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Politics & Government×

Masters Degrees in Politics & Government, New Zealand

We have 17 Masters Degrees in Politics & Government, New Zealand

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In today's increasingly complex and unpredictable world we need more thinkers who can grasp the dynamics of politics and society—people who can help create stronger and more effective government. Read more

In today's increasingly complex and unpredictable world we need more thinkers who can grasp the dynamics of politics and society—people who can help create stronger and more effective government.

The one-year 180-point Master of Philosophy, Politics and Economics (MPPE) combines three complementary disciplines to give you a broad understanding of the world and social decision-making. Study the only postgraduate programme of its kind in New Zealand, and get a head start in your career in politics, government or the public service.

Learning across disciplines

Studying philosophy will develop your skills in logical reasoning and knowledge of ethics. Economics will teach you what drives people and organisations to make the decisions they do and the effect those choices have. And politics will give you a knowledge of political institutions and processes, and the impact they have on society. Combining these disciplines will give you a well-rounded range of practical and theoretical skills relevant to government.

From the vantage point of New Zealand’s capital city, you'll learn to critically examine concepts around politics, liberty and justice, and study the principles of micro- and macro-economics, and global governance and finance.

Through your Master's study, you'll become skilled in oral and written communication and learn to apply critical and reflective thinking, logic and persuasion to solve problems.

Research and internship

Your studies will build towards completing your own independent research project. Examine an area of interest under supervision from world-class academics.

You'll also have the opportunity to complete an internship that will build on what you have learnt. You'll be placed in a workplace such as a government ministry or other agency where you'll gain real-world experience and valuable insights into the workings of government.

International connections

Take advantage of Victoria's connections around the world including the opportunity to apply for a US congressional internship once you graduate.

How you’ll learn

You'll study for your MPPE in two parts. In Part 1 you'll complete the 30-point core course Philosophy, Politics and Economics MPPE 401, and a further five courses from the individual disciplines.

In Part 2 you'll do a 30-point research project that builds on what you've studied in Part 1. You'll also complete a 160-hour internship in a relevant workplace so you can begin to put your skills and knowledge into practice.

Most of your courses will be taught through 12 two-hour seminars. For your research project you'll meet with your supervisor for one to two hours each week.

If you only complete Part 1 of the programme, you may be able to graduate with a Postgraduate Diploma in Arts.

Duration and workload

You'll study for your MPPE over three trimesters, or one calendar year. If you're studying part time, you're likely to take two years, and must complete the degree within three years of enrolling.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.



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Effective leadership, better management, positive change. Enhance your career prospects and learn to make organisations work better with postgraduate studies in Public Management at Victoria's . Read more

Effective leadership, better management, positive change

Enhance your career prospects and learn to make organisations work better with postgraduate studies in Public Management at Victoria's School of Government. Find out how to lead people and make change happen.

Become an effective public manager and build your ability to influence the strategic and operational direction of public sector organisations. Learn about governance and public sector reform, and how to manage budgets, finances and organisational capital.

Gain the knowledge and skills to design and implement innovative and effective programmes and services, including planning, service delivery and monitoring and evaluation.

Diploma and Certificate programmes

As well as the Master of Public Management we have some shorter postgraduate Public Management qualifications. Depending on your goals you can opt for the Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma and use them as stepping stones towards the Master's degree or build your capability by upskilling with these valuable courses.

Well-connected

Victoria is the only New Zealand university that is connected to the Australia and New Zealand School of Government (ANZOG)—so you know your qualification is of the highest standard.

Your lecturers are actively involved in public and non-profit service, exchanging ideas on key policy and management issues. They're connected to decision makers from local, regional and national government, giving you the opportunity to meet and learn from those in the know.

International students, global insights

Be part of a school that attracts not only local professionals but a talented group of international students—many highly experienced employees of government organisations in their own countries. Take advantage of the diverse experience in public policy and public management these students take to the classroom—providing valuable insights and bringing the comparative perspective alive.

What you'll study

The MPM will give you the skills and capability to understand the theory and practice of public management and boost your performance as a manager.

Your studies will include:

  1. Three foundation courses that examine government and governing in modern societies, government and the economy, and policy and management practice.
  2. Four core courses–you'll study governance and public sector reform, and strategic and financial management. You'll also learn about planning and service delivery, human resources and monitoring and evaluation.
  3. A research project that leads to a report on a specific topic in public management.
  4. Three other courses–choose from a variety of courses according to your interests and career goals—like public sector law, economics, policy analysis or politics and philosophy.

The Diploma programme requires you do seven foundation and core courses and one more course of your choice, and Certificate students do four foundation and core courses.

How you'll learn

Courses are delivered in a Block, Intensive or Weekly format.

Block format

These courses have 24 hours of structured class time, which are broken up into three separate days of six hours each. There are also six hours of structured class work, which may be delivered face-to-face or online.

Intensive format

These courses have a minimum of 24 hours' class time. They are delivered over four consecutive days, or two blocks of two consecutive days with about six weeks in between. Attendance is required on all course days.

Weekly format

Weekly courses take place during the standard university trimester periods. These courses are held weekly in the evening.

You can check the course schedules in the School of Government Postgraduate Prospectus. Whatever format your course is delivered in, you need to attend all of the classes to pass and to get the most out of your study.

Study while you work

The block format of the classes means you can fit your study commitments around your work and home life. If you're struggling at any time, just let us know—we want your study to be a success.

Workload

If you are studying fulltime you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–25 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working full-time.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Duration

You can usually complete the Master of Public Management in three or four trimesters over two years, when studying full time. If you're studying part time, the MPM can usually be completed in six trimesters over three years.

The Postgraduate Diploma in Public Management can usually be completed in four trimesters over two years.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Public Management is usually completed in two trimesters over one year.

Top locations

Surrounded by Parliament Buildings, government offices and corporate headquarters, you'll benefit from the strong links the School of Government maintains with the industry.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues.

There will be opportunities to attend events, workshops, social functions and seminars such as the Student Learning Postgraduate Research skills sessions. You'll also have access to the the postgraduate student workspace on the 2nd floor of Rutherford House—make use of the spacious computer lab, meeting rooms, printer and small kitchen.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can give you information on study at Victoria and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

If you're wanting a career or are already working in the government and non-government sectors, a Public Management qualification is a good choice.

You could find management work in central, local or regional government, in business, not-for-profits, consultancies and for iwi. You might also work as a researcher, advocate, campaign coordinator, lobbyist, strategist or planner.



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The MPols is a one-year (full-time) degree, which encompasses both coursework and research. The coursework component is spread across two semesters. Read more

The MPols is a one-year (full-time) degree, which encompasses both coursework and research. The coursework component is spread across two semesters. It consists of four papers including the core paper, 'The Political': Theory and Practice, which introduces students to the contested notion of politics and key methodological issues in theory and practice. Students also undertake a research dissertation of 20,000 words under the supervision of a politics staff member over a 12 month period and are expected to attend workshops designed to assist with the process of writing a dissertation. The degree is also available to part-time students.

Students may enrol in the MPols either for first semester (February) or second semester (July).

Graduates will be prepared for careers in the private and public sectors as researchers, policy makers, advisors and analysts. The degree also provides a pathway to doctoral-level study in Politics.

Programme Requirements

Papers

Structure of the Programme

The programme of study shall consist of; four 30-point 500-level papers, which must include POLS 501 and three further POLS 500-level papers; a 60-point research dissertation (POLS 590).

The research dissertation shall be completed over the course of one calendar year. It should be started at the beginning of the programme and submitted no later than twelve months following first enrolment. The limit is 20,000 words of text, exclusive of appendices, footnotes, tabular material, bibliography or equivalent.

Before commencing the investigation to be described in the research dissertation, a candidate shall obtain the approval of the Programme Co-ordinator and the supervisor(s) of the proposed topic.

A candidate may not present a dissertation which has previously been accepted for another degree.



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Take your social policy study to the next level. Prepare for a meaningful career with Massey’s MA in social policy. What Is It Like?. Read more

Take your social policy study to the next level

Prepare for a meaningful career with Massey’s MA in social policy.

What Is It Like?

If you are fascinated by how and why power, resources and opportunities are distributed within society, then Massey’s MA Social Policy (MA(SocPol)) is for you.

You will gain an understanding of the political, economic, social and cultural factors that influence the development, implementation and evaluation of social policy in Aotearoa New Zealand.

You will study law, politics, and the roles of central and local government in a democratic society. This will lead to insights into the relationship between the state, political parties, the judiciary, the legal system, and the public in shaping legislation and developing policy.

Careers

Your MA (SocPol) will give you the knowledge and competencies you need in your career as a policy analyst and researcher. You will learn a range of intellectual and practical skills that will stand you in good stead in the job market.

This qualification opens up a world of opportunity to be involved in influencing a broad number of social issue outcomes (e.g healthy housing, youth development, Maori wellbeing, health promotion, gender analysis of policy), not only from a Government-down position, but also from an individual-, community- and society-up perspective.

You will learn to apply your critical social policy analysis skills to a number of decision-making scenarios to result in better social outcomes. This decision-making can take many forms including a policy, a project plan, submission, or even the strategic direction of an organisation.

You could work in areas such as:

  • Research
  • Communications
  • Project management
  • Governance
  • Charitable trusts
  • Social marketing
  • Journalism (critical analysis of social issues)
  • Advocacy
  • Teaching and lecturing
  • Policy analysis - public, private and third sector (NGOs, PPPs, not-for-profit, voluntary and charity organisations)
  • Youth development
  • Community development
  • Politics
  • Government agencies - local, regional and central
  • NGOs - trusts etc (housing, Maori land trusts, health service providers, disability advocacy and support, youth development).


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Fast-track your career with a 12-month Master of Political Science. This gives you Master’s-level expertise without needing an Honours degree. Read more

Fast-track your career with a 12-month Master of Political Science. This gives you Master’s-level expertise without needing an Honours degree. You can also do the shorter, coursework-only Postgraduate Diploma in Political Science.

Study politics where it happens. Located in New Zealand's capital city, the programme gives you a close-up view of the political process.

You'll also get an international perspective. The programme is global in scope. You’ll learn how to compare and contrast how politics works in New Zealand with other countries around the world. You can include courses from related disciplines like international relations, strategic studies and public policy.

Make use of the programme's connections in the capital and around the world. You’ll get the chance to apply for Victoria University's prestigious Parliamentary Internship, along with the China Field Study and the Japan Field Study, which run every second year.

What you’ll study

You'll develop the core knowledge needed to understand political systems, policy processes and government in New Zealand and around the world. You’ll also hone your ability to design, interpret and apply political science research.

You’ll be able to choose from a range of courses spanning political thought, leadership, representation, political participation and political action. You can complement your Political Science courses with approved International Relations and Strategic Studies courses.

Master of Political Science

The MPols is in two parts—a taught and a research component.

The taught component starts with the core course and a range of approved courses.

For the research component you can choose between a 60-point dissertation and a combination of a 30-point research project and a taught course.

You may get permission from the MPols administrator to do a 90-point thesis in place of the part two research component and some part one courses.

Postgraduate Diploma in Political Science

You can choose to study the taught courses only and get a PGDipPols. If you later complete the research courses you receive your MPols in place of the PGDipPols.

Workload

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working full time.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Duration

The MPols will usually take 12 months for full-time students and 24 months for part-time students.

The PGDipPols generally takes two trimesters full time and four trimesters part time.

Research topics

If you're thinking of doing a research project you can check suggested thesis topics and staff research areas for the Political Science and International Relations programme.



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Fast-track your career with a 12-month Master of International Relations. This gives you Master’s-level expertise without needing an Honours degree. Read more

Fast-track your career with a 12-month Master of International Relations. This gives you Master’s-level expertise without needing an Honours degree. You can also do the shorter, coursework-only Postgraduate Diploma in International Relations.

As well as giving graduates a path into a career with a global scope, the programme gives professionals from around the world an opportunity to enhance their analytical skills and knowledge of international relations.

International connections

Learn from staff known worldwide for their research and expertise. The programme has close connections with internationally-focused government agencies in Wellington, and prestigious institutions around the world. These contacts give you the opportunity to learn from visiting researchers, politicians and policy makers and to build your own networks.

The programme attracts working professionals and graduates from around the world, giving you the chance to network with and learn from peers who bring a range of international perspectives.

What you’ll study

Enhance your theoretical foundation with the core course, Approaches to International Relations.

Hone your ability to think critically and creatively about pressing geopolitical issues, including war and its aftermath, international migration, China and the world, identity in world politics, global political economy and the challenges to international order.

You can complement your International Relations courses with approved Political Science and Strategic Studies courses. These include the China Field Study and the Japan Field Study, which run every second year.

Master of International Relations

The MIR is in two parts—a taught and a research component.

The taught component starts with the core course and a range of approved courses.

For the research component you can choose between a 60-point dissertation and a combination of a 30-point research project and a taught course.

You may get permission from the MIR coordinator to do a 90-point thesis, in place of the part two research component and some part one courses.

Postgraduate Diploma in International Relations

You can choose to study the taught courses only and get a PGDipIR. If you later complete the research courses, you receive your MIR in place of the PGDipIR.

Workload

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing one course per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working full time.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Duration

The MIR will usually take 12 months for full-time students and 24 months for part-time students.

The PGDipIR generally takes two trimesters full time and four trimesters part time.

Research topics

If you're thinking of doing a research project you can check suggested thesis topics and staff research areas for the Political Science and International Relations programme.

Peking double degree

You can apply for the double degree programme with Peking University in Beijing, China. This lets you combine the MIR with a one-year Master Program in Public Policy (MPP) in Beijing.



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The Master of Peace and Conflict Studies is an inter-disciplinary programme providing students with an advanced qualification in peace and conflict studies, development and peacebuilding. Read more

The Master of Peace and Conflict Studies is an inter-disciplinary programme providing students with an advanced qualification in peace and conflict studies, development and peacebuilding. Drawing upon national and international expertise in the field, this programme will position graduates for a wide range of career options in the public and private sectors as academic researchers and as practitioners and policy makers in fields such as conflict analysis and resolution, peace-building, and post-conflict transformation.

This programme (which replaces the Postgraduate Diploma in Arts (PGDipArts) in Peace and Conflict Studies) combines theory and practice with a solid research component and is regionally focused on Asia and the Pacific.

Programme Requirements

PEAC 501 Theories of Peace and Conflict

PEAC 502 Conflict Analysis and Conflict Resolution Theory

PEAC 590 Research Dissertation or PEAC 595 Practicum and Research Report

and two of



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The Master of International Studies (MIntSt) degree requires at least twelve months of full-time study, or the equivalent in part-time study, and entails an intensive programme of postgraduate coursework and research in the multi-disciplinary field of International Studies. Read more

The Master of International Studies (MIntSt) degree requires at least twelve months of full-time study, or the equivalent in part-time study, and entails an intensive programme of postgraduate coursework and research in the multi-disciplinary field of International Studies. The aim is to develop in candidates the analytical skills and knowledge essential to understanding the contemporary world.

Degree candidates are required to master a core curriculum of four taught papers - INTS 502International Politics, INTS 503 The Global Economy, INTS 504 International Legal Issues, and INTS 509 Global Peace and Conflict - and write a supervised research essay of between 18,000 and 20,000 words.

This degree may prepare candidates for leadership roles in professions that require international expertise: diplomacy, the public service, teaching, journalism or business. It can also serve as a foundation qualification for graduates interested in advancing to the PhD.

You may enrol in the MIntSt degree at the beginning of semester one (February) or semester two (July) each year.

Structure of the Programme

  1. The programme of study shall consist of four taught papers and a supervised research dissertation:
  • INTS 502 International Politics (30 points)
  • INTS 503 The Global Economy (30 points)
  • INTS 504 International Legal Issues (30 points)
  • INTS 509 Global Peace and Conflict (30 points)
  • INTS 590 Research Dissertation (60 points)
  1. The research dissertation should be started at the beginning of the programme and submitted no later than twelve months following first enrolment. The limit is 20,000 words of text, exclusive of appendices, footnotes, tabular material, bibliography or equivalent.
  2. Before commencing the investigation to be described in the research dissertation, a candidate shall obtain the approval of the Programme Co-ordinator and the supervisor(s) of the proposed topic.
  3. A candidate may not present a dissertation which has previously been accepted for another degree.


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A Master of Social Sciences (MSocSc) builds on the Bachelors or Honours qualification you've already gained. When studying for your MSocSc, you'll focus on your preferred Social Science subject area and you'll immerse yourself in a high-level programme of study. Read more

A Master of Social Sciences (MSocSc) builds on the Bachelors or Honours qualification you've already gained. When studying for your MSocSc, you'll focus on your preferred Social Science subject area and you'll immerse yourself in a high-level programme of study. You'll learn the latest research techniques and be updated on recent developments in knowledge relating to your chosen field.

You'll be preparing for a dissertation or thesis, so will be conducting a substantial amount of your own independent research. If you think you may want to complete a doctorate level qualification later on, completing a MSocSc prepares you for that next level of academic study.

As you grow your knowledge of your chosen subject area, you'll be refining your intellectual skills, particularly your ability to think critically, problem solve and analyse. This will enable you to prepare for leadership roles in fields related to your subject area.

Industry Connections

During your studies, you'll be supervised by well-connected Faculty members who have networks with people working in a wide range of sectors, from business to government.

These people, including representatives from local and central government and tribal authorities, provide input into the different subject areas. Members of community groups, business organisations and industrial and professional groups do the same – they provide valuable support and input. The subject area experts themselves provide consultancy services that the community in general needs, so there are broader links and connections made through this sharing of knowledge.

Career opportunities

  • Clinical or Community Psychologist
  • Coastal Resource Officer
  • Communications Coordinator
  • Community Health Administrator
  • Counsellor
  • Demographer
  • Economist
  • Educator (Primary, Secondary or Tertiary Sector)
  • Environmental Planner
  • Hazards and Emergency Management Officer
  • Human Resources Advisor
  • Industrial Relations Advocate
  • Journalist
  • Policy Analyst
  • PR Consultant
  • Research Executive
  • Social Services Manager
  • Tourism Consultant
  • Union Organiser

Subjects

Please visit http://www.waikato.ac.nz/study/qualifications/master-of-social-sciences to see what subjects are available for the Master of Social Sciences.



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Take your Honours degree or Postgraduate Diploma to the next level with a Master of Commerce (MCom). You'll take an in-depth look at an issue through completing a research thesis, gaining advanced knowledge of your subject area and thorough training in independent research. Read more

Take your Honours degree or Postgraduate Diploma to the next level with a Master of Commerce (MCom). You'll take an in-depth look at an issue through completing a research thesis, gaining advanced knowledge of your subject area and thorough training in independent research.

Once complete, you'll have the tools and capabilities you need for a career in business or public policy. You'll also be able to apply for PhD study in New Zealand or overseas.

This 120-point programme will take you 12 months to complete full time, or one and a half to two years part time. You must take at least 90 points of research. This means you'll complete a research thesis made up of a literature review, data collection and analysis, and your findings. A thesis is usually 30,000–40,000 words.

Available subjects

Workload

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students will need to do around 20–24 hours of work a week so make sure you take this into account if you are working.

Further study

At the end of your Master's you can choose to continue your research and apply to do a PhD.



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Better government through technology. e-Government is a growing area. As our world becomes increasingly connected through ICT, governments need skilled professionals who understand how to manage the impact of these ever-evolving technologies. Read more

Better government through technology

e-Government is a growing area. As our world becomes increasingly connected through ICT, governments need skilled professionals who understand how to manage the impact of these ever-evolving technologies.

At Victoria's School of Government, you'll discover innovative new uses for ICT—building new ways for communities to engage with government and use public services.

A unique qualification in an emerging field

Victoria's Master of e-Government is the only course of its kind in the Asia-Pacific region.

Focusing on the management rather than the technical aspects of e-Government, your courses are designed by experts in government and ICT and taught by leading academics in this new field.

International students, global insights

Be part of a school that attracts not only local professionals but a talented group of international students—many highly experienced employees of government organisations in their own countries. Take advantage of the diverse experience in public policy and public management these students take to the classroom—providing valuable insights and bringing the comparative perspective alive.

What you'll study

The MEGov will give you the skills and knowledge to manage transformational government ICT projects, using real-life examples from New Zealand and overseas. Your studies will include:

  1. Up to eight core courses depending on your previous work and study experience—you'll learn about the theories, concepts, frameworks and strategies that underpin the management of public service ICT. You'll also find out how e-Government relates to good government and examine the risks and benefits of using ICT to enable public engagement.
  2. A research project–you'll research and report on a specific topic in e-Government or apply your knowledge to the design and management of a transformational e-Government project.
  3. Four other courses–choose from a wide variety of courses depending on your career goals, looking at issues in public policy, public management and information management in government and the private sector.

How you'll learn

Courses are delivered in a Block, Intensive or Weekly format. Whatever format your course is delivered, you need to attend all of the classes to pass and to get the most out of your study.

Block

Most MEGov courses are delivered on-campus in a block format, which means that you'll need to attend classes on three full days each semester. These classes are separated by about six weeks.

Weekly

Some of your core classes are delivered in a weekly format, with classes taking place in the evening during the standard university trimesters.

Intensive

Depending on the courses you take, you may have a class that's delivered in an intensive format. Intensive courses are structured as one-off blocks of four days, or two blocks of two days separated by six weeks.

Workload

If you are studying full-time you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working full-time.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Duration

The MEGov can be completed in two years part-time, or one year of full-time study.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues.

You’ll get an orientation to introduce you to the people you’ll work with, a working space with desk, computer and storage, and use of a common room or kitchen when you want to take a break or mingle.

You'll also have opportunities to attend events, workshops, social functions and seminars such as the Student Learning Postgraduate Research skills sessions.

The Postgraduate Student's Association can give you information and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

You'll be well-placed to take part in the emerging area of e-government, leading and managing ICT projects at government departments or non-governmental organisations (NGOs).

And while you'll develop skills that will uniquely prepare you for e-government projects, you'll also have capabilities and knowledge you can use in private industry.



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Fast-track your career in policy. Policy-makers create strategic and operational policies that make life better—locally, nationally and internationally. Read more

Fast-track your career in policy

Policy-makers create strategic and operational policies that make life better—locally, nationally and internationally.

Give yourself the opportunity to get a high-level overview of the latest public sector developments and insights. You'll develop your abilities, broaden your perspective, deepen your understanding, challenge your thinking—and increase your employability.

You'll study at the School of Government, learning to help decision makers get the best outcomes in environmental, economic and social areas. Find out about the machinery of government and get the skills to design, evaluate and put in place strategic and operational policies that improve our lives.

Well connected

Victoria is the only New Zealand university that is connected to the Australia and New Zealand School of Government (ANZSOG)—so you know your qualification is of the highest standard.

Our lecturers are actively involved in the public sector, exchanging ideas on key policy and management issues. They're connected to decision makers from local, regional and national government, giving you the opportunity to meet and learn from those in the know.

We're also associated with important public and volunteer sector organisations like the Society of Local Government Managers (SOLGM), Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ), the NZ Council of Social Services (NZCOSS) and Hui E! Community Aotearoa.

International students, global insights

Be part of a school that attracts not only local professionals but a talented group of international students—many highly experienced employees of government organisations in their own countries. Take advantage of the diverse experience in public policy and public management these students take to the classroom—providing valuable insights and bringing the comparative perspective alive.

Qualification family structure

  • Master of Public Policy
  • Postgraduate Diploma in Public Policy
  • Postgraduate Certificate in Public Policy

Choose the qualification that suits your career goals, time constraints and financial situation.If you are initially accepted for a certificate or diploma, you can apply to transfer to the Master’s degree at a later stage. Both your performance in the programme and your professional work experience will be taken into account when looking at your application.

If you're working towards a Master of Public Policy and illness, promotion or other reasons for leaving your studies come up, you may still be able to graduate with a certificate or diploma.

What you'll study

You'll take a mixture of foundation and core courses that will give you the skills and capability to design, implement and evaluate policy for a range of different outcomes.

Learn about the theory and practice of policy making and examine the role of government and others in policy creation and implementation. Understand the issues at play in different policy areas like local government, health or development. If you're working while you study, you can apply what you learn to your own workplace policy challenges immediately.

MPP students should also take a research paper as part of their qualification. This could be a research topic that is relevant to your workplace. If you want to complete your Master's by coursework only, you need to get approval from the Master's Programme Director.

How you'll learn

Most classes are delivered on-campus in a block format. That means you'll need to attend day-long classes on three different days each semester, each of these separated by about six weeks. You'll also need to complete an additional six hours of structured class work, which may be face-to-face or online.

Some classes are delivered in a weekly or intensive format. Intensive courses are structured as one-off blocks of four days, or two blocks of two days separated by six weeks. Classes for weekly courses usually take place in the evening during the standard university trimesters.

Whatever format your course is delivered in, you'll need to attend all of the classes to pass and to get the most out of your study.

Study while you work

Because of the block format of the classes, you can fit your study commitments around your work and home life. And if you're struggling at any time, just let us know—we want your study to be a success.

Workload

If you are studying full-time you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working full-time.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Duration

The MPP can be completed in three years part-time, or in two years of full-time study.

Top locations

Surrounded by Parliament Buildings, government offices and corporate headquarters, you'll benefit from the strong links the School of Government maintains with the industry.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues.

There will be opportunities to attend events, workshops, social functions and seminars such as the Student Learning Postgraduate Research skills sessions. You'll also have access to the postgraduate student workspace on the 2nd floor of Rutherford House—make use of the spacious computer lab, meeting rooms, printer and kitchen.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can give you information and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

Skilled-policy makers are in demand both in and outside of government, due to their technical and creative skills and commitment to solving society's challenges.

You might find work in central, local or regional government, a Crown entity or a not-for-profit organisation, or a private consultancy or corporation active in policy-making and implementation processes.



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Migration is increasingly a high-priority issue for governments and organisations around the world. Explore the social, economic and political drivers and consequences of forced and voluntary migration. Read more

Migration is increasingly a high-priority issue for governments and organisations around the world. Explore the social, economic and political drivers and consequences of forced and voluntary migration.

Drawing on several disciplines, including political science, geography and history, you'll discover why and how migration happens and gain an in-depth understanding of the challenges and opportunities it creates. You can choose to examine topics such as the refugee crisis in Europe, labour migration, multiculturalism and immigration as an election issue.

Learning across disciplines

You'll not only gain an in-depth understanding of migration issues, you'll develop your critical thinking, communications and research skills.

If you're a Master's student, you may have the opportunity to do an internship with an organisation involved in migration policy, research or practice. Or you can choose to complete a 60-point research project instead. Take the opportunity to contribute your own perspectives to the study of migration.

Qualification family structure

The Master of Migration is part of a tiered family of qualifications:

  • Master of Migration Studies
  • Postgraduate Diploma in Migration Studies
  • Postgraduate Certificate in Migration Studies

Choose the qualification that suits your career goals, time constraints and financial situation.

Staircasing allows movement in both directions—if you begin by enrolling in the Certificate or Diploma programme you can continue on to complete your Master's. Or if you enrol in the Master's but can't complete it, for whatever reason, you may be awarded the Certificate or Diploma.

What you'll study

The Master of Migration is divided into Part 1 and Part 2.

In Part 1 you'll complete four 30-point courses and you'll have some choice in what you study. In the core course—Approaches to Migration Studies POLS 488—you'll examine how migration is analysed, study the main concepts, theories and debates and prepare a research proposal. In your elective courses you might focus on a particular historical migration flow, explore the challenges of refugee resettlement in New Zealand, study the international or domestic politics of migration or choose to complete an individual research project.

In the second half of your studies, or Part 2, you'll complete a 60-point research essay that builds on your research proposal in Part 1 of the programme. Alternatively, you may have the opportunity to complete an internship and research at a workplace involved in migration.

If you're doing the Diploma, you'll complete Part 1 of the Master's.

Certificate students complete the core course in Part 1 and choose one further course from the MMigS programme.

How you'll learn

For most of your courses you'll attend one three-hour seminar each week that will include classroom discussions and sometimes student presentations.

You'll also complete your own self-directed research under the guidance of your supervisor. You'll meet with them regularly to discuss your progress.

Duration and workload

The MMigS can be completed in one calendar year of full-time study, or in two years part time. You'll need to finish the degree within three years of enrolling.

The PGDipMigS takes two trimesters of full-time study or can be studied over four trimesters part time.

You can complete the PGCertMigS in one trimester, or over two trimesters part time.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

In the heart of it

In the capital city of Wellington, you'll be at the centre of immigration policy and decision-making. Take advantage of Victoria's links with national organisations that deal with migration such as the Office of Ethnic Communities, the Asia New Zealand Foundation and Immigration New Zealand.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues.

You'll have opportunities to attend events, workshops, social functions and seminars such as the Student Learning Postgraduate Seminars skills sessions.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can give you information and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

People with an in-depth knowledge of migration issues are increasingly in demand in governments, NGOs, media and research organisations. You'll be able to apply your understanding of migration in a wide range of professions such as policy analysis, research, international development, community development and refugee resettlement.



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International insights and opportunities. Develop a deep practical and theoretical understanding of the ways power is exercised. Explore how conflict is managed and security maintained across the globe. Read more

International insights and opportunities

Develop a deep practical and theoretical understanding of the ways power is exercised. Explore how conflict is managed and security maintained across the globe.

You'll get insights into the pressing geopolitical issues of our age, such as the relationship between the US and China, cybersecurity, the South China Sea, and strategic responses to the problems of terrorism and civil conflict.

Enhance your policy, analytical and research skills and accelerate your career with a globally connected Strategic Studies programme.

Studying with the School of History, Philosophy, Political Science and International Relations, you’ll join a fully integrated Political Science and International Relations programme, giving you access to a broad range of relevant courses and expertise.

What you’ll study

The MSS is in two parts—a taught and a research component.

The taught component starts with a core course and a range of approved courses.

As well as Strategic Studies courses, you can choose from selected International Relations and Political Science courses.

For the research component you can choose between a 60-point dissertation and a combination of a 30-point research essay or project and approved taught courses.

You may get permission from the head of school to do a 90-point thesis in place of the part two research component and some part one courses.

Postgraduate Diploma in Strategic Studies

You can choose to study only the taught courses and get a PGDipSS. If you later complete the research courses you’ll receive your MSS in place of the PGDipSS.

Workload

If you are studying full time you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Duration

The MSS will usually take 12 months for full-time students and 24 months for part-time students.

The PGDipSS generally takes two trimesters full time or four trimesters part time.

Capital connections

Take advantage of the programme’s location in the nation’s capital and close relationship with the policy, diplomatic and security communities. You’ll develop connections and get practical expertise through seminars, roundtables and guest lectures.

International recognition

Work with internationally recognised staff who are prominent researchers, teachers and commentators on strategic and security issues.

You’ll study alongside the Centre for Strategic Studies, ranked number two in the region by the University of Pennsylvania 2015 Global Go To Think Tank Index Report, and 39th worldwide among university think tanks.

Fast-track or fit in with work

You can complete either qualification in a year, giving you a fast-track to specialist expertise in Strategic Studies.

You can also study part time while you work, with courses commonly available in the late afternoon or early evening.

Community

Join a school with a focus on fostering its postgraduate community. Enjoy the benefits of strong relationships with staff, a thriving research culture and practical support through postgraduate seminars and events. You’ll get to hear leading speakers from overseas including the annual lecture by the Kippenberger Visiting Professor in Strategic Studies.

Careers

Gain the expertise needed to work in the wider security community, including government, research organisations and think tanks, civil society and the private sector.

You might work in policy, research, assessment or analysis jobs in organisations with a foreign affairs, defence or intelligence role.

The programme has a successful track record of getting internships in New Zealand and overseas—a good way to set up your career here or further afield.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can give you information and provides a voice for you on campus.



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Increase your expertise and make a positive contribution to development practice around the world. Examine the theories and practices associated with inequalities in world development, and investigate the enormous differences between the living standards of people worldwide and what we can do about them. Read more

Increase your expertise and make a positive contribution to development practice around the world. Examine the theories and practices associated with inequalities in world development, and investigate the enormous differences between the living standards of people worldwide and what we can do about them.

Look at the relationships between people and institutions, developed and developing societies, and consider the effect these relationships have on the processes of social, political, economic and environmental transformation.

Postgraduate Development Studies is designed to suit people from a wide range of disciplines and occupations. If you have work experience in community and international development, particularly in the Asia-Pacific region, or want to work in the area in the future, postgraduate Development Studies is a good choice for you.

Overseas research opportunities

You'll be encouraged to spend some time in a developing country as part of your postgraduate study—you can complete your Master's thesis based on your work in a developing country.

Past research has been done in countries such as Cambodia, Chile, the Cook Islands, Indonesia, Laos, Peru, the Philippines, Samoa, Tonga and Vanuatu.

Current issues and possible research areas in Development Studies include:

  • environmental change
  • gender equity
  • globalisation
  • human rights
  • inequality
  • international aid
  • participation and democracy
  • poverty.

You'll be part of an active and dynamic culture of world-class research. Work with experienced staff who are internationally renowned in their fields. Choose an area of research that interests you.

Postgraduate Diploma in Development Studies

If you're wanting to study without doing a thesis, you can enrol for the Postgraduate Diploma in Development Studies (PGDipDevStud).

It's a great option if you're already in the workforce and are looking to update or build your skills, or if you're a recent graduate wanting to expand on your undergraduate degree.

Duration

The Master of Development Studies can be completed in two years of full-time study or in four years if you are studying part time.

The Postgraduate Diploma will take you one year of full-time study or two years part time.

Workload

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

How you'll study

You should plan your course of study with the programme coordinator before you enrol.

Master's programme

The first year of the Master of Development Studies consists of four core courses. You'll look at the theories of development, professional practice and technique, and the concepts and tools of development policy.

Development Research (DEVE 514) will prepare you for your thesis. You'll cover research methodology for development fieldwork and put together a full research proposal for your thesis, which you'll submit at the end of the course.

You'll also do a further 60 points of approved 400- and 500-level courses. You'll need to work towards an average of B+ grades in your first year.

In your second year you'll research and write your thesis. Your thesis has a maximum of 40,000 words which is around 120—150 pages.

Diploma programme

The PGDipDevStud follows the same requirements as the first year of the Master's—five core courses and a further 60 points of approved 400- and 500-level courses.

With permission from the programme coordinator, you may be able to replace DEVE 514 with another approved course.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues. You'll have opportunities to attend events, seminars, workshops and social functions.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can also give you information on study at Victoria and provides a voice for you on campus.



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