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Masters Degrees in Economics, New Zealand

We have 11 Masters Degrees in Economics, New Zealand

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Economics in action. Take your career to the next level with a qualification from Victoria's Professional Economics programme. Develop an economic toolbox that you can use to address 'real-world' problems. Read more

Economics in action

Take your career to the next level with a qualification from Victoria's Professional Economics programme. Develop an economic toolbox that you can use to address 'real-world' problems. This respected programme will equip you with decision-making skills that are based on a solid understanding of economic principles.

Economics under the microscope

Examine the intricacies of microeconomic and macroeconomic analysis. Study market structures, the implications of government interventions in the economy and different economic theories in relation to growth, development and stability. Explore how policy influences economic decisions.

In demand

There is a real demand for skilled professional economists who are able to engage in rigorous economic analysis. To fill this need, the programme has been developed in close consultation with leading professional economists from the Government Economics Network, the New Zealand Association of Economists, bank economists and other industry experts.

Qualification family structure

The MPE is part of a tiered family of qualifications:

  • Postgraduate Certificate in Professional Economics
  • Postgraduate Diploma in Professional Economics
  • Master of Professional Economics

Choose the qualification that suits your career goals, time constraints and financial situation.Staircasing allows movement in both directions—if you start with the Certificate or Diploma, you can apply to transfer to the Master’s degree at a later stage.

Both your performance in the programme and your professional work experience will be taken into account when assessing your application for transfer.

If you enrol in the Master's but can't complete it, for whatever reason, you may have enough points to be awarded the Certificate or Diploma.

View a diagram of the MPE qualifications staircase.

What you'll study

The Professional Economics qualifications are all about the principles, practice and application of economics to policy and business issues in a professional context. They are designed to equip you with the skills and knowledge you need to succeed in the world of professional economics.

Depending on your choice of qualification you'll do either three courses for the Certificate or six courses for the Diploma. If you choose to study for the Master's you'll need to do nine courses.

Find out more about the courses you can study.

How you'll learn

You'll learn through block format for some courses, and in weekly lectures for the others. The block courses are held close together to give you the flexibility to continue working while you study and to keep transport costs down.

You have to attend all sessions, which can fall on weekdays, weekends and occasionally on public holidays. Each block course is different and may be delivered as a set of four or five one-day sessions or two two-and-a-half-day sessions. You'll need to do your reading, assignments and tutorials between the sessions in your own time.

As well as attending formal lectures and computer lab sessions, running simulations and taking tests, you'll have networking opportunities through visiting speakers, group discussions and workshops.

Workload

Part-time students doing one course a trimester will need to do around 12–14 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working full time. If you are studying full time you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

The Professional Economics Programme Director is happy to work with you to plan a programme of study that meets your goals and interests. Many students' demanding professional lives mean they choose to study part time and only do one or two courses at a time.

Duration

The Professional Economics courses take about 12–14 hours study per week each.

The Master’s degree will take you a minimum of 12 months to complete and a maximum of six years. Most part-time students do one course per trimester, and complete their degree within three years. The maximum duration gives you flexibility to fit study with your work and life.

You have a minimum of one year and a maximum of four years to complete the Postgraduate Diploma.

For the Postgraduate Certificate, your minimum completion time is one trimester and your maximum is two years.

Courses generally run in a cycle of 12–24 months, depending on the topic. This means that core courses will run each year, while more specialist courses may run every second year.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues. And studying alongside working professionals will give you a good insight into the demands of the industry.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can give you information and provides a voice for you on campus.

You'll have opportunities to attend events, workshops, social functions and seminars such as the Student Learning Postgraduate Research skills sessions.You'll also have access to the the postgraduate student workspace on the 2nd floor of Rutherford House—make use of the spacious computer lab, meeting rooms, printer and small kitchen.

Careers

With the executive skills you'll gain you might find work in central or local government as a policy analyst, adviser, planner or regulator. Or you could work as an economist or analyst in a bank or other financial institution, in a multinational company or international organisation or trade body.

You might work as an economic or management consultant, or an advocate for industry groups, or as a media researcher or presenter.

Elective courses from other postgraduate programmes such as the Master of Applied Finance (MAF), Master of Business Administration (MBA), or Master of Public Policy (MPP) programmes may be included in your professional economics programme to open up even further career possibilities.



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The Master of Economics (MEcon) will equip students to be either professional practitioners or academic researchers in the field of Economics. Read more
The Master of Economics (MEcon) will equip students to be either professional practitioners or academic researchers in the field of Economics. It can also provide a pathway to doctoral-level study in Economics. The degree consists of both coursework and a research dissertation.

The normal admission requirement is a Bachelor’s degree majoring in Economics and an average grade of at least B+ for the relevant 300-level papers. Candidates should have also completed 300-level papers in mathematical economics and econometrics. Admission on the basis of alternative qualifications and experience is possible.

The Master of Economics can be completed in one year of full-time, or its equivalent in part-time, study. You may begin the MEcon degree in semester one or semester two.

Structure of the Programme

The programme of study shall consist of six papers, including ECON 410 and ECON 411 plus at least one of ECON 412 and ECON 413, selected from:
ECON 402 Growth, Institutions and Development (20 Points)
ECON 403 Monetary Economics (20 Points)
ECON 404 International Economics (20 Points)
ECON 405 The Economics of Natural Resources and Public Choice (20 Points)
ECON 406 Labour and Population Economics (20 Points)
ECON 407 Special Topic in Advanced Economics (20 Points)
ECON 410 Advanced Microeconomic Theory (20 Points)
ECON 411 Advanced Macroeconomic Theory (20 Points)
ECON 412 Macroeconometrics (20 Points)
ECON 413 Microeconometrics (20 Points)
together with:
ECON 580 Research Dissertation (60 Points)

-A candidate may be exempted from some of the required papers on the basis of previous study, subject to the approval of the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Commerce). Alternative papers will be required at an equivalent level of study.
-A candidate shall, before commencing the investigation to be described in the dissertation, secure the approval of the Head of the Department of Economics for the topic, the supervisor(s) and the proposed course of the investigation.
-A candidate may not present a project which has previously been accepted for another degree.
-A candidate must pass both the papers and the dissertation components.

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In today's increasingly complex and unpredictable world we need more thinkers who can grasp the dynamics of politics and society—people who can help create stronger and more effective government. Read more

In today's increasingly complex and unpredictable world we need more thinkers who can grasp the dynamics of politics and society—people who can help create stronger and more effective government.

The one-year 180-point Master of Philosophy, Politics and Economics (MPPE) combines three complementary disciplines to give you a broad understanding of the world and social decision-making. Study the only postgraduate programme of its kind in New Zealand, and get a head start in your career in politics, government or the public service.

Learning across disciplines

Studying philosophy will develop your skills in logical reasoning and knowledge of ethics. Economics will teach you what drives people and organisations to make the decisions they do and the effect those choices have. And politics will give you a knowledge of political institutions and processes, and the impact they have on society. Combining these disciplines will give you a well-rounded range of practical and theoretical skills relevant to government.

From the vantage point of New Zealand’s capital city, you'll learn to critically examine concepts around politics, liberty and justice, and study the principles of micro- and macro-economics, and global governance and finance.

Through your Master's study, you'll become skilled in oral and written communication and learn to apply critical and reflective thinking, logic and persuasion to solve problems.

Research and internship

Your studies will build towards completing your own independent research project. Examine an area of interest under supervision from world-class academics.

You'll also have the opportunity to complete an internship that will build on what you have learnt. You'll be placed in a workplace such as a government ministry or other agency where you'll gain real-world experience and valuable insights into the workings of government.

International connections

Take advantage of Victoria's connections around the world including the opportunity to apply for a US congressional internship once you graduate.

How you’ll learn

You'll study for your MPPE in two parts. In Part 1 you'll complete the 30-point core course Philosophy, Politics and Economics MPPE 401, and a further five courses from the individual disciplines.

In Part 2 you'll do a 30-point research project that builds on what you've studied in Part 1. You'll also complete a 160-hour internship in a relevant workplace so you can begin to put your skills and knowledge into practice.

Most of your courses will be taught through 12 two-hour seminars. For your research project you'll meet with your supervisor for one to two hours each week.

If you only complete Part 1 of the programme, you may be able to graduate with a Postgraduate Diploma in Arts.

Duration and workload

You'll study for your MPPE over three trimesters, or one calendar year. If you're studying part time, you're likely to take two years, and must complete the degree within three years of enrolling.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.



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Take your Honours degree or Postgraduate Diploma to the next level with a Master of Commerce (MCom). You'll take an in-depth look at an issue through completing a research thesis, gaining advanced knowledge of your subject area and thorough training in independent research. Read more

Take your Honours degree or Postgraduate Diploma to the next level with a Master of Commerce (MCom). You'll take an in-depth look at an issue through completing a research thesis, gaining advanced knowledge of your subject area and thorough training in independent research.

Once complete, you'll have the tools and capabilities you need for a career in business or public policy. You'll also be able to apply for PhD study in New Zealand or overseas.

This 120-point programme will take you 12 months to complete full time, or one and a half to two years part time. You must take at least 90 points of research. This means you'll complete a research thesis made up of a literature review, data collection and analysis, and your findings. A thesis is usually 30,000–40,000 words.

Available subjects

Workload

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students will need to do around 20–24 hours of work a week so make sure you take this into account if you are working.

Further study

At the end of your Master's you can choose to continue your research and apply to do a PhD.



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Make the move into higher-level study with a degree that combines the variety and structure of classroom-based courses with opportunities for research. Read more

Make the move into higher-level study with a degree that combines the variety and structure of classroom-based courses with opportunities for research.

You'll be able to expand your expertise in one of nine subjects while taking advantage of the flexibility to study courses across a range of commerce disciplines.

Build on your Bachelor's degree to enhance your career options in business, management and government with advanced study at Victoria Business School.

International recognition

Victoria Business School is among a small group of business schools worldwide that hold the 'Triple Crown' of international business education accreditations. You can be confident your qualification will stand up against the best around the world.

Find out more about university accreditations and what they mean for you.

Available subjects

Workload

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 24–28 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working full time.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Duration

This 180-point programme will take you three to four trimesters of full-time study. If you’re studying part time it usually takes six trimesters.



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The Master of Commerce (MCom) degree allows for the development of individual research. Starting with a sound background of coursework, students will have the opportunity to contribute to existing fields or to begin to develop new areas of research. Read more
The Master of Commerce (MCom) degree allows for the development of individual research. Starting with a sound background of coursework, students will have the opportunity to contribute to existing fields or to begin to develop new areas of research.

The MCom can be pursued by a combination of papers and thesis, or by thesis only. Students who have a good Bachelor's degree (or equivalent qualification) will complete the MCom by papers and thesis (at least two years' full-time study). The first year consists of a selection of papers worth 144 points, leading to a Postgraduate Diploma in Commerce (PGDipCom). Students who have a good Honours degree or a PGDipCom (or equivalent qualification) can complete an MCom by thesis only (minimum one year).

Further information about completing a Master's degree is available at: otago.ac.nz/study/masters/index.html

Subject areas

-Accounting
-Economics
-Finance
-Information Science
-International Business
-Management
-Marketing Management
-Tourism

Structure of the Programme

-The degree may be awarded in any of the subjects listed above. With the approval of the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Commerce) the degree may be awarded in a subject not listed above.
-The programme of study shall consist of the preparation and submission of a thesis embodying the results of supervised research. In some cases, a candidate may also be required to take and pass approved papers, normally at 400-level, in addition to completing a thesis.
-The candidate shall, before commencing the investigation to be described in the thesis, secure the approval of the Head of the Department concerned for the topic, the supervisor(s) and the proposed course of the investigation.
-A candidate may not present a thesis which has previously been accepted for another degree.
-For the thesis, the research should be of a kind that a diligent and competent student should complete within one year of full-time study.

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Relevant skills for a growing industry. Gain skills aligned to industry requirements and join this rapidly growing industry. Massey’s Master of AgriCommerce is an internationally-recognised qualification. Read more

Relevant skills for a growing industry

Gain skills aligned to industry requirements and join this rapidly growing industry.

Massey’s Master of AgriCommerce is an internationally-recognised qualification. You will gain the research and professional skills required across the value chain from farm production to food marketing.

Join a world-leading university

When you study AgriCommerce at Massey you’ll gain from our expertise across relevant agribusiness-related skills.

Massey is world-ranked and New Zealand’s No 1 university in agriculture according to the QS (Quacquarelli Symonds) rankings. We are also ranked in the top 150 universities worldwide for agriculture by the ShanghaiRanking's Global Ranking of Academic Subjects.

Our proud record dates back to 1927 when we offered New Zealand’s first degrees in agriculture and horticulture. Our expertise in agricultural and environmental systems is supported by the Centre for Farm Business Excellence.

Massey University also has a focus on food - we were the first university to offer a food technology degree and today are the host of FoodHQ, the Palmerston North based centre for collaborative food research.

Our Massey Business School is also world-ranked - it is among the top two per cent of business schools globally and is AACSB accredited with internationally-acclaimed economics and finance specialists. 

A relevant qualification

Key skills you will learn in the Master of AgriCommerce include how to communicate results of investigations and analyse opportunities clearly and persuasively, work effectively in small teams and apply advanced knowledge of agribusiness to effective solutions to agribusiness issues in an ethical and culturally-appropriate way.

You can choose a research or professional practice pathway.

Professional practice pathway

The professional practice pathway is most relevant if you wish to continue to work while studying and offers an industry-related research project. Part-time this qualification can be completed in 2.5 to five years.

You will learn how to take advantage of new agribusiness opportunities and conduct an investigation of these ethically, taking into account relevant cultural and regulatory issues. You can choose a research project relevant to your own career and industry.

Research pathway

The research pathway is appropriate if you wish to go into a research or academic career, or have come from undergraduate study and wish to continue your learning at a more in-depth level. This pathway allows you to complete an in-depth thesis on a topic of your choice.

Our close links with industry will help you identify research that specifically addresses organisational problems.

Join industry at a senior level

New Zealand’s economy is dominated by agriculture and food - it generates close to $37 billion in export earnings a year and international demand is predicted to continue to grow. Join the large group of Massey students that have secured jobs before they graduate. They have gone on to become leaders in the industry.

Relevant international knowledge

Massey’s AgriCommerce programme aligns itself with agribusiness industries throughout the world - ensuring our graduates have the skills and industry knowledge employers want today, and in the future.

Take less of your time

This qualification is 180 credits, which means you can complete full-time in 1.5 years, or two and a half to five years full time.

Why postgraduate study?

Postgraduate study is hard work but hugely rewarding and empowering. The Master of AgriCommerce will push you to produce your best creative, strategic and theoretical ideas. The workload replicates the high-pressure environment of senior workplace roles.

Not just more of the same

Postgraduate study is not just ‘more of the same’ undergraduate study. Our experts are there to guide but if you have come from undergraduate study, you will find that postgraduate study demands more in-depth and independent study. It takes you to a new level in knowledge and expertise especially in planning and undertaking research.

Careers

There is growing demand for professional skills in the primary industries.. The 2014 MPI People Powered report forecast growing demand and up to 50,000 more jobs in this sector.



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Gain an edge for success in the global economy. Take advantage of this unique opportunity for multidisciplinary study and discover the complex world of international trade. Read more

Gain an edge for success in the global economy

Take advantage of this unique opportunity for multidisciplinary study and discover the complex world of international trade. Explore the role of trade in society from a range of perspectives—the international legal rules, economic rationales and the political and social implications.

Study how the world is connected through trade and the way it affects businesses, as producers and exporters—consider these issues through the lenses of different disciplines. Explore the impact of trade on indigenous populations, including the historical and contemporary perspectives of Māori involvement in international trade.

Expert staff, international reputation

You'll be learning from lecturers with international reputations for teaching, research and publishing. And because international trade involves several disciplines, including International Relations, Economics, Law, Public Policy and Development Studies, teaching will be across four different faculties—Law, Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, and Victoria Business School.

What you'll study

The Master of International Trade is made up of four core courses totalling 120 points and further courses totalling 60 points.

The core courses will give you a broad knowledge of the main principles of international trade and the ability to apply that knowledge in discussion, debate and problem-solving.

You'll develop your oral and written communication skills, as well as a keen awareness of the social, economic, political and cultural contexts in which international trade operates.

You'll also gain an understanding of the customary laws of Māori and Pacific peoples and how these fit in with modern trade. Explore the impact of international trade agreements on Māori tino rangatiratanga/sovereignty.

Your elective courses can be any that are relevant to international trade and might include courses from the School of Geography, Environment and Earth Sciences or through Te Kawa a Māui (Māori Studies).

How you'll study

You'll learn through lectures, seminars, class discussion and meetings with course teachers and the programme director, and through your own independent study and research.

Lectures will be held in the evenings and during the day. Assessment will include a combination of tests, examinations, essays and reports.

Some courses are only available in certain Trimesters, check the programme timetable to help you plan your study.

Workload and duration

If you are studying full-time you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students taking two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

The Master of International Trade can be completed in three years of part-time study, or in three trimesters of full-time study.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues.

You'll have opportunities to attend events, workshops, social functions and seminars such as the Student Learning Postgraduate Research skills sessions.

Careers

A Master of International Trade will open doors to a career as an international trade specialist in public agencies, businesses and non-governmental organisations around the world.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can give you information and provides a voice for you on campus.



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The Master of International Studies (MIntSt) degree requires at least twelve months of full-time study, or the equivalent in part-time study, and entails an intensive programme of postgraduate coursework and research in the multi-disciplinary field of International Studies. Read more
The Master of International Studies (MIntSt) degree requires at least twelve months of full-time study, or the equivalent in part-time study, and entails an intensive programme of postgraduate coursework and research in the multi-disciplinary field of International Studies. The aim is to develop in candidates the analytical skills and knowledge essential to understanding the contemporary world.

Degree candidates are required to master a core curriculum of four taught papers - INTS 502 International Politics, INTS 503 The Global Economy, INTS 504 International Legal Issues, and INTS 509 Global Peace and Conflict - and write a supervised research essay of between 18,000 and 20,000 words.

This degree may prepare candidates for leadership roles in professions that require international expertise: diplomacy, the public service, teaching, journalism or business. It can also serve as a foundation qualification for graduates interested in advancing to the PhD.

You may enrol in the MIntSt degree at the beginning of semester one (February) or semester two (July) each year.

Programme Requirements

INTS 502 International Politics
INTS 503 The Global Economy
INTS 504 International Legal Issues
INTS 509 Global Peace and Conflict
INTS 590 Research Dissertation

Structure of the Programme

-The research dissertation should be started at the beginning of the programme and submitted no later than twelve months following first enrolment. The limit is 20,000 words of text, exclusive of appendices, footnotes, tabular material, bibliography or equivalent.
-Before commencing the investigation to be described in the research dissertation, a candidate shall obtain the approval of the Programme Co-ordinator and the supervisor(s) of the proposed topic.
-A candidate may not present a dissertation which has previously been accepted for another degree.

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A Master of Social Sciences (MSocSc) builds on the Bachelors or Honours qualification you've already gained. When studying for your MSocSc, you'll focus on your preferred Social Science subject area and you'll immerse yourself in a high-level programme of study. Read more

A Master of Social Sciences (MSocSc) builds on the Bachelors or Honours qualification you've already gained. When studying for your MSocSc, you'll focus on your preferred Social Science subject area and you'll immerse yourself in a high-level programme of study. You'll learn the latest research techniques and be updated on recent developments in knowledge relating to your chosen field.

You'll be preparing for a dissertation or thesis, so will be conducting a substantial amount of your own independent research. If you think you may want to complete a doctorate level qualification later on, completing a MSocSc prepares you for that next level of academic study.

As you grow your knowledge of your chosen subject area, you'll be refining your intellectual skills, particularly your ability to think critically, problem solve and analyse. This will enable you to prepare for leadership roles in fields related to your subject area.

Industry Connections

During your studies, you'll be supervised by well-connected Faculty members who have networks with people working in a wide range of sectors, from business to government.

These people, including representatives from local and central government and tribal authorities, provide input into the different subject areas. Members of community groups, business organisations and industrial and professional groups do the same – they provide valuable support and input. The subject area experts themselves provide consultancy services that the community in general needs, so there are broader links and connections made through this sharing of knowledge.

Career opportunities

  • Clinical or Community Psychologist
  • Coastal Resource Officer
  • Communications Coordinator
  • Community Health Administrator
  • Counsellor
  • Demographer
  • Economist
  • Educator (Primary, Secondary or Tertiary Sector)
  • Environmental Planner
  • Hazards and Emergency Management Officer
  • Human Resources Advisor
  • Industrial Relations Advocate
  • Journalist
  • Policy Analyst
  • PR Consultant
  • Research Executive
  • Social Services Manager
  • Tourism Consultant
  • Union Organiser

Subjects

Please visit http://www.waikato.ac.nz/study/qualifications/master-of-social-sciences to see what subjects are available for the Master of Social Sciences.



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