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City, University of London, Full Time Masters Degrees in Psychology

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Promoting the scientific study of health, illness and healthcare to improve health outcomes for patients and the public. Read more
Promoting the scientific study of health, illness and healthcare to improve health outcomes for patients and the public.

Who is it for?

The course is for highly motivated students who have intellectual curiosity to learn about complex problems of health and healthcare and the ambition to conduct research that may lead to a solution to these problems. The programme is especially suited to students who want to go on to do doctoral studies – either a DPsych Health Psychology (for practitioner training) or a PhD (for research training).

The Health Psychology course is also for those who have an undergraduate degree that is accredited by the British Psychological Society. If you are an international student and would like to undertake a Masters degree in this subject but do not have the BPS accreditation, we offer the MSc Psychology and Health as an alternative programme (with identical modules) for students who have not achieved the Graduate Basis for Registration with the British Psychological Society.

Objectives

Health psychology explores the psychological and behavioural processes that influence the development of illness, the promotion of health, and the delivery of healthcare through rigorous research that feeds into evidence-based practice.

Teaching at City promotes the scientist-practitioner model in which research influences how we practice, while allowing our experiences in practice to shape the research questions we ask.

We recognise that great research will not make a difference to people’s lives unless the insights feed into evidence-based practice. You will therefore learn how to make research evidence accessible to help maximise its impact. Taught by a team of leading research-active academics, who are members of the Centre for Health Services Research (CHSR), the MSc Health Psychology programme is designed to give you the foundations that will propel you to an exciting career in the discipline.

Here are some examples of the kinds of questions the course poses:
-How can we help people cope with a diagnosis?
-What are the main challenges facing individuals living with long-term conditions?
-What is psychological theory and how can this be used to understand health and illness behaviours?
-How can we make complex interventions more effective by using theory and empirical evidence?

Academic facilities

City University has recently opened the TECS Lab, a dedicated ‘smart home’, to showcase some of the exciting technologies that are being implemented around the UK to support patients with long-term conditions and complex health and social care needs.

This is a one-of-a-kind resource that is already being used for teaching and research purposes. You will visit the TECS Lab in the spring term and the resource will be available to conduct your own dissertation research on a related topic. As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

The course uses a range of teaching methods including classroom teaching, seminars and workshops. You will be assessed through a varied combination of formats throughout the programme including coursework, examination, a diary component, online discussion forums and a significant piece of empirical research.

The assessment for the Doctorate includes:
-A reflective report (3,000 words) detailing how supervised practice has enabled you to fulfil the generic professional competence.
-A report (1,000 words) summarising the involvement of service users and/or carers in your training.
-Log of experiences that enabled you to gain competence in each component of all core units over the equivalent of two years’ full-time supervised practice (this should include a record of your attendance at core CPD workshops)
-A case study (3,000 words excluding appendices) with supporting evidence in appendices.
-A contract and working agreement conditions document (3,000 words, excluding appendices) with supporting evidence in appendices.
-Two teaching and training case studies (1 x 1,000 & 1 x 2,000 words, excluding appendices) with supporting evidence in appendices. One of the populations must be health care professionals and an observer’s report (500 words)
-A case study describing the process of conducting a psychological intervention that has been implemented through face-to-face work with an individual client (3000 words, excluding appendices) with supporting evidence in appendices.
-A case study (2,000 words, excluding appendices) describing the process of conducting a psychological intervention that has been delivered through a medium other than face-to-face with an individual client with a reflective report on delivering this intervention included in the appendices.
-A research thesis (approximately 15,000 words, excluding appendices) to be written to a standard acceptable for publication in peer-reviewed academic journals.
-A systematic review (6,000 words excluding appendices) to be written to a standard acceptable for publication in peer-reviewed academic journals.

You will also be able to learn from our on-site TECS lab. This is a dedicated smart home equipped with tele-health and tele-care applications and an adjacent monitoring system.

The purpose of the TECS lab is to enable researchers to monitor long-term conditions, and use technology to track an individual’s health in real time. For example seat and bed occupancy sensors enable health psychologists to monitor physical movement and intervene when routine behaviours are disrupted.

Modules

The programme consists of eight compulsory modules and all the teaching takes place in the first two terms. In term one you will be introduced to behavioural medicine, lifestyle, gender and culture, theoretical foundations of health psychology and research design and statistics. In the second term you study understanding and managing long term conditions, developing complex interventions, professional practice and contextual issues in health psychology and advanced research design and statistics. The third term is dedicated to the dissertation.

You may have the opportunity to interact directly with patients or healthcare professionals at the dissertation stage of this Masters degree. You will be conducting your own independent research and this may, for example, involve interviewing patients or professionals about a particular subject, or delivering behaviour change interventions.

To become a qualified researcher and practitioner, you will need to be able to understand and critique published research and to understand practitioner issues, so you can conduct your own research from scratch. At City we will encourage you to conduct research on the front line working on projects that require ethical approval, where you are engaging with real people so you can have a direct impact on their lives.

Core modules
-Theoretical foundations of health psychology (15 credits)
-Behavioural medicine (15 credits)
-Understanding and managing long-term conditions (15 credits)
-Lifespan, gender & culture (15 credits)
-Developing complex interventions (15 credits)
-Professional and contextual Issues in health psychology (15 credits)
-Introduction to research design & statistics (15 credits)
-Advanced research design & statistics (15 credits)
-Dissertation (60 credits)

Career prospects

Health psychologists work in academia as researchers and within the NHS and the wider healthcare sector. The nature of the work means you will be trying to influence public health policy in terms of the way that health care is practised. You will also be evaluating how health care professionals do their work while adhering to the best clinical standards.

As a UK student, because the Health Psychology MSc is accredited, it is known as Stage 1 of the standard training in healthcare psychology. By successfully completing this course you will be able to move on to Stage 2 training (a doctoral level qualification in health psychology). This leads to becoming a fully recognised health psychologist whereby you can apply for Chartered Membership of the British Psychological Society (BPS) and apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

Full membership of the Division of Health Psychology means you will also be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a Chartered Health Psychologist. You can only use the protected title ‘Health Psychologist’ by registering with the HCPC, the statutory regulator.

Graduates of the MSc in Health Psychology and MSc in Psychology & Health take a variety of career paths across the NHS and wider public sector. Here are some examples of the kinds of roles our graduates go on to do:
-A PhD student studying a Professional Doctorate in Health Psychology.
-A research assistant in higher education, NHS or the private sector.
-An assistant psychologist in an applied setting.
-An NHS or third sector healthcare professional, such as a smoking cessation officer, or a public health and health promotion practitioner.

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The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology course is designed to equip you with a rigorous training in clinical practice, as well as professional research skills at doctoral level, to enable you to become an effective and competent Practitioner Psychologist. Read more
The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology course is designed to equip you with a rigorous training in clinical practice, as well as professional research skills at doctoral level, to enable you to become an effective and competent Practitioner Psychologist.

Who is it for?

The DPsych aims to develop ethical, reflective and professional practitioners of counselling psychology who work collaboratively with their clients to provide high-quality psychological services, drawing on evidence-based psychological practice in the context of a therapeutic relationship characterised by trust, respect, and appreciation for the subjective experience of the person and individuality of the client and their unique world view.

Our programme seeks to sit at the interface of science and practice. We value reflective professional practice and development of practice through the rigor of top class research.

You are equipped to work with a wide range of complex presenting issues; with individual adults and children, couples, families, groups and organisations; short and long term; in single and multi-professional contexts; and through transferring psychological skills to others in multidisciplinary teams.

You are actively supported during your studies by the course team to develop your own personal theory of the evolution, maintenance and resolution of psychological problems, based on your reading, lectures, practical skills workshops, personal development, collaborative learning and clinical and research experience.

We want you to have a stimulating, challenging, inspiring and personally supportive professional training environment in which to develop your knowledge and skills and further develop as a person and professional. We view you as active contributors to your learning and to the overall success of the course, treating each of you with respect and working with you in a genuinely collegial atmosphere as a developing professional.

Objectives

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology course is designed to equip you with a rigorous training in clinical practice, as well as professional research skills at doctoral level, to enable you to become an effective and competent Practitioner Psychologist registered with the HCPC, and Chartered Psychologist with the BPS.

Our professional, clinical and academic training is combined with the opportunity to develop your own portfolio of placement experience. This equips you to build a successful and fulfilling career in a broad range of settings, including:
-The NHS (e.g. inpatient settings, community mental health teams, specialist services such as early intervention, with different clinical populations e.g. older adults)
-The independent hospital sector
-Forensic settings including HMPS and probation
-Organisations in areas such as occupational health
-The Third (voluntary) sector
-Industry
-Government
-Private practice (including Employee Assistance Programmes)
-Academic and research settings

Placements

In addition to the taught components of the Counselling Psychology MSc/DPsych course, you are also required to complete 400 hours of professional face-to-face client practice in placements and 45 hours of indirect client work; frequent clinical supervision; personal development; 40 hours of personal therapy (at least 15 hours in Year 1); and various pieces of assessment throughout the three years, including a doctoral thesis.

Who arranges the placements?
It is your responsibility to find and arrange your own placements, although advice and support is offered by the Placements Co-ordinator and personal tutors. If your application is successful, on acceptance of a place on the course you will be sent further information about finding placements and available opportunities.

Do placements have to be in London?
No, you can undertake your placements wherever is convenient for you as long as you ensure your supervision is from appropriately qualified professionals. Supervisors should be registered with the Health & Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a 'Practitioner Psychologist', 'Registered Psychologist', 'Counselling Psychologist' or 'Clinical Psychologist'. All placements arrangements need to be approved by your personal tutor.

Supervision
Supervision should normally be in the ratio of one hour of supervision for every 8 hours of counselling work in Years 1 and 2, with a minimum of one hour of supervision per fortnight. In Year 3, supervision should be in the ratio of one hour for every 8 hours of counselling work, with a minimum of two hours of supervision per month.

Teaching and learning

A wide range of learning and teaching methods are used, including lectures, group discussion, group work, role play, trainee presentations, supervised clinical practice, personal therapy and personal development activities.

Assessment

You will be assessed through role plays, learning logs, skills assessments, essays, process reports, client studies, examination, critical literature review and DPsych portfolio.

Student focus

We want your time on the Counselling Psychology MSc/DPsych course to be as inspiring, challenging and stimulating as it can be. As part of our dedication to enhancing the overall student experience, we support you throughout your studies in many different ways:
-Personal Tutors
-Student-staff liaison committees
-Placements Co-ordinator

Modules

Year one:
-Context, Diversity and Standards in Professional Practice (15 credits)
-Research design and analysis 1 (15 credits)
-Research design and analysis 2 (30 credits)
-Professional components of counselling psychology (45 credits)
-Personal and professional development (15 credits)
-Cognitive behavioural approaches to counselling psychology (15 credits)
-Person-centred approaches to counselling psychology (15 credits)
-Psychodynamic approaches to counselling psychology (15 credits)
-Professional development and supervision (15 credits)

Year two:
-Professional Components of Counselling Psychology (45credits)
-Systems and Systemic Psychological Therapies in Counselling Psychology (15 credits)
-Psychopathology: Clinical Skills and Critical Approaches (15 credits)
-DPsych Counselling Psychology Thesis one (30 credits)
-Developing Research Skills in Counselling Psychology (15 credits)
-Contemporary Developments in Psychological Approaches (15 credits)
-Specialist group supervision (15 credits)
-Psychometrics A: Ability and Aptitude Training (15 credits)

Year three:
-Professional Components of Counselling Psychology (60 credits)
-Psychometrics B: Personality Measures (15 credits)
-Negotiating Relationships: Advanced Skills (15 credits)
-DPsych Counselling Psychology Thesis two (45 credits)
-Integrative and Pluralistic Approaches to Counselling Psychology (15 credits)
-Developing Research Skills in Counselling Psychology (15 credits)
-Specialist Group Supervision (15 credits)
-Supervising, Consulting and leading in Counselling Psychology (15 credits)

Career prospects

Counselling Psychology graduates are typically employed in a variety of settings, including NHS primary, secondary or tertiary care, the prison service, schools and voluntary agencies.

Employers of recent graduates include:
-St Bartholomews Hospital
-South London & Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust
-Central & North West London NHS Trust
-City, University of London
-Maggie's Cancer Centre
-Imperial College London
-Roehampton University
-London Metropolitan University
-Homerton University Hospital
-The Priory
-Capio Nightingale Hospital

Job titles included Consultant Psychologist, Counselling Psychologist, High Intensity Therapist, Lecturer, and Practitioner Psychologist.

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Explore human behaviour in the workplace on this BPS accredited MSc in Organisational Psychology. This course is for students who want to improve the working lives of employees. Read more
Explore human behaviour in the workplace on this BPS accredited MSc in Organisational Psychology.

Who is it for?

This course is for students who want to improve the working lives of employees. It is for those who want to understand how to improve organisational life.

We welcome applicants with a degree in Psychology, from a UK or international institution. We will also consider those with other degrees and a keen interest in improving people’s working lives. You will be expected to conduct some statistical analysis as part of the course so some experience working with data would be beneficial.

Objectives

From understanding how to select the best employee, training them to reach their potential and investigating the politics of power on corporate boards, City’s MSc in Organisational Psychology gives you the opportunity to explore your own area of interest and conduct research within an organisation of your choice.

The programme has been designed to give you the theoretical and practical knowledge you will need to work as an organisational psychologist. Developed to reflect the Department’s unique research strengths, you will have access to specialist topics such as mindfulness within the workplace and the use of innovative selection methods.

At City we interrogate the discipline from a holistic perspective, considering the individual, the organisation and the socio-political framework in which both operate; taking a scientist-practitioner approach ensuring that everything we teach can be applied in practice.

Taught by academic experts who are also involved in consulting, this accredited Masters will give you the tools to understand human behaviour within the workplace.

These are some of the questions that the course poses:
-What are the key contextual issues affecting the workplace now?
-What impact does technology have on the wider work environment?
-How can wellbeing be measured and promoted in the workplace?

Placements

Placements are not a formal requirement of the course. However, this MSc generates interest from employers seeking talented students and graduates for voluntary work placements, evaluations, internships, and short-term work experience. Whilst on the course, previous students have secured excellent internships with London-based consultancies.

You have the opportunity to conduct your final dissertation within an organisation and there are also opportunities to get involved in the research being conducted by members of staff while you study.

Academic facilities

As part of the University of London you can become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

You will learn through a substantial amount of group work and discussions around the core content from the first term onwards. One of the benefits of this programme is the blend of diverse perspectives you will experience collaborating with peers from a broad skillset and age range.

When it comes to assessment, you will find a substantial amount of the assignments are practitioner focused rather than being purely essay and exam based. For example, you might be asked to write a pitch for a company, where we would expect you to write about the theoretical underpinning of what you are proposing and then present it to the client as a practitioner.

One of the benefits of this varied assessment style is that you learn to write from an academic and practitioner perspective and understand different client needs.

Modules

The MSc Organisational Psychology consists of eight taught modules, plus an applied research dissertation, which normally takes five months to complete and forms the final part of the programme.

There is a substantial amount of theoretical work in all of the modules, but you will have the opportunity to apply your learning through practical exercises, group role plays and case studies.

Full-time students complete all eight modules and the dissertation in one calendar year (from September to September). Part-time students complete the course over two years.

Modules
-Research Design and Statistics (15 credits)
-Workplace Wellbeing (15 credits)
-Design of Work and Work Environments (15 credits)
-Learning, Training and Development (15 credits)
-Leadership and Organisational Behaviours (15 credits)
-Professional skills (15 credits)
-Psychological assessment (15 credits)
-Research in organisations (15 credits)

Dissertation
You will need to submit a dissertation as part of the programme. In the second term you will start with a research methods seminar where you will be given support to develop the necessary skills for undertaking independent research. You will choose a topic under the guidance of a project supervisor and conduct empirical research in your chosen area, which will involve gaining access, collecting and analysing data and submitting an 8-10,000-word dissertation. In the summer term, you will work full-time completing your final dissertation. Many students choose to conduct research within an organisation for their final dissertation so they can address a real-world problem. One of our current students is working with a large public health organisation to explore how employee engagement has changed since a major internal change programme; whilst another is investigating what impact shared parental leave has on men’s careers with a professional severance firm.

Career prospects

Our graduates go on to apply their learning in a range of professional settings across the public and private sector, including organisations such as Aviva, Accenture, the Ministry of Defence and the BBC.

Lucy Gallagher MSc Organisational Psychology, 2014
Whilst completing her Masters at City, Lucy worked for Assessment and Development Consultants as a Centre Administrator supporting the manager in running assessment and development centres. Soon after completing her Masters, Lucy completed a Graduate Scheme at Saville Consulting, gaining experience in the three core business areas.

Now working as a consultant at Saville Consulting, Lucy works on a number of projects including partner recruitment, assessment centre design, selection and assessment, employee development and competency framework design. She is passionate about making sure the right people are in the right roles and that individuals get the help and development they need to reach their full potential.

Tara Tapper MSc Organisational Psychology, 2008
Since graduating from City in 2008, Tara has worked in India as the Head of HR for RBS Technology Services and managed change programmes at Mischon de Reya, a law practice based in London and New York. Tara is currently working as Group HR Director at Wonga.com.

In 2008 Tara was awarded the MSc Occupational Psychology Research Prize for her research into the employee engagement challenges, barriers and biases faced by maternity returners on the 'Partner track' at a city law firm. The prize recognises academic excellence and is awarded by the British Psychological Society.

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Learn how psychological knowledge is created while receiving practical training in a range of quantitative and qualitative research methods. Read more
Learn how psychological knowledge is created while receiving practical training in a range of quantitative and qualitative research methods.

Who is it for?

This course is suited to students with an undergraduate-level knowledge of psychological research methods who wish to broaden and deepen their research skills. This will probably be with a view towards managing their own research projects. This could be in academia, or in a variety of other work settings where the ability to survey opinions, interpret data meaningfully, and construct and test hypotheses, is valued.

Objectives

This programme provides training in psychological research methods, including research design, statistical methods, and relevant software, but also offers a range of supplementary options from several other psychology masters programmes.

It covers an array of methodological content which will provide you with the skills necessary to engage in research in public or private-sector organisations, or alternatively continue on to a PhD in preparation for an academic research career.

By offering modules from several masters programmes, this course will allow you to gain broad-ranging research skills that leave your future options open, whilst allowing you to engage with a range of students on more specialised programmes, thus providing specific practical examples to help ground abstract research concepts.

Academic facilities

The programme leans heavily on our up-to-date computer labs, and also our research facilities (e.g. TMS, EEG and eye-tracking labs).

Teaching and learning

The general approach to teaching and learning in this programme is through a combination of lectures, interactive sessions, practical workshops and small group classes, including individual and group presentations. You are expected to give presentations, to engage in discussions designed to encourage you to reflect on issues raised in the lectures, to expand further specific topics, and to develop your communication skills.

You are encouraged to undertake extensive reading in order to understand the topics covered in lectures and classes and to broaden and deepen your knowledge of the subject. The teaching and learning process is supported by resources available on City’s virtual learning environment, Moodle, and by a personal tutorial system, as well as the welfare services provided by the Institution.

Assessment of the Programme is through coursework (i.e. assessed essays and assignments, for example stats tests, research proposal presentations, and programming exercises), examinations, and a summer dissertation.

Modules

You will take five core taught modules, two in the Autumn term and three in the Spring term. You also get to customise your programme through the choice of three elective modules, typically two in the Autumn term and one in the Spring term. Finally, you will complete a research dissertation in the Summer term.

Taught modules generally involve two to three hours of contact time (i.e. lectures, lab classes etc.) per week, for ten weeks, but you will need to supplement these classes with individual study and skill development. You should anticipate spending around 150 hours on each taught module, which implies a full-time (~40 hours per week) workload.

You will take five core modules (PEM104, PEM107, SAM005, PSM207 and PSM208) totalling 75 credits. You will also take three elective modules worth a total of 45 credits. The research dissertation is worth 60 credits.

This is a composite programme, which provides you with the opportunity to study modules from several of our other MSc courses. Your research methods training is thus situated within several sub-disciplines of social science. Click on the links below to read the descriptions provided within the context of the programme from which the module originates. Elective modules are illustrative and can change from year to year.

Core modules
-Behavioural Research Methods: Design & Analysis
-Applied Econometrics and Psychological Research Methods
-Research Methods & Programming
-Statistical Models
-Applied Qualitative Data Analysis

Elective modules
-Qualitative Research Methods
-Fundamentals of Cognitive Science
-Psychological Processes: Individual and Social
-Principles of Neuroscience: Brain anatomy, techniques and paradigms
-Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
-Mental Health, Wellbeing and Neuroscience
-Work Design, Organisational Change and Development
-Research, Design & Analysis
-Research in organisations
-Epidemiology

Dissertation - to be eligible for the MSc, you must complete a 60 credit dissertation.

Career prospects

Possible career paths for graduates of this course include academic research (usually following a PhD) or work involving central and local government agencies, public health, the voluntary sector, market/media research, or management consultancy. This programme of study is suitable for progression onto a PhD programme.

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Learn how different brain functions contribute to cognition, mediate social interaction, and determine mental health, well-being and psychiatric illness. Read more
Learn how different brain functions contribute to cognition, mediate social interaction, and determine mental health, well-being and psychiatric illness.

Who is it for?

This Masters is ideal for those who have an undergraduate degree in Psychology or a related discipline and would like to build more knowledge and skills highly valued both in academic research and the clinical professions. The MSc is an ideal platform from which to progress to PhD studies, particularly in Cognitive or Social Neuroscience. Students will also be well-equipped should they wish to undertake further professional training in Clinical Psychology, or a related discipline.

Objectives

This Masters degree bridges three research and clinical disciplines:
-Cognitive neuroscience (the study of human brain functions such as memory, perception and language).
-Clinical neuroscience (the understanding of neurological, psychological or psychiatric illness via their neural and cognitive antecedents).
-Social neuroscience (the investigation of brain processes that help us communicate, feel, learn and interact with others).

The major aim of this programme is to provide you with a thorough grounding in the neuroscience that underpins human cognitive brain function, clinical, social and affective interaction, and neuropathology.

Teaching will comprise of seminars, lectures, computing and statistics classes, and supervision of an individual research project. Your learning experience during the programme will be enhanced by an invited speaker’s programme of external experts who work in clinical, social or cognitive neuroscience.

Academic facilities

You will have access to all the facilities and laboratories in the Psychology Department. Our members have experience with a wide range of neuroscientific techniques, including neuropsychological testing, psychophysics and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI).

We have particular strengths in the use of Electroencephalography (EEG), Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and Transcranial Electric Stimulation (a weak current applied to the scalp), in addition to measures of human behaviour (e.g. response times, response errors, and eye movements) and physiological measures (e.g. galvanic skin response and heart rate).

We test neurologically normal individuals, special populations (e.g. people with synesthesia) and people with expertise or acquired skills (e.g. dancers, musicians, athletes), as well as people with brain damage (e.g. neglect or split-brain patients), psychiatric diagnoses (e.g. schizophrenia), sensory deficits (e.g. visual and hearing impairments) and developmental disorders (e.g. dyslexia or autism).

Placements

We help facilitate Clinical placements and are able and offer Research placements within our department.

Clinical placements: Center for Psychological Wellbeing and Neuroscience (CPWN) in collaboration with City and Hackney Mind (CHM).

Teaching and learning

Teaching will be comprised of lectures, seminars, group work and discussions, workshops and tutorials, reports, computing and statistics classes and the individual research dissertation.

You will undertake independent study, supported by the teaching and learning team, and will receive detailed feedback on your coursework. You will be provided with assessment and grade-related criteria which will outline your intended learning outcomes, along with the skills, knowledge and attitudes you are expected to demonstrate in order for you to complete an assessment successfully. You will also be assigned a personal tutor as your primary contact, who will advise you on academic matters and monitor your progress through the programme.

You will find a supportive vibrant research environment in the Department. The course is taught by academics, who are internationally recognised experts in their field with different backgrounds in clinical, social and cognitive neuroscience.

Assessment

Your learning will be assessed through essays, examinations, oral presentations, research methods projects and interpretation of statistical analyses, formal research proposals and a dissertation.

Modules

The programme consists of eight taught modules worth 15 credits each with around 30-34 hours of face-to-face contact, supported by online resources and an empirical research project (worth 60 credits).

You will learn about the latest advances in clinical, social and cognitive neuroscience and develop an appreciation of the reciprocal nature of research and practice in these domains. For example how insights from functional neuroimaging inform our understanding of neurological disorders and how clinical observations inform neurocognitive modelling.

Course structure
-Principles of Neuroscience: Brain anatomy, techniques and paradigms
-Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
-Mental Health, Well-being and Neuroscience
-Fundamental Processes in Cognitive Neuroscience & Neuropsychology I
-Fundamental Processes in Cognitive Neuroscience & Neuropsychology II
-Social Cognition and the Social Brain
-Statistical models and Research Methods and Programming
-Research Dissertation
-Invited speakers programme

Career prospects

This course will provide you with knowledge and skills highly valued both in academic research and the clinical professions. The MSc is an ideal platform from which to progress to PhD studies, particularly in Cognitive or Social Neuroscience. You will also be well-equipped should you wish to undertake further professional training in Clinical Psychology, or a related discipline.

The knowledge and skills you will acquire in this programme are highly valuable, whether you choose to pursue further research or an applied occupation. They will enhance your employability prospects in a wide range of sectors including the pharmaceutical industry, neuromarketing, the computing industry, science and the media, science and the arts, business or education.

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Behavioural economics applies psychological insights into human behaviour to explain how real people make economic decisions. Read more
Behavioural economics applies psychological insights into human behaviour to explain how real people make economic decisions.

Who is it for?

The course is suitable for recent graduates in economics, psychology and related social science or quantitative disciplines who are looking to develop a career in the fast-paced world of behavioural economics, either in the public or private sector.

As the course is offered in full-time and part-time modes, it is also suited to professionals who want to enhance their theoretical knowledge and practical skills and would benefit from an academic environment.

Objectives

Behavioural economics applies psychological insights into human behaviour to investigate how people make economic decisions under various conditions of constraint (e.g. time and knowledge) and influence (e.g. social pressure). This is an important field in modern economics, and the social sciences more generally.

Commercial organisations have long known the limitations of individual decision making and they routinely use this knowledge in their commercial practices (e.g. anchoring effect of minimum payment on credit cards). The practical implications of behavioural economics are varied and significant, and acknowledged to provide a powerful and cost-effective approach to improving human welfare.

The Behavioural Economics MSc will develop your skills and knowledge to prepare you for a wide variety of roles in the private or public sector that require a solid understanding of human behaviour.

Teaching and learning

The modules are taught by lecturers from the economics and psychology department with research interests in behavioural economics.

In each module you will receive typically 30 hours of face-to-face contact, supported by online resources (e.g., videos and advanced readings provided on the learning platform Moodle) for your self-directed study. You will be required to take responsibility for your own learning and to take advantage of the learning opportunities offered (e.g., invited speakers programme and online resources). The learning and teaching strategies for each module will expose you to a range of methods, comprising: lectures, guest lectures, seminars, group work, workshops, small group discussions, tutorials, reflective reports and research project supervision.

Assessment

In order to assess your full range of learning, you will complete reflective reports, essays, examinations, interpretation of statistical analyses, formal research proposals and a research dissertation. Most individual modules are assessed by a combination of coursework and examinations. In addition, you will be directed to independent study and receive detailed feedback on your coursework as an aid to your further learning. These different forms of assessment have the aim of assessing your knowledge, skills and appreciation in different areas of behavioural economics (e.g., theoretical knowledge and applied aspects of behavioural techniques).

Modules

Full-time students take four modules in each of the first two terms, followed by a written research dissertation in the third term.

Most of the modules are structured as a combination of two-hour lectures (to present information) and one-hour seminars or clinics (to understand and assimilate lecture material) or lab sessions. Teaching and learning is enhanced by technology-supported resources, and teaching staff are available for one-to-one interaction and feedback.

It is expected that full-time students will spend about three hours in lectures/seminars plus self-directed, independent study hours for each module per week. You should also expect to attend seminars given by invited speakers and seminars on dissertation writing (about one to two hours per week).

Your workload might vary from week to week.

Term 1
-Principles of Economics
-Cognitive and Economic Science of Rational Choice
-Psychological Processes: Individual and Social
-Behavioural Research Methods: Design and Analysis

Term 2
-Experimental Economics and Game Theory
-Fundamentals of Cognitive Science
-Applied Econometric and Psychological Research Methods
-Professional Aspects of Behavioural Economics

Term 3
-Research Dissertation
Students with a strong background in Economics may substitute 'Principles of Economics' with a microeconomics module from one of the MSc programmes offered by the Department of Economics. You may also substitute an appropriate elective from one of the MSc modules offered by the Department of Economics for 'Professional Aspects of Behavioural Economics' - this will allow a pathway through the programme that is focused on theoretical and research economic themes.

Career prospects

Whilst there is not yet a specific occupation of 'behavioural economist', the knowledge and skills acquired are highly valuable in a range of sectors:
-Economic consultants undertaking marketing activities
-Health economics consultants developing sales/markets for products (from branded medicines to health insurance schemes)
-Public policy specialist who advises on the choice architecture of decision making (e.g., transport decisions)
-Political campaigns and public relations more generally
-General marketing, sales and consumer psychology (preferences, sensitivity to incentives, and default behaviour)
-Brand awareness consultancies
-Financial trading and risk assessment
-Internet auction companies
-Design consultancies (e.g. websites)
-In large international institutions, e.g. World Bank, EBRD, Central Banks etc.

City’s Behavioural Economics postgraduate course would be especially valuable for professionals who already work in occupations which involve the need to understand the scientific dynamics of human decision making and behaviour (e.g., financial traders who require the right psychological attitude as much as appropriate strategy knowledge).

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Empower yourself as a producer and user of empirical research by developing a methodological toolkit of knowledge and skills. This programme is for students who wish to develop their knowledge and skills as a professional researcher in academia, private or public sectors. Read more
Empower yourself as a producer and user of empirical research by developing a methodological toolkit of knowledge and skills.

Who is it for?

This programme is for students who wish to develop their knowledge and skills as a professional researcher in academia, private or public sectors. It is suitable for those seeking to undertake foundational training for doctoral level research, as well as those planning to work in an environment where they might need to commission, undertake, or otherwise critically engage with empirical social research.

Students will typically have a first degree in an arts or social sciences subject. Some students come to us with prior experience of conducting empirical research, or using it, while some are new to the field – the programme thrives on the diversity of experiences and interests of its students.

Objectives

The aim of the course is to boost your understanding, appreciation and practice of qualitative and quantitative research methods. It is taught by academics in the School of Arts and Social Sciences, so whatever your academic or professional background, you will achieve a broad perspective on the production and consumption of empirical research across a range of disciplines. At the same time, you will be able to pursue your own subject specialism through elective module choices and by conducting your own original research for your dissertation.

In the course we aim to equip you with an overview of key issues in research design and philosophical foundations of social research. We offer several modules in applied quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis. These equip you with a set of practical skills to enable you to conduct and critically read research using these methods, and provide a firm foundation from which you can pursue further specialist training.

Academic facilities

You will have the opportunity to learn a range of statistical software applications to aid data collection and analysis, such as SPSS, Stata, MatLab and R.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is delivered predominantly by lecturers and other academic staff across the School. You will experience a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops and computer lab sessions. You will be expected to read in preparation for classes, and to participate in discussions, group work, presentations and other practical activities. You will be expected to take responsibility for your own learning and to engage in independent study. You will be guided by reading lists for each module, and teaching materials will be made available via the virtual learning environment Moodle. The dissertation is a major part of your MSc work, for which you will receive individual supervision.

Assessment is by means of coursework (written assignments, essays or reports), class tests, presentations, unseen written examinations, and the dissertation. The particular assessment details vary according to the module being studied. Your overall degree result is based on your performance in the taught modules and the dissertation.

Modules

The course consists of taught modules from interdisciplinary core subjects, plus department-specific elective modules, and a research dissertation.

In full-time study you will typically take four 15-credit modules in Term 1 and four in Term 2. The balance of teaching between the terms may vary according to your module choice. Most modules are worth 15 credits each, with a few elective modules worth 30 credits. Your dissertation is worth 60 credits.

As a general guide, a 15-credit module delivered over ten weeks of teaching will typically comprise an hour-long lecture and an hour-long seminar or workshop each week. We would notionally expect you to spend 150 hours in independent study for each 15-credit module (this time includes time spent reading, working through exercises, preparing for examinations, writing coursework, using online resources, navigating Library resources, and so on.)

Core modules - you will take six core modules alongside your dissertation. Your taught core modules will be as below:
-Research design, methods and methodology (15 credits)
-Rationale and philosophical foundations of social research (15 credits)
-Qualitative research methods (15 credits)
-Applied qualitative data analysis (15 credits)
-Introduction to quantitative inference* (15 credits)

You will choose one of the following (two if you do not study quantitative interference) core quantitative analysis modules with the guidance of the Programme Director:
-Statistical models ** (15 credits)
-Applied econometric and psychological research methods (15 credits)
-Multivariate data analysis (15 credits)
-Statistical modelling ** (15 credits)
-Research methods dissertation (60 credits)

*May not be compulsory if you have prior training in quantitative methods.
**You may study Statistical models or Statistical modelling, but not both.

Elective modules - in addition, you take one or two elective modules (to the value of 30 credits) from the following list. All modules are worth 15 credits, unless otherwise stated. Some modules have a stronger methodological element, while some are more substantively focused.

Culture and Creative Industries (Sociology Department)
-Evaluation, politics and advocacy (15 credits)
-Culture (15 credits)
-Cultural policy (15 credits)

Department of Journalism
-Storytelling (30 credits)
-Literary criticism non-fiction (30 credits)

Department of Economics
-Macroeconomics (15 credits)
-Financial derivatives (15 credits)
-Corporate finance (15 credits)
-Asset pricing (15 credits)
-Econometrics (15 credits)

Department of International Politics
-Political Islam in global politics (15 credits)
-International financial institutions (15 credits)
-Understanding security in the 21st century (15 credits)
-International organisations in global politics (15 credits)
-Development and world politics (15 credits)
-Political economy of global finance (15 credits)
-The politics of forced migration (15 credits)
-Global governance (15 credits)
-International politics of the Middle East (15 credits)
-Global financial governance (15 credits)
-US foreign policy (15 credits)
-Economic diplomacy (15 credits)
-Foreign policy analysis (15 credits)

Department of Psychology
-Fundamental processes in cognitive neuroscience and neuropsychology (15 credits)
-Mental health, wellbeing & neuroscience (15 credits)
-Research methods & programming (15 credits)

Department of Sociology
-Survey research methods (15 credits)
-Transnational media and communication (15 credits)
-Developments in communications policy (15 credits)
-Political communication (15 credits)
-Democratisation and networked communication (15 credits)
-Communication, culture and development (30 credits)
-Celebrity (15 credits)
-Analysing crime (15 credits)
-Researching criminal justice (15 credits)
-Criminal minds (15 credits)
-Victims: policy and politics (15 credits)
-Crime news and media justice (15 credits)

*Please note, elective modules are run subject to minimum enrolment numbers/availability and may vary slightly from year to year.

Career prospects

Graduates from the MSc in Research Methods should find themselves well equipped for careers which require critical engagement with empirical research, whether in commissioning, designing, conducting, or making use of its results. Likely destinations include local and central government, public and private sector research organisations, companies involved in marketing, charities and non-governmental organisations. Recent graduate destinations of students studying research methods include the UK Government’s Cabinet Office; Ministry of Defence; Department of Energy and Climate Change; National Health Service; London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham; Eurofound (EU agency); Rhetoric Solutions (market knowledge provider); Ipsos MORI (leading UK market research company); NatCen (leading social research organisation in the UK); and a range of charities and institutions.

The course is also an ideal foundation for students who wish to pursue doctoral research in social sciences.

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