hypotheses. This normally involves up to 5 months full-time work, typically including: 2-3 months for data collection from the field, laboratory or computer; 1-2 months for data analysis; and 1-2 months for writing-up.

Professional Accreditation

This degree is accredited by the Institute of Chartered Foresters (ICF) and qualifies students for associate membership

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