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Masters Degrees in Psychology, New Zealand

We have 10 Masters Degrees in Psychology, New Zealand

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If you choose to specialise in organisational psychology, you'll be focusing on organisational and personnel (human resources/employee) psychology. Read more

If you choose to specialise in organisational psychology, you'll be focusing on organisational and personnel (human resources/employee) psychology. Organisational psychologists are experts in aiding organisational effectiveness by improving the well-being of their employees. During your MAppPsy(Org), you'll learn how to carry out applied organisational research. This research relates to areas like job or competency analyses and surveys. You'll learn how to evaluate organisational and human resource (personnel) interventions.

Throughout your studies, you'll become familiar with how organisational psychology initiatives relate to an organisation's wider goals. You'll develop your ability to analyse and to carry out library research effectively. You'll refine your skills in presenting proposals and reports, both in writing and orally.

At Waikato, you'll have the opportunity to gain practical experience during your studies. You'll undertake projects in different organisations and you'll be able to join a professional network site called IO-net.

Waikato MAppPsy(Org) students learn from experts in the field of organisational psychology – Professor Michael O’Driscoll and Dr Maree Roche.

Course structure

Students in the MAppPsy(Org) must pass the equivalent of 240 points, including a 90-point thesis in their second year.

The remaining points come from the compulsory taught papers in Organisational Psychology and from other elective papers chosen in consultation with the Convenor of the Organisational Psychology programme.

Up to 120 points of the MAppPsy(Org) may be waived for students who have already completed four-year degrees (for example, an honours degree or other four-year undergraduate degree) provided that:

No required papers are waived, unless the student has already taken these papers (or equivalent papers) in their fourth year of study, and at least 195 of the 240 points must have been in psychology papers.

Core Papers

  • LBST531 (15 points) Advanced Employment Relations 1: The Employment Relations Framework
  • or 
  • LBST532 (15 points) Advanced Employment Relations 2: Current Policies and Practices
  • PSYC539 (15 points) Graduate Research Methods in Psychology
  • PSYC571 (15 points) Psychology of Careers
  • PSYC572 (15 points) Personnel Selection
  • PSYC573 (15 points) Training and Development
  • PSYC579 (15 points) Advances in Organisational Psychology
  • PSYC585 (15 points) Leading Organisation Development

Elective courses are typically a selection from the areas of Psychology, Labour Studies, Human Resource Management or Strategic Management.

Career opportunities

Where might your MAppPsy(Org) take you? Organisational psychologists work in staff selection and performance evaluation. They work in training, motivation and work attitudes. You might also use your skills to help with occupational stress and burnout. Organisations may employ you to work with leadership, organisational culture and organisation development strategies.



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If you choose to specialise in Community Psychology, you'll develop the practical skills you need to apply psychological techniques to a range of social issues. Read more

If you choose to specialise in Community Psychology, you'll develop the practical skills you need to apply psychological techniques to a range of social issues. New Zealand is becoming a more diverse society, so it's vital you can apply these techniques in a fair and culturally sensitive way – during your MAppPsy(Com) you'll learn how to do this. You'll develop the ability to analyse complex situations and plan appropriate actions. You'll be introduced to research and inquiry methods, and carry out your own practical research. Throughout your studies, you'll gain an in-depth understanding of the key ideas, principles and fundamental values relating to this area of psychology.

In the first year of your MAppPsy(Com) studies, you'll gain experience in human and social services by completing a programme evaluation for a service provider. In the second year, you'll gain this experience by working with a relevant community organisation or organisations.

The MAppPsy(Com) also provides a pathway into the Postgraduate Diploma in the Practice of Psychology (Community Psychology). This is a one year work-based programme accredited by the New Zealand Psychologists Board, which enables graduates to become registered as psychologists in New Zealand.

Course structure

Students in the MAppPsy(Com) must pass the equivalent of 240 points at 500 level.

This is made up of 75 points from the following compulsory papers (or equivalent papers from another university)

Core Papers

  • PSYC511 (15 points) Evaluation Research Design
  • PSYC513 (30 points) Evaluation Research Analysis
  • PSYC582 (15 points) Community Health Psychology
  • PSYC583 (15 points) Foundations of Community Psychology
  • PSYC575 (15 points) Psychological Applications and the Treaty of Waitangi

And 30 to 90 points from optional 500 level papers in Psychology, Human Development, Anthropology, Development Studies, Screen and Media Studies, Geography, History, Sociology, Women's and Gender Studies, Demography, Political Science, Philosophy and Public Policy.

In the second year of study students will complete either a 60-point dissertation (PSYC592) or a 90-point thesis (PSYC593) or a 120-point thesis (PSYC594). Although the regulations offer students the option of a 60-point dissertation, in practice students are strongly encouraged to take either the 90 or 120-point option.

Up to 120 points of the MAppPsy may be waived for students who have already completed four-year degrees (for example, an honours degree or other four-year undergraduate degree) provided that:

  • No required papers are waived, unless the student has already taken these papers (or equivalent papers) in their fourth year of study, and
  • At least 195 of the 240 points must have been psychology papers.

Optional papers should be selected in consultation with the Community Psychology Programme Convenor.

Career opporunities

Once you've gained your MAppPsy(Com), you'll be qualified to work in health services, community service organisations, government departments and in private practice. You may choose to do contract work with human service organisations as a researcher, trainer or consultant.



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Get the skills and knowledge you need to help people with social or learning difficulties in a range of educational settings. You'll have the opportunity to develop and practise your skills under the expert guidance of world-class researchers and practitioners. Read more

Get the skills and knowledge you need to help people with social or learning difficulties in a range of educational settings.

You'll have the opportunity to develop and practise your skills under the expert guidance of world-class researchers and practitioners.

Explore a wide range of theoretical viewpoints and their practical applications in educational, community and workplace settings. The programme has a bicultural focus and is tailored to meet the needs of New Zealand communities. However your studies will also prepare you to work in multicultural communities and overseas.

Pathway in Educational Psychology

The Faculty of Education offers a research-based Master's programme and the practice-based Postgraduate Diploma that leads to registration as an educational psychologist. You need to complete the Master's before applying to study the limited-entry Diploma programme. The programme includes supervised practice as an intern psychologist and allows you to become a Registered Psychologist with the New Zealand Psychologists Board.

Research

The Faculty of Education has a strong focus on research that enhances theoretical and evidence-based educational psychology policy and practice. You'll benefit from collaboration across education and psychology disciplines, and with the education sector.

Find out more about research in the Faculty of Education

Master of Educational Psychology

You'll study 10 compulsory courses over two or more years. In Part 1, the first year, you'll examine research methods and evidence-based practice, and take courses covering cultural issues in educational psychology, what motivates people to learn, and how to assess those with education difficulties.

In Part 2, you'll explore mental health in young people and how to promote positive behaviours, and study counselling and applied behaviour analysis. You'll also complete a practical research project.

You need to complete this qualification to apply for entry into the Postgraduate Diploma in Educational Psychology Practice (PGDipEPP).

Postgraduate Diploma in Educational Psychology Practice

Study to become an educational psychologist. During this one-year programme you'll complete 1,500 hours of supervised practice. You will be placed in an education setting, usually with the Ministry of Education, where you'll gain 1,200 hours of experience. The remaining 300 hours will be spent one day a week with a community service provider such as an early childhood centre, youth support organisation or other social service.

The Ministry of Education determines where the national internship placements will be depending on supervisor availability and local need, so you may need to be prepared move to another location for your internship.

You'll also take four compulsory courses on campus, covering assessment and intervention, the role of the educational psychologist, and professional practice in both education and community settings.

When you've completed the PGDipEPP, you'll be able to register as a general scope psychologist or as an educational psychologist.

Workload and duration

The MEd Psych takes two years of full-time study. If you are studying part time, you must complete the MEdPsych within four years.

The PGDipEPP takes place from January to December including a two week mid-year break. While it is normally carried out full-time over the year, it is possible to complete the course of study part-time over two years, but you'll need to discuss this with the programme director before you apply.

If you are studying full-time you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues.

You'll have opportunities to attend events, workshops, social functions and seminars such as the Student Learning Postgraduate Research skills sessions.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can also give you information and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

An educational psychologist might focus on doing research or creating and implementing programmes that can help young people learn more effectively. You could work in a school or for the Ministry of Education, or you may plan to run your own practice providing services to both the public and private sector.

MEdPsyc graduates might go on to PhD study, or work in educational agencies that need specialised educational psychology knowledge and skills.

Explore educational psychology at CareersNZ



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This specialist programme enables students to develop their knowledge and competencies, including the following. A sound understanding of the underlying concepts and principles associated with Behaviour Analysis, and of the applications of these concepts and principles. Read more

This specialist programme enables students to develop their knowledge and competencies, including the following:

  • A sound understanding of the underlying concepts and principles associated with Behaviour Analysis, and of the applications of these concepts and principles
  • A knowledge of the research skills required for Behaviour Analysis, including the ability to read, interpret and appraise published behavioural research critically, and the ability to conduct fundamental and, where appropriate, applied research in Behaviour Analysis
  • An understanding of functional analyses of problem behaviour and of how to develop an appropriate programme for behaviour change in their area of speciality
  • Analytic and library research skills, as well as skills in presenting proposals and reports in both written and oral format

The Behaviour Analysis courses in this programme provide a course sequence approved by the Behavior Analysis Certification Board ®, Inc. (BACB) (http://www.bacb.com) as meeting the academic requirements to sit the examination to become a Board Certified Assistant Behaviour Analyst, and contribute to a BACB® approved course sequence for a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA®). Students can also progress on to further postgraduate study to complete the full BACB® approved.

Career opportunities

Depending on your specialty, you may work in a range of settings (including research institutions, private practice, schools, special education settings, universities, health services, business and industry, governmental agencies and zoos), and with a range of populations (including families, people with psychological problems, children with challenging behaviours, individuals with special needs, teachers, people and their pets, agricultural species and any others seeking positive behaviour change).

Students who specialised in the application of Behaviour Analysis to human behaviour are working in the community, in mental health, and in educational settings and with a wide range of individuals.

However, it doesn’t matter what type of psychology you choose to practice, or whether you end up in a field orientated to people or animals. What is important is that you gain an understanding of how and why organisms behave (i.e., what maintains and/or influences behaviour) whether it be private or public.

Industry Experience

Many students intending careers involving application of behaviour analysis (for example, those who intend to work with families, children or with people with an intellectual disability) gain practical experience alongside their graduate studies.

This can be voluntary work or paid work as a support worker. In addition, sometimes experience can be gained though working for parents or trusts who employ students specialising in applied behaviour analysis to work with their children, helping to implement programmes for them.

The MAppPsy(BA) programme includes training in the skills required to work practically applying behaviour analytic principles to behaviour change.



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Get a degree that's recognised worldwide and contribute to knowledge in your field. A Master of Science (MSc) will develop your technical, laboratory and academic writing skills to prepare you for a career in science. Read more

Get a degree that's recognised worldwide and contribute to knowledge in your field. A Master of Science (MSc) will develop your technical, laboratory and academic writing skills to prepare you for a career in science.

The MSc by thesis will take you between 12 and 15 months to complete. You'll carry out in-depth supervised research and write a thesis. During your studies you might also author publications for peer-reviewed journals.

To do an MSc by thesis you'll need an Honours degree or postgraduate diploma in an appropriate field, with an average grade of B+ or higher in your subject area.

Available subjects

Workload

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.



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Get a degree that's recognised worldwide and contribute to knowledge in your field. A Master of Science (MSc) will develop your technical, laboratory and academic writing skills to prepare you for a career in science. Read more

Get a degree that's recognised worldwide and contribute to knowledge in your field. A Master of Science (MSc) will develop your technical, laboratory and academic writing skills to prepare you for a career in science.

The MSc will take you between two and two and half years of full-time study or up to four years part time. In the first year of your MSc you'll take several courses related to your specialist subject area. Next, you'll carry out in-depth supervised research for 12–15 months and write a thesis. During your studies you might also author publications for peer-reviewed journals.

To do an MSc you'll need a Bachelor's degree in an appropriate field, with an average grade of B+ or higher in your subject area. You may also be able to qualify for entry if you have appropriate work or other experience.

Range of Master's programmes

Choose to complete this Master's programme or one of the specialist science Master's programmes. Most specialist programmes are 180 points and don't require a thesis.

If you have already done a BSc(Hons) you can apply to go directly into the 120-point MSc by thesis.

Available subjects

Workload

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.



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Help improve human health. Study Clinical Research and get the skills you need to carry out evidence-based research that will advance medical knowledge. Read more

Help improve human health. Study Clinical Research and get the skills you need to carry out evidence-based research that will advance medical knowledge.

You’ll learn to use both qualitative and quantitative research methods, and find out how to critically evaluate current literature. Gain knowledge in good study design and research practice, data analysis and research presentation. You'll find out how to carry out clinical trials and cover ethical and cultural issues in clinical research.

Real-world skills

Toward the end of your studies you'll be guided to write a full research grant application that describes a proposed clinical research project. Past students' projects have included a trial of medical grade honey in childhood impetigo, an investigation of a new type of prosthetic hip, a trial of a new medication in Huntingdon's disease and research into the benefits of steroids in pneumonia treatment.

Taught by the School of Biological Sciences in partnership with Capital and Coast Health, the PGDipClinRes will give you the skills essential to conducting your own clinical research or to work for a research institution.

Learn from the experts

You’ll learn from highly regarded clinicians from Capital and Coast District Health Board (CCDHB), the Medical Research Institute of New Zealand (MRINZ) and Victoria University. Some sessions are delivered by outside tutors from around New Zealand who have specific areas of expertise.

For health professionals

If you’re a medical trainee or graduate, a nurse or other health professional who wants to carry out clinical research, or you just need to up-skill in research methods, then this qualification is well-suited to you. To enrol in the Diploma, you’ll need a relevant degree in health, medicine, neuroscience, psychology, biomedical science or biostatistics with a B+ average in relevant subjects, or have extensive relevant experience in the field.

Part-time online learning

The PGDipClinRes is mostly taught online and through teleconferencing, but includes a practical weekend seminar each semester that you need to attend in person. Teleconferencing forums are normally held on a weeknight.

The programme is best suited to part time study over two years, and is equivalent to about 1,200 student work hours. You’ll complete six compulsory courses totalling 120 points and will be assessed through your presentations, essays and formal reports. There is no formal examination.

You can enrol if you’re an international student, but you should note:

  • this programme is only available part-time
  • you need to attend a weekend seminar in Wellington at least twice a year
  • you need to participate in up to eight telephone conferences each semester
  • all of the above will be at your own expense, and is on top of your international student fees.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, academics, clinical experts and professional colleagues.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can give you information on study at Victoria and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

You‘ll be able to expand your current work to include clinical research, or move into a new career as a clinical researcher in a range of areas in the health sector. You might work for a drug company, a hospital clinical trials unit or a research institute.



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Master of Arts under Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. Are you seeking the ability to think critically and communicate well? A Master of Arts (MA) from Waikato will teach you the skills to work independently and see a major project through to completion. Read more

Master of Arts under Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

Are you seeking the ability to think critically and communicate well? A Master of Arts (MA) from Waikato will teach you the skills to work independently and see a major project through to completion. These are characteristics that are highly sought after by employers.

Enrolling in a MA gives you the opportunity to engage in independent (but supervised) research in one or more of a wide range of Arts subjects. Graduating with an MA provides you with a gateway to a higher research degree or to a wide range of careers.

Master of Arts under Faculty of Māori and Indigenous Studies

The recognition of Māori as an official language of Aotearoa has been accompanied by an acknowledgement of tangata whenua issues within the community and society as a whole. The ability to be fluent in both Māori and English has become increasingly important within a number of professional areas. These areas include: Iwi/hapu development, Education, Medicine, Research, Media, Government and Travel and Tourism.

You can choose from the following subjects: Māori Language/Te Reo Māori, Maori Cultural Studies/Tikanga Māori, Māori Media and Communication.

Industry Connections

The programmes within the MA host networks and relationships with a diverse range of national and international industry bodies. These include, the wider education sector (particularly with secondary schools), linguistic and cultural groups, creative, theatrical and performing groups, embassies, government, business organisations, historical organisations, international organisations, and industrial and professional groups or organisations.

Music and Theatre Studies, for example, have links directly with the public at large through the Gallagher Academy of Performing Arts. History has close links with the New Zealand Historical Association and English with Creative New Zealand and the Fulbright Foundation.

Career Opportunities

Our subjects equip MA graduates for specific careers. For instance, a Screen and Media Studies MA graduate might become a director or producer, a media relations adviser, a media research executive, a professional fundraiser, a public affairs specialist, a public relations consultant or a journalist. History MA graduates might become historians, museum curators, heritage researchers or work in community development (for instance, with tribal authorities). Foreign language MA graduates might work in the diplomatic service or become international marketing managers, trade commissioners, interpreters or translators – the possibilities are endless.

Subjects

To see a full list of the subjects available please visit http://www.waikato.ac.nz/study/qualifications/master-of-arts



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A Master of Social Sciences (MSocSc) builds on the Bachelors or Honours qualification you've already gained. When studying for your MSocSc, you'll focus on your preferred Social Science subject area and you'll immerse yourself in a high-level programme of study. Read more

A Master of Social Sciences (MSocSc) builds on the Bachelors or Honours qualification you've already gained. When studying for your MSocSc, you'll focus on your preferred Social Science subject area and you'll immerse yourself in a high-level programme of study. You'll learn the latest research techniques and be updated on recent developments in knowledge relating to your chosen field.

You'll be preparing for a dissertation or thesis, so will be conducting a substantial amount of your own independent research. If you think you may want to complete a doctorate level qualification later on, completing a MSocSc prepares you for that next level of academic study.

As you grow your knowledge of your chosen subject area, you'll be refining your intellectual skills, particularly your ability to think critically, problem solve and analyse. This will enable you to prepare for leadership roles in fields related to your subject area.

Industry Connections

During your studies, you'll be supervised by well-connected Faculty members who have networks with people working in a wide range of sectors, from business to government.

These people, including representatives from local and central government and tribal authorities, provide input into the different subject areas. Members of community groups, business organisations and industrial and professional groups do the same – they provide valuable support and input. The subject area experts themselves provide consultancy services that the community in general needs, so there are broader links and connections made through this sharing of knowledge.

Career opportunities

  • Clinical or Community Psychologist
  • Coastal Resource Officer
  • Communications Coordinator
  • Community Health Administrator
  • Counsellor
  • Demographer
  • Economist
  • Educator (Primary, Secondary or Tertiary Sector)
  • Environmental Planner
  • Hazards and Emergency Management Officer
  • Human Resources Advisor
  • Industrial Relations Advocate
  • Journalist
  • Policy Analyst
  • PR Consultant
  • Research Executive
  • Social Services Manager
  • Tourism Consultant
  • Union Organiser

Subjects

Please visit http://www.waikato.ac.nz/study/qualifications/master-of-social-sciences to see what subjects are available for the Master of Social Sciences.



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The Master of Counselling (MCouns) is established as a flagship degree that has seen 92% of graduates over the past six years gain successful employment. Read more

The Master of Counselling (MCouns) is established as a flagship degree that has seen 92% of graduates over the past six years gain successful employment.

The degree has specifically been designed for professional counsellors or supervisors interested in leadership roles within the New Zealand counselling profession.

The programme has a key teaching focus on providing experiences in which you can further develop your professional attitudes, knowledge and competencies in the areas of counselling, group leadership, mediation and practitioner research. You'll graduate with a high level of knowledge and understanding through the narrative practice this programme is known for.

For the past 20 years, our teaching staff have been active in promoting narrative therapy, beginning with a book staff produced called Narrative Therapy in Practice. Today Waikato is considered a leader in this field with several local and international publications produced each year.

This notable reputation extends also into our thriving doctoral counselling programme.

Learning outcomes

As a graduate of the MCouns programme, you will have developed competence in the practices of counselling, and established a firm understanding in philosophical and ethical issues relating to professional counselling practice.

You'll learn how to engage critically with the theoretical concepts and research which underpins counselling practice and the knowledge of the professional context within which you work.

Not only will your studies set you up with a well-articulated theoretical position and reflective professional stance in your counselling work, you'll also gain a recognised qualification for membership of New Zealand Association of Counsellors.

Cultural experience

Manākitanga (hospitality and care) is offered by Tangata whenua, people of the land, who open the space for collaboration, with the intention of weaving cultural knowledge and practice into the shaping of our counsellor education programme. The significant contributions include interchanges, connections, noho marae and visits to the following marae:

  • Te Kohinga Marama Marae at the University of Waikato (over night noho)
  • Maniaroa Marae at Mokau (week long stay with workshops and presentations)
  • Parihaka (visit to learn about Māori passive resistance to land confiscation).

Practical experience

Professional papers offer students the opportunity to have supported professional experience in community and or education settings. Efforts are made to cater for and respond to the individual student’s particular background and professional education goals.

Practicum placements

In order to gain a place in the programme, students must be able to demonstrate a relationship with a community-based counselling service or school or mental health service, which will give them access to an appropriate practicum placement.

Students must have a commitment to ongoing appropriate professional supervision. However, students will not establish any formal contract with an agency until they have been selected into the Counsellor Education Programme and have received all the necessary information on practicum placements.

In general, students in the first year of a full-time programme complete 200 hours in a professional counselling setting and complete 80 hours of counselling. They will engage in professional supervision*. The supervisor must be a member of a professional helping body such as NZAC, NZASW, NZPsS, or NZAP. Students must engage in a minimum of 16 supervision sessions, in each of the practicum papers. Students should note that NZAC membership now requires supervision with an experienced NZAC Member.

In the second year of the full-time programme the practicum involves 450 hours in counselling settings. Up to three placements may be arranged.

Note: Successful applicants will be completely responsible for setting up an appropriate placement to meet the requirements of the counselling practicum for the various papers.

*There may be a cost involved.

Career opportunities

  • NGO Social Service practices
  • Hospice
  • Private practice
  • Family and relationship counselling
  • Corrections and Probation
  • Youth services
  • Career support
  • Pastoral care
  • School counselling


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