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Masters Degrees in History & Archaeology, New Zealand

We have 10 Masters Degrees in History & Archaeology, New Zealand

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The Master of Science (MSc) is a two-year degree which encompasses both coursework and research. The first year involves mainly coursework and preliminary research preparation. Read more
The Master of Science (MSc) is a two-year degree which encompasses both coursework and research. The first year involves mainly coursework and preliminary research preparation. Students will have the opportunity to contribute to existing fields of research, or to begin to develop new areas.

The MSc can be studied in any of the subjects listed below, and may be taken by a combination of coursework and thesis, or by thesis only. Students who have a Bachelor's degree will complete the MSc by papers and thesis (at least two years of full-time study). Students who have an Honours degree or postgraduate diploma can complete the degree by thesis only (minimum of one year of study).

Subject areas

-Anatomy
-Biochemistry
-Bioengineering
-Botany
-Chemistry
-Clothing and Textile Sciences
-Cognitive Science
-Computational Modelling
-Computer Science
-Consumer Food Science
-Design for Technology (No new enrolments)
-Ecology
-Economics
-Electronics
-Energy Studies
-Environmental Management
-Environmental Science
-Food Science
-Genetics
-Geographic Information Systems
-Geography
-Geology
-Geophysics
-Human Nutrition
-Immunology
-Information Science
-Marine Science
-Mathematics
-Microbiology
-Neuroscience
-Pharmacology
-Physics
-Physiology
-Plant Biotechnology
-Psychology
-Statistics
-Surveying
-Toxicology
-Wildlife Management
-Zoology

Structure of the Programme

The degree may be awarded in any of the subjects listed above. With the approval of the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Sciences) the degree may be awarded in a subject not listed above.

The programme of study shall be as prescribed for the subject concerned. A candidate whose qualification for entry to the programme is the degree of Bachelor of Science with Honours or the Postgraduate Diploma in Science or equivalent may achieve the degree after a minimum of one year of further study, normally by completing a thesis or equivalent as prescribed in the MSc Schedule.
A candidate may be exempted from some of the prescribed papers on the basis of previous study.

A candidate shall, before commencing the investigation to be described in a thesis, secure the approval of the Head of the Department concerned for the topic, the supervisor(s), and the proposed course of the investigation.

A candidate may not present a thesis which has previously been accepted for another degree. A candidate taking the degree by papers and thesis must pass both the papers and the thesis components.

For the thesis, the research should be of a kind that a diligent and competent student should complete within one year of full-time study

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Master of Arts under Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. Are you seeking the ability to think critically and communicate well? A Master of Arts (MA) from Waikato will teach you the skills to work independently and see a major project through to completion. Read more

Master of Arts under Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

Are you seeking the ability to think critically and communicate well? A Master of Arts (MA) from Waikato will teach you the skills to work independently and see a major project through to completion. These are characteristics that are highly sought after by employers.

Enrolling in a MA gives you the opportunity to engage in independent (but supervised) research in one or more of a wide range of Arts subjects. Graduating with an MA provides you with a gateway to a higher research degree or to a wide range of careers.

Master of Arts under Faculty of Māori and Indigenous Studies

The recognition of Māori as an official language of Aotearoa has been accompanied by an acknowledgement of tangata whenua issues within the community and society as a whole. The ability to be fluent in both Māori and English has become increasingly important within a number of professional areas. These areas include: Iwi/hapu development, Education, Medicine, Research, Media, Government and Travel and Tourism.

You can choose from the following subjects: Māori Language/Te Reo Māori, Maori Cultural Studies/Tikanga Māori, Māori Media and Communication.

Industry Connections

The programmes within the MA host networks and relationships with a diverse range of national and international industry bodies. These include, the wider education sector (particularly with secondary schools), linguistic and cultural groups, creative, theatrical and performing groups, embassies, government, business organisations, historical organisations, international organisations, and industrial and professional groups or organisations.

Music and Theatre Studies, for example, have links directly with the public at large through the Gallagher Academy of Performing Arts. History has close links with the New Zealand Historical Association and English with Creative New Zealand and the Fulbright Foundation.

Career Opportunities

Our subjects equip MA graduates for specific careers. For instance, a Screen and Media Studies MA graduate might become a director or producer, a media relations adviser, a media research executive, a professional fundraiser, a public affairs specialist, a public relations consultant or a journalist. History MA graduates might become historians, museum curators, heritage researchers or work in community development (for instance, with tribal authorities). Foreign language MA graduates might work in the diplomatic service or become international marketing managers, trade commissioners, interpreters or translators – the possibilities are endless.

Subjects

To see a full list of the subjects available please visit http://www.waikato.ac.nz/study/qualifications/master-of-arts



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A Master of Social Sciences (MSocSc) builds on the Bachelors or Honours qualification you've already gained. When studying for your MSocSc, you'll focus on your preferred Social Science subject area and you'll immerse yourself in a high-level programme of study. Read more

A Master of Social Sciences (MSocSc) builds on the Bachelors or Honours qualification you've already gained. When studying for your MSocSc, you'll focus on your preferred Social Science subject area and you'll immerse yourself in a high-level programme of study. You'll learn the latest research techniques and be updated on recent developments in knowledge relating to your chosen field.

You'll be preparing for a dissertation or thesis, so will be conducting a substantial amount of your own independent research. If you think you may want to complete a doctorate level qualification later on, completing a MSocSc prepares you for that next level of academic study.

As you grow your knowledge of your chosen subject area, you'll be refining your intellectual skills, particularly your ability to think critically, problem solve and analyse. This will enable you to prepare for leadership roles in fields related to your subject area.

Industry Connections

During your studies, you'll be supervised by well-connected Faculty members who have networks with people working in a wide range of sectors, from business to government.

These people, including representatives from local and central government and tribal authorities, provide input into the different subject areas. Members of community groups, business organisations and industrial and professional groups do the same – they provide valuable support and input. The subject area experts themselves provide consultancy services that the community in general needs, so there are broader links and connections made through this sharing of knowledge.

Career opportunities

  • Clinical or Community Psychologist
  • Coastal Resource Officer
  • Communications Coordinator
  • Community Health Administrator
  • Counsellor
  • Demographer
  • Economist
  • Educator (Primary, Secondary or Tertiary Sector)
  • Environmental Planner
  • Hazards and Emergency Management Officer
  • Human Resources Advisor
  • Industrial Relations Advocate
  • Journalist
  • Policy Analyst
  • PR Consultant
  • Research Executive
  • Social Services Manager
  • Tourism Consultant
  • Union Organiser

Subjects

Please visit http://www.waikato.ac.nz/study/qualifications/master-of-social-sciences to see what subjects are available for the Master of Social Sciences.



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The Master of Māori and Pacific Development (MMPD) will take you through an advanced assessment of the underlying concepts and principles associated with social, cultural, political and economic development for indigenous peoples. Read more

The Master of Māori and Pacific Development (MMPD) will take you through an advanced assessment of the underlying concepts and principles associated with social, cultural, political and economic development for indigenous peoples.

You'll explore approaches to solving problems in the theory and practice of indigenous development, and more so in the realms of Māori and Pacific Development.

You can be assured that you are studying with the best. Our lecturers remain at the coalface of global development challenges and discourses including the refugee crisis, climate change, environmental issues, economic development challenges, labour migration, sustainable development, poverty and illiteracy.

You'll be learning with those who are recognised as development practitioners in NZ, Pacific and internationally through their projects, networks and collaborations. This includes projects for UNESCO, ASPBAE (Asia South Pacific Association for Adult and Basic Education) and other civil society groups. Our staff are also working towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG’s) as agreed upon by the United Nations in 2015.

Course Structure

120 Point Masters

The Master of Māori and Pacific Development involves two semesters of full time study or its equivalent in part time study.

Students may choose from the following options:

  • a 120 point thesis, or
  • a 90 point thesis and 30 points from an approved 500 level paper, or
  • a 60 point dissertation and 60 points from approved 500 level papers.

At least 60 points must be gained from a single subject. Up to 30 points may be taken from outside the field of the degree.

Students should normally have qualified for the Postgraduate Diploma or its equivalent and have normally achieved a B+ or better.

180 Point Masters Requirements

To be admitted to the MMPD directly from a BMPD or BA, or equivalent, students will need to gain a high level of attainment in their relevant 300 level papers, normally an A-. This requirement, combined with the inclusion of an approved research methodology paper, will underpin successful completion of a significant research project of 60, 90, or 120 points.

This pathway involves one full calendar year or one and a half academic calendar years or its equivalent in part-time study. It comprises 180 points of which at least 60 points at 500 level from one subject must be taken, including an approved research methods paper, and any compulsory papers prescribed in the relevant subject. Students must take either a 120 point thesis, a 90 point thesis, or a 60 point dissertation.

Career opportunities

  • Government Ministries and Agencies
  • Public Corporations
  • International Organisations
  • Public Service/Administration
  • Local Government
  • Small and Medium Business ownership
  • Business Planning
  • Appraisal and Evaluation
  • Negotiation and Facilitation
  • Health, Training and Welfare
  • Local and Tribal Authorities
  • Marae, Community  and Non-governmental Work
  • Research, Consultancy and Needs and Impacts Assessments


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Study your specialist subject in detail and take the opportunity to contribute to the world's knowledge in that area. Enhance your critical thinking, communication and problem-solving abilities and learn to create and assess new ideas. Read more

Study your specialist subject in detail and take the opportunity to contribute to the world's knowledge in that area. Enhance your critical thinking, communication and problem-solving abilities and learn to create and assess new ideas.

Working alongside some of New Zealand’s leading academic staff, you'll complete a research thesis of up to 40,000 words and emerge as an expert in your subject with highly developed research skills.

Victoria's MA is offered in more than 40 subjects. Most programmes are by thesis only but some include coursework and require a shorter thesis, and others you can complete doing mainly coursework and a research project.

A Master of Arts will give your career prospects a boost and open doors to new opportunities. Be a leader in a humanities or social science field and help make New Zealand a better place.

Available subjects

Duration

If you are doing an MA by thesis you'll normally need to complete it within 12 months, or two years if you're studying part time.

If you are doing your MA by coursework and thesis you'll normally be able to complete your degree within 12 months, but you can take up to one year and six months. Part-time students can take up to four years to complete this MA.

Workload

If you are studying full time you can expect a workload of a minimum of 30 hours a week for much of the year. If you can't commit this many hours you should enrol as a part-time student.



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Fast track your career in the museum and heritage sector. Get the practical skills, theoretical knowledge and sector experience you need to work as a museum and heritage professional. Read more

Fast track your career in the museum and heritage sector

Get the practical skills, theoretical knowledge and sector experience you need to work as a museum and heritage professional.

Choose from a flexible range of qualifications that can all be completed in a year.

Get connected

Join a programme that's an integral part of New Zealand’s museum and heritage sector. It’s been designed for and with the sector to give you the professional development you need for a career in GLAM (galleries, libraries, archives and museums) or in heritage management.

Taking advantage of Wellington's rich cultural resources, you’ll head out on numerous field trips and meet with experts from local organisations.

Studying in the School of Art History, Classics and Religious Studies, you’ll learn from academics with strong local and international networks, along with highly qualified professionals drawn from the sector.

Placements build practical experience

Learn on the job. You'll get to do a placement in one of the dozens of organisations involved with the programme and if you're doing the MMHP you'll have the option of doing a longer internship. To get an idea of the opportunities available, read about some of the previous student placements.

You’ll get practical experience, make valuable contacts and learn from working professionals.

Flexible qualifications

Choose from a range of flexible qualifications and courses that balance taught classes and work experience, academic research and professional skills, theory and practice.

The qualifications are part of a tiered family, with each one counting towards the next step. This lets you choose the qualification that best suits your current situation and build on this later should you wish.

Qualification family structure

The Master of Museum and Heritage Practice is part of a tiered family of qualifications. These are staircased so that courses completed for each qualification can count towards the next step.

  • A Postgraduate Certificate in Museum and Heritage Practice (PGCertMHP) can lead into:
  • A Postgraduate Diploma in Museum and Heritage Practice (PGDipMHP), which can lead into:
  • A Master of Museum and Heritage Practice (MMHP).

Choose the qualification with the time commitment, course options and career benefits that suit you.

What you'll study

All qualifications

Students studying each of the three qualifications do the core courses:

  • an introductory course
  • a practicum (including a 200-hour placement).

PGDip and Master's

  • If you're doing either a PGDipMHP or MMHP, you'll choose an additional 60 points from approved courses.
  • The introductory course, practicum and approved courses are normally done in Trimesters one and two as full-year courses. They make up Part One of the MMHP.

Master's

For Part Two of the MMHP, you'll do either:

  • a research essay and a project, or
  • an internship (600-hour placement).

Part Two is usually completed after Part One.

Workload

If you are studying full-time you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Duration

The MMHP can be completed in 12 months or three trimesters of full-time study, or in two to four years part-time study. The Diploma and Certificate can both be completed in a full year.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships with peers, university staff and future colleagues, and become part of a strong professional network.

You’ll be part of a small, friendly and supportive postgraduate programme and have access to the postgraduate room and printing facilities.

Kick off your study with a three-day wānanga. Experience a pōwhiri, stay on a marae and learn about tikanga Māori alongside members of the museum and heritage sector.

You'll have opportunities to attend and present to seminars, conferences, workshops and social functions.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can give you information on study at Victoria and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

Past students have been snapped up for a wide range of roles in the sector, including exhibition developer, collection manager, gallery manager, curator, researcher, registrar, interpreter and educator. They're working in museums, art galleries, libraries, archives, government and community and heritage organisations all around New Zealand. Other students have embarked on academic careers, building on their research work.

Find out more about museum and heritage careers



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Many of the most pressing issues facing New Zealand and the world today—climate change, the loss of biodiversity, and how to respond to new technologies—can't be solved using traditional scientific approaches. Read more

Many of the most pressing issues facing New Zealand and the world today—climate change, the loss of biodiversity, and how to respond to new technologies—can't be solved using traditional scientific approaches.

In the age of social media, clickbait headlines and 'fake news', new means of communicating science and engaging different groups and communities are required.

The 180-point Master of Science in Society is a cross-disciplinary programme that combines taught courses, research projects and your choice of final project to give you a practical understanding of the role of science in society.

You'll learn how to engage New Zealanders in conversations about the science that impacts their lives so they can make informed decisions. Find out how you can influence policy change and research priorities.

Broad perspectives

Develop your understanding of contemporary scientific issues, and draw from a range of diverse fields such as philosophy, history and the creative arts to gain a broader and more nuanced perspective on science.

Gain an insight into the range of perspectives different communities have on scientific and environmental issues, and explore the important role of mātauranga Māori and other indigenous knowledge in science decision-making.

The Master of Science in Society is suited to students who are interested in science but don't want to pursue a traditional postgraduate science research programme. If you're interested in more effective public engagement around key scientific issues like conservation and pest eradication, or you're keen to pursue a career in science policy or advocacy, this degree is a good choice for you.

Learn from the best

Learn from award-winning academics and professionals who are leaders in the field of science communication, public engagement with science, natural and social science, the humanities and the arts. You'll also be exposed to a wide range of expertise from across the university and from visiting experts.

How you’ll study

The Master of Science in Society has two parts. The first part takes place in Trimester One, is based on-campus and is compulsory for all students.

In Part 1, you'll focus on developing your critical thinking and communication skills in four taught courses. Look at the theory and practice of science communication, and gain a grounding in contemporary scientific issues and theories. Explore perspectives on science from different cultures and from across the humanities and social sciences.

You'll choose from three of four core 400-level courses, and complete an additional approved course worth 15 points.

The field component of SCIS 589, the Science Communication Project, also takes place during Trimester One.

You'll go on to put your learning into practice in Part 2 by completing your science communication project and a research essay. You'll also choose to do a work placement or a research project, or choose other relevant courses from another discipline of your choice, such as Māori Studies, Public Policy or Conservation Biology.

While working on your final projects you'll be supervised by subject experts from within and outside of the university, and will continue to meet regularly with your fellow students in tutorials or seminar sessions.

Study off-campus

You can complete Part 2 of your Master's remotely if your placement or research project takes place outside Wellington. You'll need to have sufficient internet access to take part in online seminars, lectures and workshops.

Duration and workload

The Master of Science in Society will take you three trimesters (one year) of full-time study, or up to three years if you are studying part time.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year.

If you're a part-time student, you can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.



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