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Masters Degrees in Geography, New Zealand

We have 14 Masters Degrees in Geography, New Zealand

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Become part of something bigger. Take part in a research-led physical geography programme and have an excellent, world-class learning experience. Read more

Become part of something bigger

Take part in a research-led physical geography programme and have an excellent, world-class learning experience.

Find out more about the Master of Science parent structure.

Massey’s Master of Sciences (Geography) will give you the knowledge and skills to understand and help solve some of the world’s most important environmental issues like flooding, coastal erosion, sea level change, landslide hazards and environmental change.

Broad range of equipment and facilities

You will have access to a wide range of techniques and equipment, making it easier to progress your research in a timely and comprehensive fashion. From ground survey equipment like a Trimble RTK differential GPS and S6 robotic total station and a ground penetrating radar to a range of coring apparatus e.g., lake/bog corers, percussion corer and vibracorer and Schmidt hammers for relative age dating of boulders we have the specialist equipment to help your research meet global standards.

Other equipment includes:

  • Fully equipped palynology laboratory
  • SEM, TEM and Confocal microscopes (via the Manawatu Microscopy and Imaging Centre)
  • Classifynder automated microscope system prototype (see http://www.classifynder.com)
  • Laser particle size analyser
  • Sontek M9 river surveyor (ADCP flow meter)
  • Several electromagnetic flow meters
  • Chirp Sub-bottom sonar

Work readiness

Our strong relationship with industry and counciis and the masters programmes research element make our graduates very attractive to potential employers such as environmental consultancies and regional councils.

Globally-renowned expertise

Let our experts help you develop your own expertise.

Massey’s geography lecturers have an extensive range of experience and expertise. The ratio of staff to students is high. Your lecturers will be your mentors, working alongside you to fully engage you in the practical and theoretical aspects of advanced physical geography study, to prepare you for life in the workplace in a specialist sense or preparing you for research at a higher level.

World-leading

Massey’s geography programmes are ranked as some of the best globally. Out of 800 of the world’s leading universities we were ranked in the top 200 in the QS World University Rankings.

Gain expertise in an area of your choice

The physical geography team at Massey research and have expertise in fluvial processes, coastal processes, slope processes, palynology, biogeography, palaeoecology and river solutions. During the course of your studies you can choose to further your knowledge and apply your learning on an exciting research project like:

  • Monitoring active landslides in glaciated valleys
  • Age estimation of ancient glaciated rockslides
  • Refining understanding of marine terrace development
  • Reconstructing the evolution of estuaries and coastal environmentsStatistical analyses of earthquake-induced landslides
  • 3D soil mapping
  • Pollen-based vegetation and climate reconstructions
  • Applications of automated palynology systems
  • Mapping floodplain geomorphology
  • Flood series extension

Why postgraduate study?

Postgraduate study is hard work but hugely rewarding and empowering. The Master of Science will push you to produce your best creative, strategic and theoretical ideas. The workload replicates the high-pressure environment of senior workplace roles. Our experts are there to guide but if you have come from undergraduate study, you will find that postgraduate study demands more in-depth and independent study.

The postgraduate study experience

Some courses in the geography major are taught in block mode, which means you come onto campus for a period. This gives you the opportunity to come to Massey for a semester and spend valuable time with lecturers and fellow students in lectures, seminars, student-led presentations and seminars, lab work, field work day trips, small group discussions, and residential field work.

Not just more of the same

Postgraduate study is not just ‘more of the same’ undergraduate study. It takes you to a new level in knowledge and expertise especially in planning, time management, setting goals and milestones and undertaking research.

Geography options

The Master of Science (Geography) may comprise a selection of courses from across both physical and human geography. However, normally students taking this programme will focus on physical geography and it is this experience that is described in these pages.

Students should also consult the Master of Arts (Geography) programme pages for a description of the equivalent experience in human geography.



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Get a degree that's recognised worldwide and contribute to knowledge in your field. A Master of Science (MSc) will develop your technical, laboratory and academic writing skills to prepare you for a career in science. Read more

Get a degree that's recognised worldwide and contribute to knowledge in your field. A Master of Science (MSc) will develop your technical, laboratory and academic writing skills to prepare you for a career in science.

The MSc by thesis will take you between 12 and 15 months to complete. You'll carry out in-depth supervised research and write a thesis. During your studies you might also author publications for peer-reviewed journals.

To do an MSc by thesis you'll need an Honours degree or postgraduate diploma in an appropriate field, with an average grade of B+ or higher in your subject area.

Available subjects

Workload

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.



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Get a degree that's recognised worldwide and contribute to knowledge in your field. A Master of Science (MSc) will develop your technical, laboratory and academic writing skills to prepare you for a career in science. Read more

Get a degree that's recognised worldwide and contribute to knowledge in your field. A Master of Science (MSc) will develop your technical, laboratory and academic writing skills to prepare you for a career in science.

The MSc will take you between two and two and half years of full-time study or up to four years part time. In the first year of your MSc you'll take several courses related to your specialist subject area. Next, you'll carry out in-depth supervised research for 12–15 months and write a thesis. During your studies you might also author publications for peer-reviewed journals.

To do an MSc you'll need a Bachelor's degree in an appropriate field, with an average grade of B+ or higher in your subject area. You may also be able to qualify for entry if you have appropriate work or other experience.

Range of Master's programmes

Choose to complete this Master's programme or one of the specialist science Master's programmes. Most specialist programmes are 180 points and don't require a thesis.

If you have already done a BSc(Hons) you can apply to go directly into the 120-point MSc by thesis.

Available subjects

Workload

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.



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Study your specialist subject in detail and take the opportunity to contribute to the world's knowledge in that area. Enhance your critical thinking, communication and problem-solving abilities and learn to create and assess new ideas. Read more

Study your specialist subject in detail and take the opportunity to contribute to the world's knowledge in that area. Enhance your critical thinking, communication and problem-solving abilities and learn to create and assess new ideas.

Working alongside some of New Zealand’s leading academic staff, you'll complete a research thesis of up to 40,000 words and emerge as an expert in your subject with highly developed research skills.

Victoria's MA is offered in more than 40 subjects. Most programmes are by thesis only but some include coursework and require a shorter thesis, and others you can complete doing mainly coursework and a research project.

A Master of Arts will give your career prospects a boost and open doors to new opportunities. Be a leader in a humanities or social science field and help make New Zealand a better place.

Available subjects

Duration

If you are doing an MA by thesis you'll normally need to complete it within 12 months, or two years if you're studying part time.

If you are doing your MA by coursework and thesis you'll normally be able to complete your degree within 12 months, but you can take up to one year and six months. Part-time students can take up to four years to complete this MA.

Workload

If you are studying full time you can expect a workload of a minimum of 30 hours a week for much of the year. If you can't commit this many hours you should enrol as a part-time student.



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Gain an edge for success in the global economy. Take advantage of this unique opportunity for multidisciplinary study and discover the complex world of international trade. Read more

Gain an edge for success in the global economy

Take advantage of this unique opportunity for multidisciplinary study and discover the complex world of international trade. Explore the role of trade in society from a range of perspectives—the international legal rules, economic rationales and the political and social implications.

Study how the world is connected through trade and the way it affects businesses, as producers and exporters—consider these issues through the lenses of different disciplines. Explore the impact of trade on indigenous populations, including the historical and contemporary perspectives of Māori involvement in international trade.

Expert staff, international reputation

You'll be learning from lecturers with international reputations for teaching, research and publishing. And because international trade involves several disciplines, including International Relations, Economics, Law, Public Policy and Development Studies, teaching will be across four different faculties—Law, Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, and Victoria Business School.

What you'll study

The Master of International Trade is made up of four core courses totalling 120 points and further courses totalling 60 points.

The core courses will give you a broad knowledge of the main principles of international trade and the ability to apply that knowledge in discussion, debate and problem-solving.

You'll develop your oral and written communication skills, as well as a keen awareness of the social, economic, political and cultural contexts in which international trade operates.

You'll also gain an understanding of the customary laws of Māori and Pacific peoples and how these fit in with modern trade. Explore the impact of international trade agreements on Māori tino rangatiratanga/sovereignty.

Your elective courses can be any that are relevant to international trade and might include courses from the School of Geography, Environment and Earth Sciences or through Te Kawa a Māui (Māori Studies).

How you'll study

You'll learn through lectures, seminars, class discussion and meetings with course teachers and the programme director, and through your own independent study and research.

Lectures will be held in the evenings and during the day. Assessment will include a combination of tests, examinations, essays and reports.

Some courses are only available in certain Trimesters, check the programme timetable to help you plan your study.

Workload and duration

If you are studying full-time you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students taking two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

The Master of International Trade can be completed in three years of part-time study, or in three trimesters of full-time study.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues.

You'll have opportunities to attend events, workshops, social functions and seminars such as the Student Learning Postgraduate Research skills sessions.

Careers

A Master of International Trade will open doors to a career as an international trade specialist in public agencies, businesses and non-governmental organisations around the world.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can give you information and provides a voice for you on campus.



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Migration is increasingly a high-priority issue for governments and organisations around the world. Explore the social, economic and political drivers and consequences of forced and voluntary migration. Read more

Migration is increasingly a high-priority issue for governments and organisations around the world. Explore the social, economic and political drivers and consequences of forced and voluntary migration.

Drawing on several disciplines, including political science, geography and history, you'll discover why and how migration happens and gain an in-depth understanding of the challenges and opportunities it creates. You can choose to examine topics such as the refugee crisis in Europe, labour migration, multiculturalism and immigration as an election issue.

Learning across disciplines

You'll not only gain an in-depth understanding of migration issues, you'll develop your critical thinking, communications and research skills.

If you're a Master's student, you may have the opportunity to do an internship with an organisation involved in migration policy, research or practice. Or you can choose to complete a 60-point research project instead. Take the opportunity to contribute your own perspectives to the study of migration.

Qualification family structure

The Master of Migration is part of a tiered family of qualifications:

  • Master of Migration Studies
  • Postgraduate Diploma in Migration Studies
  • Postgraduate Certificate in Migration Studies

Choose the qualification that suits your career goals, time constraints and financial situation.

Staircasing allows movement in both directions—if you begin by enrolling in the Certificate or Diploma programme you can continue on to complete your Master's. Or if you enrol in the Master's but can't complete it, for whatever reason, you may be awarded the Certificate or Diploma.

What you'll study

The Master of Migration is divided into Part 1 and Part 2.

In Part 1 you'll complete four 30-point courses and you'll have some choice in what you study. In the core course—Approaches to Migration Studies POLS 488—you'll examine how migration is analysed, study the main concepts, theories and debates and prepare a research proposal. In your elective courses you might focus on a particular historical migration flow, explore the challenges of refugee resettlement in New Zealand, study the international or domestic politics of migration or choose to complete an individual research project.

In the second half of your studies, or Part 2, you'll complete a 60-point research essay that builds on your research proposal in Part 1 of the programme. Alternatively, you may have the opportunity to complete an internship and research at a workplace involved in migration.

If you're doing the Diploma, you'll complete Part 1 of the Master's.

Certificate students complete the core course in Part 1 and choose one further course from the MMigS programme.

How you'll learn

For most of your courses you'll attend one three-hour seminar each week that will include classroom discussions and sometimes student presentations.

You'll also complete your own self-directed research under the guidance of your supervisor. You'll meet with them regularly to discuss your progress.

Duration and workload

The MMigS can be completed in one calendar year of full-time study, or in two years part time. You'll need to finish the degree within three years of enrolling.

The PGDipMigS takes two trimesters of full-time study or can be studied over four trimesters part time.

You can complete the PGCertMigS in one trimester, or over two trimesters part time.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

In the heart of it

In the capital city of Wellington, you'll be at the centre of immigration policy and decision-making. Take advantage of Victoria's links with national organisations that deal with migration such as the Office of Ethnic Communities, the Asia New Zealand Foundation and Immigration New Zealand.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues.

You'll have opportunities to attend events, workshops, social functions and seminars such as the Student Learning Postgraduate Seminars skills sessions.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can give you information and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

People with an in-depth knowledge of migration issues are increasingly in demand in governments, NGOs, media and research organisations. You'll be able to apply your understanding of migration in a wide range of professions such as policy analysis, research, international development, community development and refugee resettlement.



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Deepen your understanding of the environmental issues facing New Zealand and the world. Examine subjects like climate change, the sustainability of our cities, loss of biodiversity, water quality and consumerism. Read more

Deepen your understanding of the environmental issues facing New Zealand and the world. Examine subjects like climate change, the sustainability of our cities, loss of biodiversity, water quality and consumerism.

Learn how environmental problems can be addressed through better policy, planning, design and communication. Discover how human behaviour can be influenced by these things and the role that politics plays in environmental concerns. You'll graduate with a good understanding of how you can create change.

Study alongside students from around the world and find out how environmental issues are tackled in different countries and the different problems they face.

Learn from the experts

Learn from highly regarded academics who are experts in their fields. You'll also hear from guest lecturers who are experienced professionals in environmental planning, economics, policy, law, politics, ethics and indigenous development.

Across disciplines

Environmental Studies connects with Geography and Development Studies as well as Public Policy, Law and Management. You can study the subject at postgraduate level from a science, commerce or arts background. Because you'll study with students from a variety of disciplines and professions, you'll broaden your own understanding through their different viewpoints and experiences.

The right connections

Make connections with the organisations that make the policy, do the research and create the spaces we live in. In the capital city you can take advantage of Victoria's relationships with the central government policy world and major research institutes like the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research and the New Zealand Climate Change Research Institute.

Flexible study

You can choose to complete a one-year Postgraduate Diploma or a two-year Master's that will include a thesis. Both programmes offer you the flexibility to choose the courses that best suit your interests and career goals.

If you are interested in creating a better environment and have a Bachelor's degree with a B+ average in a relevant subject (or B for the PGDip), then postgraduate Environmental Studies is ideal for you. If you don't have a degree but have significant relevant experience, you may also be able to enrol in one of the programmes.

Available qualifications

  • Master of Environmental Studies
  • Postgraduate Diploma in Environmental Studies

Choose the qualification that suits your career goals, time constraints and financial situation. If you begin by enrolling in the Diploma programme you may be able to continue on to complete your Master's. Or if you enrol in the Master's but only complete the first year (Part 1), for whatever reason, you can be awarded the Diploma.

What you'll study

The PGDip is the same as the first year, or Part 1, of the Master's.

Core courses

Both qualifications include the 15-point core courses Environmental Management, and Research Methods. You'll get an overview of the current issues decision-makers face in managing the environment and look at case studies ranging from water management to urban design.

Research Methods will prepare you for thesis research and you'll study research design, data collection and analysis and how to communicate research findings.

Elective courses

You'll select the remaining 90 points from a wide range of approved 400- and 500-level courses from several different disciplines. You'll complete around seven of these and can tailor your choices to match your areas of interest and career direction.

You might focus on environmental law or economics, Māori resource management, climate change, political ecology or the psychology of behaviour change.

Master's thesis and practicum

If you are doing the Master's, you'll go on to a second year (Part 2) and complete a research thesis. You can choose to do the 35,000-word option, or complete a 25,000-word thesis and do a 30-point practicum. The practicum is a supervised work placement at an organisation that specialises in environmental or resource management.

You'll need an average grade of B+ across your courses in Part 1, for entry into Part 2 of the Master's programme.

Research topics

The Environment Studies programme encourages an active culture of research. Find out what potential projects you might work on.

Workload and duration

If you are studying full time you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

The Postgraduate Diploma (PGDipEnvStud) can be completed in one year full time or usually two years part time. The Master’s (MEnvStud) will take you up to two and half years of full-time study or can be completed over up to five years if you are part time.

Careers

You'll graduate able to contribute to environmental practice in New Zealand or anywhere in the world. The skills you'll develop are relevant to many careers, including environmental policy, planning and management.

Many students have gone on to work in places like the Ministry for the Environment, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade and regional or city councils. You might join a non-governmental organisation (NGO), a corporation, an iwi organisation or become an environmental business consultant or social entrepreneur.



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During your Master of Environmental Planning (MEP), you'll develop your knowledge and skills relating to both the theory and practical applications of planning. Read more

During your Master of Environmental Planning (MEP), you'll develop your knowledge and skills relating to both the theory and practical applications of planning.

Your research skills will build to an advanced level, and you'll gain a broad and in-depth understanding of knowledge relating to this specialist area. Throughout this degree, you'll refine your ability to show independent critical judgement.

Collaboration with Planning Professionals

At Waikato, you'll benefit from the service provided by a Planning Advisory Group. This Group is made up of experienced planning professionals working in the region.

During the MEP programme, you'll go to guest lectures, attend workshops and enjoy field trips where a range of professionals share their expertise. The Environmental Planning programme has enjoyed longstanding and active links with these professionals.

The teaching staff are connected with relevant networks such as the Resource Management Law Association and the New Zealand Planning Institute. Collaboration is encouraged and the MEP helps build close relations between Faculty members and employers, whether they be in environmental agencies or resource-use industries. These links help with addressing practical environmental problems.

Course Structure

The MEP involves one year of full-time study, or the equivalent in part-time study. It comprises 120 points at 500 level, including either a 60-point dissertation and 60 points from approved 500 level papers , or a 90-point thesis and 30 points from approved 500 level papers , or a 120-point thesis.

Papers offered for the MEP include:

  • ECON539 – Environmental and Resource Economics
  • ENVP501 – Environmental Planning: Practicum 1
  • ENVP502 – Environmental Planning: Practicum 2
  • ENVP503 – Legal Principles and Processes for Planners
  • ENVP504 – Strategic Spatial Planning
  • ENVP505 – Maori Environmental Management
  • ENVP508 – Plan Interpretation and Consent Processing
  • ENVP510 – Planning Theory
  • ENVP589 – Directed Study
  • ENVP590 – Directed Study
  • ENVP591 – Dissertation
  • ENVP592 – Dissertation
  • ENVP593 – Environmental Planning Thesis
  • ENVP594 – Environmental Planning Thesis
  • ENVS524 – Environmental Evaluation
  • GEOG518 – Advanced Cartographic Theory and Practice
  • GEOG520 – Human Dimensions of Environmental Change
  • GEOG538 – Automated Spatial Analysis using Geographic Information Systems
  • GEOG548 – Advanced Geographic Information Systems Modelling
  • GEOG558 – Applied Geographic Information Systems for Research and Planning
  • GEOG568 – Applications of Geographic Information Systems
  • POLS537 – Environmental Politics and Public Policy

Career Opportunities

Once you've completed your MEP, you'll be qualified to work in a range of different jobs. You may be passionate about research, and want to work in a research-focused role in either the public or private sector. Maybe you'd prefer to work for a professional planning consultancy or in a local or central government agency. You may like to work for an iwi authority or a natural resource user.



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Master of Arts under Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. Are you seeking the ability to think critically and communicate well? A Master of Arts (MA) from Waikato will teach you the skills to work independently and see a major project through to completion. Read more

Master of Arts under Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

Are you seeking the ability to think critically and communicate well? A Master of Arts (MA) from Waikato will teach you the skills to work independently and see a major project through to completion. These are characteristics that are highly sought after by employers.

Enrolling in a MA gives you the opportunity to engage in independent (but supervised) research in one or more of a wide range of Arts subjects. Graduating with an MA provides you with a gateway to a higher research degree or to a wide range of careers.

Master of Arts under Faculty of Māori and Indigenous Studies

The recognition of Māori as an official language of Aotearoa has been accompanied by an acknowledgement of tangata whenua issues within the community and society as a whole. The ability to be fluent in both Māori and English has become increasingly important within a number of professional areas. These areas include: Iwi/hapu development, Education, Medicine, Research, Media, Government and Travel and Tourism.

You can choose from the following subjects: Māori Language/Te Reo Māori, Maori Cultural Studies/Tikanga Māori, Māori Media and Communication.

Industry Connections

The programmes within the MA host networks and relationships with a diverse range of national and international industry bodies. These include, the wider education sector (particularly with secondary schools), linguistic and cultural groups, creative, theatrical and performing groups, embassies, government, business organisations, historical organisations, international organisations, and industrial and professional groups or organisations.

Music and Theatre Studies, for example, have links directly with the public at large through the Gallagher Academy of Performing Arts. History has close links with the New Zealand Historical Association and English with Creative New Zealand and the Fulbright Foundation.

Career Opportunities

Our subjects equip MA graduates for specific careers. For instance, a Screen and Media Studies MA graduate might become a director or producer, a media relations adviser, a media research executive, a professional fundraiser, a public affairs specialist, a public relations consultant or a journalist. History MA graduates might become historians, museum curators, heritage researchers or work in community development (for instance, with tribal authorities). Foreign language MA graduates might work in the diplomatic service or become international marketing managers, trade commissioners, interpreters or translators – the possibilities are endless.

Subjects

To see a full list of the subjects available please visit http://www.waikato.ac.nz/study/qualifications/master-of-arts



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A Master of Social Sciences (MSocSc) builds on the Bachelors or Honours qualification you've already gained. When studying for your MSocSc, you'll focus on your preferred Social Science subject area and you'll immerse yourself in a high-level programme of study. Read more

A Master of Social Sciences (MSocSc) builds on the Bachelors or Honours qualification you've already gained. When studying for your MSocSc, you'll focus on your preferred Social Science subject area and you'll immerse yourself in a high-level programme of study. You'll learn the latest research techniques and be updated on recent developments in knowledge relating to your chosen field.

You'll be preparing for a dissertation or thesis, so will be conducting a substantial amount of your own independent research. If you think you may want to complete a doctorate level qualification later on, completing a MSocSc prepares you for that next level of academic study.

As you grow your knowledge of your chosen subject area, you'll be refining your intellectual skills, particularly your ability to think critically, problem solve and analyse. This will enable you to prepare for leadership roles in fields related to your subject area.

Industry Connections

During your studies, you'll be supervised by well-connected Faculty members who have networks with people working in a wide range of sectors, from business to government.

These people, including representatives from local and central government and tribal authorities, provide input into the different subject areas. Members of community groups, business organisations and industrial and professional groups do the same – they provide valuable support and input. The subject area experts themselves provide consultancy services that the community in general needs, so there are broader links and connections made through this sharing of knowledge.

Career opportunities

  • Clinical or Community Psychologist
  • Coastal Resource Officer
  • Communications Coordinator
  • Community Health Administrator
  • Counsellor
  • Demographer
  • Economist
  • Educator (Primary, Secondary or Tertiary Sector)
  • Environmental Planner
  • Hazards and Emergency Management Officer
  • Human Resources Advisor
  • Industrial Relations Advocate
  • Journalist
  • Policy Analyst
  • PR Consultant
  • Research Executive
  • Social Services Manager
  • Tourism Consultant
  • Union Organiser

Subjects

Please visit http://www.waikato.ac.nz/study/qualifications/master-of-social-sciences to see what subjects are available for the Master of Social Sciences.



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What is GIS?. GISc, Geographic Information Science, is the science that underlies Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and their use. Read more

What is GIS?

GISc, Geographic Information Science, is the science that underlies Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and their use. GIS, as they are traditionally known, capture, store, manage, analyse and visualise spatial data in one software environment. Or, GIS, taken in the broadest sense of the term, are information systems that work with spatial data, be they spatial databases or location based services available on your iPhone. Our MGIS teaches both the standalone GIS software, such as ArcGIS, as well as a wider array of spatially aware applications.

About the programme

The MGIS and PGDipGIS programmes provide full time and part time opportunities for students with an interest and background in Geographic Information Science. Students must be resident in either Christchurch, Wellington or Auckland, New Zealand, in order to attend classes at either Canterbury University, Victoria University of Wellington or Auckland University of Technology. 

The programme aims to provide a model for exceptional collaborative teaching and research, using new technology and media to enhance the learning experience for students. The program will use a blended learning approach, involving synchronous seminars and labs (via the KAREN network), residential intensive sessions, and online synchronous and asynchronous learning support. Once a year, students will be brought together for a one week gathering, which will serve to introduce the programme and enable a week of intensive teaching for the ‘GIS401 Foundations of GI Science’ course.

The current programme has two qualifications on offer: a Postgraduate Diploma of Geographic Information Science (PGDipGIS) and a Masters in Geographic Information Science (MGIS). The qualifications provided include a range of courses covering geoinformation processing, analysis, visualisation and applications, as well as the one week intensive course at the field station in Kaikoura.

Please note: This programme is currently NOT offered via distance learning. Students must be present at one of the three participating institutions.

PGDipGIS

The PGDipGIS is a one year (full time) or two year (part time) postgraduate diploma which is comprised of coursework only. To complete the PGDipGIS, students need to successfully complete at least 8 of the courses offered in the course schedule. 

MGIS

The MGIS is a two year (full time) or four year (part time) research masters programme, which is comprised of coursework and a research thesis. Students need to complete the coursework as per the PGDipGIS, as well as an additional masters thesis (GISC690) in the second half of their study.

GIS Careers

There is currently a shortage of qualified GIS specialists in New Zealand and more widely. Organisations in many areas need GIS professionals who can integrate GIS with their core business. As a result, there are many exciting opportunities for graduates, in a growing field that allows you to have an interesting career and make a difference.



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