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Mathematics×

Masters Degrees in Numerical Analysis

We have 47 Masters Degrees in Numerical Analysis

Masters degrees in Numerical Analysis involved advanced study of algorithms to obtain approximate numerical results to mathematical problems.

Related postgraduate specialisms include Applied Mathematics, Computational Mathematics and Systems Analytics. Entry requirements typically include an undergraduate degree in an appropriate Mathematics discipline.

Why study a Masters in Numerical Analysis?

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The Applied Mathematics group in the School of Mathematics at the University of Manchester has a long-standing international reputation for its research. Read more

The Applied Mathematics group in the School of Mathematics at the University of Manchester has a long-standing international reputation for its research. Expertise in the group encompasses a broad range of topics, including Continuum Mechanics, Analysis & Dynamical Systems, Industrial & Applied Mathematics, Inverse Problems, Mathematical Finance, and Numerical Analysis & Scientific Computing. The group has a strongly interdisciplinary research ethos, which it pursues in areas such as Mathematics in the Life Sciences, Uncertainty Quantification & Data Science, and within the Manchester Centre for Nonlinear Dynamics.

The Applied Mathematics group offers the MSc in Applied Mathematics as an entry point to graduate study. The MSc has two pathways, reflecting the existing strengths within the group in numerical analysis and in industrial mathematics. The MSc consists of five core modules (total 75 credits) covering the main areas of mathematical techniques, modelling and computing skills necessary to become a modern applied mathematician. Students then choose three options, chosen from specific pathways in numerical analysis and industrial modelling (total 45 credits). Finally, a dissertation (60 credits) is undertaken with supervision from a member of staff in the applied mathematics group with the possibility of co-supervision with an industrial sponsor. 

Aims

The course aims to develop core skills in applied mathematics and allows students to specialise in industrial modelling or numerical analysis, in preparation for study towards a PhD or a career using mathematics within industry. An important element is the course regarding transferable skills which will link with academics and employers to deliver important skills for a successful transition to a research career or the industrial workplace.

Special features

The course features a transferable skills module, with guest lectures from industrial partners. Some dissertation projects and short internships will also be available with industry.

Teaching and learning

Students take eight taught modules and write a dissertation. The taught modules feature a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, coursework, and computing and modelling projects (both individually and in groups). The modules on Scientific Computing and Transferable Skills particularly involve significant project work. Modules are examined through both coursework and examinations.

Coursework and assessment

Assessment comprises course work, exams in January and May, followed by a dissertation carried out and written up between June and September. The dissertation counts for 60 credits of the 180 credits and is chosen from a range of available projects, including projects suggested by industrial partners.

Course unit details

Course unit details

 CORE (75 credits)

 * Introduction to Uncertainty Quantification

 * Mathematical Methods

 * Partial Differential Equations

 * Scientific Computing

 * Transferable Skills for Applied Mathematicians

 OPTIONAL (3 modules, 45 credits)

 * Applied Dynamical Systems (IM)

 * Continuum Mechanics (IM)

 * Stability theory (IM)

 * Transport Phenomena and Conservation Laws (IM)

 * Advanced Uncertainty Quantification (IM,NA)

 * Approximation Theory and Finite Element Analysis (NA)

 * Numerical Linear Algebra (NA)

 * Numerical Optimization and Inverse Problems (NA)

Students registered on the Numerical Analysis pathway must select modules marked NA, and those registered on the Industrial Modelling pathway must select modules marked IM.

Syllabuses for the modules Introduction to Uncertainty Quantification and Advanced Uncertainty Quantification are currently being finalized and details will be added here as soon as possible.

Facilities

Modern computing facilities are available to support the course.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

The programme will prepare students for a career in research (via entry into a PhD programme) or direct entry into industry. Possible subsequent PhD programmes would be those in mathematics, computer science, or one of the many science and engineering disciplines where applied mathematics is crucial. The programme develops many computational, analytical, and modelling skills, which are valued by a wide range of employers. Specialist skills in scientific computing are valued in the science, engineering, and financial sector.



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About the programme. In addition to being a science in its own right, mathematics plays a fundamental role in the quantitative areas of practically all other academic disciplines, particularly in the natural sciences, engineering, business administration, economics, medicine and psychology. Read more

About the programme

In addition to being a science in its own right, mathematics plays a fundamental role in the quantitative areas of practically all other academic disciplines, particularly in the natural sciences, engineering, business administration, economics, medicine and psychology. Mathematical results permeate nearly all facets of life and are a necessary prerequisite for the vast majority of modern technologies – and as our IT systems become increasingly powerful, we are able to mathematically handle enormous amounts of data and solve ever more complex problems.

Special emphasis is placed on developing students' ability to formalise given problems in a way that facilitates algorithmic processing as well as enabling them to choose or develop, and subsequently apply, suitable algorithms to solve problems in an appropriate manner. The degree programme is theoretical in its orientation, with strongly application-oriented components. Studying this programme, you can gain advanced knowledge in the mathematical areas of Cryptography, Computer Algebra, Algorithmic Algebra and Geometry, Image and Signals Processing, Statistics and Stochastic Simulation, Dynamical Systems and Control Theory as well as expert knowledge in Computer Science fields such as Data Management, Machine Learning and Data Mining.

Furthermore, you will have the chance to learn how to apply your knowledge to tackle problems in areas as diverse as Marketing, Predictive Analytics, Computational Finance, Digital Humanities, IT Security and Robotics.

Programme syllabus

The core modules consist of two mathematics seminars and the presentation of your master's thesis.The compulsory elective modules are divided into eight module groups:

1)   Algebra, Geometry and Cryptography

This module group imparts advanced results in the areas of algebra and geometry, which constitute the fundament for algorithmic calculations, particularly in cryptography but also in many other mathematical areas.

2)   Mathematical Logic and Discrete Mathematics

The theoretical possibilities and limitations of algorithm-based solutions are treated in this module group.

3)   Analysis, Numerics and Approximation Theory

Methods from the fields of mathematical analysis, applied harmonic analysis and approximation theory for modelling and approximating continuous and discrete data and systems as well as efficient numerical implementation and evaluation of these methods are the scope of this module group.

4) Dynamical Systems and Optimisation

Dynamical systems theory deals with the description of change over time. This module group is concerned with methods used for the modelling, analysis, optimisation and design of dynamical systems, as well as the numerical implementation of such techniques.

5) Stochastics, Statistics

This module group deals with methods for modelling and analysing complex random phenomena as well as the construction, analysis and optimisation of stochastic algorithms and techniques used in statistical data analysis.

6) Data Analysis and Data Management and Programming

This module group examines the core methods used in computer science for the analysis of data of heterogeneous modalities (e.g. multimedia data, social networks and sensor data) and for the realisation of data analysis systems.

7) Applications

In this module group, you will practise applying the mathematical methods learned in module groups 1 to 6 to real-world applications such as Marketing, Predictive Analytics and Computational Finance.

8) Key Competencies and Language Training

In this module group, you will choose seminars that develop your non-subject-specific skills, such as public speaking and academic writing and other soft skills; you may also undertake internships. This serves to complement your technical expertise gained during your degree studies and helps to prepare you for your professional life after university.



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This one-year master's course provides training in the application of mathematics to a wide range of problems in science and technology. Read more

This one-year master's course provides training in the application of mathematics to a wide range of problems in science and technology. Emphasis is placed on the formulation of problems, on the analytical and numerical techniques for a solution and the computation of useful results.

By the end of the course students should be able to formulate a well posed problem in mathematical terms from a possibly sketchy verbal description, carry out appropriate mathematical analysis, select or develop an appropriate numerical method, write a computer program which gives sensible answers to the problem, and present and interpret these results for a possible client. Particular emphasis is placed on the need for all these parts in the problem solving process, and on the fact that they frequently interact and cannot be carried out sequentially.

The course consists of both taught courses and a dissertation. To complete the course you must complete 13 units.

There are four core courses which you must complete (one unit each), which each usually consist of 24 lectures, classes and an examination. There is one course on mathematical methods and one on numerical analysis in both Michaelmas term and Hilary term. Each course is assessed by written examination in Week 0 of the following term.

Additionally, you must choose at least least one special topic in the area of modelling and one in computation (one unit each). There are around twenty special topics to choose from, spread over all three academic terms, each usually consisting for 12 to 16 lectures and a mini project, which culminates in a written report of around 20 pages. Topics covered include mathematical biology, fluid mechanics, perturbation methods, numerical solution of differential equations and scientific programming. 

You must also undertake at least one case study in modelling and one in scientific computing (one unit each), normally consisting of four weeks of group work, an oral presentation and a report delivered in Hilary term.

There is also a dissertation (four units) of around 50 pages, which does not necessarily need to represent original ideas. Since there is another MSc focussed on mathematical finance specifically, the MSc in Mathematical and Computational Finance, you are not permitted to undertake a dissertation in this field.

You will normally accumulate four units in core courses, three units in special topics, two units in case studies and four units in the dissertation. In addition, you will usually attend classes in mathematical modelling, practical numerical analysis and additional skills during Michaelmas term.

In the first term, students should expect their weekly schedule to consist of around seven hours of core course lectures and seven hours of modelling, practical numerical analysis and additional skills classes, then a further two hours of lectures for each special topic course followed. In addition there are about three hours of problem solving classes to go through core course exercises and students should expect to spend time working through the exercises then submitting them for marking prior to the class. There are slightly fewer contact hours in the second term, but students will spend more time working in groups on the case studies.

In the third term there are some special topic courses, including one week intensive computing courses, but the expectation is that students will spend most of the third term and long vacation working on their dissertations. During this time, students should expect to work hours that are equivalent to full-time working hours, although extra hours may occasionally be needed. Students are expected to write special topic and case study reports during the Christmas and Easter vacations, as well as revising for the core course written examinations.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Mathematics and Computing for Finance at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Mathematics and Computing for Finance at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MSc Mathematics and Computing for Finance course has been designed to meet the growing demand for specially trained mathematicians to work in the world’s financial markets and insurance.

Despite the current volatile nature of the banking industry, many banks still have a pressing need for employees with advanced mathematical skills who can further their understanding of turbulence in financial markets.

On the Mathematics and Computing for Finance course you will study different elements of both mathematics and computing in addition to developing your communication and presentational skills through a project you will undertake. As a student of the MSc in Mathematics and Computing for Finance programme you will be fully supported to ensure that your project is best suited to support your future career plans.

Aims of MSc in Mathematics and Computing for Finance

Have in depth knowledge in stochastic analysis and parts of advanced real analysis. (Fourier analysis and Partial Differential Equations) as well as parts of numerical analysis which are central for applications to finance.

Have developed advanced computing skills being essential for handling problems relevant for a job on the finance markets.

Have, as a mathematician, a good understanding of finance markets.

Have developed skills needed to work in a highly inter-disciplinary profession, including advanced programming techniques and communication skills across the borders.

Modules

Please visit our website for a full description of modules for the MSc Mathematics and Computing for Finance.

Careers

The ability to think rationally and to process data clearly and accurately are highly valued by employers. Mathematics graduates earn on average 50% more than most other graduates. The most popular areas are the actuarial profession, the financial sector, IT, computer programming and systems administration, and opportunities within business and industry where employers need mathematicians for research and development, statistically analysis, marketing and sales.

Some of our students have been employed by AXA, BA, Deutsche Bank, Shell Research, Health Authorities and Local Government. Teaching is another area where maths graduates will find plenty of career opportunities.

Research

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that our research environment (how the Department supports research staff and students) and the impact of our research (its value to society) were both judged to be 100% world leading or internationally excellent.

All academic staff in Mathematics are active researchers and the department has a thriving research culture.

Student profiles

"Further to my studies at Swansea University as a Master of Science graduate in Financial Mathematics, I am currently working at Deutsche Bank in London as part of the Structured Financial Services team providing client services for corporate lending and debt portfolios. The complex nature of the course has helped me become a logical decision maker and a highly skilled problem solver. These transferable skills are very useful in the world of Finance since the role is highly challenging working towards deadlines and structured transaction targets. My studies at Swansea University have also enriched me with leadership, motivational skills and have enhanced my communication skills. I work in a close team of 10 people within a large department which encourages a culture that strives towards learning and effective teamwork. I thoroughly enjoyed my time at Swansea University and cherish the many fond memories. I am so pleased to be expanding my horizon within a major financial centre."

Rhian Ivey, BSc Mathematics, MSc Mathematics and Computing for Finance



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Gain an understanding of advanced mathematics, concentrating on pure, applied and numerical mathematics. This grounding allows you to choose the mathematical orientation that best fits your tastes and aspirations. Read more
Gain an understanding of advanced mathematics, concentrating on pure, applied and numerical mathematics. This grounding allows you to choose the mathematical orientation that best fits your tastes and aspirations.

Mathematics at Sussex plays an important role in the current development of areas as diverse as:
-Analysis and partial differential equations
-Geometry and topology
-Mathematical physics
-Mathematics applied to biology
-Numerical analysis and scientific computing
-Probability and statistics

This course is for you if you’re a mathematician in industry or a mathematical educator looking for training, or if you’re preparing to do research.

How will I study?

In the autumn and spring terms, you choose from a range of core modules and options.

In the summer term, you work on your MSc dissertation. You can choose from a wide range of dissertation topics. You’ll be supervised by research-active faculty members.

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

Our graduates go on to careers in:
-Academia
-Scientific research
-Teaching
-Management
-Actuarial roles
-Financial management and analysis
-Programming
-Scientific journalism

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Our MPhil/PhD degree in Mathematics and Statistics aims to train you to conduct research of a high academic standard and to make original contributions to the subject. Read more
Our MPhil/PhD degree in Mathematics and Statistics aims to train you to conduct research of a high academic standard and to make original contributions to the subject.

The programme involves coursework (where suitable) and research training, but its major component is the preparation of a substantial research thesis. The thesis should demonstrate a sound understanding of the main issues in the area and add to existing knowledge.

Research interests in mathematics and statistics include: mathematical finance, in particular the analysis of risk and numerical computation; mathematical physics and partial differential equations; approximation theory and numerical analysis; probability and stochastic processes, pure and applied; applied statistics and multivariate analysis; covariance modelling for repeated measures and longitudinal data; medical statistics; combinatorics, algebra and designs.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

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Why does one car have more air resistance than another? How can a satellite be kept in an orbit around the earth? Applied mathematicians provide the necessary theoretical background to such questions. Read more
Why does one car have more air resistance than another? How can a satellite be kept in an orbit around the earth? Applied mathematicians provide the necessary theoretical background to such questions.

Applied Mathematics is concerned with the development and exploitation of mathematical tools for the analysis and control of technological problems. Mathematical modelling of the problem at hand plays a basic role, followed by (numerical) analysis and (computer) simulation. Interaction with other disciplines and with specialists in the fields of application is essential.

Two specialisations

- Systems and control
This specialisation deals with the mathematics behind designing stable controllers for satellites, purification plants or more general technical processes. Questions that arise include: is it possible to suppress perturbations in a system? Or, how can one stabilize and control a system without causing shocks?

- Computational science and numerical mathematics
This specialisation emphasizes modelling, analysis and the simulation of fluid flow problems. Although the applications can be quite diverse, the basic mathematical methods are much the same. If you are capable of computing the flow of air, you are able to predict the weather, and to design cars and aeroplanes. People who can simulate the flow of water can compute the optimal shape of ships, harbours and dikes.

Why in Groningen?

- Typical for Applied Mathematic in Groningen: the connection between mathematical theory and real-life problems
- You can combine courses from both Mathematics and Applied Mathematics
- Courses include related fields, e.g. Econometrics and Physics
- Internship and research opportunities

Job perspectives

A Master's degree in Applied Mathematics opens up many job opportunities. During the Master's programme you will learn to think in a logical, systematic, and problem-oriented way in a multidisciplinary environment. After having finished the programme you will be able to apply mathematics to a technical problem, and hence to work at the interface between theory and practice. These qualities are highly appreciated by employers.

Job opportunities are available in industrial companies, research institutes, as well as in universities. Examples of companies looking for applied mathematicians include Gasunie, Philips, Stork, Shell, Corus, KPN and small engineering bureaus. Examples of research institutes are the National Aerospace Laboratory (NLR, the picture on these pages comes from the NLR), WL/Delft Hydraulics, KNMI and TNO.You can start a university career by working as a PhD student, which means working for four years on a research project and writing a thesis. After having successfully defended this thesis, you will be awarded a PhD degree. Afterwards you can continue an academic career or start a career in industry.

Job examples

- Research institutes
- Engineering bureaus
- Industrial companies
- Universities

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Mathematics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Mathematics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MSc Mathematics course has been designed for students who wish to build on their BSc, extending their range of mathematics expertise across a broader spread of topics, and demonstrating their literature research skills through an extended dissertation.

Such a qualification will mark graduates out as having a broader and deeper understanding of mathematics, and the skills required to pursue a significant project with a high level of independence, presenting their results in a written report. This will give MSc Mathematics graduates an edge in the ever more competitive jobs market.

On the Mathematics course you will study different elements of mathematics in a broad sense - including mathematical elements of computing if desired - in addition to developing your research, project management, and written communication skills through a project you will undertake. As a student of MSc in Mathematics, you will be fully supported to ensure that your project further develops an excellent foundation for your future career plans.

Modules

Modules on the MSc Mathematics include:

• Algebraic coding theory

• Biomathematics

• Black-Scholes theory

• Data science

• Differential geometry

• Fourier analysis

• Ito calculus

• Lie theory

• Numerical analysis

• Partial differential equations

• Stochastic processes

• Statistical mechanics

• Topology

Please visit our website for a full description of modules for the MSc Mathematics.

On top of the Mathematics modules you study, you will also complete a dissertation as part of your studies.

Facilities

The Aubrey Truman Reading Room, located in the centre of the Department of Mathematics, houses the departmental library and computers for student use. It is a popular venue for students to work independently on the regular example sheets set by their lecturers, and to discuss Mathematics together.

Our main university library, Information Services and Systems (ISS), contains a notably extensive collection of Mathematics books.

Mathematics students will benefit from the £31m Computational Foundry for computer and mathematical sciences which will provide the most up-to-date and high quality teaching facilities featuring world-leading experimental set-ups, devices and prototypes to accelerate innovation and ensure students will be ready for exciting and successful careers. (From September 2018)

Careers

The ability to think rationally and to process data clearly and accurately are highly valued by employers. Mathematics graduates earn on average 50% more than most other graduates. The most popular areas are the actuarial profession, the financial sector, IT, computer programming and systems administration, and opportunities within business and industry where employers need mathematicians for research and development, statistically analysis, marketing and sales.

Some of our Mathematics students have been employed by AXA, BA, Deutsche Bank, Shell Research, Health Authorities and Local Government. Teaching is another area where Mathematics graduates will find plenty of career opportunities.

Research

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that our research environment (how the Department supports research staff and students) and the impact of our research (its value to society) were both judged to be 100% world leading or internationally excellent.

All academic staff in Mathematics are active researchers and the department has a thriving research culture.

http://www.swansea.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/science/mscmathematics/

Student Profile

"Further to my studies at Swansea University as a Master of Science graduate in Financial Mathematics, I am currently working at Deutsche Bank in London as part of the Structured Financial Services team providing client services for corporate lending and debt portfolios. The complex nature of the Mathematics course has helped me become a logical decision maker and a highly skilled problem solver. These transferable skills are very useful in the world of Finance since the role is highly challenging working towards deadlines and structured transaction targets. My studies at Swansea University have also enriched me with leadership, motivational skills and have enhanced my communication skills. I work in a close team of 10 people within a large department which encourages a culture that strives towards learning and effective teamwork. I thoroughly enjoyed my time at Swansea University and cherish the many fond memories. I am so pleased to be expanding my horizon within a major financial centre."

Rhian Ivey, BSc Mathematics, MSc Mathematics and Computing for Finance



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This programme allows students to 'Upgrade to Success'. In other words, you can upgrade a non-standard qualification, or a third class honours degree, to a level equivalent to that of a first or second class honours degree. Read more
This programme allows students to 'Upgrade to Success'. In other words, you can upgrade a non-standard qualification, or a third class honours degree, to a level equivalent to that of a first or second class honours degree.

Why study Mathematics at Dundee?

The qualification that you gain from this course is a marketable addition to your CV. The skills gained through this course are highly transferable; maths is the backbone of many disciplines along a broad range of categories such as sciences and economics.

The material that is currently in the Mathematics programme covers a wide range of topics including mathematical biology, fluid dynamics, magneto hydrodynamics and numerical analysis and scientific computing as well as core subjects such as analysis and mathematical methods.

Please note that this course does not provide a direct entry route to Masters or PhD programmes at Dundee: applications for these programmes are considered separately.

The Graduate Diploma in Mathematics is made up by selecting eight Level 3 or Level 4 modules available in the Division of Mathematics. Each of these consists of 22 lectures and 11 tutorials. The standard of presentation is equivalent to that of an honours degree, and if you have a degree without honours or similar attainment, you may find a Graduate Diploma is a useful way of upgrading your qualifications.

Candidates may take any modules from the pool available, subject to timetable constraints. A total SCOTCAT credit count of 120 credits must be achieved, and since most of the relevant modules are 15 credits each, the normal program of study would consist of eight modules, four taken in each semester.

What's so good about Mathematics at Dundee?

The Mathematics division at the University of Dundee boasts an enviable staff to student ratio. Teachers are able to get to know students on a personal level, enhancing the support they can provide and improving our students' learning experience.

We also provide 24/7 access to computers dedicated to students studying mathematics to further support you throughout your studies.

How you will be taught

You will learn by a combination of lectures, tutorials, workshops and computer practical classes.

What you will study

The Graduate Diploma in Mathematics is made up by selecting eight Level 3 or Level 4 modules available in the Division of Mathematics. Each of these consists of 22 lectures and 11 tutorials. The standard of presentation is equivalent to that of an honours degree, and if you have a degree without honours or similar attainment, you may find a Graduate Diploma is a useful way of upgrading your qualifications.

Candidates may take any modules from the pool available, subject to timetable constraints. A total SCOTCAT credit count of 120 credits must be achieved, and since most of the relevant modules are 15 credits each, the normal program of study would consist of eight modules, four taken in each semester.

How you will be assessed

Coursework (20%) and a written examination (80%).

Careers

Mathematics is central to the sciences, and to the development of a prosperous, modern society. The demand for people with mathematical qualifications is considerable, and a degree in mathematics is a highly marketable asset.

Mathematics graduates are consistently amongst those attracting the highest graduate salaries and can choose from an ever-widening range of careers in research, industry, science, engineering, commerce, finance and education.

Many of our graduates enter the financial sector following career paths in accountancy, banking, the stock market and insurance.

Even if you do not take your mathematics any further than university, employers know that mathematics graduates are intelligent, logical problem solvers. With this training behind you, the career options become almost limitless.

Find out more from our Careers Service website.

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Understand the main aspects of quantitative finance – including general finance theory, finance models and programming for graduates with a science, engineering and mathematics background. Read more
Understand the main aspects of quantitative finance – including general finance theory, finance models and programming for graduates with a science, engineering and mathematics background.

Our course has been developed drawing on expertise from industry professionals. You cover topics such as:
-Interest-rate theory
-Arbitrage theory
-GARCH models
-Corporate finance
-The Black-Scholes model and numerical analysis
-Programming in C and Java
-The use of mathematical computing software

How will I study?

You’ll study core modules and options in the autumn and spring terms. In the summer term, you undertake work on your MSc dissertation.

You’ll be assessed by a combination of unseen examinations and dissertation/projects.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

ESRC 1+3 and +3 Scholarships (2017)
-A number of ESRC-funded standalone PhD and PhD with Masters scholarships across the social sciences.
-Application deadline: 30 January 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

Our graduates have found jobs in banking (investment funds and hedge funds) and financial software companies.

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Why this course?. Globally, financial tools, products and software are becoming increasingly complex and sophisticated. There's a demand for market-aware graduates who can demonstrate an understanding of mathematical models used in these products. Read more

Why this course?

Globally, financial tools, products and software are becoming increasingly complex and sophisticated. There's a demand for market-aware graduates who can demonstrate an understanding of mathematical models used in these products.

The MSc in Quantitative Finance – an innovative cross-faculty alliance between the Strathclyde Business School and the Faculty of Science – has been developed to address this need. The course has been designed so that students who have a strong aptitude for mathematics, statistics and computing but who have not studied these topics in detail in their first degree can learn the necessary skills to move into the financial industry.

This masters course will prepare you for a career in financial engineering and risk management. Careers include roles as a hedge fund manager or financial analyst.

You’ll gain:

  • a good understanding of financial theory and analysis
  • an appreciation of financial markets
  • a practical understanding of numerical methods in finance
  • an introduction to programming for financial applications
  • an understanding of the role of computers in business processes

What you’ll study

The curriculum provides a balance between finance and mathematical theory, computer implementations of this theory, and practical skills and knowledge.

Core classes are undertaken in the first semester, and address themes such as principles of finance and quantitative methods for finance, as well as foundation classes in mathematics, statistics and computing science.

Work placement

You may be able to undertake an industrial based MSc project. This takes place in the third semester of the course between June and September. The placement can be based in the UK or in another country and are typically paid internships.

Facilities

The Department of Mathematics & Statistics has teaching rooms which provide you with access to modern teaching equipment and access to University computing laboratories with all necessary software available.

You'll also have access to a common room facility which gives you a modern and flexible area which can be used for individual and group study work and is also a relaxing social space.

Learning & teaching

Classes are delivered by a number of teaching methods:

  • lectures (using a variety of media including electronic presentations and computer demonstrations)
  • tutorials
  • computer laboratories
  • coursework
  • projects.

Teaching is student-focused, with students encouraged to take responsibility for their own learning and development. Classes are supported by web-based materials.

Assessment

The form of assessment varies from class to class. For most classes the assessment involves both coursework and examinations.

Careers

Our graduates have gone on to find careers with reputable companies such as Deloitte, PWC, Bank of Ireland and BlackRock to name a few.

Job titles include:

  • Business Change Consultant
  • Advisor to CEO
  • Manager Transfer Pricing Economist
  • Risk Officer
  • Trainee Actuarial Analyst
  • Management Trainee

Financial tools, products and software are becoming increasingly complex and sophisticated and there's a need for the finance industry to self-regulate as it witnesses unprecedented growth. Market-aware finance graduates, who understand the mathematical models used to develop these products and their computer implementations will be much in demand by international organisations.

Drawing on expert academic input from three departments – Accounting & Finance, Mathematics & Statistics, and Computer & Information Sciences – this one-year programme has been developed to prepare participants for careers within areas such as financial engineering and risk management, and for highly quantitative roles, such as hedge fund managers and financial analysts.

We also work closely with the University's Careers Service. They offer advice and guidance on career planning and looking for and applying for jobs. In addition they administer and publicise graduate and work experience opportunities.



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This programme reflects and benefits from the strong research activities of the Department of Mathematics. The taught modules and dissertation topics are closely aligned with the interests of the Department’s four research groups. Read more

This programme reflects and benefits from the strong research activities of the Department of Mathematics.

The taught modules and dissertation topics are closely aligned with the interests of the Department’s four research groups:

  • Mathematics of Life and Social Sciences
  • Dynamical Systems and Partial Differential Equations
  • Fields, Strings and Geometry
  • Fluids, Meteorology and Symmetry

During the first two semesters you will take a range of taught modules from an extensive list of options, followed by an extended research project conducted over the summer under the supervision of a member of the department, culminating in the writing of a dissertation.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Careers

Mathematics is not only central to science, technology and finance-related fields, but the logical insight, analytical skills and intellectual discipline gained from a mathematical education are highly sought after in a broad range of other areas such as law, business and management.

There is also a strong demand for new mathematics teachers to meet the ongoing shortage in schools. 

As well as being designed to meet the needs of future employers, our MSc programme also provides a solid foundation from which to pursue further research in mathematics or one of the many areas to which mathematical ideas and techniques are applied.

Educational aims of the programme

  • To provide graduates with a strong background in advanced mathematical theory and its applications to the solution of real problems
  • To develop students understanding of core areas in advanced mathematics including standard tools for the solution of real life applied mathematical problems
  • To develop the skill of formulating a mathematical problem from a purely verbal description
  • To develop the skill of writing a sophisticated mathematical report and, additionally, in presenting the results in the form of an oral presentation
  • To lay a foundation for carrying out mathematical research leading to a research degree and/or a career as a professional mathematician in an academic or non-academic setting

Programme learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

  • Knowledge of the core theory and methods of advanced pure and applied mathematics and how to apply that theory to real life problems
  • An in-depth study of a specific problem arising in a research context

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Ability to demonstrate knowledge of key techniques in advanced mathematics and to apply those techniques in problem solving
  • Ability to formulate a mathematical description of a problem that may be described only verbally
  • An understanding of possible shortcomings of mathematical descriptions of reality
  • An ability to use software such as MATLAB and IT facilities more generally including research databases such as MathSciNet and Web of Knowledge

Professional practical skills

  • Fluency in advanced mathematical theory
  • The ability to interpret the results of the application of that theory
  • An awareness of any weaknesses in the assumptions being made and of possible shortcomings with model predictions
  • The skill of writing an extended and sophisticated mathematical report and of verbally summarising its content to specialist and/or non-specialist audiences

Key / transferable skills

  • Ability to reason logically and creatively
  • Effective oral presentation skills
  • Written report writing skills
  • Skills in independent learning
  • Time management
  • Use of information and technology

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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Understand the main aspects of quantitative finance – including general finance theory, finance models and programming for graduates with a science, engineering and mathematics background. Read more
Understand the main aspects of quantitative finance – including general finance theory, finance models and programming for graduates with a science, engineering and mathematics background.

Our course has been developed drawing on expertise from industry professionals. You cover topics such as:
-Interest-rate theory
-Arbitrage theory
-GARCH models
-Corporate finance
-The Black-Scholes model and numerical analysis
-Programming in C and Java
-The use of mathematical computing software

How will I study?

You’ll study core modules and options in the autumn and spring terms. In the summer term, you undertake work on your MSc dissertation.

You’ll be assessed by a combination of unseen examinations and dissertation/projects.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

ESRC 1+3 and +3 Scholarships (2017)
-A number of ESRC-funded standalone PhD and PhD with Masters scholarships across the social sciences.
-Application deadline: 30 January 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Faculty

You’ll be taught by faculty from both the Department of Mathematics and the Department of Business and Management.

Careers

Our graduates have found jobs in banking (investment funds and hedge funds) and financial software companies.

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The part-time MSc in Mathematical Finance aims to develop your mathematical modelling, data analysis and computational skills as applied to finance, without the need to take time out of your career to study. . Read more

The part-time MSc in Mathematical Finance aims to develop your mathematical modelling, data analysis and computational skills as applied to finance, without the need to take time out of your career to study. 

Incorporating concepts from applied and pure mathematics, statistics, computing and corporate finance, the course gives you a broad intellectual perspective and covers, from fundamentals to the latest research, the most important aspects of quantitative finance currently in use in the finance industry.

The course:

  • is delivered in a series of intensive week-long modules based in Oxford, so that time away from work is kept to a minimum; 
  • allows you to choose advanced modules based on, and write an academic dissertation in, an area of relevance to your career;
  • regularly updates its content to reflect the ever-changing industry and keep the material relevant;
  • is taught by a panel of world-leading academics and industrial practitioners; and

It is possible to exit the course early and be awarded the Postgraduate Diploma in Mathematical Finance, should work pressures intervene before it is possible to write a dissertation.

In order to complete the MSc each student must attend and be assessed on four core modules, three advanced modules and to submit a dissertation. Students are expected to take seven terms (28 months) to complete the course. 

Modules are taught through a series of lectures, practical sessions, guided reading, guest lectures and course assignments. 

The core modules cover the mathematical foundations of probability, statistics and partial differential equations, stochastic calculus and martingale theory, portfolio theory, the Black-Scholes model and extensions, numerical methods (finite differences and Monte Carlo), interest rate modelling, stochastic optimisation, exotic derivatives and stochastic volatility. MATLAB and Python are used as a practical computing languages.

Attendance at the four core modules is compulsory. For each module there is an assignment for which feedback and an indicative mark is given to assist you in improving your future performance. Assessment for these compulsory modules consists of two two-hour written examinations held in September of the first year.

Each of the advanced modules explores a key area in contemporary mathematical finance. The programme of advanced modules is published in July each year, and you will be asked to register your choice of three modules. Attendance at these three assessed modules is compulsory. Advanced modules will be assessed by short ‘special project’ reports, each submitted on a subject chosen by you that is covered in the module.

You will complete a dissertation on a topic chosen in consultation with your supervisor and the Course Director.



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BECOME A DESIRED MATHEMATICIAN. This research oriented Master’s will provide you with a rich toolkit of creative problem solving skills that will turn you into a desired scientist, both in and outside academia. Read more

BECOME A DESIRED MATHEMATICIAN

This research oriented Master’s will provide you with a rich toolkit of creative problem solving skills that will turn you into a desired scientist, both in and outside academia. You will dive deep into mathematics, develope genuine research skills in pure, applied and industrial areas and learn to think out of the box. 

CHOOSE FROM AN EXCEPTIONAL LIST OF COURSES

This Master's is part of the national Mastermath Programme, a collaboration of Dutch Mathematics Departments who joined efforts to enhance their Master's programmes. Due to this collaboration you can benefit from an exceptional list of mathematical courses, offered either by Utrecht University or another Dutch University. Check the courses page for more information and a full overview of the courses you can choose from.

WHY UTRECHT?

We combine our course offerings with personal and small-scale teaching, including:

  • a lively colloquium with distinguished international speakers;
  • research training in small group projects in pure-, applied- and industrial mathematics;
  • a unique special training in using historical sources;
  • student seminars in which you practice your own scientific presentation skills; 
  • collective learning of very advanced topics in pure or applied mathematics.

PERSONALIZE YOUR MASTER'S: CHOOSE YOUR TRACK

Within this Master's you can choose from 8 different tracks, allowing you to tailor the programme to your own personal interest. Depending on the track you choose, you can pursue your degree either in the direction of Fundamental Mathematics or in Mathematical Modeling. 

Fundamental Mathematics tracks:

Mathematical Modeling tracks:

You can also choose to do a Research project in History of Mathematics

DOUBLE MASTER DEGREE

If you are up for it, you can also combine the Mathematical Sciences programme with another Master's programmes of the Graduate School of Natural Sciences (e.g. Theoretical Physics, Climate Physics or Computing Science). This will result in a double Master's degree.

PROGRAMME OBJECTIVE

The Mathematical Sciences programme will prepare you for a challenging career, either in or outside academia. Mathematicians are desired employees in today's job market since they can easily deal with complex problems and large data sets in an abstract way. About 40% of our students continue with a PhD in mathematics or related research areas such as imaging or physics (in recent years at Harvard, London, Oxford, Stanford, etc). Many find employment in a research oriented environment at governments or in industry. Work fields include risk analysis, security, forensics, consultancy, data analytics, IT, logistics and more.



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