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Masters Degrees in Quantum Mechanics

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The Quantum Technologies MSc will take students to the cutting-edge of research in the emerging area of quantum technologies, giving them not only an advanced training in the relevant physics but also the chance to acquire key skills in the engineering and information sciences. Read more
The Quantum Technologies MSc will take students to the cutting-edge of research in the emerging area of quantum technologies, giving them not only an advanced training in the relevant physics but also the chance to acquire key skills in the engineering and information sciences.

Degree information

Students learn the language and techniques of advanced quantum mechanics, quantum information and quantum computation, as well as state-of-the-art implementation with condensed matter and quantum optical systems.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research project with a dissertation/report (60 credits).

Core modules
-Advanced Quantum Theory
-Atom and Photon Physics
-Quantum Communication and Computation
-Research Case Studies for Quantum Technologies
-Transferable Skills in Research Case Studies for Quantum Technologies

Optional modules - students choose three of the following optional modules:
-Advanced Photonic Devices
-Introduction to Cryptography
-Nanoelectronic Devices
-Nanoscale Processing for Advanced Devices
-Optical Transmission and Networks
-Order and Excitations in Condensed Matter
-Physics and Optics of Nano-Structures
-Research Computing with C++
-Research Software Engineering with Python

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project (experimental or theoretical) related to quantum technologies, which culminates in a presentation and a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars, with self-study on two modules devoted to the critical assessment of current research topics and the corresponding research skills. Assessment is through a combination of problem sheets, written examinations, case study reports and presentations, as well as the MSc project dissertation.

Careers

The programme prepares graduates for careers in the emerging quantum technology industries which play an increasingly important role in: secure communication; sensing and metrology; the simulation of other quantum systems; and ultimately in general-purpose quantum computation. Graduates will also be well prepared for research at the highest level in the numerous groups now developing quantum technologies and for work in government laboratories.

Employability
Graduates will possess the skills needed to work in the emerging quantum industries as they develop in response to technological advances.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL offers one of the leading research programmes in quantum technologies anywhere in the world, as well as outstanding taught programmes in the subjects contributing to the field (including physics, computer science, and engineering). It also hosts the EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Delivering Quantum Technologies.

The programme provides a rigorous grounding across the disciplines underlying quantum technologies, as well as the chance to work with some of the world's leading groups in research projects. The new Quantum Science and Technology Institute ('UCLQ') provides an umbrella where all those working in the field can meet and share ideas, including regular seminars, networking events and opportunities to interact with commercial and government partners.

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Exploration of quantum phenomena has recently led to extraordinary applications of quantum entanglement. The degree of control exerted over these systems is reflected in the term ‘quantum technology’, describing both experimental and theoretical developments in this area. Read more
Exploration of quantum phenomena has recently led to extraordinary applications of quantum entanglement. The degree of control exerted over these systems is reflected in the term ‘quantum technology’, describing both experimental and theoretical developments in this area.

This course is for you if you’re interested in the wonders of quantum physics and have a desire to exploit its full power. We cover:
-Ion-trap quantum processors
-Ion-photon interfaces for the projected quantum internet
-Quantum simulators
-Superconducting quantum circuits
-Devices for quantum-enhanced metrology

How will I study?

Assessment is split equally between the project and modules.

Your project culminates in a dissertation (with a contribution from a research talk). The modules are assessed by problem sets, with either open-notes tests or unseen examinations. You’ll attend research seminars and contribute to your group’s discussions of the latest journal papers.

You can choose to study this course full time or part time.

Your time is split between taught modules and a research project. The project can take the form of a placement in industry, but usually our faculty supervises them. Supervisors and topics are allocated, in consultation with you, at the start of the autumn term. You work on the project throughout the year. Often the projects form the basis of research papers that are later published in journals. Most projects are theoretical but there is an opportunity for you to become involved in the reduction and analysis of data acquired by faculty members.

In the autumn and spring terms, you take core modules and choose options. You start work on your project and give an assessed talk on this towards the end of the spring term. In the summer term, you focus on examinations and project work.

In the part-time structure, you take the core modules in the autumn and spring terms of your first year. After the examinations in the summer term, you begin work on your project. Project work continues during the second year when you also take options.

Distribution of modules between the two years is relatively flexible and agreed between you, your supervisor and the module conveners. Most of your project work naturally falls into the second year.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

This course may be attractive to you if you aim to:
-Go on to doctoral study (theory or experiment)
-Work in a high-technology company exploiting cutting-edge technologies related to our research (this could involve development of quantum information technology, high-precision measurements and quantum metrology, and photonics/optical communications)
-Work in business/data analysis, research, computer programming, software development, or teaching

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Our Physics MSc is highly flexible, giving you the opportunity to structure your course to meet your individual career aspirations. Read more

Our Physics MSc is highly flexible, giving you the opportunity to structure your course to meet your individual career aspirations.

The course gives you the opportunity to broaden and deepen your knowledge and skills in physics, at the forefront of research in the area. This will help to prepare you to progress to PhD study, or to work in an industrial or other business related area.

A key feature of the course is that you can choose to study a wide range of optional modules or focus on a particular area of research expertise according to your interests and future career aspirations.

Under the umbrella of an MSc in physics, you can specialise in astrophysics, bionanophysics, soft matter physics, condensed matter physics, quantum technology, optical materials or medical imaging. Or you can take a diverse range of modules to suit your interests and keep their options open.

Course content

The course offers you a very wide range of optional modules, giving you the opportunity to specialise in areas such as astrophysics, bionanophysics, soft matter physics, condensed matter physics, quantum technology, optical materials or medical imaging.

Modules studied may include: quantum field theory; superconductivity; general relativity; medical image analysis; cosmology; bionanophysics; magnetism in condensed matter; statistical mechanics; star and planet formation; elementary particle physics; quantum matter; and photonics.

Alongside your optional modules, you will undertake an advanced and extensive research project in one of the School of Physics and Astronomy’s internationally recognised research groups. This will enable you to develop advanced skills in research planning, execution and reporting, possibly leading to publication of your work in an international journal.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • MSc Project 75 credits
  • Advanced Literature Review 15 credits
  • Current Research Topics in Physics 15 credits

Optional modules

  • Cardiovascular Medical Imaging 10 credits
  • Digital Radiography and X-ray Computed Tomography 10 credits
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging 10 credits
  • Ultrasound Imaging 10 credits
  • Radionuclide Imaging 10 credits
  • Medical Image Analysis 10 credits
  • Digital Radiography and X-ray Computed Tomography 15 credits
  • Ultrasound Imaging 15 credits
  • Radionuclide Imaging 15 credits
  • Medical Image Analysis 15 credits
  • Cosmology 15 credits
  • Photonics 15 credits
  • Molecular Simulation: Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Star and Planet Formation 15 credits
  • Advanced Quantum Mechanics 15 credits
  • Quantum Photonics 15 credits
  • Quantum Matter 15 credits
  • Magnetism in Condensed Matter 15 credits
  • Statistical Mechanics 15 credits
  • Advanced Mechanics 15 credits
  • Bionanophysics 1 15 credits
  • Theoretical Elementary Particle Physics 15 credits
  • Soft Matter Physics: Liquid Crystals 15 credits
  • Quantum Many-Body Physics 15 credits
  • Winds, Bubbles and Explosions 15 credits
  • Bionanophysics 2: Advanced Bionanophysics Research 15 credits
  • Advanced Group Industrial Project 15 credits
  • Superconductivity 15 credits
  • Soft Matter Physics: Polymers, Colloids and Glasses 15 credits
  • Quantum Transport in Nanostructures 15 credits
  • Quantum Field Theory 15 credits
  • General Relativity 15 credits
  • Quantum Information Science 15 credits
  • Advanced Physics in Schools 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Physics MSc in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Teaching methods include a combination of lectures, seminars, supervisions, problem solving, presentation of work, independent research, and group work (depending on the modules you choose to study).

Assessment

Assessment of modules are by problem solving exams and research assignments. The project is assessed on the ability to plan and conduct research and communicate the results in written and oral format.

Career opportunities

The specialist pathways offered by this course (in astrophysics, bionanophysics, soft matter physics, condensed matter physics, quantum technology, optical materials or medical imaging) allow you to tailor your course and focus on a particular area of research expertise according to your interests and future career aspirations.

Physicists are highly employable due to their high level of numeracy and mathematical competence, their computer skills, and their high level of technical academic scientific knowledge. They are employed by: industry, financial sector, defence, education, and more.

This course is also a clear route to PhD level study.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Working at a frontier of mathematics that intersects with cutting edge research in physics. Mathematicians can benefit from discoveries in physics and conversely mathematics is essential to further excel in the field of physics. Read more
Working at a frontier of mathematics that intersects with cutting edge research in physics.

Mathematicians can benefit from discoveries in physics and conversely mathematics is essential to further excel in the field of physics. History shows us as much. Mathematical physics began with Christiaan Huygens, who is honoured at Radboud University by naming the main building of the Faculty of Science after him. By combining Euclidean geometry and preliminary versions of calculus, he brought major advances to these areas of mathematics as well as to mechanics and optics. The second and greatest mathematical physicist in history, Isaac Newton, invented both the calculus and what we now call Newtonian mechanics and, from his law of gravity, was the first to understand planetary motion on a mathematical basis.

Of course, in the Master’s specialisation in Mathematical Physics we look at modern mathematical physics. The specialisation combines expertise in areas like functional analysis, geometry, and representation theory with research in, for example, quantum physics and integrable systems. You’ll learn how the field is far more than creating mathematics in the service of physicists. It’s also about being inspired by physical phenomena and delving into pure mathematics.

At Radboud University, we have such faith in a multidisciplinary approach between these fields that we created a joint research institute: Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics (IMAPP). This unique collaboration has lead to exciting new insights into, for example, quantum gravity and noncommutative geometry. Students thinking of enrolling in this specialisation should be excellent mathematicians as well as have a true passion for physics.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/mathematics/physics

Why study Mathematical Physics at Radboud University?

- This specialisation is one of the few Master’s in the world that lies in the heart of where mathematics and physics intersect and that examines their cross-fertilization.
- You’ll benefit from the closely related Mathematics Master’s specialisations at Radboud University in Algebra and Topology (and, if you like, also from the one in Applied Stochastics).
- Teaching takes place in a stimulating, collegial setting with small groups. This ensures that at Radboud University you’ll get plenty of one-on-one time with your thesis supervisor.
- You partake in the Mastermath programme, meaning you can follow the best mathematics courses, regardless of the university in the Netherlands that offers them. It also allows you to interact with fellow mathematic students all over the country.
- As a Master’s student you’ll get the opportunity to work closely with the mathematicians and physicists of the entire IMAPP research institute.
- More than 85% of our graduates find a job or a gain a PhD position within a few months of graduating. About half of our PhD’s continue their academic careers.

Career prospects

Mathematicians are needed in all industries, including the industrial, banking, technology and service industry and also within management, consultancy and education. A Master’s in Mathematics will show prospective employers that you have perseverance, patience and an eye for detail as well as a high level of analytical and problem-solving skills.

Job positions

The skills learned during your Master’s will help you find jobs even in areas where your specialised mathematical knowledge may initially not seem very relevant. This makes your job opportunities very broad indeed and is why many graduates of a Master’s in Mathematics find work very quickly.
Possible careers for mathematicians include:
- Researcher (at research centres or within corporations)
- Teacher (at all levels from middle school to university)
- Risk model validator
- Consultant
- ICT developer / software developer
- Policy maker
- Analyst

PhD positions

Radboud University annually has a few PhD positions for graduates of a Master’s in Mathematics. A substantial part of our students attain PhD positions, not just at Radboud University, but at universities all over the world.

Our research in this field

The research of members of the Mathematical Physics Department, emphasise operator algebras and noncommutative geometry, Lie theory and representation theory, integrable systems, and quantum field theory. Below, a small sample of the research our members pursue.

Gert Heckman's research concerns algebraic geometry, group theory and symplectic geometry. His work in algebraic geometry and group theory concerns the study of particular ball quotients for complex hyperbolic reflection groups. Basic questions are an interpretation of these ball quotients as images of period maps on certain algebraic geometric moduli spaces. Partial steps have been taken towards a conjecture of Daniel Allcock, linking these ball quotients to certain finite almost simple groups, some even sporadic like the bimonster group.

Erik Koelink's research is focused on the theory of quantum groups, especially at the level of operator algebras, its representation theory and its connections with special functions and integrable systems. Many aspects of the representation theory of quantum groups are motivated by related questions and problems of a group representation theoretical nature.

Klaas Landsman's previous research programme in noncommutative geometry, groupoids, quantisation theory, and the foundations of quantum mechanics (supported from 2002-2008 by a Pioneer grant from NWO), led to two major new research lines:
1. The use of topos theory in clarifying the logical structure of quantum theory, with potential applications to quantum computation as well as to foundational questions.
2. Emergence with applications to the Higgs mechanism and to Schroedinger's Cat (aka as the measurement problem). A first paper in this direction with third year Honours student Robin Reuvers (2013) generated worldwide attention and led to a new collaboration with experimental physicists Andrew Briggs and Andrew Steane at Oxford and philosopher Hans Halvorson at Princeton.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/mathematics/physics

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The MSc Theoretical Physics programme will provide you with exposure to a very wide range of world-leading teaching and research skills. Read more
The MSc Theoretical Physics programme will provide you with exposure to a very wide range of world-leading teaching and research skills. As well as the wide range of modules offered by the Department of Mathematics, many optional modules are available from across the University of London, subject to approval. King's will offer you a unique module in 'General Research Techniques' which will prepare you for life as a research scientist. You will also undertake an extended research project supervised by one of our academic staff.

Key benefits

- This intensive programme covers basic topics in theoretical and mathematical physics such as general relativity and quantum field theory, and leads to advanced topics such as string theory, supersymmetry and integrable quantum field theory.

- Intimate class environment with small class sizes (typically fewer than 30 students per module) allows good student-lecturer interactions.

- A full 12-month course with a three-month supervised summer project to give a real introduction to research.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/theoretical-physics-msc.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The master's is organised on a module system together with an individual project. You will take eight taught modules of which at least five will be from the list: Mechanics, Relativity & Quantum Theory; Quantum Mechanics II; Quantum Field Theory; Lie Groups & Lie Algebras; Manifolds; Space-time Geometry and General Relativity; Advanced General Relativity; Supersymmetry & Gauge Theory; String Theory and Branes; Mathematical Methods for Theoretical Physics; Standard Model Physics and Beyond.

The remaining modules can be drawn from the wide range of theoretical physics or pure mathematics MSc courses available in London, the Financial Mathematics MSc in King's and at most two courses from the undergraduate programme at King's. The project is undertaken over the summer in an area of current research.

- Purpose -

The purpose of this programme is to provide a coherent and comprehensive introduction to the main building blocks of modern theoretical physics, preparing students for active research at the forefront of this discipline.

- Course format and assessment -

At least eight taught modules assessed by written examinations and one individual project.

Career prospects

Many of our very successful graduates go on to start PhD studies in theoretical physics at various universities in the United Kingdom and abroad, including with our group here at King's, for which the MSc is particularly well tailored. Our graduates also take up full-time employment in various industries that require good mathematical/computer knowledge or that look for intelligent and creative people. Recent employers of our graduates include the Algerian Space Agency, FRM Capital Advisors and Lloyds Banking Group.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Revealing the ‘terra incognita’ between quantum mechanics and the classical world and inspiring new technologies. As a scientist, you’re a problem solver. Read more

Master's specialisation in Physics of Molecules and Materials

Revealing the ‘terra incognita’ between quantum mechanics and the classical world and inspiring new technologies.
As a scientist, you’re a problem solver. But how do you tackle a problem when there are no adequate theories and calculations become far too complicated? In the specialisation in Physics of Molecules and Materials you’ll be trained to take up this challenge in a field of physics that is still largely undiscovered: the interface between quantum and classical physics.
We focus on systems from two atoms to complete nanostructures, with time scales in the order of femtoseconds, picoseconds or nanoseconds. One of our challenges is to understand the origin of phenomena like superconductivity and magnetism. As theory and experiment reinforce each other, you’ll learn about both ‘research languages’. In this way, you’ll be able to understand complex problems by dividing them into manageable parts.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/physicsandastronomy/physics

Why study Physics of Molecules and Materials at Radboud University?

- At Radboud University there’s a strong connection between theory and experiment. Theoretical and experimental physicists will teach you to become acquainted with both methods.
- In your internship(s), you’ll have the opportunity to work with unique research equipment, like free electron lasers and high magnetic fields, and with internationally known scientists.
- We collaborate with several industrial partners, such as Philips and NXP. This extensive network can help you find an internship or job that meets your interests.

If you’re successful in your internship, you have a good chance of obtaining a PhD position at the Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM).

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Physics
2. A proficiency in English
In order to take part in this programme, you need to have fluency in both written and spoken English. Non-native speakers of English* without a Dutch Bachelor's degree or VWO diploma need one of the following:
- A TOEFL score of ≥575 (paper based) or ≥90 (internet based
- An IELTS score of ≥6.5
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of C or higher.

Career prospects

This Master’s specialisation is an excellent preparation for a career in research, either at a university or at a company. However, many of our students end up in business as well. Whatever job you aspire, you can certainly make use of the fact that you have learned to:
- Solve complex problems
- Make accurate approximations
- Combine theory and experiments
- Work with numerical methods

Graduates have found jobs as for example:
- Consultant Billing at KPN
- Communications advisor at the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM)
- Systems analysis engineer at Thales
- Technical consultant at UL Transaction Security
- Business analyst at Capgemini

PhD positions

At Radboud University, we’re capable of offering many successful students in the field of Physics of Molecules and Materials a PhD position. Many of our students have already attained a PhD position, not just at Radboud University, but at universities all over the world.

Our approach to this field

In this specialisation, you’ll discover the interface between quantum mechanics and the classical world, which is still a ‘terra incognita’. We focus on two-atom systems, multi-atom systems, molecules and nanostructures. This is pioneering work, because these systems are often too complex for quantum calculations and too small for the application of classical theories.

- Theory and experiment
At Radboud University, we believe that the combination of theory and experiments is the best way to push the frontiers of our knowledge. Experiments provide new knowledge and data and sometimes also suggest a model for theoretical studies. The theoretical work leads to new theories, and creative ideas for further experiments. That’s why our leading theoretical physicists collaborate intensively with experimental material physicists at the Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM). Together, they form the teaching staff of the Master’s specialisation in Physics of Molecules and Materials.

- Themes
This specialisation is focused on two main topics:
- Advanced spectroscopy
Spectroscopy is a technique to look at matter in many different ways. Here you’ll learn the physics behind several spectroscopic techniques, and learn how to design spectroscopic experiments. At Radboud University, you also have access to large experimental infrastructure, such as the High Magnetic field Laboratory (HFML), the FELIX facility for free electron lasers and the NMR laboratory.
- Condensed matter and molecular physics
You’ll dive into material science at the molecular level as well as the macroscopic level, on length scales from a single atom up to nanostructure and crystal. In several courses, you’ll get a solid background in both quantum mechanical and classical theories.

- Revolution
We’re not aiming at mere evolution of current techniques, we want to revolutionize them by developing fundamentally new concepts. Take data storage. The current data elements are near the limits of speed and data capacity. That’s why in the IMM we’re exploring a completely new way to store and process data, using light instead of electrical current. And this is but one example of how our research inspires future technology. As a Master’s student you can participate in this research or make breakthroughs in a field your interested in.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/physicsandastronomy/physics

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The Graduate Diploma is designed for graduates whose first degree may be inappropriate for direct entry to an MSc in Physics at a UK university. Read more
The Graduate Diploma is designed for graduates whose first degree may be inappropriate for direct entry to an MSc in Physics at a UK university. Though it may be taken as a free-standing qualification, most students take this programme as a pathway to the MSc. This pathway forms the first year of a two-year programme with successful students (gaining a merit or distinction) progressing onto the MSc Physics in second year.

Key benefits

- King's College London offers a unique environment for the taught postgraduate study of physics. Our size enables us to provide a welcoming environment in which all our students feel at home. The Physics Department has been built up to its current strength in the last few years, which has allowed us to design a bespoke research department focused in three areas.

- Particle physics and cosmology is led by Professor John Ellis CBE FRS, who collaborates closely with CERN, and this group provides unique lecture courses, including "Astroparticle Cosmology" as well as "The Standard Model and beyond".

- The Experimental Biophysics and Nanotechnology research group is a world-leading centre for nanophotonics, metamaterials and biological physics. Here you can study the state of the art in experimental nanoplasmonics, bio-imaging, near-field optics and nanophotonics, with access to the laboratories of the London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN). You will be offered our flagship module in "Advanced Photonics".

- Theory and Simulation of Condensed Matter is a group of theoreticians with a critical-mass expertise in many-body physics and highly-correlated quantum systems—magnetism and superconductivity, and world-leading research in condensed matter, particularly in biological and materials physics. The group is a founding member of the prestigious Thomas Young Centre (TYC), the London centre for the theory and simulation of materials.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/physics-grad-dip.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Students will undertake a total of 120 credits, from the following modules:

- Mathematical Methods in Physics III
- Statistical Mechanics
- Spectroscopy and Quantum Mechanics
- Particle Physics
- Optics
- Solid State Physics
- General Relatvity and Cosmology
- Fundamentals of Biophysics and Nanotechnology
- Introduction to Medical Imaging
- Laboratory Physics II
- Computational Lab
- Nuclear Physics
- Quantum Mechanics for Physics I
- Mathematical methods in Physics
- Symmetry in Physics
- Electromagnetism
- Astrophysics

- Course purpose -

For students with an undergraduate degree or equivalent who wish to have the experience of one year in a leading UK Physics Department, or who may not be immediately eligible for entry to a higher degree in the UK and who wish to upgrade their degree. If you successfully complete this programme with a Merit or Distinction we may consider you for the MSc programme.

- Course format and assessment -

The compulsory modules are assessed via coursework. The majority of the other optional modules avaiable are assessed by written examinations.

Career prospects

Many students go on to do a higher Physics degree, work in scientific research, teaching or work in the financial sector.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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This is a one year advanced taught course. The aim of this course is to bring students in twelve months to the frontier of elementary particle theory. Read more
This is a one year advanced taught course. The aim of this course is to bring students in twelve months to the frontier of elementary particle theory. This course is intended for students who have already obtained a good first degree in either physics or mathematics, including in the latter case courses in quantum mechanics and relativity.

The course consists of three modules: the first two are the Michaelmas and Epiphany graduate lecture courses, which are assessed by examinations in January and March. The third module is a dissertation on a topic of current research, prepared under the guidance of a supervisor with expertise in the area. We offer a wide variety of possible dissertation topics. The dissertation must be submitted by September 15th, the end of the twelve month course period.

Course Structure

The main group of lectures are given in the first two terms of the academic year (Michaelmas and Epiphany). This part of the lecture course is assessed by examinations. In each term there are two teaching periods of four weeks, with a week's break in the middle of the term in which students will be able to revise the material. Most courses are either eight lectures or 16 lectures in length. There are 14 lectures/week in the Michaelmas term and 14 lectures/week in Epiphany term.

Core Modules

-Introductory Field Theory
-Group Theory
-Standard Model
-General Relativity
-Quantum Electrodynamics
-Quantum Field Theory
-Conformal Field Theory
-Supersymmetry
-Anomalies
-Strong Interaction Physics
-Cosmology
-Superstrings and D-branes
-Non-Perturbative Physics
-Euclidean Field Theory
-Flavour Physics and Effective Field Theory
-Neutrinos and Astroparticle Physics
-2d Quantum Field Theory

Optional Modules available in previous years included:

-Differential Geometry for Physicists
-Boundaries and Defects in Integrable Field Theory
-Computing for Physicists

Learning and Teaching

This is a full-year degree course, starting early October and finishing in the middle of the subsequent September. The aim of the course is to bring students to the frontier of research in elementary particle theory. The course consists of three modules: the first two are the Michaelmas and Epiphany graduate lecture courses. The third module is a dissertation on a topic of current research, prepared under the guidance of a supervisor with expertise in the area. We offer a wide variety of possible dissertation topics.

The lectures begin with a general survey of particle physics and introductory courses on quantum field theory and group theory. These lead on to more specialised topics, amongst others in string theory, cosmology, supersymmetry and more detailed aspects of the standard model.

The main group of lectures is given in the first two terms of the academic year (Michaelmas and Epiphany). This part of the lecture course is assessed by examinations. In each term there are two teaching periods of 4 weeks, with a week's break in the middle of the term in which students will be able to revise the material. Most courses are either 8 lectures or 16 lectures in length. There are 14 lectures/week in the Michaelmas term and 14 lectures/week in Epiphany term they are supported by weekly tutorials. In addition lecturers also set a number of homework assignments which give the student a chance to test his or her understanding of the material.

There are additional optional lectures in the third term. These introduce advanced topics and are intended as preparation for research in these areas.

The dissertation must be submitted by mid-September, the end of the twelve month course period.

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Microsystems Engineering is one of the most dynamic and interdisciplinary engineering fields. The Master of Science program in Microsystems Engineering (MSE) provides the educational basis for your success in this field. Read more
Microsystems Engineering is one of the most dynamic and interdisciplinary engineering fields. The Master of Science program in Microsystems Engineering (MSE) provides the educational basis for your success in this field. The MSE program is designed for highly qualified graduate students holding a Bachelor degree in engineering or science.

In the first year 12 mandatory courses provide the fundamental theoretical framework for a future career in Microsystems. These courses are designed to provide students with a broad knowledge base in the most important aspects of the field:

• MSE technologies and processes
• Microelectronics
• Micro-mechanics
• MSE design laboratory I
• Optical Microsystems
• Sensors
• Probability and statistics
• Assembly and packaging technology
• Dynamics of MEMS
• Micro-actuators
• Biomedical Microsystems
• Micro-fluidics
• MSE design laboratory II
• Signal processing

As part of the mandatory courses, the Microsystems design laboratory is a two-semester course in which small teams of students undertake a comprehensive, hands-on design project in Microsystems engineering. Requiring students to address all aspects of the generation of a microsystem, from conceptualization, through project planning to fabrication and testing, this course provides an essential glimpse into the workings of engineering projects.

In the second year, MSE students can specialise in two of the following seven concentration areas (elective courses), allowing each student to realize individual interests and to obtain an in-depth look at two sub-disciplines of this very broad, interdisciplinary field:

• Circuits and systems
• Design and simulation
• Life sciences: Biomedical engineering
• Life sciences: Lab-on-a-chip
• Materials
• Process engineering
• Sensors and actuators

Below are some examples of subjects offered in the concentration areas. These subjects do not only include theoretical lectures, but also hands-on courses such as labs, projects and seminars.

Circuits and Systems
• Analog CMOS Circuit Design
• Mixed-Signal CMOS Circuit Design
• VLSI – System Design
• RF- und Microwave Devices and Circuits
• Micro-acoustics
• Radio sensor systems
• Optoelectronic devices
• Reliability Engineering
• Lasers
• Micro-optics
• Advanced topics in Macro-, Micro- and Nano-optics


Design and Simulation
• Topology optimization
• Compact Modelling of large Scale Systems
• Lattice Gas Methods
• Particle Simulation Methods
• VLSI – System Design
• Hardware Development using the finite element method
• Computer-Aided Design

Life Sciences: Biomedical Engineering
• Signal processing and analysis of brain signals
• Neurophysiology I: Measurement and Analysis of Neuronal Activity
• Neurophysiology II: Electrophysiology in Living Brain
• DNA Analytics
• Basics of Electrostimulation
• Implant Manufacturing Techologies
• Biomedical Instrumentation I
• Biomedical Instrumentation II

Life Sciences: Lab-on-a-chip
• DNA Analytics
• Biochip Technologies
• Bio fuel cell
• Micro-fluidics 2: Platforms for Lab-on-a-Chip Applications

Materials
• Microstructured polymer components
• Test structures and methods for integrated circuits and microsystems
• Quantum mechanics for Micro- and Macrosystems Engineering
• Microsystems Analytics
• From Microsystems to the nano world
• Techniques for surface modification
• Nanomaterials
• Nanotechnology
• Semiconductor Technology and Devices

MEMS Processing
• Advanced silicon technologies
• Piezoelectric and dielectric transducers
• Nanotechnology

Sensors and Actuators
• Nonlinear optic materials
• CMOS Microsystems
• Quantum mechanics for Micro- and Macrosystems Engineering
• BioMEMS
• Bionic Sensors
• Micro-actuators
• Energy harvesting
• Electronic signal processing for sensors and actuators


Essential for the successful completion of the Master’s degree is submission of a Master’s thesis, which is based on a project performed during the third and fourth semesters of the program. Each student works as a member of one of the 18 research groups of the department, with full access to laboratory and cleanroom infrastructure.

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his is a one year advanced taught course. The aim of this course is to bring students in twelve months to the frontier of elementary particle theory. Read more
his is a one year advanced taught course. The aim of this course is to bring students in twelve months to the frontier of elementary particle theory. This course is intended for students who have already obtained a good first degree in either physics or mathematics, including in the latter case courses in quantum mechanics and relativity.

The course consists of three modules: the first two are the Michaelmas and Epiphany graduate lecture courses, which are assessed by examinations in January and March. The third module is a dissertation on a topic of current research, prepared under the guidance of a supervisor with expertise in the area. We offer a wide variety of possible dissertation topics. The dissertation must be submitted by September 15th, the end of the twelve month course period.

Course Structure
The main group of lectures are given in the first two terms of the academic year (Michaelmas and Epiphany). This part of the lecture course is assessed by examinations. In each term there are two teaching periods of 4 weeks, with a week's break in the middle of the term in which students will be able to revise the material. most courses are either 8 lectures or 16 lectures in length. There are 14 lectures/week in the Michaelmas term and 14 lectures/week in Epiphany term.

Core Modules
- Introductory Field Theory
- Group Theory
- Standard Model
- General Relativity
- Quantum Electrodynamics
- Quantum Field Theory
- Conformal Field Theory
- Supersymmetry
- Anomalies
- Strong Interaction Physics
- Cosmology
- Superstrings and D-branes
- Non-Perturbative Physics
- Euclidean Field Theory
- Flavour Physics and Effective Field Theory
- Neutrinos and Astroparticle Physics
- 2d Quantum Field Theory
- Optional Modules
- Differential Geometry for Physicists
- Boundaries and Defects in Integrable Field Theory
- Computing for Physicists.

For further information on this course, please visit the Centre for Particle Theory website (http://www.cpt.dur.ac.uk/GraduateStudies)

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This course aims to bring you, in 12 months, to a position where you can embark with confidence on a wide range of careers, including taking a PhD in Mathematics or related disciplines. Read more
This course aims to bring you, in 12 months, to a position where you can embark with confidence on a wide range of careers, including taking a PhD in Mathematics or related disciplines. There is a wide range of taught modules on offer, and you will also produce a dissertation on a topic of current research interest taken from your choice of a wide range of subjects offered.

Course structure and overview

-Six taught modules in October-May.
-A dissertation in June-September.

Modules: Six of available options
In previous years, optional modules available included:

Modules in Pure Mathematics:
-Algebraic Topology IV
-Codes and Cryptography III
-Differential Geometry III
-Galois Theory III
-Geometry III and IV
-Number Theory III and IV
-Riemannian Geometry IV
-Topology III
-Elliptic Functions IV

Modules in Probability and Statistics:
-Mathematical Finance III and IV
-Decision Theory III
-Operations Research III
-Probability III and IV
-Statistical Methods III
-Topics in Statistics III and IV

Modules in Applications of Mathematics:
-Advanced Quantum Theory IV
-Dynamical Systems III
-General Relativity III and IV
-Mathematical Biology III
-Numerical Differential Equations III and IV
-Partial Differential Equations III and IV
-Quantum Information III
-Quantum Mechanics III
-Statistical Mechanics III and IV

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We offer postgraduate research degrees in Physics at the MPhil and PhD level in all of our major research areas such as Emerging Technology and Materials, Applied Mathematics, and Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Read more
We offer postgraduate research degrees in Physics at the MPhil and PhD level in all of our major research areas such as Emerging Technology and Materials, Applied Mathematics, and Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

We supervise MPhil students whose interests match the expertise we have in our four main research themes.

Condensed matter and nanoscale physics

We research electronic, optical, structural and magnetic properties of novel solid-state materials, particularly novel semi-conductor structures and nanostructured materials such as nanocrystals and nanowires. Theoretical studies use quantum mechanical approaches and involve massively parallel supercomputing.

Our development of new approaches to quantum modelling is changing the size and complexity of systems that can be modelled. Experimental work takes place at synchrotron facilities in Europe and America and related work takes place with colleagues in the Emerging Technology and Materials (ETM) Group in the School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering.

Biophysics

Our research in biophysics explores the structure and function of cells with the aim of creating artificial life and building machines based on biological parts. Projects include protocell development and the construction of a cyborg robot. An understanding of biological physics is needed that uses techniques including single molecule manipulation, atomic force microscopy and scanning tunnelling microscopy.

Astrophysics

Galaxies and the interstellar medium, the source of the galactic magnetic field and its influence on the structure of the galaxy form the focus of our research in astrophysics. There is also interest in cosmology, particularly the early universe and its origin in the big bang.

Ultrafast optics

Our research focuses on coherent optical control of atomic collisions in ultracold gases by femtosecond laser light for studies of problems in fundamental physics, such as the measurement of time dependence of the fundamental constants of nature. We also research metrological protocols for characterisation of broadband light, specifically those relating to foundational aspects of quantum mechanics and its application.

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This programme reflects and benefits from the strong research activities of the Department of Mathematics. The taught modules and dissertation topics are closely aligned with the interests of the Department’s four research groups. Read more

This programme reflects and benefits from the strong research activities of the Department of Mathematics.

The taught modules and dissertation topics are closely aligned with the interests of the Department’s four research groups:

  • Mathematics of Life and Social Sciences
  • Dynamical Systems and Partial Differential Equations
  • Fields, Strings and Geometry
  • Fluids, Meteorology and Symmetry

During the first two semesters you will take a range of taught modules from an extensive list of options, followed by an extended research project conducted over the summer under the supervision of a member of the department, culminating in the writing of a dissertation.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Careers

Mathematics is not only central to science, technology and finance-related fields, but the logical insight, analytical skills and intellectual discipline gained from a mathematical education are highly sought after in a broad range of other areas such as law, business and management.

There is also a strong demand for new mathematics teachers to meet the ongoing shortage in schools. 

As well as being designed to meet the needs of future employers, our MSc programme also provides a solid foundation from which to pursue further research in mathematics or one of the many areas to which mathematical ideas and techniques are applied.

Educational aims of the programme

  • To provide graduates with a strong background in advanced mathematical theory and its applications to the solution of real problems
  • To develop students understanding of core areas in advanced mathematics including standard tools for the solution of real life applied mathematical problems
  • To develop the skill of formulating a mathematical problem from a purely verbal description
  • To develop the skill of writing a sophisticated mathematical report and, additionally, in presenting the results in the form of an oral presentation
  • To lay a foundation for carrying out mathematical research leading to a research degree and/or a career as a professional mathematician in an academic or non-academic setting

Programme learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

  • Knowledge of the core theory and methods of advanced pure and applied mathematics and how to apply that theory to real life problems
  • An in-depth study of a specific problem arising in a research context

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Ability to demonstrate knowledge of key techniques in advanced mathematics and to apply those techniques in problem solving
  • Ability to formulate a mathematical description of a problem that may be described only verbally
  • An understanding of possible shortcomings of mathematical descriptions of reality
  • An ability to use software such as MATLAB and IT facilities more generally including research databases such as MathSciNet and Web of Knowledge

Professional practical skills

  • Fluency in advanced mathematical theory
  • The ability to interpret the results of the application of that theory
  • An awareness of any weaknesses in the assumptions being made and of possible shortcomings with model predictions
  • The skill of writing an extended and sophisticated mathematical report and of verbally summarising its content to specialist and/or non-specialist audiences

Key / transferable skills

  • Ability to reason logically and creatively
  • Effective oral presentation skills
  • Written report writing skills
  • Skills in independent learning
  • Time management
  • Use of information and technology

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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Degree. Master of Science (two years) with a major in Applied Physics or Master of Science (two years) with a major in Physics. Teaching language. Read more
Degree: Master of Science (two years) with a major in Applied Physics or Master of Science (two years) with a major in Physics
Teaching language: English

The Material Physics and Nanotechnology master's programme focuses on the physics of new materials. The importance of advanced materials in current technology is best exemplified by the highly purified semiconductor crystals in use today, which are the foundation of the electronic age. Future applications in electronics and photonics will include nanoscaled physics, molecular electronics and non-linear optics.

The Materials Physics and Nanotechnology master's programme covers a wide range of materials used in for example semiconductor technology, optoelectronics and biotechnical applications. Students also study materials used in chemical sensors and biosensors, as well as materials' mechanical applications such as hardness and elasticity.

In the first semester students take mandatory courses such as Nanotechnology, Quantum Mechanics, Surface Physics and Physics of Condensed Matter, in order to get the knowledge necessary to understand advanced materials research.

The second and third semesters consist mainly of elective courses, and the fourth and final semester is devoted to a degree project in the area of material- and nanophysics.

The programme is supported by a number of internationally known research divisions, and is directed towards those who wish to pursue a university or industry career in materials-related research and development.

Welcome to the Institute of Technology at Linköping University

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This MSc is for you if you’re a graduate from an applied mathematics- or physics-based degree and wish to learn how to apply your knowledge to cosmology. Read more
This MSc is for you if you’re a graduate from an applied mathematics- or physics-based degree and wish to learn how to apply your knowledge to cosmology.

It is one of only two MScs in this subject area in the UK. Our emphasis is on observational and theoretical cosmology in the pre- and post-recombination universe.

How will I study?

Teaching is through:
-Lectures
-Exercise classes
-Seminars
-Personal supervision

You’re assessed by coursework and unseen examination. Assessment for the project is an oral presentation and a dissertation of up to 20,000 words. You’ll contribute to our weekly informal seminars and are encouraged to attend research seminars.

You can choose to study this course full time or part time.

Your time is split between taught modules and a research project. The project can take the form of a placement in industry, but usually our faculty supervises them. Supervisors and topics are allocated, in consultation with you, at the start of the autumn term. You work on the project throughout the year. Often the projects form the basis of research papers that are later published in journals. Most projects are theoretical but there is an opportunity for you to become involved in the reduction and analysis of data acquired by faculty members.

In the autumn and spring terms, you take core modules and choose options. You start work on your project and give an assessed talk on this towards the end of the spring term. In the summer term, you focus on examinations and project work.

In the part-time structure, you take the core modules in the autumn and spring terms of your first year. After the examinations in the summer term, you begin work on your project. Project work continues during the second year when you also take options.

Distribution of modules between the two years is relatively flexible and agreed between you, your supervisor and the module conveners. Most of your project work naturally falls into the second year.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Faculty

Our research focuses on extragalactic astrophysics and cosmology.

Careers

Most of our graduates have gone on to study for a research degree in a closely related field.

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