• University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • Queen Mary University of London Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
  • Arden University Featured Masters Courses
  • Loughborough University London Featured Masters Courses
  • Ulster University Featured Masters Courses
  • Loughborough University Featured Masters Courses
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
University of Bradford Featured Masters Courses
Barcelona Executive Business School Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
0 miles
Creative Arts & Design×

Masters Degrees in Poetry

Masters degrees in Poetry train postgraduates in the art of reading, constructing and analysing Poetry for critical and creative writing purposes.

Though courses are typically listed as MA (Master of Arts), some courses are primarily taught degrees, while others are essentially a Masters by research. Entry requirements normally include an undergraduate degree in a relevant subject such as English Language, Literature or Creative Writing.

Why study a Masters in Poetry?

Read more...

  • Creative Arts & Design×
  • Poetry×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 25
Order by 
Our Writing Poetry MA will develop your creative ability through practice, discussion and revision. You'll work with established poets and writers to refine your work. Read more
Our Writing Poetry MA will develop your creative ability through practice, discussion and revision. You'll work with established poets and writers to refine your work. You'll also consider the processes of writing and develop advanced editing skills.

Our flexible course allows you to enhance your writing and develop your practice. You'll receive expert tuition from distinguished and experienced poets and poetry teachers. You'll progress in a structured way, receiving formal recognition for your work.

You can choose to study either in Newcastle or London. Newcastle University leads the North East cohort. The London course is run in collaboration with The Poetry School.

The course is firmly rooted in the publishing, performing and promoting poetry world. You will work with established poets:
-Clare Pollard (London)
-Tamar Yoseloff (London)
-Tara Bergin (Newcastle)
-Bill Herbert (Newcastle)
-Sean O’Brien (Newcastle)
-Jacob Polley (Newcastle, Degree Programme Director)

You will also receive tuition from guest tutors. Our guest tutors are from The Poetry School and Newcastle University's teaching communities.

Both sites offer a wide range of opportunities and experiences, including:
-Digital projects and platforms
-Live events
-Collaborative projects
-Commissioning opportunities
-Competitions

By the end of the course, you will have:
-Advanced your creative ability through practice, discussion and revision
-An advanced awareness of the processes of writing in your own work and that of others
-A range of knowledge on the writing of poetry in English
-Knowledge of the professional world of writing and publishing
-The ability to edit and prepare poetry for submission and publication
-A sensitivity to verbal creativity
-An advanced ability to understand and judge the timing and duration of creative projects

Summer school

Each year both cohorts come together for a one week summer school. The summer school alternates between the two cities each year.

The summer schools will focus on professional skills related to:
-Creative writing teaching techniques
-The publishing industry and literary world
-Residency work
-Reviewing

The summer school also offers huge scope for innovation and working with other partners. This could include galleries, poetry films and the use of digital resources.

Newcastle

The Newcastle Centre for Literary Arts (NCLA) is home to a vibrant writing community. You can get involved with readings and events featuring poets, playwrights and novelists. Past guests include Carol Ann Duffy, Carolyn Forché and Seamus Heaney.

Through our Write Around the Toon project we also have a network of placements and partners. This enables you to collaborate, make new contacts and gain experience in the creative industries.

London

You'll study at the Poetry School in Lambeth, a short walk from Waterloo and the South Bank. The Saison Poetry Library, British libraries and London's central cultural hubs are nearby.

You'll have the opportunity to enrich your practice through The Poetry School's many collaborations. The Poetry School is embedded in the poetry world with links to other poetry and arts organisations. You'll be situated at the centre of a thriving poetry community.

A large and varied short course programme runs alongside the MA. You can choose to access these courses for a supplementary fee.

Delivery

We offer the course part time over 23 months, running from October to September.

You can choose to study in either Newcastle or London. All classes are in the evening if studying at Newcastle and during the day in London.

As well as attending weekly classes, you'll take part in our one week summer schools.

Read less
On our new MA in Poetry and Poetics you will have the opportunity to read widely and deeply in poetry and ideas about poetry from the classical period to the present day. Read more
On our new MA in Poetry and Poetics you will have the opportunity to read widely and deeply in poetry and ideas about poetry from the classical period to the present day. The language of the course, and of many of the poets studied, will be English, but you will also study poetry from a variety of linguistic cultures, and in a wide range of historical contexts. Seminars on the MA will focus on the intensive - and highly-pleasurable - reading of poems and poets, in dialogue with academic staff who have published on many major authors and periods: classical poetics, medieval literature, renaissance poetry, the Romantics and Victorians, and British, Irish and American contemporary writing. There will also be modules on old English poetry, symbolism, medieval poetic inheritances, the matter of British poetry, and poetry and art. You will develop excellent skills in reading poetry and enhance your knowledge of higher level poetics as well as the intricacies of poetic form.

The MA in Poetry and Poetics at York?

-The curriculum is international, placing issues of translation and cultural exchange at the heart of the study of poetry from classical to post-colonial poetics
-Our approach is cross-cultural as well as trans-historical, involving work between European languages, the UK and the USA
-You will focus on the poem and the poet, with an emphasis on theory and form
-You will be taught by research leaders in a wide variety of literary areas
-The wide foundation in poetry and aesthetics which it offers will equip you well for future careers in the culture industry
-It will also prepare you well for further research in this area

Assessment

-Four assessed essays of approximately 4,500 words each
-A 14,000-16,000 word dissertation, written in consultation with a supervisor on an agreed topic

Careers

We have an excellent employment record for our postgraduates who are highly prized by top level employers, both in the UK and on the international stage. A combination of outstanding teaching and a supportive collegiate environment enable our students to develop their creativity, intellectual independence and ability to filter complex information and present it persuasively in person and in writing. These are important transferable skills which will always hold their value at the top end of the jobs market.

Read less
Our taught MA pathway in Studies in Poetry offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise within this field. You can learn from the rich variety of research expertise in the Department and you also have the chance to concentrate on a particular area of literary study within the field. Read more
Our taught MA pathway in Studies in Poetry offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise within this field. You can learn from the rich variety of research expertise in the Department and you also have the chance to concentrate on a particular area of literary study within the field. Our commitment to research-led teaching means that students are able to explore the cutting edge of the discipline - from John Milton to Romantic forms of grief, to the study of modern poetry. We provide an intimate, dynamic and supportive environment for students of all backgrounds and nationalities.

Our programme offers up-to-date training in research methods and skills.

You will choose three modules, at least two of which are from within the pathway, and you will write a dissertation on a subject related to studies in poetry.

An MA in Studies in Poetry is often the platform for further research at PhD level, as well as providing an excellent grounding for jobs in education, the arts and the media.

Course Structure

If you choose to take this named pathway, you will be expected to select at least two modules from those available within the pathway and to write your dissertation in an area related to it. Your third optional module may, if you wish, be chosen from the full list of MA modules on offer in the Department. Students may, with permission, take one module from other modules on offer elsewhere in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities. All students must take the core Research Methods and Resources module and the dissertation alongside their three optional modules.

Core Modules

-Research Methods and Resources
-Dissertation

Optional Modules

Typical modules might include:
-Warrior Poets in Heroic Societies
-John Milton: Life, Works and Influence
-Lyric Poetry of the English Renaissance and Reformation
-Romantic Forms of Grief
-Second Generation Romantic Poetry
-Women in Victorian Poetry and Painting
-Modern Poetry
-The Writing of Poetry

Modules are subject to staff availability and normally no more than five of the above will run in any one year.

For more detail on individual modules see https://www.dur.ac.uk/postgraduate.modules/module_search/?search_dept=ENGL&search_level=-1

Please use the 'additional comments' section of the application form to indicate your choice of modules as well as to provide a personal statement.

Learning and Teaching

One of the distinctive features of the Durham MA in Literary Studies is that it permits both a broad-based, eclectic study of literary topics from the earliest periods of literature to the present and the possibility of specialisation through designated pathways in such areas as Medieval and Renaissance Studies or Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Studies. All students take 3 optional modules, taught in small seminar groups of up to 10, with each module generating 18 hours of contact time (9 seminars x 2 hours) over the academic year. A strong emphasis is placed on independent research, and seminars usually involve a considerable amount of preparation, including short presentations and workshop activities. Assessment for these modules is usually by coursework essay.

All students also register for the Research Methods and Resources module, which generates an additional 20 hours of contact time over the academic year. Again, a strong emphasis is given to independent research. Both pieces of assessed written work for the Research Methods and Resources module involve significant preparation for the MA dissertation (and in some cases for doctoral study later on). The MA dissertation is supported by 3.5 hours of dedicated individual supervision time. Drafts of the dissertation are read and commented upon by the supervisor. Each MA student is assigned an Academic Advisor who can guide and support her or his progress during the programme of study.

Throughout the taught MA degree programme, all students are strongly encouraged to participate in a lively series of staff-postgraduate research seminars, usually involving invited guest speakers from the UK and beyond.

International applications

We welcome applications from holders of international qualifications. For advice on the equivalency of international qualifications, please contact our International Office ()

Read less
This programme enables promising poets to develop the potential of poetry as a tool of inquiry within the humanities. You will produce a volume of poetry as well as a piece of scholarly research of 30-40,000 words. Read more
This programme enables promising poets to develop the potential of poetry as a tool of inquiry within the humanities.

You will produce a volume of poetry as well as a piece of scholarly research of 30-40,000 words. Given its emphasis on poetic practice as research into the possibilities and potential for contemporary poetry, the programme integrates with the aims and objectives of the Centre for Modern Poetry allowing for joint supervision between the two centres. Cross-faculty work on modern poetry with colleagues in the School of European Culture and Languages is also encouraged. The programme acknowledges the fact that poetry has historically understood itself as an art, consciously informed by research.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/235/poetry-text-practice-research

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Study support

You meet regularly with your supervisor, and have the opportunity to take part in informal reading groups and research seminars to which students, staff and visiting speakers contribute papers. You also benefit from a series of research skills seminars that run in the spring term, which gives you a chance to share the research expertise of staff and postdoctoral members of the department.

As a basis for advanced research, you must take the School and Faculty research methods programmes.

- Postgraduate resources

The Templeman Library is well stocked with excellent research resources, as are Canterbury Cathedral Archives and Library. There are a number of special collections: the John Crow Collection of Elizabethan and other early printed texts; the Reading/Raynor Collection of theatre history (over 7,000 texts or manuscripts); ECCO (Eighteenth-Century Collections Online); the Melville manuscripts relating to popular culture in the 19th and early 20th centuries; the Pettingell Collection (over 7,500 items) of 19th-century drama; the Eliot Collection; children’s literature; and popular literature. A gift from Mrs Valerie Eliot has increased the Library’s already extensive holdings in modern poetry. The British Library in London is also within easy reach.

Besides the Templeman Library, School resources include photocopying, fax and telephone access, support for attending and organising conferences, and a dedicated postgraduate study space equipped with computer terminals and a printer.

- Conferences and seminars

Our research centres organise many international conferences, symposia and workshops. The School also plays a pivotal role in the Kent Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, of which all graduates are associate members. The Institute hosts interdisciplinary conferences, colloquia, and other events, and establishes international links for all Kent graduates through its network with other advanced institutes worldwide.

School of English postgraduate students are encouraged to organise and participate in a conference which takes place in the summer term. This provides students with the invaluable experience of presenting their work to their peers.

The School runs several series of seminars, lectures and readings throughout the academic year. Our weekly research seminars are organised collaboratively by staff and graduates in the School. Speakers range from our own postgraduate students, to members of staff, to distinguished lecturers who are at the forefront of contemporary research nationally and internationally.

The Centre for Creative Writing hosts a very popular and successful weekly reading series; guests have included poets Katherine Pierpoint, Tony Lopez, Christopher Reid and George Szirtes, and novelists Abdulrazak Gurnah, Ali Smith, Marina Warner and Will Self.

The University of Kent is now in partnership with the Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA). Benefits from this affiliation include free membership for incoming students; embedded seminar opportunities at the ICA and a small number of internships for our students. The School of English also runs an interdisciplinary MA programme in the Contemporary which offers students an internship at the Institute of Contemporary Arts.

- Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. They also edit several periodicals including: Angelaki: Journal of the Theoretical Humanities; The Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature: 600-1500; The Dickensian; Literature Compass; Oxford Literary Review; Theatre Notebook and Wasafiri.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Read less
Our new MA in Poetry provides the unique opportunity to study historical and contemporary poetic practices while studying in London, the heart of the nation’s creative industries. Read more
Our new MA in Poetry provides the unique opportunity to study historical and contemporary poetic practices while studying in London, the heart of the nation’s creative industries. The programme offers a distinctive mix of specialised attention to the genre of poetry, the chance to develop your own poetic practice, and arranged work placements within the cultural and creative sector.

Drawing on the resources and expertise of Queen Mary’s Centre for Poetry, the programme is flexible and genuinely interdisciplinary. You will be able to pursue your own analytical and creative projects, driven by the work you’ll do on an extensive list of optional modules from Schools across the College. Modules allow you to pursue topics as diverse as modernist poetry; sociolinguistics; or art and the geography of the city. The programme’s flexibility prepares you for doctoral study, or allows you to pursue careers in the creative or cultural sectors. You will also have opportunities to deepen your own poetic practice.

On this pathway you will:
- Explore historic and contemporary theoretical and critical approaches to the study of poetry
- Pursue interdisciplinary approaches to poetry through choosing from a wide selection of modules offered in English, Languages, Linguistics, Film, Geography, and History
- Undertake a placement with a literary or cultural organisation, a publisher, an educational institution, or a community group
- Work alongside leading academics and contemporary poets
- Develop advanced skills in argumentation, analysis, and independent inquiry.

Read less
Humber’s Creative Writing – Fiction, Creative Non-Fiction, Poetry graduate certificate program is a distance studio program offering aspiring writers the exceptional opportunity to work at home. Read more
Humber’s Creative Writing – Fiction, Creative Non-Fiction, Poetry graduate certificate program is a distance studio program offering aspiring writers the exceptional opportunity to work at home. There are no formal classes on site. Individual courses are offered in a non-traditional way with a distinguished faculty member critiquing your work of creative non-fiction, fiction, book of short stories or volume of poetry. The program is intended for students working on book-length projects. The program is customized to address the particular needs of your manuscript and may include assessments of your handling of plot, story, character, dialogue, pace and style, or may focus on the particular needs of the manuscript as determined by the writing advisor. Graduates have the satisfaction of completing a large body of work which may include all or parts of a novel, volume of short stories or a book of poetry. Students are also referred to writing competitions.

Humber is noted for its exceptional faculty including authors of world stature. This faculty list has included Edward Albee, Martin Amis, Peter Carey, Miriam Toews, David Mitchell, Nino Ricci, David Adams Richards, the late Timothy Findley, Paul Quarrington, the late Carol Shields and Alistair MacLeod. Forthcoming international authors include Samantha Harvey and Tim O’Brien.

A virtual café exists through Blackboard, Humber’s online learning system, to encourage writing students to interact and build a sense of community.

Course detail

Upon successful completion of the program, a graduate will:

• Analyze personal and recognized works of fiction and creative non-fiction for form and structure and delineate story features such as conflict, crisis and resolution. Students should be able to differentiate between story and plot and compare various types of conflict used in story writing. Students will explore various methods of plotting a work of fiction such as working backward from the climax, working forward from the initial interaction or borrowing from tradition.

• Distinguish the qualities of short stories versus novels.

• Evaluate personal and recognized works of fiction for the inclusion of techniques used in creative writing for making narrative an emotional experience. These techniques include the use of significant detail, active voice, and strategies for establishing cadence, rhythm and prose. In addition, students will be expected to be masters of the mechanics of writing and demonstrate the correct use of spelling, punctuation and grammar.

• Assess personal and recognized works of fiction for characterization and the techniques used for establishing character credibility and complexity. Students will explore how character motivation is revealed and how characters are presented both directly and indirectly.
• Outline and compare personal and recognized methods for establishing setting and atmosphere in stories as well as techniques used for adjusting narrative time.

• Critique and manipulate the point of view in personal and recognized stories. In their development of point of view, students will develop strategies for deciding who is speaking in their stories and whom they are addressing. In addition, they will determine which techniques best convey the story and determine the best distance between the reader, author and characters. An analysis of point of view also includes the use of spatial and temporal distance and how to include unreliable speakers in the story.

• Evaluate the methods used for developing the theme in personal and recognized stories. They will explore how theme helps dictate the selection and organization of details, style, voice and other elements of the work.

• Evaluate personal and recognized works of fiction and creative non-fiction for unity of effect.

• Recognize and revise weak spots in their writing. They will explore common errors and the technical questions writers should ask themselves as they review and revise their work and apply them to an analysis of plot, characterization, style, setting, narration, dialogue, point of view, structure, clarity, length and originality.

• Conduct the required research to authenticate their story and make it come alive. They will be able to select and use a variety of research methods such as the internet, the library, interviews and site visits.

• Evaluate personal and recognized works of poetry for the poetic tools used to shape and focus ideas and feelings and to create texture and vividness in a poem. These techniques include: devise for rhythm; devices for sound; stanza and poem forms; and imagery and figures of speech.

• Develop a plan for marketing their creative writing and handling the business requirements of being a writer. This will include researching the needs and demands of the market, preparing query letters and/or book proposals, identifying suitable publishers for their work, finding and working with agents, negotiating a contract, submitting their work in suitable formats, setting fees where appropriate, and keeping appropriate records. In addition, they will explore some of the legal aspects of being a writer such as copyright and libel. Students will also develop an awareness of writing awards and competitions as well as writer support programs.

• Identify opportunities to publish freelance works of fiction and creative non-fiction to local, national and international magazines, newspapers, television, film, textbooks, and the Internet. This will include the analysis of the research and publication requirements of a variety of publishers, strategies for introducing ideas and personal works to various media and a thorough understanding of the features of freelance contracts. Students will prepare, review and submit works for freelance submissions.

• Evaluate the elements of successful professional writing careers and develop methods for promoting personal works and developing personal relationships with media contacts. This will include exploring ways to make public appearances and provide public readings of personal works. How to manage interviews and participate in a variety of media events will be examined. Public appearances and public speaking.

Modules

Semester 1
• WRIT 5001: Narrative Styles 1
• WRIT 5003: Character, Plot and Stylistic Development
• WRIT 5005: Editing for Publication 1
• WRIT 5007: Issues In Contemporary Writing
• WRIT 5009: Freelance Writing

Semester 2
• WRIT 5500: Narrative Styles 2
• WRIT 5501: Advance Character, Plot and Stylistic Development
• WRIT 5502: Editing for Publication 2
• WRIT 5503: The Business Of Writing
• WRIT 5504: The Writer and The Media

Your Career

Canadians still love a good read. They spend 14 percent of their leisure time reading, half of which is spent reading books. The main goal of the program is to improve your writing and publication is a possibility for some. Graduates of this program may use their writing and editing skills in a wide variety of careers and professions in addition to writing books. Some of our graduates write for newspapers, magazines, television and other media. More than 300 Humber School for Writers alumni have published books of fiction or poetry and Dr. Vincent Lam, who won the 2006 Scotiabank Giller Prize for his literary debut Bloodletting & Miraculous Cures, is just one of our distinguished former students. Other alumni have also been on the bestseller lists in Canada: Suzanne Desrochers for Bride of New France, Cathy Marie Buchanan for The Painted Girls and Eva Stachniak for Empress of the Night.

How to apply

Click here to apply: http://humber.ca/admissions/how-apply.html

Funding

For information on funding, please use the following link: http://humber.ca/admissions/financial-aid.html

Read less
Suitable for both poets and critics alike, the programme provides workshops and training for poets, alongside a critical grounding that facilitates further study of creative writing (poetry) at PhD level. Read more
Suitable for both poets and critics alike, the programme provides workshops and training for poets, alongside a critical grounding that facilitates further study of creative writing (poetry) at PhD level. It also provides specialist academic study for graduate students who wish to focus on poetry criticism at MA level and beyond, introducing them to the major poetry traditions of Ireland, Britain, and the US in terms of their formal properties and their critical, social, intellectual, and political contexts.

Read less
The MA in Poetry is for anyone who has been writing poetry for long enough to know that it is a vital part of his or her life, and who now wants to develop further, through expert guidance and in a committed group of like-minded peers. Read more
The MA in Poetry is for anyone who has been writing poetry for long enough to know that it is a vital part of his or her life, and who now wants to develop further, through expert guidance and in a committed group of like-minded peers.

A key part of UEA's world-renowned Creative Writing provision, the MA is taught by widely published and award-winning poets Tiffany Atkinson, Sophie Robinson and Denise Riley, and is closely linked with the innovative UEA Poetics Project.

At its core is the weekly workshop, a supportive but rigorous environment in which to test and refine your poetic technique. There's also a module on Describing Poetry and a diverse range of relevant options. You will have regular individual tutorials and receive detailed written feedback on your work, meet distinguished poets, editors and publishers, and develop a body of work close in length to a first collection.

Read less
Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Creative Writing at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Creative Writing at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Creative Writing is a unique programme that offers integrated training in the writing of literary and media text. The MA in Creative Writing is taught by prize-winning writers of fiction, poetry and drama who provide core training and individual pathways in the major genres of contemporary literary and media writing. Modules on the Creative Writing programme are taught through workshop sessions, group work and one-to-one mentoring between students and a tutor. Courses include the writing of prose fiction, poetry, drama, screenwriting and creative nonfiction. Writers and representatives from the arts world and the publishing industry are invited to address the MA Creative Writing group about creative work and publishing. We have strong links with Swansea’s Dylan Thomas Centre, which offers a lively programme of events throughout the year.

Key Features of the MA in Creative Writing

- The MA in Creative Writing is taught by experienced writers and offers a wide range of writing genres including fiction, short story, poetry, drama, screenwriting and creative non-fiction.

- Drama writing is a particular strength, including the relatively new and unexplored field of Dramaturgy.

- Regular play readings and students' dramatic writing is often performed by professional actors in the Rough Diamonds mini-festival in the summer.

- Creative Writers have a close relationship with National Theatre Wales and also open-mic poetry events at local venues such as the Dylan Thomas Centre and Howl.

- There is scope for work experience with local publishers.

- The writing programme has an online journal, The Swansea Review, and students write for The Siren, a student-run online journal, and The Waterfront student newspaper.

- Creative Writing students have free membership of Literature Wales, the national literature promotion agency.

- Students are involved in the annual Writers’ Day at the Dylan Thomas Centre, where they meet editors, agents, publishers and writers to discuss the ins and outs of publication and the craft of writing.

- Students are part of a vibrant community of writers and artists – Swansea, the birthplace of Dylan Thomas, having a fair claim to being Wales’s city of culture.

- The programme has connection with and experience of the unique literary culture of Wales, home to possibly the oldest (but still vibrant) bardic tradition in Europe.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Creative Writing typically include:

• Writing Fiction

• Writing Poetry

• Genre: Writing for Stage

• Creative Non-Fiction and Travel Writing

• Nature Writing

• Screenwriting

• Writing Radio Drama

• The Art of Short Story

• Writing the Self

• International Dramaturgy

Who should Apply?

Students or Professionals interested in Creative and Professional Writing. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD.

MA in Creative Writing Aims

- To offer students the chance to belong to a warmly supportive community of writers, passionate about their art.

- To give students the opportunity to discuss literary matters with agents, editors and publishers.

- To provide active participation in Swansea’s burgeoning literary scene and have students’ dramatic writing performed by professional actors at the Dylan Thomas Literature Centre.

- To offer research seminars presented by eminent creative writers and academics.

- To develop study and research skills in Creative Writing research and practice methodologies.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Creative Writing graduates. MA degree holders enter careers in professional and creative writing, publishing, education, global marketing and advertising, media, business, heritage and tourism, and performing arts. Some graduates go on to pursue further postgraduate study leading to a PhD and a career in Academia.

Student Quote

"Since graduating with an MA with Distinction in Creative Writing from Swansea University, I have published three collections of poetry, founded Grievous Jones Press, and begun lecturing in Creative Writing. In the near future I will finish my PhD in Creative Writing and have books forthcoming with Blackheath Books and Seren Books. The training, experience, and rigour of the Swansea MA in Creative Writing was invaluable for launching my career as a writer and publisher. Without the inspiration, guidance, and critique of the excellent faculty and peers, my own writing would not have grown and my flame for creation might have faltered."

David Oprava, Creative Writing, MA



Read less
Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Creative Writing (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Creative Writing (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Creative Writing is a unique programme that offers integrated training in the writing of literary and media text. The MA in Creative Writing is taught by prize-winning writers of fiction, poetry and drama who provide core training and individual pathways in the major genres of contemporary literary and media writing. Modules on the Creative Writing programme are taught through workshop sessions, group work and one-to-one mentoring between students and a tutor. Courses include the writing of prose fiction, poetry, drama, screenwriting and creative nonfiction. Writers and representatives from the arts world and the publishing industry are invited to address the MA Creative Writing group about creative work and publishing. We have strong links with Swansea’s Dylan Thomas Centre, which offers a lively programme of events throughout the year.

The Extended MA (EMA) in Creative Writing is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

Key Features of the MA in Creative Writing

- The MA in Creative Writing is taught by experienced writers and offers a wide range of writing genres including fiction, short story, poetry, drama, screenwriting and creative non-fiction.

- Drama writing is a particular strength, including the relatively new and unexplored field of Dramaturgy.

- Regular play readings and students' dramatic writing is often performed by professional actors in the Rough Diamonds mini-festival in the summer.

- Creative Writers have a close relationship with National Theatre Wales and also open-mic poetry events at local venues such as the Dylan Thomas Centre and Howl.

- There is scope for work experience with local publishers.

- The writing programme has an online journal, The Swansea Review, and students write for The Siren, a student-run online journal, and The Waterfront student newspaper.

- Creative Writing students have free membership of Literature Wales, the national literature promotion agency.

- Students are involved in the annual Writers’ Day at the Dylan Thomas Centre, where they meet editors, agents, publishers and writers to discuss the ins and outs of publication and the craft of writing.

- Students are part of a vibrant community of writers and artists – Swansea, the birthplace of Dylan Thomas, having a fair claim to being Wales’s city of culture.

- The programme has connection with and experience of the unique literary culture of Wales, home to possibly the oldest (but still vibrant) bardic tradition in Europe.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Creative Writing typically include:

• Writing Fiction

• Writing Poetry

• Genre: Writing for Stage

• Creative Non-Fiction and Travel Writing

• Nature Writing

• Screenwriting

• Writing Radio Drama

• The Art of Short Story

• Writing the Self

• International Dramaturgy

Who should Apply?

Students or Professionals interested in Creative and Professional Writing. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD.

MA in Creative Writing Aims

- To offer students the chance to belong to a warmly supportive community of writers, passionate about their art.

- To give students the opportunity to discuss literary matters with agents, editors and publishers.

- To provide active participation in Swansea’s burgeoning literary scene and have students’ dramatic writing performed by professional actors at the Dylan Thomas Literature Centre.

- To offer research seminars presented by eminent creative writers and academics.

- To develop study and research skills in Creative Writing research and practice methodologies.

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for Creative Writing graduates. MA degree holders enter careers in professional and creative writing, publishing, education, global marketing and advertising, media, business, heritage and tourism, and performing arts. Some graduates go on to pursue further postgraduate study leading to a PhD and a career in Academia.

Student Quote

"Since graduating with an MA with Distinction in Creative Writing from Swansea University, I have published three collections of poetry, founded Grievous Jones Press, and begun lecturing in Creative Writing. In the near future I will finish my PhD in Creative Writing and have books forthcoming with Blackheath Books and Seren Books. The training, experience, and rigour of the Swansea MA in Creative Writing was invaluable for launching my career as a writer and publisher. Without the inspiration, guidance, and critique of the excellent faculty and peers, my own writing would not have grown and my flame for creation might have faltered."

David Oprava, Creative Writing, MA



Read less
The principal aim of this course is to study the full range of Shakespeare’s dramatic and poetic works more closely and comprehensively than is possible at undergraduate level, while also allowing you to focus in depth on a single major play. Read more
The principal aim of this course is to study the full range of Shakespeare’s dramatic and poetic works more closely and comprehensively than is possible at undergraduate level, while also allowing you to focus in depth on a single major play.

A distinctive feature of the course is its close engagement with the works themselves and with what they say now about our world as well as what they reveal about Shakespeare’s.The critical, historical and theoretical issues raised by his plays and poetry are allowed to emerge out of your direct encounter with them, rather than being prescribed in advance as avenues of approach.

The MA is designed to provide you with both breadth of coverage and depth of focus, and the course is ideal whether you wish to pursue research at PhD level or simply wish to develop your knowledge of Shakespeare and your critical skills.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/english/coursefinder/mashakespeare.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The MA Shakespeare is unique in its detailed engagement with the full range of Shakespeare’s works.

- All members of staff are actively engaged in major research projects: the Department was awarded a 4* rating in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). This commitment to scholarly research means all our postgraduate courses are informed by the latest developments in literary studies.

- Our excellent library resources span the full range of English studies and you will also have access to the University of London Library at Senate House as well as the British Library and the many specialist libraries located in central London.

Department research and industry highlights

In the most recent RAE (2008), 90% of the work submitted by the Department was judged to be of international standard with 30% assessed as world-leading (4*), 35% as internationally excellent (3*) and 25% as internationally recognised (2*). The Department’s performance, in terms of 4* and 3* results, was ranked 11th equal. Overall, the Department was ranked one of the top three English Departments in London.

We have particular strengths in the following research areas:
- Medieval Studies
- Shakespeare and the Renaissance
- 17th and 18th Century Literature and Culture
- 19th Century Literature
- 20th Century Literature and Theory
- Postcolonialism
- Creative Writing and Practice-based Research.

Course content and structure

You will study the two core course units and complete a dissertation under the supervision of one of the course tutors.

Core course units:
The Works: Plays & Poetry
This unit spans Shakespeare’s entire career as a dramatist and poet. You will explore in detail, through close reading and class discussion, every kind of play he wrote and his greatest poetry, engaging throughout with the most important recent critical accounts of them. After focusing on the romantic comedies, the key history plays and the Sonnets, you will go on to explore the problem plays, the major tragedies and the haunting romances Shakespeare wrote at the end of his career.

King Lear: Critical Debate & Creative Response
This is an intensive study of Shakespeare’s supreme tragic masterpiece, the critical controversies it has provoked, and the diverse ways in which it has been adapted and transformed since Shakespeare’s time, on stage and on screen as well as in later fiction, poetry and drama.

Dissertation
The dissertation (12,000—15,000 words) is designed to test your ability to handle a complex topic and to display research skills at greater length than the course essays allow. It may develop work done for any part of either course unit, or be on any Shakespearean topic approved by your dissertation supervisor.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- a detailed, critical understanding of a wide range of works written by Shakespeare

- an advanced understanding of the critical controversies produced by King Lear from the eighteenth century to the present day; and its creative afterlife in fiction, poetry, drama and film

- evaluated relevant critical, theoretical and contextual research at the forefront of Shakespeare studies

- experience of independent literary research at an advanced level using traditional and electronic resources

- confidence in deploying the appropriate critical and technological skills required in this field of study.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by essays and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

The Department has an impressive record for placing graduates in academic jobs and in prominent positions outside academia. In the field of Shakespeare and Renaissance studies alone, our postgraduates have recently secured positions at the Universities of Edinburgh, Sussex and Leeds, Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre and the National University of Ireland. The English Department also prepares postgraduates for successful careers in a variety of other areas, such as teaching, writing and journalism, administration and marketing.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

Read less
This programme enables you to engage in both creative and critical writing while focusing on the larger critical question of identity. Read more

This programme enables you to engage in both creative and critical writing while focusing on the larger critical question of identity. You'll be able to develop a theoretically informed understanding of the relationship between writing and the self while exploring a range of literary genres as a critical reader and as a practitioner. You will study a wide variety of genres, such as memoir and autobiography, lyric poetry, prose fiction, and drama.

You’ll develop your knowledge of research methods in critical and creative studies and choose from a range of options to explore genres that suit your own interests.

With the support of active researchers, publishers and writers you'll have access to wide-ranging research resources in our library as well as workshop opportunities to develop expertise in a range of different kinds of writing skills which will be valuable not just in the creative sphere, but in a variety of careers. You’ll learn in a stimulating environment with access to excellent resources for your research. The world-class Brotherton Library has extensive holdings to support both critical and creative writing. Our Special Collections are full of archive and manuscript material, including the extensive archives of contemporary poets, including Tony Harrison, Geoffrey Hill, and Simon Armitage. The University Library offers full training to help you make the most of them, equipping you with valuable skills in the process. The School of English also hosts readings and workshops by contemporary writers, including the [email protected] series of readings run by the Poetry Centre; and there are creative writers on its staff, including the Douglas Caster Poetry Fellow.

This degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

Two core modules in your first semester will develop your understanding of research methods in the study of English, build your research skills and provide an introduction to critical and creative writing practices. In the following semester, you’ll choose at least one of the optional modules related to critical and/or creative writing, with the option to choose one final module from the full range of English modules or from outside the School of English.

Throughout the programme, you’ll have the opportunity to explore the complex relationships between writing and identity through critical and theoretical reflection while also working as a writer within your chosen genres. You'll also have the opportunity of specializing in either critical or creative work in your research project, though you may continue to combine the two sides of the programme if you wish. If you choose to focus on the creative side, this will entail a critical reflection on your own work to accompany the portfolio.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll take fewer modules in each year and study over a longer period.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Studying English: Research Methods 30 credits
  • Research Project 60 credits
  • Writing Identities: Criticism, Creativity, Practice 30 credits

Optional modules

  • So Where do you come from? Selves, Families, Stories 30 credits
  • Poetry of Catastrophe: Reading Paul Celan 30 credits
  • Feeling Time 30 credits
  • The Magic of Mimesis 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Writing Identities: Critical and Creative Practices MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Writing Identities: Critical and Creative Practices MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll generally have two-hour weekly seminars in each module where you discuss the themes and issues arising from your reading, and you’ll be able to enhance your learning by attending the wide range of research seminars and talks by visiting speakers that we arrange throughout the year. You’ll also have a series of foundational workshops in the first semester to develop your creative writing skills. Further workshops will feature depending on your option module choices in semester 2 and you will benefit from supervisions throughout semester 2 with an allocated dissertation supervisor.

Independent study is a vital part of the degree as it allows you to build your skills and explore your own ideas.

Assessment

Most of our modules are assessed by a single essay of around 4,000 words, which you submit at the end of the semester in which you studied the module. You may also be expected to submit unassessed essays to gain feedback on your work, or give presentations in your seminars. The research project/dissertation is 12,000-15,000 words in length.

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with advanced transferable skills which are valuable in a wide range of careers.

You’ll be a confident researcher who can work independently as well as within a team. You’ll be a strong communicator, both verbally and in writing, and be able to think critically and analytically. In addition, you’ll have a strong level of cultural and critical awareness, and you’ll be able to look at a situation from different points of view.

All of these qualities are attractive to employers across sectors, and you’ll be well equipped to pursue a career in a wide range of fields depending on your interests. These could include teaching, journalism, publishing, advertising, broadcasting and law. Many of our graduates also progress to PhD-level study and you’ll be in a good position to develop a career in academia.

Careers support

Leeds for Life is our unique approach to helping you make the most of University by supporting your academic and personal development. Find out more at the Leeds for Life website.

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
Have you ever dreamed about becoming a writer in any capacity? If the answer is yes you have a great opportunity to consolidate and expand your creative writing style at University of Aberdeen. Read more

Your programme of study

Have you ever dreamed about becoming a writer in any capacity? If the answer is yes you have a great opportunity to consolidate and expand your creative writing style at University of Aberdeen. You are guided by professional writers. The world of writing is changing rapidly to allow you to self publish electronically online where you may be picked up by an agent, you can write freelance for any number of magazines, newspapers online and offline or you may decide to write and publish on the internet to improve your own marketing within your chosen area of creativity. You need to get your work visible and there are now many ways to do this.

The MLitt in Creative Writing is a taught postgraduate programme designed to offer you the opportunity to develop your creativity and literary skills in a highly supportive, constructive learning environment. You prepare for the processes and challenges involved in publishing creative written work, whether poetry or prose. There are plenty of courses to find your inspiration in which included narrative, prose, the role of literature, Irish and Scottish Women's fiction, study of language, Walter Scott, Visual Culture and more.

Courses listed for the programme

First Semester
Creative Writing: Poetry
Creative Writing: Fiction

Optional
Approaching Literature
Critical Approaches to Literature
Special Study in Language and Literature
Novel Ideas: Reading Prose Fiction
Introduction to Visual Culture

Second Semester
Creative Writing: Prose Fiction
Creative Writing: Narrative, Medicine, Psychology

Optional
Locations and Dislocations: the Role of the Place in Literature
Contemporary Irish and Scottish Women's Fiction
Irish and Scottish Science Fiction
Special Study in Language and Literature
Scott in Context: Walter Scott and His World
Critical Analysis of Visual Culture

Third Semester
Creative Writing Portfolio (dissertation)

Qualification MLitt

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/degree-programmes/39/creative-writing/

Why study at Aberdeen?

• At Aberdeen you get to explore you writing potential at any age with no prior experience necessary
• You can study to Diploma or MLitt level or go on to PhD level
• There are a wide variety of careers from which you can earn a living whilst pursuing your dream book which include: publishing,
journalism, advertising, broadcasting and agency plus teaching.

Where you study

• University of Aberdeen
• Full Time or Part Time
• September or January
• 12 Months or 24 Months

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees:
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/tuition-fees-and-living-costs-287.php

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/finance-funding-1599.php
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/funding/

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:
• Your Accommodation
• Campus Facilities
• Aberdeen City
• Student Support
• Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen:
https://abdn.ac.uk/study/student-life

Living costs
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/finance.php

Read less
The Master of Fine Arts in Writing program offers graduate students an intimate, personalized learning experience while taking advantage of San Francisco’s vibrant, eclectic literary scene. Read more
The Master of Fine Arts in Writing program offers graduate students an intimate, personalized learning experience while taking advantage of San Francisco’s vibrant, eclectic literary scene. Founded in 1986, the program is designed to instruct writers in creative techniques, nurture their individual development and vision, and help them thrive in the larger community of writers.

Our two-and-a-half year program offers workshops and literature seminars in the genres of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction. The distinctive design of the program emphasizes the connection between reading and the students’ own writing and fosters collegial relationships among faculty and students in small classes. All courses are taught by accomplished practicing writers, so that both literature seminars and workshops pay detailed attention to craft.

Because cross-fertilization enriches creativity, students are free to take courses outside their primary genre and sample a range of cross-genre literature seminars. Because depth of understanding is crucial to successful writing, students also take seminars and workshops that focus exclusively on one genre — long fiction, short fiction, poetry, or nonfiction. Students’ work culminates in a creative thesis — a book-length manuscript that is conceived, composed, and revised with extensive faculty mentoring.

Read less
The principal aim of the programme is to enable students to develop (and reflect on) their own practice in the context of an understanding of contemporary experimanetal practice in poetry from the UK and North America. Read more
The principal aim of the programme is to enable students to develop (and reflect on) their own practice in the context of an understanding of contemporary experimanetal practice in poetry from the UK and North America. The programme aims to develop advanced skills in poetic practice, to develop a critical and theoretical language to discuss practice, to introduce students to the use of electronic and video media as part of poetic practice, and to encourage individual exploration in the range of contemporary poetic practice.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X