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Politics & Government×

Nova Southeastern University Masters Degrees in Politics & Government

We have 2 Nova Southeastern University Masters Degrees in Politics & Government

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The M.A. in Cross-disciplinary Studies is multidisciplinary, experiential, and allows students to self-design their graduate studies. Read more

The M.A. in Cross-disciplinary Studies is multidisciplinary, experiential, and allows students to self-design their graduate studies. The program is designed to meet the needs of students who are seeking a broader learning forum and who appreciate the unique self-design of cross-disciplinary studies. The M.A. program provides intellectual advancement and the opportunity to expand and enrich educational horizons in keeping with the liberal studies traditions. The M.A. program utilizes a multidisciplinary approach and variety of perspectives for observing, analyzing, and addressing contemporary social issues. Students focus on systemic approaches and methodologies when studying human challenges. The M.A. utilizes experiential learning to provide students with hands-on training where theory and practice are integrated.

The M.A. consists of an 11-course (33 credits) sequence that includes core classes, practicums, and a 12-credit concentration track.

Program Formats

The M.A. aims at convenience and accommodation by utilizing online course delivery format and self-designed programs. The students enrolled in the M.A. programs are afforded the greatest flexibility in self-selecting and self-directing their concentrated areas of interest, while at the same time retaining and reinforcing an emphasis on general professional skills. Students can complete the program completely online, but have a large selection of on-campus courses from which to choose.

Students may enroll full or part time, taking six to nine credit hours per term. Students who attend full-time can expect to complete the program in 19 months. Part-time students may complete the program in 2 ½ years. Summer attendance is mandatory.

Curriculum

The Master of Arts in Cross-Disciplinary Studies (MACS) degree program requires an 11-course (33 credits) sequence that includes core classes, practicums, a 12-credit concentration track and 1 elective.

Core courses:

  • MACS 5020 Theories and Philosophies of Conflict and Peace
  • MACS 5200 Research Design and Program Evaluation
  • MACS 5310 Introduction to Systems Theories
  • MACS 5400 The Interdisciplinary Writer
  • MACS 6130 Practicum I: Supervised Field Experience
  • MACS 6160 Practicum II: Supervised Field Experience

Concentration tracks

Culture and Society: Explore conflict resolution in diverse world cultures, business, and public service. Gain professional skills for communication, client support, counseling, crisis management, mediation and conflict resolution.

Health and Society : Manage data and research to meet the challenges of today's health care administration system. Develop skills to mediate between the medical establishment, the patient community, and the insurance community. In partnership with the College of Allied Health and Nursing.

Information Systems and Society: Appreciate technology-based solutions to leadership challenges, bridge the gap between corporate technology specialists and management staff, and mediate between technophiles and technophobes. In partnership with the Graduate School of Computer and Information Sciences.

Coastal Environment and Society: Discover environmental data and research as a source of political conflict, while addressing the need to work comfortably within a diversity of local, national, and international cultures and boundaries. In partnership with the Oceanographic Center.

Education and Society: Investigate pedagogy and leadership in the diverse systems of education. Establish skills to manage conflict in learning environments. In partnership with the Fischler College of Education and Human Services.

Institutional Assessment: Research student-learning outcomes and prepare to lead academic organizations in assessment. Practice techniques to evaluate academic programs and curricula, respond to academic accreditation bodies, and create a "culture of evidence" at academic organizations.

Practicum

Students complete two practicums during their course of study. Practicum placements have been established in an array of settings depending on student's areas of study. Students are also encouraged to explore and initiate a practicum setting specific to their own individual interests. For more information please http://cahss.nova.edu/departments/ms/graduate/macs/practicum.html

Master's Thesis

Option Students who wish to complete a 6-credit Master's Thesis may do so by completing in 3 additional credits. Students must request permission from the Director before enrolling for the Master's Thesis.



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The 36-credit M.S. in National Security Affairs and International Relations in the Department of History and Political Science is designed to provide students with theoretical, research, and applied skills in the emerging academic field of national security affairs. Read more

The 36-credit M.S. in National Security Affairs and International Relations in the Department of History and Political Science is designed to provide students with theoretical, research, and applied skills in the emerging academic field of national security affairs. Students in this program will build a core understanding of critical issues informing the field of national security today, including the assessment and analysis of the threat of terrorism in the US and beyond and the analysis of intelligence collection. The M.S. in National Security Affairs and International Relations is offered online worldwide.

National security affairs is one of the fastest growing professions with positions open in the public sector in the federal, state and local governments and in the private sector. This program is designed for professionals in the field seeking career advancement, those who aspire to enter the field, individuals in related professions, and those retired from the military and government seeking consulting and other positions. Examples of potential students include personnel in the military, federal, state and local governments, law enforcement, corporations, and academia, as well as recent college graduates.

The program consists of a core of 7 courses (21 credits). Pedagogically, the program core focuses on building the critical analytical skills graduates need to succeed professionally and academically in the field of national security affairs. The ability to critically analyze intelligence information and global security issues, interpret historical and contemporary issues informing the field, and perform textual analyses, defines the program core's most important learning outcomes. 

M.S. in National Security Affairs and International Relations in the Department of History and Political Science is designed to provide students with theoretical, research, and applied skills in the emerging academic field of national security affairs. Students in this program will build a core understanding of critical issues informing the field of national security today, including the assessment and analysis of the threat of terrorism in the U.S. and beyond, and the analysis of intelligence collection. Students will also develop a deep understanding of the international context in which U.S. national security issues are shaped.

The program consists of a core of 7 courses (21 credits). Pedagogically, the program core focuses on building the critical analytical skills graduates need to succeed professionally and academically in the field of national security affairs. The ability to critically analyze intelligence information and global security issues, interpret historical and contemporary issues informing the field, and perform textual analyses, defines the program core's most important learning outcomes.

Following completion of the program core, students must complete 15 credits of coursework from the list of available electives. The majority of the elective offerings were developed specifically for the national security and international relations program, with a small number drawn from closely related fields. The elective list contains both courses that emphasize domestic security and courses that have a broader international focus, resulting in sufficient breadth of subject matter to allow students to tailor their choices around particular academic or professional interests.

Students interested in Cyber Security can choose to take a specific concentration in this area. Students who choose this option must complete 9 credits from the Cyber Security concentration and 6 credits from the elective list. Before choosing this option, students must secure permission from the Department of History and Political Science. After a consultation, it will be determined whether the student can enter the Cyber Security concentration, or if additional foundation courses will be required in order to enter and successfully complete the concentration.

Core Courses (21 credits)

  • NSAM 5001 - Current Issues in National Security (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5003 - National Intelligence Collection and Analysis: Theory and Practice (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5004 - Border Protection and Military Issue (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5005 - Research and Evaluation in National Security Affairs (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5010 - US Foreign Policy and National Security (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5014 - Ethical Issues in National Security (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5016 - International Relations: Theory and Practice (3 credits)

Electives (15 credits)

  • NSAM 5002 - Terrorists and Terrorism: Theory and Practice (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5015 - Civil Liberties and National Security (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5020 - International Law and Institutions (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5030 - American Government and Domestic Security (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5040 - Cyber Conflict and Statecraft (3 credits)
  • DEM 5090 - Weapons of Mass Threat and Communicable Diseases (3 credits)
  • MHS 5314 - Bioterrorism and Weapons of Mass Destruction (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5502 - Directed Readings in National Security Affairs (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5650 - Economic Statecraft in National Security Affairs (3 credits)
  • NSAM 6130 - Practicum/Internship (3 credits)
  • NSAM 6690 - Special Topics in National Security Affairs and International Relations (3 credits)
  • NSAM 6700 - Directed Thesis in National Security Affairs and International Relations (6 credits)

Optional Cyber Security Concentration

  • MMIS 0683 - Fundamentals of Security Technologies (3 credits)
  • MMIS 0684 - Information Security Management (3 credits)
  • MMIS 0685 - Information Security Governance (3 credits)
  • MMIS 0686 - Information Systems Auditing (3 credits)
  • MMIS 0687 - Information Security Project (3 credits)

Practicum

In addition to successfully completing all course work, students must pass a tabletop examination to be awarded the M.S. in National Security Affairs and International Relations. When a student has completed all coursework, has maintained a minimum of 3.0 GPA with no "incomplete" grades, and is a "student in good standing" with no disciplinary actions pending or disciplinary tasks to complete, the student will be eligible to take the tabletop examination. The tabletop exam is an assessment of the student's ability to integrate the knowledge and skills gained through course work.The exam tests the student's written ability to critically analyze and apply conflict assessment, theory, and research methodology to hypothetical conflict situations. The exam also tests knowledge of material specific to the academic curriculum.



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