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Masters Degrees in Marine Sciences, New Zealand

We have 4 Masters Degrees in Marine Sciences, New Zealand

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With the increasing pressures on the marine environment, both in the South Pacific region and worldwide, experts in the conservation and management of marine organisms and ecosystems are in demand. Read more

With the increasing pressures on the marine environment, both in the South Pacific region and worldwide, experts in the conservation and management of marine organisms and ecosystems are in demand.

As a world-leader in marine conservation, New Zealand is a great place to develop your expertise in the field. Its unique and lengthy coastline is home to numerous marine organisms—from the tiny phytoplankton to the endangered New Zealand sea lion.

Study with Victoria's School of Biological Sciences, a leader in marine biology research. Examine marine conservation issues and practice using examples from New Zealand, Australia, South Pacific and wider Indo-Pacific region, which can be applied worldwide.

Marine Conservation can be studied through two qualifications. The Master of Marine Conservation (MMarCon) is a taught Master's with no thesis component and is the only taught Marine Conservation Master's degree in New Zealand.

Or you can choose to study the Postgraduate Certificate in Marine Conservation (PGCertMarCon), a shorter qualification for those who want to expand their expertise into a new area of interest.

Master of Marine Conservation

The 180-point Master of Marine Conservation consists of three core courses and three courses chosen from a range of marine biology, biodiversity, ecology, ecological restoration and conservation courses. You can also choose courses that specialise in environmental management and conservation issues relating to New Zealand Māori and Pacific Island communities.

Two of your core courses, BIOL 424 New Zealand Conservation Practice and BIOL 529 Tropical Marine Conservation Practice, are field courses. You'll visit several world-renowned marine conservation sites in New Zealand and overseas.

The field courses will have costs over and above the course fees.

You'll also examine marine conservation issues of cultural and socioeconomic significance to Māori and Pacific peoples, such as exploitation of coastal regions and ecotourism, seabed and foreshore rights, and community-led conservation strategies.

Postgraduate Certificate in Marine Conservation

The Postgraduate Certificate is made up of three courses totalling 90 points chosen from any of the courses in the MMarCon programme; however, you must include at least one of the core courses.

Workload

If you are studying full time you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Duration

The Master of Marine Conservation can be completed in 12 months of full-time study, or in 24 months part time.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Marine Conservation can be completed in six months of full-time study or in 12 months part time.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues. You'll have opportunities to attend events, workshops, social functions and seminars.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can give you information and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

You'll gain skills and knowledge in a wide range of areas within the conservation and management of marine organisms and ecosystems, in both temperate and tropical climates. You might find work at Crown Research Institutes, private research institutes or with national government agencies managing marine conservation and fisheries.

Other organisations you may work with include regional authorities such as city, regional and district councils, consultancy firms carrying out contract marine biology work or non-government agencies and not-for-profit organisations.



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Human impact, loss of biodiversity and a growing awareness of environmental change make conservation biology more important every day. Read more

Human impact, loss of biodiversity and a growing awareness of environmental change make conservation biology more important every day.

Linking conservation, ecology, biodiversity and sustainability, the Master of Conservation Biology is a one-year, 180-point professional Master's. You'll get the scientific expertise you need to do conservation work in New Zealand and around the world.

Wellington is an international hot spot for biodiversity and studying with the School of Biological Sciences you'll learn from world leaders in conservation practice—internationally respected scientists whose work informs the management of New Zealand’s unique biota.

Using theoretical and field-based approaches in a range of terrestrial and marine environments, you’ll explore the processes of conservation biology. Examine internationally renowned examples of conservation best practice in action, and gain skills in experimental design, the collection and analysis of data and the presentation of research results.

You'll graduate with the expertise to make a valuable contribution to the conservation of the natural environment.

Workload

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Field course

One of your core courses is held in the field, visiting key conservation sites in New Zealand.

BIOL 424 New Zealand Conservation Practice involves travel around the country to observe management practices and become familiar with the unique plants and animals of New Zealand.

How you'll study

You'll study three core courses and 90 points worth of approved courses of your choice.

If you're starting in January, you'll begin with the four-week field course, BIOL 424. The course sits outside normal trimester dates with the timing changing from year to year to allow for tide times. Usual timing for the start of the course is late January/early February and actual dates can be confirmed at least six months prior.

The July start to the programme includes the core course, BIOL 405 Biosecurity, which involves biosecurity management from both biological and legal perspectives.

While there is no thesis component to the MConBio, you can do small research projects through the elective BIOL 440. You'll need a supervisor for this course—talk to staff within the School of Biological Sciences about potential projects.

Study abroad

Broaden your horizons with the student exchange programme, Victoria Abroad. Study towards your Victoria University degree at one of 100 partner universities around the world. Talk to the programme manager if you're thinking about including an exchange in your programme of study.

Victoria Abroad

Prime location

Studying in Wellington offers unparalleled access to the natural wealth of New Zealand. Private and public conservation sites close by create opportunities for gaining research experience and learning conservation techniques.

Zealandia and Otari-Wilton's Bush are within the city boundaries and an ecological restoration programme is underway on Matiu/Somes Island in Wellington Harbour.

Two marine reserves are also close to Wellington city—Taputeranga on the south coast and Kapiti, an hour's drive north.



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The Master of Science (MSc) is a two-year degree which encompasses both coursework and research. The first year involves mainly coursework and preliminary research preparation. Read more

The Master of Science (MSc) is a two-year degree which encompasses both coursework and research. The first year involves mainly coursework and preliminary research preparation. Students will have the opportunity to contribute to existing fields of research, or to begin to develop new areas.

The MSc can be studied in any of the subjects listed below, and may be taken by a combination of coursework and thesis, or by thesis only. Students who have a Bachelor's degree will complete the MSc by papers and thesis (at least two years of full-time study). Students who have an Honours degree or postgraduate diploma can complete the degree by thesis only (minimum of one year of study).

Subject areas

View the list of subjects offered for the Master of Science (MSc) and the Master of Applied Science (MAppSc).

Structure of the Programme

The degree may be awarded in any of the subjects listed above. With the approval of the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Sciences) the degree may be awarded in a subject not listed above.

The programme of study shall be as prescribed for the subject concerned.

A candidate whose qualification for entry to the programme is the degree of Bachelor of Science with Honours or the Postgraduate Diploma in Science or equivalent may achieve the degree after a minimum of one year of further study, normally by completing a thesis or equivalent as prescribed in the MSc Schedule.

A candidate may be exempted from some of the prescribed papers on the basis of previous study.

A candidate shall, before commencing the investigation to be described in a thesis, secure the approval of the Head of the Department concerned for the topic, the supervisor(s), and the proposed course of the investigation.

A candidate may not present a thesis which has previously been accepted for another degree.

A candidate taking the degree by papers and thesis must pass both the papers and the thesis components.

For the thesis, the research should be of a kind that a diligent and competent student should complete within one year of full-time study.



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The Master of Environmental Sciences (MEnvSci) is a 180 point interdisciplinary degree that draws on a wide range of papers across the Biological, Chemical, Earth and Engineering Sciences. Read more

The Master of Environmental Sciences (MEnvSci) is a 180 point interdisciplinary degree that draws on a wide range of papers across the Biological, Chemical, Earth and Engineering Sciences.

A key feature of this degree is the development of scientific and interdisciplinary (cross-faculty) research skills, including collection and analysis of data and critical review of the relevant literature.

The MEnvSci is normally a 12-18 month degree comprising a minimum of 90 points in taught papers at 500 level and a maximum 90 point thesis.  The balance of thesis papers to taught papers may be altered subject to permission from the graduate co-ordinator in your discipline of choice.

Study an MEnvSci at Waikato University and you will enjoy more lab and field work, more one-on-one time with top academics and access to world-class research equipment. Our great industry contacts may also mean exciting collaborations with local, national and international companies and organisations.

While the bulk of your papers will be drawn from the Faculty of Science & Engineering, you may also include papers from the Faculty of Arts & Social SciencesWaikato Management School, the Faculty of Maori and Indigenous Studies and Te Piringa - Faculty of Law.

Facilities

The University of Waikato's School of Science is home to a suite of well-equipped, world-class laboratories.  You will have the opportunity to use complex research equipment and facilities such as NMR spectroscopyDNA sequencing and the University of Waikato Herbarium.

The School of Engineering’s specialised laboratories includes the Large Scale Lab complex that features a suite of workshops and laboratories dedicated to engineering teaching and research.  These include 3D printing, a mechanical workshop and computer labs with engineering design software.

Build a successful career

Depending on the major completed and your particular interests, graduates of this degree may find employment in a range of science-related industries, including local and regional councils, Crown Research Institutes, energy companies, environmental agencies, government departments, environmental consulting companies, private research companies, universities, food and dairy industries and agriculture and fisheries industries.

Career opportunities

  • Agricultural Adviser
  • Biosecurity Officer
  • Coastal Resource Manager
  • Consent Planner
  • Environmental Analyst
  • Environmental Scientist
  • Hydrologist
  • Oceanographer
  • Water Resource Manager


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