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Politics & Government×

University of Manchester, Full Time Masters Degrees in Politics & Government

We have 39 University of Manchester, Full Time Masters Degrees in Politics & Government

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You would like to study at one of the strongest centres for European politics in the UK. You want a course that builds on comparative European perspectives and offers an excellent range of modules. Read more
  • You would like to study at one of the strongest centres for European politics in the UK
  • You want a course that builds on comparative European perspectives and offers an excellent range of modules
  • You are interested in combining robust transferable research skills with focused expertise in European politics

The programme draws from one of the strongest centres for European politics in the UK. It combines analytical and conceptual rigour with topical subjects relating to the governance and policies of the European Union and their impact on the domestic politics of its member states.

The programme also focuses on processes of Europeanisation both within the context of the EU's existing member states, but also on candidate countries and the EU's neighbours. Building on a very strong comparative perspective (across Europe and the European Union), the programme offers students an excellent range of compulsory and optional modules with strong areas of expertise in gender and media policies, varieties of European capitalism; nationalism and political violence; and the EU's external relations.

The programme has been designed for those who want to combine strong transferable research skills with focused expertise in European politics. It will appeal to students who aspire to pursue a doctoral degree or a career in research. It will also appeal to those seeking employment in government at the supranational, national and sub national levels, as well as to those wishing to pursue careers in journalism, teaching and international commerce.

The programme also attracts students from other European countries wishing to pursue postgraduate study abroad as well as growing numbers employed in business and government elsewhere who have to deal with the European Union.

Course Director: Dr Laura McLeod

Email:  

Teaching and learning

IMPORTANT NOTE ON PART-TIME STUDY

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.  

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.  

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director

Facilities

The School of Social Sciences is now based in a brand new purpose-built building which allows 24/7 access.

Dedicated area in the atrium with computer terminals

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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International Relations (IR) is one of the most popular programmes at postgraduate level On this programme you will be taught and supervised by experienced staff with strong interests in critical approaches to the study of global politics. Read more

International Relations (IR) is one of the most popular programmes at postgraduate level On this programme you will be taught and supervised by experienced staff with strong interests in critical approaches to the study of global politics. Course units on offer cover a wide range of global issues - from authority; citizenship; foreign policy (both China and US); gender, war and peace; global ethics; human rights; media; environmental politics; security studies; and terrorism. 

Two modules form the centrepiece of our programme: the Graduate Seminar in International Politics and Critical Thinkers in International Politics. These modules are designed to develop transferable skills in critical inquiry, creative thinking, research design and problem-solving. Students on the programme will also complete a major research dissertation of their own, with the guidance of a member of staff in International Politics.

A part of a postgraduate community, students on the programme are encouraged to participate in the Critical Global Politics research cluster, who organise a seminar series attracting high profile speakers including Cynthia Enloe, Cynthia Weber, Nick Vaughan-Williams, Marysia Zalewski and Laura Shepherd, amongst others. 

This route will suit those wishing to obtain a high-level specialist subject qualification and the programme will appeal to students interested in developing a deeper knowledge and understanding of critically-orientated international relations. The diversity of the programme also makes it a suitable introduction to the study of global politics. Those wishing to pursue a research training qualification or a PhD are advised to explore the International Relations (Research) route.

This programme is designed for students for whom a taught MA will be a prelude to careers in fields related to government and non-governmental organisations. Former graduates have gone on to work for international organisations including NATO and the UNDP, or for foreign offices. The MA would also be suitable for students wishing to go into teaching, journalism or any career where advanced knowledge of international politics coupled with an excellent capacity to communicate effectively will be an advantage.

Course Director: Dr Laura McLeod

Email: 

Teaching and learning

IMPORTANT NOTE ON PART-TIME STUDY

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.  

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.  

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director

Course unit details

Compulsory

  • POLI70401 Graduate seminar in International Relation Theory
  • POLI70412 Critical Thinkers in International Politics
  • POLI60312 Dissertation Research Design

Optional

  • POLI70451 Ethics in World Politics
  • POLI70461 Security Studies
  • POLI71061 Foreign Policy Analysis
  • POLI70311 Critical Approaches to IPE
  • POLI70851 EU as an International Actor 
  • POLI70981 The Arab Uprisings and Revolutionary State Formation
  • POLI71111 The United Nations and International Security
  • POLI60092 Power and Resistance in Postcolonial Societies
  • POLI60262 Media, War and Conflict
  • POLI70282 Critical Globalisation Studies
  • POLI70612 Debating Justice 
  • POLI70722 Theories of Rights
  • POLI70492 Human Rights in World Politics

Facilities

The School of Social Sciences is in a purpose-built building which allows 24/7 access.

There are dedicated areas in the atrium with computer terminals.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



Read less
You would like to study at one of the strongest centres for European politics in the UK. You want a course that builds on comparative European perspectives and offers an excellent range of modules. Read more
  • You would like to study at one of the strongest centres for European politics in the UK
  • You want a course that builds on comparative European perspectives and offers an excellent range of modules
  • You would like a flexible course structure allowing for a level of specialisation

The programme draws from one of the strongest centres for European politics in the UK. It combines analytical and conceptual rigour with topical subjects relating to the governance and policies of the European Union and their impact on the domestic politics of its member states.

The programme also focuses on processes of Europeanisation both within the context of the EU's existing member states, but also on candidate countries and the EU's neighbours. Building on a very strong comparative perspective (across Europe and the European Union), the programme offers students an excellent range of compulsory and optional modules with strong areas of expertise in gender and media policies, varieties of European capitalism; nationalism and political violence; and the EU's external relations.

The programme has been designed with maximum flexibility in mind. It will appeal to students for whom a taught MA will be a prelude to employment in government service at the supranational, national and sub national levels, as well as to careers in journalism, teaching and international commerce.

The programme also attracts students from other European countries wishing to pursue postgraduate study abroad as well as growing numbers employed in business and government elsewhere who have to deal with the European Union.

Course Director: Dr Laura McLeod

Email:  

Teaching and learning

IMPORTANT NOTE ON PART-TIME STUDY

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.  

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.  

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director

Facilities

The School of Social Sciences is now based in a brand new purpose-built building which allows 24/7 access.

Dedicated area in the atrium with computer terminals

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



Read less
International Relations (IR) is one of the most popular programmes at postgraduate level On this programme you will be taught and supervised by experienced staff with strong interests in critical approaches to the study of global politics. Read more

International Relations (IR) is one of the most popular programmes at postgraduate level On this programme you will be taught and supervised by experienced staff with strong interests in critical approaches to the study of global politics. Course units on offer cover a wide range of global issues - from authority; citizenship; foreign policy (both China and US); gender, war and peace; global ethics; human rights; media; environmental politics; security studies; and terrorism. 

Two modules form the centrepiece of our programme: the Graduate Seminar in International Politics and Critical Thinkers in International Politics. These modules are designed to develop transferable skills in critical inquiry, creative thinking, research design and problem-solving. Students on the programme will also complete a major research dissertation of their own, with the guidance of a member of staff in International Politics.

A part of a postgraduate community, students on the programme are encouraged to participate in the Critical Global Politics research cluster, who organise a seminar series attracting high profile speakers including Cynthia Enloe, Cynthia Weber, Nick Vaughan-Williams, Marysia Zalewski and Laura Shepherd, amongst others. 

This route will suit those wishing to obtain a high-level specialist subject qualification and the programme will appeal to students interested in developing a deeper knowledge and understanding of critically-orientated international relations. The diversity of the programme also makes it a suitable introduction to the study of global politics. Those wishing to pursue a research training qualification or a PhD are advised to explore the International Relations (Research) route.

This programme is designed for students for whom a taught MA will be a prelude to careers in fields related to government and non-governmental organisations. Former graduates have gone on to work for international organisations including NATO and the UNDP, or for foreign offices. The MA would also be suitable for students wishing to go into teaching, journalism or any career where advanced knowledge of international politics coupled with an excellent capacity to communicate effectively will be an advantage.

Course Director: Dr Laura McLeod

Email: 

Teaching and learning

IMPORTANT NOTE ON PART-TIME STUDY

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.  

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.  

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director

Facilities

The School of Social Sciences is in a purpose-built building which allows 24/7 access.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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MSc Environmental Governance critically analyses some of the key environmental challenges of our time, exploring the connections between environmental governance and policies and the production, distribution and consumption of resources. Read more

MSc Environmental Governance critically analyses some of the key environmental challenges of our time, exploring the connections between environmental governance and policies and the production, distribution and consumption of resources.

The course will develop your ability to apply sophisticated, critical and interdisciplinary sustainability and environmental theories at multiple scales and in different geographical contexts.

As part of the course, you'll have the unique opportunity to collaborate and engage with cutting-edge researchers and world-leading experts on environmental governance, political ecology, Marxist political economy and urban sustainability. You will learn from real-world practitioners, and liaise with external organisations on live policy problems.

This makes MSc Environmental Governance an ideal choice for:

  • future leaders interested in pursuing a career in environmental policy regulation and urban sustainable management
  • those wishing to develop further their academic career by pursuing a PhD
  • environmental professionals wishing to deepen their knowledge.

Aims

  • Interdisciplinary and sophisticated academic rigour: The course is highly interdisciplinary, exposing you to ideas and practices developed in a range of subject areas such as geography, environmental studies, politics, economics and development studies, rather than one alone. Our curriculum covers theories and interdisciplinary practices of environmental governance and offers you a comprehensive introduction to how human-use of the non-human world is organised at multiple scale and what the effects of this are.
  • Inclusive and collaborative research environment : The degree offers collaboration with the internationally renowned Society-Environment Research Group (SERG) . This group involves more than ten researchers from the School of Environment, Education and Development , with distinguished records of theoretical, empirical and applied research in a range of geographical and environmental settings. This includes work on water and energy governance in Europe, Africa and South-East Asia; social, environmental and climate justice and equity in Central and Eastern Europe, smart cities and urban sustainability in the UK - to name but a few.
  • Knowledge transfer and employability : We combine training in theory and critical thinking with more practical and applied elements. Our range of `real world' practitioners gives you the opportunity to liaise with external organisations on live policy problems and enhance your employability.

Teaching and learning

Part-time Study

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director first and also seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

Eight taught units comprise two-thirds of the programme. The remainder of the programme consists of a 12,000 word dissertation on an approved topic. Typical course units comprise two hours a week of seminar or small-group work. Together these units involve a range of formative and summative assessments, including individual and group work, oral presentations and long essays, project work and reports. Coursework is designed to allow you to pursue your particular areas of interest. 

In the summer semester, you work independently to undertake dissertation work based on primary and/or secondary data, or else a more philosophical/theoretical dissertation. We encourage you develop research in collaboration with members of the Society and Environment Research Group and external organisations.

Course unit details

Core course units

  • Key Debates in Environmental Governance - Introduces the main (and often competing) approaches to environmental governance in play today, ranging from `free market environmentalism', environmental modernisation and ecological economics, to the `risk society' perspective and green governmentality.
  • Issues in Environmental Policy - Links theory and practice by focusing on different types of environmental policy measures (their logic, operation and outcomes), and is taught by way of real world case studies drawn from the research literature and the work of policy practitioners locally, nationally and globally.
  • Doing Environmental Research - Provides advanced research skills and encourages you to plan and design your dissertation/research review projects. The course introduces you to a range of both research and career options appropriate to the skills acquired on the course, including planning research projects and preparing and writing a detailed proposal for dissertation/research review.

Past dissertation projects

Every year we have a range of different dissertation topics that reflect students' research interests. For illustration, this list presents some past dissertation topics:

  • The Nature of Industrial Preservation: Mapping Gentrification in New Islington, Manchester
  • Exploring the (post)political nature of urban climate change governance: a study of Manchester: A Certain Future
  • Multi-actor Partnership for Environmental Governance: An Investigation from the Perspective of Bangladesh
  • Transition Impossible? A Post-Political Analysis of the Transition Movement
  • Representation of Nature in Environmental Campaigns: The Visual Case of Greenpeace's #SavetheArctic Polar Bear
  • From government to governance in an age of austerity: an evaluation of new land management partnerships to fit a new economic era for the Peak District National Park
  • The urban commons and the scalar politics of climate activism
  • Manchester Certain Future Forum: Success of network partnerships in promoting sustainability behaviour change.

What our students say

"From the very start, I found all the staff extremely friendly and helpful. There was always someone to speak to, no matter what the problem - as someone who came into studying this subject from a very different undergraduate degree, this made my transition much easier. It also helped that the teaching staff have a real passion for the subject, which I found infectious and inspiring."

Oliver Gibbons, MSc Environmental Governance

Facilities

The Arthur Lewis Building provides excellent resources including analytical laboratories, studio facilities, workshops, seminar rooms, an on-site cafe and dedicated computer clusters including GIS facilities.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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The MA in Human Rights focuses on the pressing questions of human rights. Read more

The MA in Human Rights focuses on the pressing questions of human rights. Can there be space for human rights in world affairs? Who is responsible for the protection of human rights in world politics? These theoretical and practical concerns form the central focus of the degree and are addressed through the compulsory course units. This `standard route' course is designed for students for whom a taught MA will be a prelude to careers in fields related to government and non-governmental organisations, as well as teaching, journalism or any career where advanced knowledge of human rights coupled with an advanced capacity to communicate effectively will be an advantage. It will appeal particularly to those with an interest in the political, legal and ethical issues that arise from widespread human rights violations globally. The course provides students with an advanced, critical, interdisciplinary and systematic understanding of human rights issues within a global context. It is an interdisciplinary degree which allows student's exposure to developments in international politics, political theory, and law in order to better understand the complex global environment in which human rights claims are made.

Course Director: Dr Jamie M. Johnson

Tel: 0161 306 6929

Email: 

Teaching and learning

IMPORTANT NOTE ON PART-TIME STUDY

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.  

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.  

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director.

Facilities

The School of Social Sciences is now based in a brand new purpose-built building which allows 24/7 access.

Dedicated area in the atrium with computer terminals

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Successful graduates go into careers in Academia, the Civil Service, Journalism, the NGO sector, and wide range of related positions in both the public and private sectors among others.



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The LLM Transnational Dispute Resolution allows you to develop advanced knowledge of the rules and procedures along which international and transnational disputes are settled. Read more
The LLM Transnational Dispute Resolution allows you to develop advanced knowledge of the rules and procedures along which international and transnational disputes are settled.

The course focuses on the contemporary rules, procedures and practices of international courts and tribunals, including the International Court of Justice, interstate and mixed arbitration tribunals, investment dispute resolution mechanisms like International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID), or World Trade Organisation (WTO) dispute settlement mechanisms. It also deals with mechanisms allowing the settlement of disputes which are of a hybrid nature, partly international, partly domestic.

You will gain a command of the techniques of argumentation before domestic, regional and international tribunals, as well as critical tools to understand, apprehend and analyse the politics and the dynamics of international dispute resolution mechanisms.

Aims

The LLM in Transnational Dispute Resolution provides students with a command of the techniques of argumentation before domestic, regional and international tribunals, advanced knowledge of the rules and procedures along which international and transnational disputes are settled, as well as critical tools to understand, apprehend and analyse the politics and the dynamics of international and transnational disputes.

Special features

This course offers the strongest students the opportunity of an internship with a renowned law firm or international organisation.

Teaching and learning

The course is based on small-group, seminar-style teaching by our research-active teaching staff as well as invited external experts and renowned practitioners.

This master's degree is offered part time to allow those with a professional occupation to follow the course.

Coursework and assessment

Most course units are assessed by standard methods - either one unseen written examination, or one coursework essay, or a combination of these two methods of assessment. The assessment method of each individual course unit is listed in the course unit description on The School of Law website.

The course has a compulsory research component, in which students have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). If students choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research paper must be within the area of a semester two course unit that you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve students' legal writing and research skills. For specialised streams, dissertation topic must be within those streams while for general LLM dissertation topics must be within one of the modules chosen by the student.

Career opportunities

This highly relevant LLM offers you career opportunities with states, government agencies, international courts and tribunals, law firms and multinational corporations who are looking for lawyers with international and transnational dispute resolution.

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You would like to study the legal and political issues surrounding human rights in a top UK institution with world class research facilities. Read more
  • You would like to study the legal and political issues surrounding human rights in a top UK institution with world class research facilities
  • You want to work with dedicated staff and an internationally diverse peer group who share a passion for advancing human rights
  • You are interested in the theoretical issues around human rights and gaining hands-on experience via a placement

Can there be space for human rights in world affairs? Who is responsible for the protection of human rights in world politics? These theoretical and practical concerns form the central focus of the programme and are addressed through the compulsory course units.

This 'standard route' course is designed for students for whom a taught MA will be a prelude to careers in fields related to government and non-governmental organisations, as well as teaching, journalism or any career where advanced knowledge of human rights coupled with an advanced capacity to communicate effectively will be an advantage.

It will appeal particularly to those with an interest in the political and ethical issues that arise from widespread human rights violations globally. The course provides students with an advanced, critical, interdisciplinary and systematic understanding of human rights issues within a global context. It is an interdisciplinary degree which allows student's exposure to developments in international politics, political theory, and law in order to better understand the complex global environment in which human rights claims are made.

Teaching and learning

IMPORTANT NOTE ON PART-TIME STUDY

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.  

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.  

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is by class presentations, essays and 12-15,000 word dissertation.

Facilities

The School of Social Sciences is now based in a brand new purpose-built building which allows 24/7 access.

Dedicated area in the atrium with computer terminals

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Successful graduates go into careers in Academia, the Civil Service, Journalism, the NGO sector, and wide range of related positions in both the public and private sectors among others.



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You would like to learn from the greatest concentration of Elections scholars in the country. You want to access teaching based on high quality data from the prestigious British Election Study that we run. Read more
  • You would like to learn from the greatest concentration of Elections scholars in the country
  • You want to access teaching based on high quality data from the prestigious British Election Study that we run
  • You are interested in cutting edge research-led teaching by internationally renowned specialists in the area of elections and democratic engagement

The democracy and elections pathway will appeal to students interested in aspects of formal and informal politics, party and non-party engagement, the elected and electors and in the relationship between the process of government and the normative foundations of democracy.

Teaching and learning

IMPORTANT NOTE ON PART-TIME STUDY

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.  

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.  

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



Read less
You would like to learn from the greatest concentration of Elections scholars in the country. You want to access teaching based on high quality data from the prestigious British Election Study, which we run. Read more
  • You would like to learn from the greatest concentration of Elections scholars in the country
  • You want to access teaching based on high quality data from the prestigious British Election Study, which we run
  • You are interested in strong methods training, which makes all the difference for future employability and future study

The democracy and elections pathway will appeal to students interested in aspects of formal and informal politics, party and non-party engagement, the elected and electors and in the relationship between the process of government and the normative foundations of democracy.

Teaching and learning

IMPORTANT NOTE ON PART-TIME STUDY

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over two years.  There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme.  

You must first check the schedule of the compulsory modules and then select your optional modules to suit your requirements.  

Updated timetable information will be available from mid-August and you will have the opportunity to discuss your module choices during induction week with your Course Director

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



Read less
This multidisciplinary degree course focuses on response to crises originating from both conflict-zones and natural disasters. Read more

This multidisciplinary degree course focuses on response to crises originating from both conflict-zones and natural disasters. Bringing together the study of medicine and humanities, the course provides an inclusive approach that mirrors the reality of aid operations and informs the reflexive processes of both analytical and applied disciplines. Students will be able to draw synergies from an exceptionally wide breadth of disciplinary traditions and research expertise.

Aims

1. Provide critical insights into competing perspectives on how Humanitarianism and Conflict Responses can be understood, analysed and explained - from both an historiographic and contemporary viewpoint.

2. Develop analytical skills in critically evaluating the idea of humanitarianism and the ways that responses to conflict are organised, justified and implemented. This includes competency in developing a reasoned argument, critically considering data sources and defending different approaches.

3. Develop skills in gathering, organising and using evidence and information from a wide variety of sources. This will be complemented by guidance on how best to manage workloads and obtain research materials.

4. Enable students to apply research skills to a relevant research area.

Intended learning outcomes of the programme

Students should be able to show a critical understanding of :

1. Key issues and debates in Humanitarianism and Conflict Response, familiarity with different theoretical approaches, practical problems and an appreciation of the diversity of policies at international and national levels.

2. Both the range of social science topics associated with Humanitarianism and Conflict Response and the normative and historiographic assumptions which underpin these issues.

3. The analytical and policy literature concerning the related issues of the causes of conflict, reconstruction, ethics and international governance structures and institutions, the role and perspectives of the state, multilateral and bilateral agencies, international and domestic NGOs and other civil institutions.

4. A detailed and extensive understanding of a specific conceptual and/or policy-related area of Humanitarianism and Conflict Response, of the implications and limitations of research findings on this subject; and of how to produce an original piece of academic research, all through their dissertation.

Special features

HCRI at The University of Manchester is inspired by the need to conduct rigorous research and to support postgraduate training on the impact and outcomes of contemporary and historical crises. Directed by Dr Rony Brauman (former President of MSF France, Associate Professor at L'Institut d'Études Politiques, Paris, and Director of Research at the MSF Foundation, Paris), HCRI is widely recognised as being a leading international research institute focusing on the study of humanitarianism, conflict response and peacebuilding.

Our work is driven by a desire to inform and support policy and decision makers, to optimise joint working between partner organisations, and to foster increased understanding and debate within the field. Bringing together the disciplines of medicine and the humanities (including international relations and political science) to achieve these goals, HCRI aims to facilitate improvements in crisis response on a global scale whilst providing a centre of excellence for all concerned with emergencies, conflicts and peace. In offering a range of postgraduate courses we embrace this opportunity to develop a scholarly and professional agenda for humanitarians and peacebuilders around the world.

Teaching and learning

View the course handbook to see details of the current unit options.

Coursework and assessment

This will vary from course unit to unit.

Course unit details

Course units may include:

  • Humanitarianism and conflict response: inquiries
  • Emergency humanitarian assistance
  • Fundamentals of epidemiology
  • Humanitarian responses to crises: case studies
  • The history of humanitarian aid
  • Research & evaluation methods
  • Global health
  • The Arab revolts and post-revolutionary state formation
  • Anthropology of violence
  • Performance in theory and practice
  • The ethics of killing
  • Ethics in world politics
  • Conflict analysis
  • Democracy: theory & practice
  • Reconstruction and development
  • Global governance

Career opportunities

As a hard-working, ambitious Manchester postgraduate, a wide range of exciting careers are within your reach. Students at the Humanitarian and Conflict Response Institute come from a broad range of backgrounds, with varying levels of experience. Many who already have work experience will be able to harness the knowledge gained from their course to progress within their field of expertise, reaching senior roles in government and non-governmental organisations. Others will be able to use the course as a starting point to progress onto careers within NGOs, HR consultancies, financial institutions, academic institutions and more. Whatever your level of experience, you can access support from your tutors, the University Careers Service and an extensive alumni network to boost your career prospects further than ever before whilst at Manchester.

Associated organisations

A close link has been formed with the humanitarian organisation Médecins Sans Frontières. Recipient of the 1999 Nobel Prize, it delivers emergency aid in over 60 countries to people affected by armed conflict, epidemics, natural or man-made disasters or exclusion from healthcare through its staff of 25,000 health professionals, logistics experts and administrators. The HCRI is also building a network of associate fellows based in relevant organisations and academic institutions around the world.



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This interdisciplinary MA explores the processes through which actors have attempted to define and build peace in areas affected by war and violence, particularly since the end of the Cold War. Read more

This interdisciplinary MA explores the processes through which actors have attempted to define and build peace in areas affected by war and violence, particularly since the end of the Cold War. Drawing on expertise from the fields of history, politics, anthropology and the arts, this newly revamped course will offer students the opportunity to engage with conflict management, conflict resolution, conflict transformation, peacebuilding and statebuilding theories and practices.

 Moreover, the programme will critically address the conceptualization of peace and the implementation of peacebuilding projects by global, regional, national and local actors, including the UN, the International Financial Institutions, development agencies and donors, INGOs, and local organisations in conflict-affected environments. In particular, it will focus on social agency for peace, the question of the nature of the `peaceful state', and the ever-fraught question of the reform of the international system. The dynamics of these various contributions to peace will be the focus of a guided engagement, via local partner organisations, with the range of peace and conflict management actors present in either Bosnia Herzegovina or Cyprus (in Semester II).

Aims

Students will be able to show a critical understanding of:

1. Key issues and debates related to the theories of peace and practices of peacebuilding, statebuilding, conflict management, resolution, and transformation. They will become familiar with the range of international actors and organisations, their policies and practices, and their pros and cons.

2. The range of social science topics that influence peacebuilding, statebuilding, conflict management, etc., (including political, historical, anthropological understandings of peace and related programming strategies). Students will become familiar with the methodological and normative underpinnings of these disciplines.

3. The analytical and policy literature concerning peacebuilding, international governance structures, statebuilding, and the role of key actors and institutions including NGOs and military and other security actors. Concurrently, students will be able to evaluate the theory and policy tools in the context of the recent history of peacebuilding and statebuilding since the end of the Cold War, in a range of examples, including across the Balkans, Cambodia, Timor Leste, Cyprus, Northern Ireland, Afghanistan, the recent and various Arab Revolts, and others.

4. An understanding of local approaches to peacebuilding, including an awareness of the problems and critiques associated with `bottom up' approaches. Students will examine current debates on the nature of everyday peace and hybrid forms of peace, related questions about `local agency' and forms of resistance, activism, and social mobilisation.

5. Students will experience the on-the-ground realities of peacebuilding and statebuilding through a guided research visit to the range of actors involved in Bosnia-Herzegovina or Cyprus. This will form a key part of one of the core modules of the programme and will be run in association with local partners.

6. The development of a range of academic and professional/transferrable skills through both independent and group-based work.

7. A detailed understanding of a specific conceptual and/or policy-related area of peacebuilding along with the implications and limitations of research findings on this subject, and of how to produce an original piece of academic research. This will be delivered via the dissertation.

Special features

The Institute is developing a novel configuration for research and teaching which will uniquely associate practitioners, non-governmental organisation (NGO) partners, theoreticians, policy makers and analysts in sustained intellectual engagement. Combining a targeted programme of research with the provision of timely analysis on current emergencies and conflicts, the institute will seek to develop new methodologies in the emerging field of humanitarian and conflict response research.

Additional voluntary workshops and events throughout the year further enhance study including:

   The evidence of objects, a trip to the Imperial War Museum (North)

   Other Case Briefings (e.g., Cyprus, Arab Uprisings)

   Policy Sessions: UN system and INGOs (Professor Dan Smith, International Alert)

   Manchester Peace and Social Justice Walk

   Working with Governments (Professor Dan Smith, International Alert)

   Regular `Leading Voices' workshops, with key thinkers in the field

Students studying this programme will also benefit from possible additional activities, such as:

   Student organised trips to London (International Alert ), New York (UN/IPA ) and Brussels

   Case Study Internships

   Attendance at the annual Peacebuilding conference in Manchester and potential participation in student panels.

Teaching and learning

Delivery of the course will take a range of forms, including lectures, seminars, tutorials, directed reading, a guided walk, a museum trip, a field trip and independent study. Much of the delivery will be problem based/enquiry based learning.

This MA will be influenced and informed by the research of both staff and postgraduate research students at the Institute including research projects on:

  •    Political space in the aid industry
  •    Local/hybrid approaches to peacebuilding
  •    The contribution of BRICS nations to peace and security programming
  •    Critical peace studies
  •    The role of the state in peace and security programming
  •    Ethnographic approaches to understanding violence
  •    Refugees and internally displaced persons
  •    The political economy of conflict
  •    Performance in conflict and disaster zones
  •    Historical analyses of aid

Career opportunities

 Students completing this MA may consider a wide range of career choices, including careers with:

  • Civil Service (working within various government ministries, including the foreign office, international development office)
  • International Institutions (such as the UN Peacebuilding Commission, Department of Peacekeeping Operations and regional bodies such as the European Union, African Union, Organization of American States)
  • NGOs (local and international) working on peacebuilding initiatives
  • Academia/Research Institutes/Think-Tanks


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MSc International Development. Development Management analyses the management, planning and policymaking aspects of the development process. Read more

MSc International Development: Development Management analyses the management, planning and policymaking aspects of the development process.

The course is designed for social science graduates, or for those working in institutions involved in the management of development activities in developing countries, such as central and local government, parastatal organisations, nongovernmental organisations and multilateral or bilateral aid agencies.

It aims to blend theory and practice and seeks to explain policy behaviour through an integrated approach, drawing on a range of disciplinary perspectives.

The course is ideal if you're looking to acquire the practical skills to manage development interventions in an increasingly challenging field.

Aims

  • Provide an opportunity for you to deepen your understanding of management, planning and policy-making in economic, social and political spheres of development.
  • Provide you with a thorough conceptual framework and the skills necessary to analyse effectively the relationships between development management and development processes.
  • Develop professionally-oriented skills related to formulating, investigating and implementing different forms of development management.
  • Provide a wide range of options for advanced training in areas of specialist expertise relevant to development and management.
  • Develop advanced competencies in transferable areas, including developing reasoned arguments, gathering, organising and using evidence and information from a wide variety of sources, undertaking both team-based and independent work to deadlines, and both written and verbal forms of communication.
  • Assist you in developing your specialist area of expertise within development management, and applying your understanding and skills through supervised individual research culminating in a dissertation.

Informal enquiries, prior to application, are welcomed. Please contact Dr Nicholas Jepson, Deputy Programme Director (    ).

Special features

An overseas field visit is an integral part of the programme. The cost of the visit is covered by the course fee. Recent fieldtrip locations have included Uganda, Ghana, Sri Lanka and India.

Countries to be visited may change their immigration and visa regulations at short notice. We cannot guarantee that where visas are required for the field course, they will be granted. Planning will ensure that, in the unlikely event this occurs, affected students are not academically disadvantaged.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director and seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

The taught elements of the programme, carrying 120 credits overall is continuously assessed by a variety of methods (project based reports, essays), involving largely individual submissions, but also elements of group work.

Participants must also complete a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice approved by the Programme Directors. Students are encouraged to base their dissertations on topics of direct professional concern to themselves.

Facilities

The Arthur Lewis Building provides excellent resources including analytical laboratories, studio facilities, workshops, seminar rooms, an on-site cafe and dedicated computer clusters including GIS facilities.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This course will prepare you for employment in a range of development-related fields, including research, policy and practice. A wide range of transferable skills will be developed, including analytical and professional skills. Many of our alumni have gone onto careers in public service, the NGO/charitable and private sectors at national and international levels, as policy officers, managers, consultants or development practitioners - while others have pursued further academic study leading to a PhD and academic careers. Since its foundation, the Global Development Institute (GDI) has trained over 7000 individuals from 170 different countries.



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MSc International Development. Poverty, Conflict and Reconstruction examines contemporary and established analytical and conceptual frameworks relating to poverty, conflict analysis and the reconstruction of conflict and disaster-affected societies. Read more

MSc International Development: Poverty, Conflict and Reconstruction examines contemporary and established analytical and conceptual frameworks relating to poverty, conflict analysis and the reconstruction of conflict and disaster-affected societies.

The course looks at policies and practices, by which individuals, communities and organisations seek to reduce poverty, understand conflict and initiate humanitarian interventions.

It is therefore ideal if you'd like to learn more about poverty and conflict, are intrigued by the reconstruction of conflict- and disaster-affected societies, and are interested in the policies and practices used to reduce poverty.

Informal enquiries, prior to application, are welcomed. Please contact Dr Nicholas Jepson, Deputy Programme Director (  ).

Aims

  • Provide you with an opportunity to deepen your critical understanding of key theoretical and practical issues relating to poverty analysis and reduction, conflict analysis and reconstruction;
  • Provide you with a thorough conceptual framework and the skills necessary to critically analyse key theoretical and practical issues relating to poverty, conflict and reconstruction and make judgements about related policies and their implementation;
  • Provide critical insights into the key strategies, policies and practices currently employed to promote development and poverty reduction
  • Develop professionally-oriented skills related to formulating, investigating and implementing different practical approaches to poverty, conflict and reconstruction;
  • Provide a wide range of options for advanced training in areas of specialist expertise relevant to poverty, conflict and reconstruction;
  • Develop advanced competencies in transferable areas, including developing reasoned arguments, gathering, organising and using evidence and information from a wide variety of sources, undertaking both team-based and independent work to deadlines, and both written and verbal forms of communication
  • Assist you in developing your specialist area of expertise within the field of poverty, conflict and reconstruction, and applying your understanding and skills through supervised individual research culminating in a dissertation.

Special features

An overseas field visit is an integral part of the programme. The cost of the visit is covered by the course fee. Recent fieldtrip locations have included Uganda, Ghana, Sri Lanka and India.

Countries to be visited may change their immigration and visa regulations at short notice. We cannot guarantee that where visas are required for the field course, they will be granted. Planning will ensure that, in the unlikely event this occurs, affected students are not academically disadvantaged.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director and seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

The taught elements of the programme, carrying 120 credits overall is continuously assessed by a variety of methods (project based reports, essays), involving largely individual submissions, but also elements of group work.

Participants must also complete a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice approved by the Programme Directors. Students are encouraged to base their dissertations on topics of direct professional concern to themselves.

Facilities

The Arthur Lewis Building provides excellent resources including analytical laboratories, studio facilities, workshops, seminar rooms, an on-site cafe and dedicated computer clusters including GIS facilities.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This course will prepare you for employment in a range of development-related fields, including research, policy and practice. A wide range of transferable skills will be developed, including analytical and professional skills. Many of our alumni have gone onto careers in public service, the NGO/charitable and private sectors at national and international levels, as policy officers, managers, consultants or development practitioners - while others have pursued further academic study leading to a PhD and academic careers. Since its foundation, the Global Development Institute has trained over 7000 individuals from 170 different countries.



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MSc International Development. Poverty, Inequality and Development is designed to help you understand and tackle the problems of poverty and inequality in a critical and constructive way. Read more

MSc International Development: Poverty, Inequality and Development is designed to help you understand and tackle the problems of poverty and inequality in a critical and constructive way.

The current impoverishment of more than 1.4 billion people, plus the growing levels of inequality at national and international levels, present the world with its greatest moral challenge.

You will learn about the different conceptualisations and characteristics of poverty and inequality through high-level academic training from leading academics, in a vibrant and stimulating environment.

Informal enquiries, prior to application, are welcomed. Please contact Dr Nicholas Jepson, Deputy Programme Director (  ).

Aims

  • Provide critical insights into different theoretical and disciplinary perspectives on how poverty, inequality and development can be understood, measured and explained
  • Provide you with a thorough conceptual framework and the skills necessary to critically analyse key theoretical and practical issues relating to poverty, inequality and development;
  • Provide critical insights into the key strategies, policies and practices currently employed to promote development, equality and poverty reduction
  • Provide a wide range of options for advanced training in areas of specialist expertise relevant to poverty, inequality and development;
  • Develop advanced competencies in transferable areas, including developing reasoned arguments, gathering, organising and using evidence and information from a wide variety of sources, undertaking both team-based and independent work to deadlines, and both written and verbal forms of communication
  • Assist you in developing your specialist area of expertise within the field of poverty, inequality and development, and applying your understanding and skills through supervised individual research culminating in a dissertation.

Special features

An overseas field visit is an integral part of the programme. The cost of the visit is covered by the course fee. Recent fieldtrip locations have included Uganda, Ghana, Sri Lanka and India.

Countries to be visited may change their immigration and visa regulations at short notice. We cannot guarantee that where visas are required for the field course, they will be granted. Planning will ensure that, in the unlikely event this occurs, affected students are not academically disadvantaged.

Teaching and learning

Part-time Study

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director and seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

The taught elements of the programme, carrying 120 credits overall is continuously assessed by a variety of methods (project based reports, essays), involving largely individual submissions, but also elements of group work.

Participants must also complete a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice approved by the Programme Directors. Students are encouraged to base their dissertations on topics of direct professional concern to themselves.

Facilities

The Arthur Lewis Building provides excellent resources including analytical laboratories, studio facilities, workshops, seminar rooms, an on-site cafe and dedicated computer clusters including GIS facilities.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This course will prepare you for employment in a range of development-related fields, including research, policy and practice. A wide range of transferable skills will be developed, including analytical and professional skills. Many of our alumni have gone onto careers in public service, the NGO/charitable and private sectors at national and international levels, as policy officers, managers, consultants or development practitioners - while others have pursued further academic study leading to a PhD and academic careers. Since its foundation, GDI has trained over 7000 individuals from 170 different countries.



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