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Bangor University, Full Time Masters Degrees in Psychology

We have 19 Bangor University, Full Time Masters Degrees in Psychology

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Clinical and Health psychology involves applying psychological understanding to difficulties connected with mental or physical health problems. Read more
Clinical and Health psychology involves applying psychological understanding to difficulties connected with mental or physical health problems. Using this understanding, clinical psychologists assess and treat people of all ages and ability levels who are experiencing psychological distress, behavioural problems or related issues. Students taking the MSc will be introduced to the theory and knowledge that underpins effective practice in clinical psychology, will explore this in relation to a range of conditions, will gain an understanding of the range of research methods used by clinical psychologists, and will conduct their own research project in a relevant area.
How the course can further your career progression

This course will be of particular interest to:
-graduates in psychology who are aiming for a career in clinical or health psychology and who do not yet have relevant work experience. Completing the MSc provides a sound basis for obtaining employment as an assistant psychologist and later gaining entry to clinical training.
-graduates in psychology who are aiming for a career in clinical and health psychology and who have already gained relevant work experience. Completing the MSc course provides evidence of academic and research skills, which is valuable when making applications for clinical training.
- graduates in psychology or closely related disciplines who are keen to pursue research in the area of clinical or helath psychology. The MSc course is accredited as providing an appropriate research training for those wishing to progress to a PhD or to employment in a research post.
- qualified health professionals with an appropriate academic background who wish to extend their understanding of clinical psychology.

Clinical psychology training in the UK involves the completion of a three-year training programme leading to a doctorate in clinical psychology and eligibility to apply for chartered clinical psychologist status. The training is funded by the National Health Service (NHS) and almost all trainees go on to work in the NHS after qualifying. Entry to these programmes is highly competitive and applicants must have good academic and research skills as well as relevant work experience, usually two years in a paid, full-time assistant psychologist position or equivalent. The MSc aims to provide students with a profile of academic knowledge and research skills which, combined with relevant work experience, will equip them to make a credible application for clinical psychology training, either in the UK or elsewhere.

About the School of Psychology
The School of Psychology at Bangor, which was ranked in the Top 20 in the UK in the most recent Research Exercise Framework with 89% of research rated either 'world-leading' or 'internationally excellent', brings together a large group of outstanding scientists with international research reputations in clinical psychology, neuropsychology and clinical and cognitive neuroscience. A number of staff also hold appointments as consultant psychologists or medical consultants with the NHS and contribute to clinical practice as well as to the training of clinical psychologists, medical students and NHS staff. The School runs its own clinical psychology training programme, leading to the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology.

Key research strengths within the clinical psychology domain include dementia, neuropsychology and rehabilitation, learning disability, developmental disorders, addictions, and cognitive-behavioural approaches. Close links with other departments and with NHS services produce tremendous opportunities for collaborative clinical psychology research. The School supports the practical implementation of research findings to improve patient care by hosting groups such as the Dementia Services Development Centre Wales.

The School has an extensive library of psychological tests and measures. Participant recruitment is facilitated through the availability of research panels for neurological patients and people with dementia, as well as student and community participation panels, supported by the School’s full-time patient co-ordinator. The School has a range of specialist laboratories and researchers in the School use a wide range of the latest techniques for understanding brain-behaviour relationships, including functional brain mapping with event related potentials (ERP), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

The School has a vibrant, diverse postgraduate community. Students on our MSc programmes are drawn from a range of backgrounds and nationalities. The School is known for its friendly and informal atmosphere, which combined with excellent facilities helps to ensure that studying here is a pleasant and enjoyable experience.

Course Structure
The course includes three components: content modules, research methods modules, and a research thesis. Content and methods modules are all 20 credit modules and the research thesis is worth 60 credits. Students achieving 120 credits on the taught modules, but not completing a research thesis, may exit with a Postgraduate Diploma. The content modules are designed to provide an in-depth look at theory, evidence and practice in clinical psychology.

The course lasts one full calendar year if taken full-time and is also available part-time. During Semester 1 and Semester 2 you will combine taught modules with work on your research project. During the summer period all your time is devoted to completing and writing up the research project.

A variety of teaching approaches are used including lectures, case presentations, small-group sessions and seminars, and individual or group supervision. Assessment will include coursework and examinations, and the research thesis.

Career Prospects
This course will be of particular interest to psychology graduates aiming for a career in clinical psychology and who do not yet have relevant work experience. Completing the MSc provides a sound basis for obtaining employment as an assistant psychologist and later gaining entry to clinical training. For graduates who already have relevant work experience the course provides evidence of academic and research skills, which is valuable when making applications for clinical training. It is also an excellent preparation for graduates who are keen to pursue research in the area of clinical psychology and for qualified health professionals with an appropriate academic background who wish to extend their understanding of clinical and health psychology.

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Our Psychology MA is a new course designed to offer advanced study in psychology with an emphasis on both research excellence and critical writing skills. Read more
Our Psychology MA is a new course designed to offer advanced study in psychology with an emphasis on both research excellence and critical writing skills. Following two semesters of academic study, students write a stand-alone literature review in an area of psychology that particularly appeals to them. This may be an idea or theory that the graduate is already developing, or may be in an area that they become interested in during the course. An academic supervisor will help students to develop their ideas and hone their writing skills, providing support for the literature review. Students can choose to follow a general programme or specialise in the following areas by choosing particular options in semesters one and two.

Read the course leaflet.

View the MA Psychology modules.

During the first two Semesters of this course, content modules are split between core research foundation courses providing an in depth knowledge of how psychological experiments are designed, carried out, analysed and written up, as well as a focus on evaluating scientific research and writing with an appropriate scientific style, and courses offering a variety of subject matters that students can choose from. Courses are taught by the highest calibre research academics and we provide an excellent teaching and learning environment through the use of innovative teaching tools, media and environments. Some courses integrate both undergraduate and graduate classes and so provide a rich and vibrant atmosphere for learning and social interactions.

The course is especially recommended to graduates who want to:

pursue a career in psychology-related humanities, the health-care professions and social-sciences such as scientific journalism, business management, occupational psychology, marketing and medical care;
give their CV an additional boost
explore a particular area of psychology in detail through researching and writing a literature review.
It should be noted that the course does not qualify a student for PhD study at Bangor Psychology, but that should not deter students from applying to psychology departments in other universities and for PhD study in other disciplines. For example, our MA graduates have pursued PhD study in Sociology, Business and Marketing, and Medical History and Humanities.

Programme Aims
To provide post-graduate foundation in psychology and psychological research;
To evaluative psychological research methodology, experimental design and analysis;
To provide the conceptual tools necessary for insight into psychological processes and meanings within several key domains of psychology that the student selects;
To enable students to develop a critical and evaluative understanding of different approaches to psychological study;
To develop key skills in psychological research such as scientific writing, critical analysis of research and communicating research in psychology;
To enable students to produce a substantial written thesis demonstrating their ability to understand, evaluate and integrate psychological research into a coherent body.
Content and Structure
This course consists of taught components along with a literature review. Semesters one and two involve both core modules and a selection of content modules. During the second semester, students work, with the support of an academic supervisor, to identify a theory, model or research question that they wish to explore through their review. This is then completed during the third semester.

Core modules for Semester 1: Issues in Qualitative & Quantitative + 3 Options.
Core modules for Semester 2: Project Proposal, Communicating Research in Psychology + 2 Options.
Students choose the five optional content modules based on their areas of interest (see module list).
Teaching and Learning Assessment
Teaching occurs via lectures, seminars and tutorials given by research experts in the School. All teachers are actively engaged in research programmes. Assessment methods include written exams, essays, oral presentations and a research thesis.

Literature Review
The thesis is the key component of this course allowing the student to demonstrate their learning, knowledge and understanding. Each student focuses on a specific research question or theory and, along with their supervisor, they will develop their ideas, review the relevant literature and write a thesis.

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This Masters degree is designed for graduates wishing to start, or further develop, careers in Consumer Psychology and Business and is delivered by schools that enjoy an international reputation in their respective fields. Read more
This Masters degree is designed for graduates wishing to start, or further develop, careers in Consumer Psychology and Business and is delivered by schools that enjoy an international reputation in their respective fields. The marriage of both disciplines is a natural one, as understanding behaviour and specifically consumer behaviour in the world of business can be crucial to organisational success. Today's successful businesses and organisations need highly trained people who can help them understand their consumers and understand issues such as: what makes them choose one product over another? Do brand names and advertising really affect our thinking? Will the Internet change the face of urban and suburban shopping areas?

In the first semester, Consumer Psychology and Business studies will be in equal proportions, however in Semester 2 there will be a greater focus on consumer psychology, and the dissertation is undertaken in this field. It is also possible to undertake a Business with Consumer Psychology Masters degree that will involve a dissertation in Business. Candidates may choose between the MA or MSc routes, which are differentiated by the nature of the dissertation. The MSc dissertation will involve undertaking empirical research.

Compulsory Modules
- Research Dissertation - Students will collect, analyse and interpret their data, and present their empirical project in a formal thesis.
- Consumer Psychology: Theory - Provides a basic knowledge of market research, practical issues in consumer science, and an introduction to some of the key psychological perspectives on these problems.
- Quantitative & Qualitative Analysis - The aim of this module is to provide students with in depth understanding of research methods
- Marketing Strategy - Introduces the "fundamentals" of marketing, by illustrating strategies in a wide range of situations, and covering the various schools of thought in marketing, together with relevant analytical models and management practices.
- Organisations and People - Provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.
- Advanced Statistics - This module focuses on the statistical techniques that are used in studying psychology
- Applied Consumer Psych - The module provides practical research experience in consumer psychology and involves hands-on work with viable commercial enterprises.

Optional Modules
- Nudges & Behaviour Change
- New Venture Creation
- Entrepreneurial Marketing
- Financial Crises & Bank Regulation
- Marketing Communication

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This joint Masters degree is designed for graduates wishing to start, or further develop, careers in Consumer Psychology and Business. Read more
This joint Masters degree is designed for graduates wishing to start, or further develop, careers in Consumer Psychology and Business. The programme is delivered by schools which enjoy an international reputation in their field.

The marriage of both disciplines is a natural one, as understanding behaviour and specifically consumer behaviour in the world of business can be crucial to the success of businesses.

Today’s successful businesses and organisations need highly trained people who can help them understand their consumers and understand issues such as: What makes them choose one product over another? Do brand names and advertising really affect our thinking? Will the internet change the face of urban and suburban shopping areas?

In the first semester, Business and Consumer Psychology studies will be in equal proportions; however in Semester 2 there will be a greater focus on business, and the dissertation is undertaken in a business-related subject. It is also possible to undertake a Consumer Psychology and Business Masters degree that will involve a dissertation in Consumer Psychology. Please click here for further details.

Candidates may choose between the MA or MSc routes, which are differentiated by the nature of the dissertation. The MSc dissertation will involve undertaking empirical research, whilst the MA dissertation will involve an extended literature review.
Course Structure

The MSc and MA degrees in Business with Consumer Psychology are scheduled for a duration of 12 months. Each degree programme consists of two parts.

Part 1:

Is a wholly taught component, contributing 120 credits. All taught modules carry a credit weighting of 15 credits. Part 1 is taught during the two semesters which make up the academic year. Teaching during semester 1 normally runs from late-September to December, with examinations in January. Teaching during Semester 2 normally runs from late-January to early-May, with examinations in May and June.

Part 2:

Consists of a supervised Dissertation of around 10,000 words completed during the summer months, from late May to September. You are expected to submit your Dissertation by September in the calendar year following your initial registration for your postgraduate degree.

Compulsory Modules:

Consumer Psychology: This module is an introduction to consumer science as it is currently practiced in the marketplace and to relevant research in academia.
Nudges and Behaviour Change: Module details are currently not available.
Marketing Strategy: This module critically evaluates the contributions of various schools of thought in marketing, and examines the relevant analytical models and management practices, with emphasis on the strategic importance of marketing to all organisations.
Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches.
Applied Consumer Psychology: This module’s aim is to provide practical research experience in consumer psychology and involves hands-on work with viable commercial enterprises. Students are partnered with local companies and are required to design and conduct a practical consumer research project, typically involving field work.

Optional modules (choose 3):

European Business: This module examines the opportunities and constraints faced by businesses that operate on a pan-European basis. Emphasis is placed on the multi-dimensional characteristics of an economic and social space that is subject to a unique system of supra-national governance
New Venture Creation: This module examines the advantages and disadvantages of the various routes to business start-up, including new venture creation, or establishing a business based on your own expertise, experience and ideas; buying an established busi9ness; purchasing a franchise; and succession through a family firm, an increasingly common way of becoming involved in entrepreneurial activity.
Contemporary Issues in Management: This module develops several theories and concepts in contemporary management theory and practice. It provides a detailed and critical analysis of management, further developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.
Finance for Managers: This module is designed for those who aim to achieve a basic understanding of financial management and control, and who require an understanding of finance in order to manage an organisation effectively. Financial planning and control are central themes, as well as the appraisal techniques of investment projects.
Enterprise by design: module information currently unavailable.
Marketing Communication: This module critically evaluates the contributions of various schools of thought in marketing, and examines the relevant analytical models and management practices, with emphasis on the strategic importance of marketing to all organisations.
Entrepreneurial Marketing: This module explores relationship marketing theory and practice in a range of global environments and business contexts. Theoretical approaches, integrated with relationship marketing models and analytical tools will be used to develop managerial understanding and competence.

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The course has been developed for those interested in developing their knowledge and ability in Psychology in general. It will also be the course that might be a good option for individuals who would like to develop their professional and academic skills, but do not intend to pursue a research career in psychology. Read more
The course has been developed for those interested in developing their knowledge and ability in Psychology in general. It will also be the course that might be a good option for individuals who would like to develop their professional and academic skills, but do not intend to pursue a research career in psychology.

The course overlaps with the MSc in Psychological Research, but instead of emphasising research skills, this proposed programme will empower students with a range of professional skills. These skills are valuable, and highly sought after, in a range of different careers. The programme will also allow students to tailor their degree according to their interests, taking modules from our wide-range of world-class specialist modules.

In general, we aim to provide a high quality teaching and learning environment through the use of the latest teaching tools, team- taught courses, and closely mentored research with experts in clinical psychology.

Content and Structure
This course consists of taught and research components that run concurrently. The taught component comprises the following modules:

Compulsory modules:
Research Methods Skills
Professional Skills Development
Dissertation

Optional Modules:
Psychology in Education
Psychosis: A psychological Perspective
Introduction to Neuroimaging
Introduction to EEG/ERP
Biological Bases of Psychological Disorders
Disorders of Neuropsychological Relevance
Methods in Cognition & Brain Research
Bilingualism: Research & Methods
Clinical Neuropsychology
Motivation, Action & Health
Practical Programming for Psychologists
Consumer Psychology: Theory
Behaviour Change

Teaching, Learning and Assessment
The curriculum is designed to extend your current knowledge of psychology and develop your professional skills. Teaching occurs via lectures, colloquium presentations, and seminar-style work with your thesis supervisor. Courses are guided by academic staff in their areas of expertise. Assessment methods include written exams, essays, blogs, oral presentations and a research thesis.

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Programme Philosophy. The Programme recognises that clinical psychology is a caring profession with a number of distinctive features. Read more
Programme Philosophy

The Programme recognises that clinical psychology is a caring profession with a number of distinctive features. Chief among these are the close interdependence between practice and research, and the systematic application of psychological models, theories and evidence to the needs of clients and the development of services. The main aim of the programme is to meet the needs of the NHS for Health and Care Professions Council registered Clinical Psychologists who have:

a wide range of clinical, organisational, leadership and research skills
developed high standards of professional integrity
an internalised model of reflective practice flexible enough to accommodate change

We therefore train clinical psychologists who promote psychological thinking in health care settings, by integrating their clinical, academic and research skills, and through critical, reflective and independent thinking. From a strong value base, they act with integrity to make a positive difference to peoples’ lives.

The programme continually reviews the training programme and is active in making adjustments, where these are indicated, in keeping with the programme’s aims and objectives and to meet the needs of the public and the profession. We are currently focusing on leadership and service user involvement. We have a People Panel, comprising service users and carers, who help us to establish a dialogue between the clients, the trainers and future colleagues in the profession.

The People Panel offer advice on a range of aspects of the training programme. The trainees are invited to consult with the panel on areas of their training, e.g. research ideas. A service user sits on our selection sub-committee and service user representatives are involved in interviewing. Service users are also involved in curriculum development; teaching, and they are invited to provide feedback on trainees as part of clinical placement evaluations.

In terms of therapeutic approaches we focus on Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Third Wave therapies: Mindfulness based approaches, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Dialectical Behavioural Therapy. With the Centre for Mindfulness and the Dialectical Behaviour Therapy training team, and a range of local clinicians using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, we are optimising learning in these exciting clinical areas. Trainees also receive teaching on psychodynamic models, systemic working and Applied Behavioural Analysis, as one of the leading centres for training and research in behaviour analysis is based within the School of Psychology.

The programme aims to select trainees for their commitment to clinical psychology and their potential to develop a high level of clinical, academic and research competence. It aims to foster this potential by encouraging the development of skills, knowledge and values that underpin these competencies. This development takes place within a supportive structure that facilitates personal and professional growth and uses the close links that exist in North Wales between the clinical and academic services.

The programme has a positive attitude towards diversity and social inclusion, which is reflected in selection, teaching, value based practice ideas and the programme’s overall ethos.

Training Facilities
In addition to the dedicated Programme library based within the Main Arts Library, trainees have access to the wide range of facilities at the University library and the School of Psychology (e.g. psychology and computer laboratories). There is a dedicated trainee resource room that contains computers and an extensive Programme test library. Lease cars are available to trainees on the Programme and many trainees take advantage of this opportunity.

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This course is primarily aimed at recipients of Knowledge Economy Skills Scholarships KESS Funding where students focus on field research in partnership with an external company. Read more
This course is primarily aimed at recipients of Knowledge Economy Skills Scholarships KESS Funding where students focus on field research in partnership with an external company. This course can also consider self-funded applicants who are already in possession of a masters level qualification (or practical work-based experience) and who have a suitable background in research methods. You may have a specific research aim in mind and will be ready to carry out independent research leading to PhD level study or be seeking a stand-alone research based qualification suitable for a career in research with transferable skills for graduate employment.

It is the normal expectation that the independent research (120 credits) should be of at a publishable standard in a high quality peer reviewed journal and you will receive support from your supervisors to support you in that aim.

If you are considering this option you are strongly encouraged to get in touch with potential supervisor in the school prior to making an application to discuss your area of interest.

The School’s Psychology masters degrees cover a number of specialist areas that reflect the mix of research expertise within the department. The School boasts a number of prestigious research centres which, as well as being in the vanguard of academic research, offer students unique opportunities for project work under internationally recognised supervisors. The School forms a large part of the College of Health and Behavioural Sciences, a College, which boasts a very strong research, and teaching ethos that translates into excellent courses.

Content
Compulsory Modules:

Advanced Research Methods: This module will provide you with the statistical skills that you need to conduct and evaluate psychological research.

Communicating Research in Psychology: This will provide you with the advanced writing skills you will need for your dissertation and for getting research published and are very relevant in the world of work.

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The course focuses on developing a student’s scientific understanding of the human mind, behaviour and experience, and of the complex interactions between these and the domain of sport and exercise. Read more
The course focuses on developing a student’s scientific understanding of the human mind, behaviour and experience, and of the complex interactions between these and the domain of sport and exercise. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Within the modular structure all students undertake core/compulsory modules in:

Research Skills;
Independent Study (a one to one supervised programme of work leading to the development of the proposal for the Research Project);
Supervised Experience – a module tailored to the needs of the individual and could include directed work with a specified client group or individual;
Research Project relevant to the programme being studied.
Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

Independent Study
The Independent Study should consist of a critical and concise review of the research literature pertaining to a particular research question. A rationale for the proposed research question must be provided, along with a sound methodology for exploring the research question, planned analyses, and expected outcomes. Further, anticipated problems such as resources, equipment, possible ethical issues, informed consent forms, a statement of feasibility of the project and expected costs must be discussed.

Supervised Experience
The content of this module will be largely student specific and include activities (workshops, directed reading, client based work) that will develop the individual’s personal applied support skills. Initially, students complete an individual self-assessment of their current skills/knowledge base and set personal goals to enable them to improve their applied support skills. All students will attend units (workshops) on Ethics in Research and consultancy, communication and counselling skills and how to conduct a needs assessment. Specific physiology and psychology workshops (eg Imagery) will also take place.

Students will complete a contract of intended activities agreed with their supervisor in the first four weeks of their programme of study. This contract may, where appropriate, include the intention to apply to British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) to commence a formally logged Supervised Experience.

A portfolio will then be developed; the portfolio records activities including meetings with supervisor, attendance at workshops, meetings and a plan of work with at least one client, and thought/evaluations of all meetings and workshops (ie evidence of reflective practice).

Overview and Format of the Research Project module
The Research Project is an independent piece of research, and acts as the culmination of the academic challenges faced by the student. The module comprises 60 credits (ie equivalent to three double modules) and will formally equate to some 600 hours of student time.

Students work closely with their supervisor to develop the work on their research proposal submitted during the Independent Study module. As External Examiners have noted, throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field, with the resulting projects being published in international, peer reviewed journals.

Specifically, this will involve a review of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to the area of enquiry. The supervisor provides excellent expert guidance throughout the process.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

Students also undertake additional compulsory modules in Sport Psychology and Exercise Psychology, and choose one optional module from Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete or Effective Coaching.

The programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours (including formal contact).

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This programme has been designed provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of the psychology of sport and exercise. Read more
This programme has been designed provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of the psychology of sport and exercise. The programme facilitates the integration of theory and professional practice, and throughout the programme the research process and emphasis on student autonomy of learning become increasingly important.

Programme Structure and Content
Research skills oriented modules form the bedrock of SHES’ MRes programmes. As a result taught modules are aligned with both discipline specific and the (higher) cognitive skills our MRes programmes aim to provide. Within a modular structure all students undertake compulsory modules in research skills totalling 40 credits:

Research Skills (20 credits)
and 20 credits from the following modules:

How to Conduct Statistics (20 credits);
Presentation of Statistics (10 credits);
Peer Reviewing (10 credits);
Latent Variable Modelling (10 credits);
plus 20 credits from optional modules and a final compulsory Research Project comprising 120 credits.

Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

How to conduct Statistics and Presentation of Statistics modules
The purpose of these two taught modules is to provide students with an in-depth understanding and critical appreciation of statistical procedures. As independent study based modules, they will enable students to gain a comprehensive understanding of a statistical procedure of their choosing (following consultation with the staff member responsible for the module). Towards this end, students will likely cover (i) relevant background issues; (ii) when to use utilise particular statistical tests;(iii) how to conduct statistical testing via appropriate software; (iv) how to correctly interpret computational output; and (v) how to present the findings following analysis.

Students learn about these themes through a “learning by teaching” paradigm via the development of a statistics oriented verbal presentation and written assignment resembling a book chapter/resource. The verbal presentation will be conducted first in order to obtain developmental feedback for the written assignment.

Peer Reviewing Scientific Research
Students work closely with their supervisor to perform an initial review of a previously submitted (and subsequently published) research article. Students will then follow the paper along the peer review process, discussing their review with their supervisor, and then be required to adequately address concerns which have been raised. Collectively this will mean that the student will cover a contemporary research topic in a highly focused and in-depth manner gaining a comprehensive understanding of how to prepare their own manuscripts (eg research proposal, Research Project) and how to evaluate the research of others. Students will also attend the School’s Research Seminar series.

Latent Variable Modelling
This module introduces postgraduate students to the concepts of Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) and to give a basic grounding in their implementation. It also covers an introduction to SEM using LISREL and topics including: measurement models and structural models; exploratory factor analysis; confirmatory factor analysis (CFA); structural modelling with observed and latent variables; conceptual issues, common misunderstandings and limitations.

Research Project
Under the guidance of their supervising tutor(s), students will pro-actively determine the content of this unit. The initial stages of the Research Project will develop the work of the project proposal and taught phases of the MRes programmes. This will involve the surveying and reviewing of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to their area of inquiry. Ethical approval of the study will be obtained before data may be collected, thereby introducing students to this integral part of the research process. Throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field. It is expected that the resulting projects will be publishable in international, peer-reviewed journals.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

Optional Modules:

In addition to the core/compulsory modules students choose a further 20 credits from the following optional modules:

Sport Psychology;
Effective Coaching;
Exercise Psychology;
Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete.
The taught programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

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Our MSc in Psychological Research is exceptional for its dual emphasis on basic psychological science and applied issues. Read more
Our MSc in Psychological Research is exceptional for its dual emphasis on basic psychological science and applied issues. The course is designed to provide students with a wide range of practical research skills, advanced studies in modern psychology, and an opportunity to learn how this knowledge is applied in either industrial or clinical settings. The course has been recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as providing the transferable skills essential to social science research. Students who take this course will get a comprehensive research experience working with top international calibre researchers, and an exceptional opportunity to see how modern psychology can be put into practice.

This Masters is recommended in the following cases:
You are looking to specialise in a particular area of Psychology.
You are interested in giving your CV/Resume an extra "boost".
You are trying to get a feel for research in psychology before undertaking a PhD.
You are looking for a job as a research assistant.
You wish to undertake a PhD.

Content
In Semester One you'll concentrate on content modules that reflect the academic specialisms within the school. In Semester Two all students take three skills modules - Advanced Statistics, Issues in Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis, and Communicating Research in Psychology.

In both Semesters One and Two, you take a tutorial style modules called Advanced Research Methods and Proposal I/II in which you develop your research thesis project with your supervisor.

Structure
The course consists of two Parts. Part One comprises taught modules over two semesters. You are required to take three 'content' modules, each designed to provide knowledge and promote understanding in a specific core area of psychology. You also take three 'skills' modules designed to help you acquire research skills. In addition you take two tutorial modules with your supervisor wherein you develop a research proposal for your thesis. On successful completion of Part One, you'll proceed to Part Two (in the third semester). At this time you complete and write your thesis.

Teaching, Learning and Assessment
Teaching occurs via lectures, seminars and tutorials given by research experts in the School. All teachers are actively engaged in research programmes. Assessment methods include written exams, essays, oral presentations and a research thesis.
Research Thesis

The thesis is the "heart" of the MSc and is an intensive research experience conducted in collaboration with your supervisor that allows you to put your knowledge and skills into practice. In conducting your thesis project, you will develop new skills such as planning, co-operative working, and the academic skills essential to understanding and reporting findings to others.

Student Profiles
To get a taste of what life as a postgraduate student in the School of Psychology is like, you may want to read the profiles of some of our current and past Postgraduate students that are on the School website.

Funding
Some course specific funding is available. Please see School Page for details.

Research/Industrial Links
The academics involved with this programme have extensive research links with external bodies and companies, which are fully utilised in ensuring that the modules are relevant to the modern work and research environment graduates will enter.

Career Prospects
This course is recommended for students who are looking to specialise in a particular area of Psychology prior to undertaking a PhD or looking for a post as a research assistant. It also provides excellent general research skills that graduates can use in a range of other employment environments.

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The PhD (or doctorate) is the highest academic qualification available. A PhD degree is designed to provide strong grounding in highly specialised areas through research. Read more
The PhD (or doctorate) is the highest academic qualification available. A PhD degree is designed to provide strong grounding in highly specialised areas through research. Its goal is to enable students to be researchers in psychology, contributing to academic knowledge and developing work of internationally publishable quality. Bangor Psychology offers PhD supervision in the following specialisms:

• Cognitive Neuroscience
• Learning and Development
• Language
• Clinical Neuroscience
• Clinical and Health Psychology
• Experimental Consumer Psychology

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
You must have an undergraduate degree in psychology or a related subject, with a minimum degree class of 2:1 or equivalent, and additional postgraduate training (see below).

STUDY MODE AND DURATION
Full-time PhD students normally spend three years in study. If you do not already have a Master’s degree, then we would normally expect you to complete such a degree prior to starting the PhD programme.If you have already obtained an appropriate Master’s degree, you may be required to take one or more relevant modules in the School’s MSc in Psychological Research to complement your background and expertise.

Part-time students have five years to complete the PhD.
SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE
Three members of academic staff will be helping you with your research: a principal supervisor, a second supervisor and a chairperson - this last from a different research specialism. The major role of the second supervisor is to provide additional input on your research and to take over the supervision of the dissertation should the primary supervisor need to withdraw. The major responsibility of the chairperson is to ensure that a "best fit" is found between you and your supervisor. This group meets periodically with you in order to provide guidance on your research and to help with any difficulty that you might be experiencing.

REVIEWS AND PROGRESS TOWARDS THE PhD DEGREE

Probationary period
The first year acts as a probationary period. Your progress will be reviewed in February and June (for full-time students), according to the requirements of the School and the goals outlined in your individual course of study. If, after these reviews, your supervisory committee considers that your progress has been fully satisfactory, then you will cease to be “probationary”.

Subsequent reviews
During the second year there will be another research review in June, and again in February of your third year. If you have not completed the write-up of your thesis by June of the third year, there will be another review meeting in June of that year (and every February and June of subsequent years until completion).

The purpose of these meetings is to ensure that you are always moving forward effectively towards completion, and to enable your committee to provide any assistance that may be necessary to help guarantee completion of the work.

YOUR PhD THESIS
Your research thesis is a large project. It will require attention throughout your studies. We have established a system to keep your research on track and help you manage your time. Completing a successful thesis builds on skills and knowledge acquired throughout the MSc modules. It constitutes an original piece of research, usually including several experiments or observational studies.

Your PhD thesis must be defended at the end of your studies in a viva voce examination. This comprises an oral report of the research in the presence of an examining committee.

CHOOSING A RESEARCH TOPIC AND SUPERVISOR
If you are thinking of studying for a PhD degree, one of your first actions, before applying for admission to the programme, is to identify and communicate with a potential supervisor in the relevant area. The research interests and publications of our academic staff are listed within our web pages. Contact the people whose research is most relevant to the area in which you wish to work. In many cases, it is best to make initial contact by e-mail or by letter.

FUNDING
Funding for full-time PhD study (tuition fees plus living allowance) is available through a number of sources, including the ESRC, the University of Wales Bangor, and the School of Psychology, which offers a number of studentships aimed at exceptional candidates from the UK, Europe, and internationally. Our website offers more details on the funding available for PhD students.

You can obtain more information on funding opportunities from our Deputy School Administrator (Paula Gurteen, ). Alternatively, you can discuss funding options with your potential supervisor.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE
We invite applications for our funded studentships at set times throughout the year, both on our website and on jobs.ac.uk.

Applications from students who have already obtained funding for their studies are welcome at any time and can be done online on the University website.

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he MSc in Foundations of Clinical Neuropsychology aims to provide you with a strong foundation of knowledge in the following areas relevant to clinical neuropsychology. Read more
he MSc in Foundations of Clinical Neuropsychology aims to provide you with a strong foundation of knowledge in the following areas relevant to clinical neuropsychology:

Neuropsychological theory and evidence from clinical and experimental studies
Neuropsychological disorders, including their basis in neuroanatomy and neuropathology, and their impact on individuals and families
Neuropsychological assessment
Neuropsychological rehabilitation
Research Methods
Conducting neuropsychological research.

The course will be of interest to graduates in psychology or closely-related disciplines, and to established health professionals with appropriate clinical qualifications and relevant experience.

How the course can further your career progression
This course of study can serve as a basis for research, clinical training, or professional practice in this area. On successful completion of the course, students will be well-equipped to undertake further postgraduate study leading to a PhD, or to work in neuropsychological research. The course is validated by the ESRC as providing an appropriate Master’s level research training within the 1 + 3 PhD model . The course provides an excellent basis for seeking employment in health care, for example as an assistant psychologist or rehabilitation assistant, and for progressing to professional training, for example in clinical psychology or related areas. Established health professionals taking the course will find that it provides a valuable opportunity for continuing professional development, which may contribute to future career progression.

Course Content
The course includes three components: content modules, research methods modules, and a research thesis. Content and methods modules are all 20 credit modules and the research thesis is worth 60 credits. Students achieving 120 credits on the taught modules, but not completing a research thesis, may exit with a Postgraduate Diploma. The content modules are designed to provide an in-depth look at theory, evidence and practice in clinical neuropsychology.

Student Profile
To get a taste of what life as a postgraduate student in the School of Psychology is like, you may want to read the profiles of some of our current and past Postgraduate students.

Funding
Please see School Page for details

Career Prospects
The course can serve as a basis for research, clinical training, or professional practice in this area. On successful completion of the course, students will be well equipped to undertake further postgraduate study leading to a PhD, or to work in neuropsychological research. The course provides an excellent basis for seeking employment in health care, for example as an assistant psychologist or rehabilitation assistant, and for progressing to professional training, for example in clinical psychology or related areas. Established health professionals taking the course will find that it provides a valuable opportunity for continuing professional development, which may contribute to future career progression.

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This course aims to prepare you to take an active role as a member of the professional counselling/ psychotherapy community. This course explores a range of psychological approaches and therapeutic methods to provide holistic training in counselling. Read more

MSc in Counselling

This course aims to prepare you to take an active role as a member of the professional counselling/ psychotherapy community. This course explores a range of psychological approaches and therapeutic methods to provide holistic training in counselling. You will learn about the Humanistic approach and Person-Centred therapy, Psychodynamic approach and Psychoanalytic therapy, Behavioural approach and Behaviour therapy, and Cognitive approach and Cognitive therapy. You will also be introduced to several integrative approaches, such as CBT, REBT, and TA. In addition, you will take part in practical activities to develop your communication skills and help you to introduce the therapeutic techniques into your practice. This extensive curriculum will equip you to work with clients across various settings, and provide you with a toolkit of evidence-based techniques and relationship-focused methods. This course will also include a solid foundation in Psychology and Research, so that you will graduate with all of the skills needed to apply for doctorate level study or work in an empirically-based practice.

During the first year of the course, you will gain a comprehensive understanding of psychology, counselling, research, and mental health through the following modules:

Research Skills (10 credit) Core and Compulsory
Therapeutic Process and Context (20 credit) Core and Compulsory
Communication Skills (10 credit) Core and Compulsory
Approaches and Therapies 1 (20 credit) Core and Compulsory
Research Methods and Statistics (10 credit) Core and Compulsory
Mental Health and Wellbeing (20 credit) Core and Compulsory
Counselling Skills (10 credit) Core and Compulsory
Approaches and Therapies 2 (20 credit) Core and Compulsory

During the second year of the course, you will have a unique opportunity to elect two modules from the wide range of options available in the School of Psychology. These options may include courses in Mindfulness, Clinical Psychology, Neuropsychology, and Applied Behaviour Analysis. This additional specialised training will give you an extra advantage as a counselling graduate, and will further equip you with the skills needed to excel in your career.

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

Our MSc in Counselling will use a range of teaching methods to provide a challenging and engaging learning environment. You will attend lectures introducing the core theories, be supported through computer labs, watch video demonstrations of counselling in action, participate in workshops simulating counselling and supervision, debate important and controversial issues in the field, and receive regular one-to-one support from your personal tutor. Your assessments on the course will also be varied and diverse, and they will include essays, on-line quizzes, oral exams, presentations, and research reports. You will receive support and guidance for all of these assessments, as we work with you to ensure that every individual has an opportunity to excel.

Research Thesis

Our MSc in Counselling includes an empirical research project in the field of counselling. Our two-year course will provide you with enough time to develop your research skills, design a project, obtain ethical approval, run your study, and write up your research thesis. Research is an essential skill for a career in counselling, as more workplaces demand that their counsellors are able to empirically test their interventions and evidence their impact on clients. Our research training will help you to develop these skills and your research thesis will demonstrate that you are able to work as an empirically-based practitioner.

Counselling Placement

Our MSc in Counselling requires that you complete a core counselling placement of 150 supervised face-to-face counselling hours and 50 hours of work based practice. After learning the foundations of ethics, boundaries, and communication skills in the first semester, you will be expected to begin your placement at the start of the second semester in your first year. You will then need to complete all of your hours before graduating from the course in order to gain the MSc in Counselling. You will be provided with support and guidance in identifying a suitable placement, but the responsibility for obtaining a placement and completing all required hours remains with the student. You will also be responsible for ensuring that every month of practice is supported by at least 1.5 hours of supervision by an appropriate counselling supervisor (please be aware that you may need to pay for the services of a supervisor, if sufficient supervision is not provided within your placement). Supervised practice and work-based learning hours are a core requirement of the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy

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Neuroimaging has emerged as a new important methodology in the study of the structure and function of the human brain in health and disease. Read more
Neuroimaging has emerged as a new important methodology in the study of the structure and function of the human brain in health and disease. In Neuroscience it is being increasingly used to study the physiological correlates of mental processes. In Clinical practice it plays a prominent role in the detection and diagnosis of neurological and psychiatric illnesses and in the evaluation of new treatments. The techniques are getting increasingly sophisticated and as a result there is a high demand for well-trained professionals.

Our Neuroimaging MSc is one of only a few programmes dealing with modern neuroimaging in the UK. It is exceptional in its focus on practical and biomedical aspects of Neuroimaging. The success of the program is reflected in the success of our students with 60% either in further higher education, or fully employed in the first year after degree completion. This figure rises to 100% within 3 years of the degree.

The Neuroimaging MSc is designed to provide students with the background knowledge and technical skills to design, analyze and evaluate imaging data. The Neuroimaging MSc focuses on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) based techniques, including functional MRI, anatomical imaging, Diffusion Tensor Imaging, and Spectroscopy. Imaging techniques will be discussed with reference to relevant applications. The programme puts a strong emphasis on practical skills. In a dedicated computer lab, the students will learn and practice analysis and imaging techniques. Under supervision of our world-class academic staff, students will design their own imaging based studies, which will be run using the in-house 3T MRI scanner. Additional classes will provide students with a broad scope of professional skills.

The Neuroimaging MSc is especially suited for:
students interested in pursuing an Academic career in the field of Neuroimaging;
students looking to find a job as research staff in industry or academic labs involved in translational research;
medical professional, looking to develop skills in a new emergent technology and research field;
students with a background in physics, mathematics or computer science who want to move into cognitive or clinical neuroscience;
students with a background in psychology or biology who want to improve your technical skills for a neuroscience career.

Content
The core of the Neuroimaging MSc consists of two modules on Neuroimaging. The first module concentrates on methodological aspects. It includes an introduction to the physics of MR imaging, the physiological basis of functional signals, processing and analysis of imaging data and the design of research studies. The second module provides an in-depth introduction to a number of specialized imaging techniques used to understand the biology of brain function in health and disease. The latter module aims to illustrate the use of imaging in the context of translational and clinical studies of disease processes affecting the human brain.

Both modules combine formal lectures, and computer-based laboratories, in which students learn and practice analysis and imaging techniques. Weekly practical labs and programming classes are held in a dedicated computer laboratory available to all students. The work done in the lab sections constitute 50% of the grade in first module, and 30% of the grade in the second module. The latter also includes student-led discussion of published scientific and clinical research.

In the weekly Bangor Imaging Group (BIG) meeting, academic staffs, postdocs and students discuss current research. All MSc and PhD students propose their research here.

Additional optional modules provide an in-depth view of several content areas of cognitive and clinical neuroscience (see below). Students are also welcome to attend weekly review of clinical scans performed at the local hospital for the purpose of patient recruitment and a monthly neuroradiology conference where cases of clinical interest are discussed. Journal-clubs and research meetings concerning fMRI, EEG, and TMS methodologies are open to all students.

Students are also required to take at least one additional module in advanced statistics or advanced computing. The module Communicating Research completes the curriculum by training students in a broad scope of professional skills.

The Bangor Imaging Unit houses a state-of-the-art 3T MRI machine, available for student projects. Setups for the measurement of eye-movement, arm and hand movement, and physiological parameters are also available.

In the beginning of the year you will choose your academic supervisor. The supervisor will be responsible for helping you plan, design and draft your research thesis. From your project proposal you will review the relevant literature, and formally outline your study. In the weekly Bangor-Imaging Group meeting we learn about and discuss proposed, ongoing and completed studies and important new publications in the field. Moreover, all MSc and PhD students present their proposed plan of research in this forum. Thus, you are tightly integrated into the research environment at the Bangor Imaging Unit, and profit from interactions with older PhD students, post-docs, and other supervisors. Your final research project is conducted over the summer months, most likely using the in-house, research-dedicated 3T MRI scanner. The course ends with the successful submission of your research thesis.

Structure
The Neuroimaging MSc consists of two parts. Part one comprises taught modules over two semesters. You are required to take the two core modules in Neuroimaging, which include a large component of laboratory work. You will also choose two 'content' modules, each designed to provide knowledge and promote understanding in a specific core area of neuroscience. You also take three 'skills' modules designed to hone your research skills. In addition, you will partner with one of the academic faculty in order to jointly develop a research proposal for your thesis. On successful completion of Part One, you'll proceed to Part Two (in the third semester), when you will carry out your research study and write your thesis.

Research Thesis
The thesis is the 'crown' of the Neuroimaging MSc and is an intensive research experience conducted in collaboration with your supervisor that allows you to put your knowledge and skills into practice. In conducting your thesis project, you will develop new skills such as planning, co-operative working, and the academic skills essential to understanding and reporting findings to others.
Career Prospects

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Applied behaviour analysis has been recognised as the treatment of choice for a broad range of clinical problems (e.g., early intervention for autism, responding to challenging behaviour, classroom management, effective instructional practices). Read more
Applied behaviour analysis has been recognised as the treatment of choice for a broad range of clinical problems (e.g., early intervention for autism, responding to challenging behaviour, classroom management, effective instructional practices). Positive behavioural support (PBS) is an example of behaviour analysis in a particular practice setting (usually implemented for adults with intellectual disabilities or within special education settings). PBS aims to improve a person’s quality of life through the use of a framework that allows behaviour to be analysed in the social, physical, and broader context in which it occurs. The aims of the course are to develop an advanced conceptual understanding of applied behaviour analysis, behavioural concepts and philosophy relevant to the development and treatment of psychological disorders, advanced knowledge of positive behavioural support and research methods. In addition, students will develop key competencies in the use of behavioural principles in clinical settings using the positive behaviour support model. In addition to obtaining PBS and behaviour analytic knowledge, graduates will have acquired critical evaluation, time management, collaborative working, sound professional conduct, and oral communication skills. The course is taught via lectures, group discussions, seminars, and activities. Assessments include written assignments in a range of formats and unseen exams. Students may undertake a research thesis in a range of available applied settings with a range of participants, or they may complete an internship across two years (limited places available). During the internship, students will work in an applied setting and will submit a portfolio of their clinical work at the end of each year.

"This course is one of the first to offer a specalisation in positive behavioural support in Europe, taught by leading UK experts and offering exceptional learning opportunities." Course Director Dr Rebecca Sharp

Course content is for guidance purposes only and may be subject to change.

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