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Psychology×

Bournemouth University, Full Time Masters Degrees in Psychology

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This new course offers a unique opportunity to study how psychological insights can throw light on politics. Read more
This new course offers a unique opportunity to study how psychological insights can throw light on politics. What are the roots of political violence? What drives shifts in public opinion? Why do some people become activists, while others never get involved? How does propaganda work? What is the appeal of the political ideologies to which some devote their lives? What makes for effective political leadership? Is the future democratic?

Psychology can make a vital contribution to developing answers to these and many other questions of importance to all those interested in the future of their societies. Political psychology is a well-established branch of psychology, yet there are very few places in the world where a Masters in the subject can be taken. Bournemouth University is now offering such a course, based on the in-depth expertise of the team who will provide it. The course leader is Professor Barry Richards, who has over thirty years’ experience of research and writing in this field, from his edited collection ‘Capitalism and Infancy’ in 1984 to his forthcoming book ‘What is Holding Us Together?’. He has been a leading figure in the application of psychoanalytic theory to the understanding of politics.

The course team also includes Professor Candida Yates, author and editor of books on popular culture, emotion and politics, and Associate Professor Darren Lilleker, a widely-published international leader in the study of political communication. These and other teaching staff bring a broad range of perspectives to the course, and enable it both to focus on the psychological dimensions of politics and also to see psychological factors in their broader societal contexts. Our psychologies need specific study, but are part of our societies and cultures.

If you are considering postgraduate research on a topic which involves looking psychologically at politics, or are intending to work in the political field itself (whether as activist, consultant, researcher or in some other role), this course offers a highly relevant, challenging and rich encounter with leading edge theory and research at the complex intersections of psychology and politics.

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Unlike other courses which focus on offender assessment and rehabilitation, this new course will examine the theoretical and investigative aspects of forensic psychology, tracking the criminal justice process from the crime scene to the court room. Read more
Unlike other courses which focus on offender assessment and rehabilitation, this new course will examine the theoretical and investigative aspects of forensic psychology, tracking the criminal justice process from the crime scene to the court room. It is an exceptionally hands-on, practical course, using our unique on-campus Crime Scene Training Centre together with Psychology Testing Suites with the latest eye-tracking and face-processing equipment.

As well as the underlying theories regarding the psychology of investigations and considering areas such as how face processing can assist identification of individuals, you will explore different offence types - sexual offending, murder and violent crime, group offending (including terrorism, hooliganism and rioting), and different forms of cyber-crime (e.g. hacktivism and on-line sexual abuse).

You’ll be expected to investigate and scrutinise violent mocked-up crime scenes to provide written and verbal evidence, learning how to present expert witness testimony in a mock court.

You will evaluate victims, witnesses, suspects and offenders, environment, geography and time, working with practitioners who create fieldwork, case studies and exercises based on their real experiences.

Guest speakers sharing their knowledge will be an integral feature of the course, as will Terri Cole, the course leader's own experiences as a Behavioural Investigative Adviser and Serious Crime Analyst. Terri worked for a number of years with police forces providing offender profiling, crime scene assessment and offence linkage advice in relation to serious sexual offences and murder. She brings her expertise and experience together to focus on crime scene behaviour and how psychology can assist investigations on this new course.

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This Master's course adopts a patient-centred approach to teaching the origins and range of clinical psychology. It is recognised and respected by practitioners for producing sound, highly employable graduates within many branches of psychology. Read more
This Master's course adopts a patient-centred approach to teaching the origins and range of clinical psychology. It is recognised and respected by practitioners for producing sound, highly employable graduates within many branches of psychology.

The course is ideal for anyone wishing to gain an in-depth knowledge of clinical psychology, and is particularly relevant if you intend to apply to a training programme to qualify as a clinical psychologist.

Delivery of the programme is typically 2 days per week on campus between October and May each year, with supervision arrangements for the dissertation in June and July. This delivery pattern allows you to plan and build a clinical portfolio more effectively, if appropriate to your future career.

This course was reviewed in February 2016.

Core units:
Roots & Range of Psychological Disorders
Psychological Therapy
Advanced Research Methods
Advanced Statistics
Dissertation

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This course focuses on the normal and abnormal changes that occur in the human brain from childhood through to adulthood through to old age. Read more
This course focuses on the normal and abnormal changes that occur in the human brain from childhood through to adulthood through to old age. Key topics include rare cognitive neuropsychological disorders and relatively common clinical and neurodegenerative disorders. The course is taught by staff members who conduct cutting-edge research in these fields and by professionals in educational psychology, clinical psychology and neuropsychology.

You'll have the opportunity to apply for a placement at one of two long established progressive specialist neurological care and rehabilitation facilities, where you'll gain valuable clinical experience. If you're more interested in research, internal placements working with a member of staff in the Psychology Research Group will be offered as part of the course.

Through the study of normal and abnormal patterns of development across the lifespan, this course provides a fascinating programme of study if you're wishing to become a researcher in this area and/or are seeking further professional development by gaining a unique and relevant qualification in an increasingly difficult job market.

Core units:
Ageing & Neurodegenerative Disorders
Advanced Research Methods
Clinical & Cognitive Neuropsychology
Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Advanced Statistics
Key Transferable Skills- Presentation & Scientific Writing
Research Project.

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This course is designed to equip you with the critical, methodological and practical skills that are necessary for advancement and development in the areas of clinical and academic hypnosis. Read more
This course is designed to equip you with the critical, methodological and practical skills that are necessary for advancement and development in the areas of clinical and academic hypnosis.

You will be based in the Department of Psychology at BU and the course is also supported by the Hypnosis and Psychosomatic Medicine Section of the Royal Society of Medicine. It has been developed to meet the needs of healthcare professionals and research psychologists with key units being taught over weekends or condensed into one week, and the other units being taught on just two days a week with the option of part-time study available. It is also ideal for graduate students with plans for a future in clinical / medical practice and those looking to be trained in the research methods required for PhD level study.

A key benefit of the course is that it contributes a minimum of 72 hours towards the European Certificate of Hypnosis, awarded by the European Society of Hypnosis.

You will be trained in the use of hypnosis and will be able to apply it in a range of clinical and research settings depending on your profession and experience. Graduates without a clinical background will be qualified to use hypnosis in ethically approved research protocols, and in clinical and medical settings in the presence of, and following a request from, a suitably qualified clinical or medical specialist.

The course is unique in that it is taught by leading researchers and clinico-medical practitioners of hypnosis from the Royal Society of Medicine.
How to apply: Applications are made via our website using the Apply Online button below. If you have an enquiry about this project please contact us via the Email NOW button below, however your application will only be processed once you have submitted an application form as opposed to emailing your CV to us.

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Good nutrition is fundamental to living a long, full and rewarding life. Nutrition related ill-health is a major factor that contributes towards preventable disease including obesity and many of the non-communicable diseases on both a national and global scale. Read more
Good nutrition is fundamental to living a long, full and rewarding life. Nutrition related ill-health is a major factor that contributes towards preventable disease including obesity and many of the non-communicable diseases on both a national and global scale: diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer.

This is the first course of its kind in the UK to explore the role of behaviour in guiding diet and nutrition and the effects of diet and nutrition on shaping behaviour. It will provide a solid foundation in the physiology and biochemistry of nutrition, which is complemented by units focused on the role of nutrition in behaviour and cognition and the management of associated clinical conditions.

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Bournemouth University has one of the largest face-processing laboratories in the UK, and our academic staff have expertise in neuropsychological disorders of face-processing and forensic applications of face-processing research. Read more
Bournemouth University has one of the largest face-processing laboratories in the UK, and our academic staff have expertise in neuropsychological disorders of face-processing and forensic applications of face-processing research. This expertise is central to the delivery of the course, where you will learn about the detection, management and potential remediation of face-processing disorders, including those with acquired, progressive, developmental or neuropsychiatric origins.

Through the study of contemporary issues in face-processing research, the fascinating programme of study is especially relevant if you hope to become a researcher in this area and/or are seeking further professional development by gaining a unique and relevant qualification in an increasingly difficult job market.

You will also gain key technological skills that are required for face-processing research. There will be training in the manipulation of facial stimuli, instruction in programming, and consideration of methodological issues and experimental design. Using our state-of-the-art research equipment, including eye-tracking, tDCS, EEG and when possible MRI, you will get plenty of practical, hands-on experience. These skills will be fundamental for the research project, in which you will carry out an experimental investigation addressing a novel research question in the field.

The course was reveiwed in February 2016.

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The Stroop effect demonstrates that the identification of the colour a word is presented in is slowed down when the word spells out a different colour (i.e. Read more
The Stroop effect demonstrates that the identification of the colour a word is presented in is slowed down when the word spells out a different colour (i.e. it is incongruent; e.g. the word ‘RED’ presented in blue) compared to when the word spells out a word that is unrelated to colour (e.g. the word ’ TOP’ presented in red). It is a commonly used paradigm to measure selective attention (see MacLeod, 1991, for a review) and is thought to arise due to the need to inhibit the automatic action of reading a word and performing the less practiced action of colour naming (see Cattell, 1886; MacLeod & MacDonald, 2000; MacLeod, 2005; Posner & Snyder, 1975). It is one of the most commonly used paradigms in cognitive and clinical psychological research and therefore it is important to understand the cognitive and neural mechanisms underpinning the task. Since the idea was initially put forward by Klein (1964), there have been studies showing that the Stroop effect is made up of interference at multiple levels. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) assays have investigated the separable neural representations of response and semantic conflict using a paradigm that maps two responses to one response key. The have shown that separate neural regions underpin these types of conflict. However, recent work has criticized this manipulation as a method for indexing semantic conflict (Hasshim & Parris, 2014; 2015). An alternative method is to use response set membership to manipulate the response and semantic conflict present on any trial (Hasshim & Parris, 2017). In separate work it has been argued that Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) of the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex effects task level conflict (Vanderhasselt et al., 2006). The aim of the present project is to use both fMRI and TMS establish the role of the dorsolateral lateral prefrontal cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in processing response, semantic and task conflict in this important cognitive and clinical task.

How to apply: Applications are made via our website using the Apply Online button below. If you have an enquiry about this project please contact us via the Email NOW button below, however your application will only be processed once you have submitted an application form as opposed to emailing your CV to us. Application deadline: 24th July 2017.

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Face recognition impairments (prosopagnosia) can present throughout life as a result of acquired or developmental influences. Yet, very little is known about early influences on the developmental trajectory of face recognition skills. Read more
Face recognition impairments (prosopagnosia) can present throughout life as a result of acquired or developmental influences. Yet, very little is known about early influences on the developmental trajectory of face recognition skills. While existing evidence indicates that face recognition difficulties appear to be influenced by genetics and early periods of atypical visual experience, other early influences may also impact the development and specialization of the face recognition system. Very recent evidence raises the possibility that premature birth and low birth rate influences face recognition skills in later childhood (Perez-Roche et al., 2017), although the trajectory of these impairments is unclear and it is unknown if they persist through to adulthood or are merely delayed. Further, it is possible that atypicalities in face-processing may be detectable from birth, or instead may manifest at a particular stage in development. Understanding this trajectory and the plasticity of the face-processing system during childhood is of fundamental importance in order for intervention to be appropriately conducted.

The current project will investigate the development trajectory of face recognition impairments that result from premature birth or low gestational weight. A large study will use age-appropriate dominant tests of face and object recognition ability to assess relevant perceptual and mnemonic skills in adults and children at various stages of development. Participants will be recruited who were born prematurely and/or experienced a low gestational weight and compared to appropriate age-matched control groups. Eye-movement data will also be collected in order to detect any abnormalities in face-processing strategy itself.

How to apply: Applications are made via our website using the Apply Online button below. If you have an enquiry about this project please contact us via the Email NOW button below, however your application will only be processed once you have submitted an application form as opposed to emailing your CV to us. Application Deadline: 24 July 2017.

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The own-group biases are indicated by superior recognition for faces of one’s own group relative to another group. These groups include ethnicity (Meissner & Brigham, 2001), gender (Wright & Sladden, 2001), age (Anastasi & Rhodes, 2007), and even university (Hugenberg, Millar, & Claypool, 2008). Read more
The own-group biases are indicated by superior recognition for faces of one’s own group relative to another group. These groups include ethnicity (Meissner & Brigham, 2001), gender (Wright & Sladden, 2001), age (Anastasi & Rhodes, 2007), and even university (Hugenberg, Millar, & Claypool, 2008). There are two broad theories explaining these biases: socio-cognitive motivational theories (Sporer, 2001) and perceptual theories (Valentine & Endo, 2002). Eye-tracking has been used to find evidence for both theories but using different groups thereby making any general conclusions about the own-group biases impossible. Evidence suggests that ethnicity determines how faces are viewed (Caldara et al., 2010; Hills, Cooper, & Pake, 2013). However, Hills & Willis (2016) and Man & Hills (in press) have found that people view own- and other-age and gender faces differently. This, therefore, suggests that these biases may be based on different mechanisms.

The proposed study will employ eye-tracking to explore four own-group biases described above using within-participant designs in order to rule out confounding variables and participant effects. Participants view 40 faces (half inverted to measure the face-inversion effect, Yin, 1969) and after a delay view 80 faces (half new) in a standard old/new recognition paradigm, repeated for each type of face.

How to apply: Applications are made via our website using the Apply Online button below. If you have an enquiry about this project please contact us via the Email NOW button below, however your application will only be processed once you have submitted an application form as opposed to emailing your CV to us. Application deadline: 24 July 2017.

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