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Environmental Sciences×

Masters Degrees in Environmental Sciences, New Zealand

We have 11 Masters Degrees in Environmental Sciences, New Zealand

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The Master of Environmental Sciences (MEnvSci) is a 180 point interdisciplinary degree that draws on a wide range of papers across the Biological, Chemical, Earth and Engineering Sciences. Read more

The Master of Environmental Sciences (MEnvSci) is a 180 point interdisciplinary degree that draws on a wide range of papers across the Biological, Chemical, Earth and Engineering Sciences.

A key feature of this degree is the development of scientific and interdisciplinary (cross-faculty) research skills, including collection and analysis of data and critical review of the relevant literature.

The MEnvSci is normally a 12-18 month degree comprising a minimum of 90 points in taught papers at 500 level and a maximum 90 point thesis.  The balance of thesis papers to taught papers may be altered subject to permission from the graduate co-ordinator in your discipline of choice.

Study an MEnvSci at Waikato University and you will enjoy more lab and field work, more one-on-one time with top academics and access to world-class research equipment. Our great industry contacts may also mean exciting collaborations with local, national and international companies and organisations.

While the bulk of your papers will be drawn from the Faculty of Science & Engineering, you may also include papers from the Faculty of Arts & Social SciencesWaikato Management School, the Faculty of Maori and Indigenous Studies and Te Piringa - Faculty of Law.

Facilities

The University of Waikato's School of Science is home to a suite of well-equipped, world-class laboratories.  You will have the opportunity to use complex research equipment and facilities such as NMR spectroscopyDNA sequencing and the University of Waikato Herbarium.

The School of Engineering’s specialised laboratories includes the Large Scale Lab complex that features a suite of workshops and laboratories dedicated to engineering teaching and research.  These include 3D printing, a mechanical workshop and computer labs with engineering design software.

Build a successful career

Depending on the major completed and your particular interests, graduates of this degree may find employment in a range of science-related industries, including local and regional councils, Crown Research Institutes, energy companies, environmental agencies, government departments, environmental consulting companies, private research companies, universities, food and dairy industries and agriculture and fisheries industries.

Career opportunities

  • Agricultural Adviser
  • Biosecurity Officer
  • Coastal Resource Manager
  • Consent Planner
  • Environmental Analyst
  • Environmental Scientist
  • Hydrologist
  • Oceanographer
  • Water Resource Manager


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The Master of Science (MSc) normally takes 12-18 months of full-time study to complete. Read more

The Master of Science (MSc) normally takes 12-18 months of full-time study to complete. The degree requires 180 points, which is made up of 90 points in taught papers and a 90-point thesis (research project).  This balance of theses to taught papers may be changed subject to permission from the graduate co-ordinator in your chosen discipline.

Study a MSc at Waikato University and you will enjoy more lab and field work, more one-on-one time with top academics and access to world-class research equipment. Our great industry contacts will also mean exciting collaborations with local, national and international companies and organisations.

This is an ideal degree for students wanting to improve their career opportunities, and seeking a qualification that is potentially not so research-heavy.

This qualification is taught at a level significantly in advance of undergraduate study, providing you with the challenges and knowledge needed to prepare for a successful career.

Facilities

The University of Waikato’s School of Science is home to a suite of well-equipped, world-class laboratories.  You will have the opportunity to use complex research equipment and facilities such as NMR spectroscopyDNA sequencing and the University of Waikato Herbarium (WAIK).

The computing facilities at the University of Waikato are among the best in New Zealand, ranging from phones and tablets for mobile application development to cluster computers for massively parallel processing. Students majoring in Computer Science, Mathematics or Statistics will have 24 hour access to computer labs equipped with all the latest computer software.

Subjects

Students enrolling in an MSc via the Faculty of Science & Engineering can study Biological SciencesChemistryEarth SciencesElectronicsMaterials and ProcessingPhysicsPsychology, and Science, Technology and Environmental Education.

Students taking Computer ScienceMathematics or Statistics will enrol through the Faculty of Computing & Mathematical Sciences.

Course Structure

An MSc is normally completed over 12-18 consecutive months, although it may be possible to study for the degree on a part-time basis. Each full-time student will normally enrol in the first year of the Masters programme in a minimum of 90 points’ worth of taught papers in addition to 30 points towards their thesis. These taught papers may be assessed exclusively on coursework, examination, or a mixture of both. In the second year each student will normally enrol in the remaining research and taught papers required to complete the degree. The degree may be awarded with First Class Honours, or Second Class Honours (first division), or Second Class Honours (second division), or without Honours.

Practical experience

You will spend more time putting theory into practice in the laboratories and out in the field. Smaller class sizes in taught papers mean more one-on-one time with renowned academics.

The University of Waikato also boasts excellent industry collaborations with organisations such as NIWA, AgResearch, Plant and Food Research and Landcare Research. These strong relationships generate numerous research projects for MSc students, who are able to work on real issues with a real client.

Build a successful career

Depending on the major completed and your particular interests, graduates of this degree may find employment in a range of science-related industries.

 Career opportunities

  • Local and Regional Council
  • Crown Research Institutes
  • Energy Companies
  • Environmental Agencies
  • Government Departments
  • Biomedical/Pharmaceutical Industries
  • Private Research Companies
  • Food and Dairy Industries
  • Agriculture and Fisheries


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The Master of Science (MSc) is a two-year degree which encompasses both coursework and research. The first year involves mainly coursework and preliminary research preparation. Read more
The Master of Science (MSc) is a two-year degree which encompasses both coursework and research. The first year involves mainly coursework and preliminary research preparation. Students will have the opportunity to contribute to existing fields of research, or to begin to develop new areas.

The MSc can be studied in any of the subjects listed below, and may be taken by a combination of coursework and thesis, or by thesis only. Students who have a Bachelor's degree will complete the MSc by papers and thesis (at least two years of full-time study). Students who have an Honours degree or postgraduate diploma can complete the degree by thesis only (minimum of one year of study).

Subject areas

-Anatomy
-Biochemistry
-Bioengineering
-Botany
-Chemistry
-Clothing and Textile Sciences
-Cognitive Science
-Computational Modelling
-Computer Science
-Consumer Food Science
-Design for Technology (No new enrolments)
-Ecology
-Economics
-Electronics
-Energy Studies
-Environmental Management
-Environmental Science
-Food Science
-Genetics
-Geographic Information Systems
-Geography
-Geology
-Geophysics
-Human Nutrition
-Immunology
-Information Science
-Marine Science
-Mathematics
-Microbiology
-Neuroscience
-Pharmacology
-Physics
-Physiology
-Plant Biotechnology
-Psychology
-Statistics
-Surveying
-Toxicology
-Wildlife Management
-Zoology

Structure of the Programme

The degree may be awarded in any of the subjects listed above. With the approval of the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Sciences) the degree may be awarded in a subject not listed above.

The programme of study shall be as prescribed for the subject concerned. A candidate whose qualification for entry to the programme is the degree of Bachelor of Science with Honours or the Postgraduate Diploma in Science or equivalent may achieve the degree after a minimum of one year of further study, normally by completing a thesis or equivalent as prescribed in the MSc Schedule.
A candidate may be exempted from some of the prescribed papers on the basis of previous study.

A candidate shall, before commencing the investigation to be described in a thesis, secure the approval of the Head of the Department concerned for the topic, the supervisor(s), and the proposed course of the investigation.

A candidate may not present a thesis which has previously been accepted for another degree. A candidate taking the degree by papers and thesis must pass both the papers and the thesis components.

For the thesis, the research should be of a kind that a diligent and competent student should complete within one year of full-time study

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Human impact, loss of biodiversity and a growing awareness of environmental change make conservation biology more important every day. Read more

Human impact, loss of biodiversity and a growing awareness of environmental change make conservation biology more important every day.

Linking conservation, ecology, biodiversity and sustainability, the Master of Conservation Biology is a one-year, 180-point professional Master's. You'll get the scientific expertise you need to do conservation work in New Zealand and around the world.

Wellington is an international hot spot for biodiversity and studying with the School of Biological Sciences you'll learn from world leaders in conservation practice—internationally respected scientists whose work informs the management of New Zealand’s unique biota.

Using theoretical and field-based approaches in a range of terrestrial and marine environments, you’ll explore the processes of conservation biology. Examine internationally renowned examples of conservation best practice in action, and gain skills in experimental design, the collection and analysis of data and the presentation of research results.

You'll graduate with the expertise to make a valuable contribution to the conservation of the natural environment.

Workload

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Field course

One of your core courses is held in the field, visiting key conservation sites in New Zealand.

BIOL 424 New Zealand Conservation Practice involves travel around the country to observe management practices and become familiar with the unique plants and animals of New Zealand.

How you'll study

You'll study three core courses and 90 points worth of approved courses of your choice.

If you're starting in January, you'll begin with the four-week field course, BIOL 424. The course sits outside normal trimester dates with the timing changing from year to year to allow for tide times. Usual timing for the start of the course is late January/early February and actual dates can be confirmed at least six months prior.

The July start to the programme includes the core course, BIOL 405 Biosecurity, which involves biosecurity management from both biological and legal perspectives.

While there is no thesis component to the MConBio, you can do small research projects through the elective BIOL 440. You'll need a supervisor for this course—talk to staff within the School of Biological Sciences about potential projects.

Study abroad

Broaden your horizons with the student exchange programme, Victoria Abroad. Study towards your Victoria University degree at one of 100 partner universities around the world. Talk to the programme manager if you're thinking about including an exchange in your programme of study.

Victoria Abroad

Prime location

Studying in Wellington offers unparalleled access to the natural wealth of New Zealand. Private and public conservation sites close by create opportunities for gaining research experience and learning conservation techniques.

Zealandia and Otari-Wilton's Bush are within the city boundaries and an ecological restoration programme is underway on Matiu/Somes Island in Wellington Harbour.

Two marine reserves are also close to Wellington city—Taputeranga on the south coast and Kapiti, an hour's drive north.



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Studying for your Master of Environment and Society (MEnvSoc) at the University of Waikato gives you the chance to build on the skills and knowledge you've already gained during your undergraduate degree. Read more

Studying for your Master of Environment and Society (MEnvSoc) at the University of Waikato gives you the chance to build on the skills and knowledge you've already gained during your undergraduate degree. You'll learn how to critically analyse the various points of view relating to environmental challenges. You'll develop your understanding of these different perspectives, and learn how to use your insights to deal with those challenges.

During your MEnvSoc, you'll do a combination of studying essential papers and preparing a dissertation or thesis. You'll be able to complete up to 120 points worth of papers and either a 60-point dissertation or a 90-point thesis. Your dissertation or thesis will be based on your own research, and you'll choose a topic relating to environmental and societal inter-relationships.

You might also like to include some relevant papers from other areas, such as environmental science, law and management. Taking this approach to structuring your degree helps you strengthen the connection between understanding issues at a theoretical level and applying the theory in practice.

The Faculty's links with groups working in local government, education and the community provide a range of opportunities for students studying towards a MEnvSoc. You'll benefit from guest lectures, workshops and field trips that have had input from members of the community or professional contributors . The teaching staff themselves are active researchers with national or global reputations in their specialist areas. You'll have the chance to benefit from their knowledge and expertise. Working with the staff, you'll be able to take advantage of, and directly access, global research ideas and communities.

Course structure

For candidates entering with a bachelors degree, the normal minimum period of enrolment for completion of the MEnvSoc is 18 months. It requires completion of 180 points at 500 level comprising at least 90 points of taught papers (List A and List B papers below) and a maximum of a 90-point research thesis. At the discretion of the programme convenors, students may also include up to 30 points in relevant papers outside of List A or List B.

Candidates must choose a minimum of 60 points from a select list of core papers (List A), including any compulsory papers. This will be complemented by 30 to 60 points from taught elective papers from a select list of papers (List A or List B), and a 60-point dissertation or a 90 point thesis in an approved topic relevant to environment and society.

For students entering with an honours degree or postgraduate diploma, the normal minimum period of enrolment for completion of the MEnvSoc is 12 months. It requires completion of 120 points at 500 level, comprising at least 30 points of taught papers from List A, including any compulsory papers, and either a 60-point dissertation or a 90-point research thesis.

List A

  • ANTH521 Environmental Anthropology (15 points)
  • ECON515 Economics and the Environment (30 points)
  • ENVP505 Māori Environmental Management (15 points)
  • ENVP510 Planning Theory (15 points)
  • GEOG520 Human Dimensions of Environmental Change (30 points)
  • HIST512 Themes in Environmental and World Garden History (30 points)
  • POLS537 Environmental Politics and Public Policy (30 points)
  • POLS504 Gender, Justice and the Environment (15 points)

List B

  • ACCT507 Accounting, Sustainability and a Changing Environment (30 points)
  • ANTH512 Anthropology and Development (15 points)
  • BIOL560 Freshwater Ecology (15 points)
  • BIOL562 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (15 points)
  • BIOL570 Plant Ecology (15 points)
  • DEVS502 Sustainable Resource Issues (30 points)
  • ECON539 Environmental and Resource Economics (15 points)
  • ENVS524 Environmental Evaluation (15 points)
  • GEOG515 Māori Geography (30 points)
  • GEOG521 Advanced Tourism and Development (30 points)
  • LAWS570 Comparative Environmental Law and Politics(30 points)
  • MCOM584 Sustainable Futures (30 points)
  • STER513 Environmental and Sustainability Education (30 points)
  • STMG580 Strategies for Sustainability (30 points)
  • TOMG502 Tourism Development and the Environment (30 points)

Career opportunities

Once you've completed your MEnvSoc, you'll be able to choose a career path that uses your skills. You might be interested in moving into policy work, whether that be at the local, regional or national level. Perhaps instead you'd prefer to work with the Waitangi Tribunal or local iwis. The MEnvSoc's interdisciplinary environmental focus provides the skills and knowledge for graduates to be able to work in those areas.



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With the increasing pressures on the marine environment, both in the South Pacific region and worldwide, experts in the conservation and management of marine organisms and ecosystems are in demand. Read more

With the increasing pressures on the marine environment, both in the South Pacific region and worldwide, experts in the conservation and management of marine organisms and ecosystems are in demand.

As a world-leader in marine conservation, New Zealand is a great place to develop your expertise in the field. Its unique and lengthy coastline is home to numerous marine organisms—from the tiny phytoplankton to the endangered New Zealand sea lion.

Study with Victoria's School of Biological Sciences, a leader in marine biology research. Examine marine conservation issues and practice using examples from New Zealand, Australia, South Pacific and wider Indo-Pacific region, which can be applied worldwide.

Marine Conservation can be studied through two qualifications. The Master of Marine Conservation (MMarCon) is a taught Master's with no thesis component and is the only taught Marine Conservation Master's degree in New Zealand.

Or you can choose to study the Postgraduate Certificate in Marine Conservation (PGCertMarCon), a shorter qualification for those who want to expand their expertise into a new area of interest.

Master of Marine Conservation

The 180-point Master of Marine Conservation consists of three core courses and three courses chosen from a range of marine biology, biodiversity, ecology, ecological restoration and conservation courses. You can also choose courses that specialise in environmental management and conservation issues relating to New Zealand Māori and Pacific Island communities.

Two of your core courses, BIOL 424 New Zealand Conservation Practice and BIOL 529 Tropical Marine Conservation Practice, are field courses. You'll visit several world-renowned marine conservation sites in New Zealand and overseas.

The field courses will have costs over and above the course fees.

You'll also examine marine conservation issues of cultural and socioeconomic significance to Māori and Pacific peoples, such as exploitation of coastal regions and ecotourism, seabed and foreshore rights, and community-led conservation strategies.

Postgraduate Certificate in Marine Conservation

The Postgraduate Certificate is made up of three courses totalling 90 points chosen from any of the courses in the MMarCon programme; however, you must include at least one of the core courses.

Workload

If you are studying full time you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Duration

The Master of Marine Conservation can be completed in 12 months of full-time study, or in 24 months part time.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Marine Conservation can be completed in six months of full-time study or in 12 months part time.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues. You'll have opportunities to attend events, workshops, social functions and seminars.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can give you information and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

You'll gain skills and knowledge in a wide range of areas within the conservation and management of marine organisms and ecosystems, in both temperate and tropical climates. You might find work at Crown Research Institutes, private research institutes or with national government agencies managing marine conservation and fisheries.

Other organisations you may work with include regional authorities such as city, regional and district councils, consultancy firms carrying out contract marine biology work or non-government agencies and not-for-profit organisations.



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An internationally significant career. Use your knowledge of soils to open doors to international careers in sustainable food. Find out more about the . Read more

An internationally significant career

Use your knowledge of soils to open doors to international careers in sustainable food.

Find out more about the Master of Science parent structure.

This qualification will give you the in-depth knowledge of soils that will open up meaningful, relevant careers that address sustainable food production globally.

As an aspiring soil scientist you will deal with the productive capacity of the land and how its management impacts on the environment. At Massey we have a reputation for producing high calibre graduates that go on to work in the international agricultural research scene.

Make our expertise your own

When you study soil science, you will be able to take advantage of Massey’s expertise in land-related disciplines. We have a wide and relevant group of expertise within the university, from agriculture, horticulture and earth science to ecology, environmental management and social sciences.

You will learn from, and research with, highly-skilled internationally-recognised and active researchers in these fields, with a huge depth of knowledge and experience. Whatever focus you’d like to have in your postgraduate study and research, there is likely to be an expert at Massey who can help you dig deeper into your area of interest.

Some examples of areas you could focus your research on include:

  • Sustainable nutrient management
  • Soil resource mapping and interpretation
  • Soil conservation
  • Irrigation, drainage, water fooprinting.
  • Water quantity and quality
  • Greenhouse gas mitigation.
  • Nutrient cycling in crop and pasture systems

Join a world-leading agriculture university

Massey University’s proud record dates back to 1927 when we offered New Zealand’s first degrees in agriculture and horticulture.

Massey is world-ranked and New Zealand’s No 1 university in agriculture according to the QS (Quacquarelli Symonds) rankings. We are also ranked in the top 150 universities worldwide for agriculture by the ShanghaiRanking's Global Ranking of Academic Subjects.

As a student, you will benefit from our internationally recognised capability and leadership in this area.

Relevant and topical

We work to ensure that our teaching fits with the changing environment, which means that you will emerge with a relevant qualification valued by potential employers. Massey has strong links with industry, used to help you find relevant and topical research projects.

Why postgraduate study?

Postgraduate study is hard work but hugely rewarding and empowering. The Master of Science will push you to produce your best creative, strategic and theoretical ideas. The workload replicates the high-pressure environment of senior workplace roles.

Not just more of the same

Postgraduate study is not just ‘more of the same’ undergraduate study. Our experts are there to guide but if you have come from undergraduate study, you will find that postgraduate study demands more in-depth and independent study. It takes you to a new level in knowledge and expertise especially in planning and undertaking research.



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The Master of Applied Science (MAppSc) is a 180-point, coursework postgraduate degree. A candidate would normally be a graduate but the degree is also open to those with other relevant qualifications. Read more
The Master of Applied Science (MAppSc) is a 180-point, coursework postgraduate degree. A candidate would normally be a graduate but the degree is also open to those with other relevant qualifications.

The MAppSc is designed for students who wish to pursue an interdisciplinary programme of study underpinned by science that delivers versatile skills relevant to multiple end-users. Optional paths are available that enphasize commercialisation, workplace-based projects or independent study.

The MAppSc can be completed in 12 months or in stages, providing flexibility for recent graduates and those currently employed.

Structure of the Programme

The programme of study:
-Shall consist of approved papers at 400-level or higher worth at least 180 points, selected from the papers specified in Science Schedule D for the Master of Applied Science subject concerned, and including at least one of APPS 596-598.
-Shall normally include papers from more than one subject.
-May, with the approval of the Head of Department or Course Director concerned, include papers worth up to 60 points from 400- and 500-level papers other than those specified in Schedule D.

A candidate who has completed the requirements for the Postgraduate Certificate or the Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Science shall be exempted from those papers in the programme for the degree which have previously been passed for the certificate or diploma.

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Deepen your understanding of the environmental issues facing New Zealand and the world. Examine subjects like climate change, the sustainability of our cities, loss of biodiversity, water quality and consumerism. Read more

Deepen your understanding of the environmental issues facing New Zealand and the world. Examine subjects like climate change, the sustainability of our cities, loss of biodiversity, water quality and consumerism.

Learn how environmental problems can be addressed through better policy, planning, design and communication. Discover how human behaviour can be influenced by these things and the role that politics plays in environmental concerns. You'll graduate with a good understanding of how you can create change.

Study alongside students from around the world and find out how environmental issues are tackled in different countries and the different problems they face.

Learn from the experts

Learn from highly regarded academics who are experts in their fields. You'll also hear from guest lecturers who are experienced professionals in environmental planning, economics, policy, law, politics, ethics and indigenous development.

Across disciplines

Environmental Studies connects with Geography and Development Studies as well as Public Policy, Law and Management. You can study the subject at postgraduate level from a science, commerce or arts background. Because you'll study with students from a variety of disciplines and professions, you'll broaden your own understanding through their different viewpoints and experiences.

The right connections

Make connections with the organisations that make the policy, do the research and create the spaces we live in. In the capital city you can take advantage of Victoria's relationships with the central government policy world and major research institutes like the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research and the New Zealand Climate Change Research Institute.

Flexible study

You can choose to complete a one-year Postgraduate Diploma or a two-year Master's that will include a thesis. Both programmes offer you the flexibility to choose the courses that best suit your interests and career goals.

If you are interested in creating a better environment and have a Bachelor's degree with a B+ average in a relevant subject (or B for the PGDip), then postgraduate Environmental Studies is ideal for you. If you don't have a degree but have significant relevant experience, you may also be able to enrol in one of the programmes.

Available qualifications

  • Master of Environmental Studies
  • Postgraduate Diploma in Environmental Studies

Choose the qualification that suits your career goals, time constraints and financial situation. If you begin by enrolling in the Diploma programme you may be able to continue on to complete your Master's. Or if you enrol in the Master's but only complete the first year (Part 1), for whatever reason, you can be awarded the Diploma.

What you'll study

The PGDip is the same as the first year, or Part 1, of the Master's.

Core courses

Both qualifications include the 15-point core courses Environmental Management, and Research Methods. You'll get an overview of the current issues decision-makers face in managing the environment and look at case studies ranging from water management to urban design.

Research Methods will prepare you for thesis research and you'll study research design, data collection and analysis and how to communicate research findings.

Elective courses

You'll select the remaining 90 points from a wide range of approved 400- and 500-level courses from several different disciplines. You'll complete around seven of these and can tailor your choices to match your areas of interest and career direction.

You might focus on environmental law or economics, Māori resource management, climate change, political ecology or the psychology of behaviour change.

Master's thesis and practicum

If you are doing the Master's, you'll go on to a second year (Part 2) and complete a research thesis. You can choose to do the 35,000-word option, or complete a 25,000-word thesis and do a 30-point practicum. The practicum is a supervised work placement at an organisation that specialises in environmental or resource management.

You'll need an average grade of B+ across your courses in Part 1, for entry into Part 2 of the Master's programme.

Research topics

The Environment Studies programme encourages an active culture of research. Find out what potential projects you might work on.

Workload and duration

If you are studying full time you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

The Postgraduate Diploma (PGDipEnvStud) can be completed in one year full time or usually two years part time. The Master’s (MEnvStud) will take you up to two and half years of full-time study or can be completed over up to five years if you are part time.

Careers

You'll graduate able to contribute to environmental practice in New Zealand or anywhere in the world. The skills you'll develop are relevant to many careers, including environmental policy, planning and management.

Many students have gone on to work in places like the Ministry for the Environment, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade and regional or city councils. You might join a non-governmental organisation (NGO), a corporation, an iwi organisation or become an environmental business consultant or social entrepreneur.



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Get professional training in Meteorology and explore the fundamental concepts of dynamic meteorology, radiation and thermodynamics. Read more

Get professional training in Meteorology and explore the fundamental concepts of dynamic meteorology, radiation and thermodynamics.

Taught in conjunction with New Zealand's leading weather forecasting organisation—MetService—you'll learn about cloud physics, satellites, climatology and numerical weather prediction. Gain an expert understanding of mid-latitude weather systems, particularly weather systems in New Zealand and the Tasman Sea region.

You'll also do a practical project based on one of the research topics arising from the work of MetService. Gain new knowledge along with expertise in independent research, critical thinking and scientific rigour.

Choose to study the Master of Meteorology (MMet) or you can opt for the shorter Postgraduate Diploma in Meteorology (PGDipMet).

The MMet is only offered on alternate years.

International recognition

Your Meteorology qualification will be recognised throughout the world and complies with the standards of the World Meteorological Organization.

Duration and workload

The 180-point Master of Meteorology will take you three trimesters of full-time study or six trimesters when studied part time.

The 120-point Postgraduate Diploma in Meteorology takes two trimesters of full-time study or four trimesters part time.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are in employment.

What you'll study

You'll learn through coursework and an independent project based on a real-world meteorological research objective.

PGDipMet students will complete seven courses and MMet students will do nine.

Both qualifications start with five core 400-level Geophysics (Meteorology) courses—covering mid-latitude weather systems, radiation and thermodynamics, cloud physics and weather prediction. You'll add another 400-level Geophysics course of your choice or an approved course of your choice that can be from another discipline, and complete the 500-level research project. If you're doing the Master's, you'll take an additional two 500-level courses.

The 30-point project gives you the opportunity to work on current meteorological issues, with data supplied by New Zealand's MetService. You'll be guided and supported by staff from both the MetService and Victoria.



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