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Creative Arts & Design×

Masters Degrees in Creative Arts & Design, New Zealand

We have 18 Masters Degrees in Creative Arts & Design, New Zealand

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Hone your collaborative, creative and business skills as a practising artist over an intensive 12-month programme. Victoria’s Master of Fine Arts (Creative Practice) is an industry-focused, practical degree that will help you build new contacts and networks in Wellington’s creative industries. Read more

Hone your collaborative, creative and business skills as a practising artist over an intensive 12-month programme. Victoria’s Master of Fine Arts (Creative Practice) is an industry-focused, practical degree that will help you build new contacts and networks in Wellington’s creative industries.

You'll take advantage of our capital city location and study at Victoria’s Kelburn campus—plus our film and music programmes get to use a new purpose-refitted facility at the Miramar Creative Centre.

Find out what the MFA (CP) offers you in your fine arts discipline.

Practice opportunities

The MFA (CP) includes a creative project in which you'll be mentored to complete work that showcases your abilities and encourages you to push boundaries in your field.

As part of the programme you'll also do an internship with an arts organisation. This will give you valuable work experience and provide you with all-important connections in your industry.

Broad approach

While your studies will be centred around your specialty area of design, film, music or theatre, you'll have opportunities to take an interdisciplinary approach to your work. If you're a Design, Music or Theatre student, you may also be able to take a complementary course from another fine arts discipline.

And, because all artists need some business knowledge, you'll complete a course in arts management and marketing as part of the programme.

Creative capital

Be part of Wellington's thriving and internationally recognised creative scene. During your studies you'll have opportunities to collaborate with your artistic peers and many of New Zealand's top arts professionals.

Community

Become part of a community of talented and like-minded students from across all of the fine arts disciplines. You'll work closely with other postgraduate students in the programme to share ideas and inspiration.

Workload

Full-time students can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year.



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Hone your collaborative, creative and business skills as a practising artist over an intensive 12-month programme. Victoria’s Master of Fine Arts (Creative Practice) is an industry-focused, practical degree that will help you build new contacts and networks in Wellington’s creative industries. Read more

Hone your collaborative, creative and business skills as a practising artist over an intensive 12-month programme. Victoria’s Master of Fine Arts (Creative Practice) is an industry-focused, practical degree that will help you build new contacts and networks in Wellington’s creative industries.

You'll take advantage of our capital city location and study at Victoria’s Kelburn campus—plus our film and music programmes get to use a new purpose-refitted facility at the Miramar Creative Centre.

Available subjects

Practice opportunities

The MFA (CP) includes a creative project in which you'll be mentored to complete work that showcases your abilities and encourages you to push boundaries in your field.

As part of the programme you'll also do an internship with an arts organisation. This will give you valuable work experience and provide you with all-important connections in your industry.

Broad approach

While your studies will be centred around your specialty area of design, film, music or theatre, you'll have opportunities to take an interdisciplinary approach to your work. If you're a Design, Music or Theatre student, you may also be able to take a complementary course from another fine arts discipline.

And, because all artists need some business knowledge, you'll complete a course in arts management and marketing as part of the programme.

Creative capital

Be part of Wellington's thriving and internationally recognised creative scene. During your studies you'll have opportunities to collaborate with your artistic peers and many of New Zealand's top arts professionals.

Community

Become part of a community of talented and like-minded students from across all of the fine arts disciplines. You'll work closely with other postgraduate students in the programme to share ideas and inspiration.

Workload

Full-time students can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year.



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The MCGD provides an opportunity for you to plan, develop and carry out a large scale design research project.  This will enable you to collaborate with other students and academics, and to work with members of the professional design industry.  The MCGD research is represented by both a written thesis and an exhibited  design realisation. Read more

The MCGD provides an opportunity for you to plan, develop and carry out a large scale design research project.  This will enable you to collaborate with other students and academics, and to work with members of the professional design industry.  The MCGD research is represented by both a written thesis and an exhibited  design realisation.

Research topics are tailored to suit your interests, providing an opportunity for you to hone a particular aspect of graphic design further, which could be a pathway to your chosen career. You will also have the full support, guidance and expertise of your supervisor during your research project.

Course Structure

For students with an undergraduate degree, the MCGD requires a total of 180 points at 500 level. Students with an honours degree or a postgraduate diploma are required to take 120 points at 500 level.

Students will normally complete a 90 or 120 points research-focused Thesis and Realisation that requires both original research and design exhibition. It is also possible for students to alternatively complete a 30 point or 60 point Dissertation and Exhibition.

Students work closely with a supervisor to select a research topic.

Students enrolled in a 180 point MCGD will include CGRD581 – Report of an Investigation to prepare them for Thesis and Realisation or Dissertation and Exhibition. The remaining points for the degree will be made up of relevant taught papers.

MCGD Papers

  • CGRD524 – Topics in Interaction Design
  • CGRD532 – Information Visualisation
  • CGRD551 – Studio Management
  • CGRD581 – Report of an Investigation
  • CGRD591 – Dissertation and Exhibition (30 points)
  • CGRD592 – Dissertation and Exhibition (60 points)
  • CGRD593 – Thesis and Realisation (90 points)
  • CGRD594 – Thesis and Realisation (120 points)

Computing facilities at Waikato

The University of Waikato offers students 24-hour computer lab access with all the latest computer software, and several labs fully equipped with Mac computers, commonly used in professional design environments.  Graduate students have a dedicated lab space and access to all undergraduate facilities.

Career opportunities

  • Advertising Designer
  • Computer Games Designer
  • Interactive Designer
  • Motion Graphics Designer
  • TV Graphics Designer
  • Web Designer


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The Master of Arts (MA) degree normally requires at least one year of full-time, or its equivalent in part-time, study and entails completion of a thesis. Read more
The Master of Arts (MA) degree normally requires at least one year of full-time, or its equivalent in part-time, study and entails completion of a thesis. The normal admission requirement is a Bachelor of Arts with Honours (BA(Hons)) degree in one of at least 24 subjects, but admission on the basis of alternative qualifications and experience is possible. Some degree candidates may be required to pass approved postgraduate papers before embarking on the thesis research, but will be advised of that before enrolment.

The thesis is a major piece of supervised research on a topic of current interest.

The primary aim of the programme is to develop in a candidate skills needed to identify a significant topic, design and implement an extended piece of research, and present the findings in a form acceptable to an expert readership. It prepares candidates for employment in education, regional and national government agencies, the private sector, and industry. The degree is also an entry qualification for the Doctor of Philsophy (PhD).

Subject Areas

The degree may be awarded in any of the following subjects:
-Anthropology
-Art History and Visual Culture
-Childhood and Youth Studies
-Chinese
-Classics
-Communication Studies
-Computer Science
-Economics
-Education
-English
-Film and Media Studies
-French
-Gender Studies
-Geography
-German
-History
-Indigenous Development / He Kura Matanui
-Information Science
-Japanese
-Linguistics
-Māori Studies
-Mathematics
-Music
-Peace and Conflict Studies
-Philosophy
-Politics
-Psychology
-Religious Studies
-Sociology
-Spanish
-Statistics
-Theatre Studies

Structure of the Programme

-The degree may be awarded in any of the subjects listed above. With the approval of the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Humanities) the degree may be awarded in a subject not listed above.
-The programme of study shall consist of the preparation and submission of a thesis embodying the results of supervised research. A candidate who has obtained a three-year bachelor’s degree will be required to take and pass the fourth-stage papers listed in the Honours requirements for the subject concerned, in addition to completing a thesis. A candidate whose qualification for entry to the programme is the degree of Bachelor of Arts with Honours, or the Postgraduate Diploma in Arts Subjects in the subject of the degree, will be required to complete a thesis, although in some cases the candidate may also be required to take and pass approved papers, normally at 400-level, in addition to completing a thesis.
-A candidate shall, before commencing the investigation to be described in the thesis, secure the approval of the Head of the Department concerned for the topic, the supervisor(s), and the proposed course of the investigation.
-A candidate may not present a thesis which has previously been accepted for another degree.
-For a thesis, the research should be of a kind that a diligent and competent student should complete within one year of full-time study.

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The Master of Music (MMus) is designed for students who've already gained an Honours-level qualification in Music. It's an advanced, one-year programme of study. Read more

The Master of Music (MMus) is designed for students who've already gained an Honours-level qualification in Music. It's an advanced, one-year programme of study. You'll be guided by experts who will supervise you in individual sessions. You'll complete substantial-sized tasks focused on your chosen area of specialty. During this process, you'll develop your skills and expertise, and show an understanding of the content of your work. You'll also develop the attributes you need to work in this field.

Is your passion for performing music? During your MMus, you'll learn how to work towards a public musical recital, right up to the actual performance. This process involves planning and preparation, the integration of music research with performance, and you'll develop skills to be able to demonstrate each step leading up to your recital.

Are you more interested in composition? You'll be given the opportunity to create a significant body of original music.  You'll develop the skills to write music to a professional standard, suitable for being performed in public at a concert or similar event.

Links with Music Professionals and Associations

When you study for your MMus at Waikato, you'll have opportunities to network with professional groups working in the music industry. You'll be able to participate in your musical field and this will help you grow as a professional musician.

Are you interested in orchestral work? Waikato's MMus programme has links with the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, Trust Waikato Symphony Orchestra, Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra and the Opus Orchestra. There are links with Chamber Music New Zealand and Opera New Zealand. In terms of local groups, Waikato has links with the Hamilton School of Instrumental Music, the Hamilton Community Centre of Music, the Waikato Museum Concert Series, Arts Waikato and the Hamilton Civic Choir.

As far as other music-related groups and associations go, Waikato has connections with Atoll Records, New Zealand Institute of Registered Music Teachers, Radio New Zealand Concert, the Composers Association of New Zealand and the New Zealand Music Examinations Board.

There are links with international organisations, including publishing companies: the Computer Music Journal (MIT Press, USA), Australasia Computer Music Association, Electronic Music Foundation (USA) and the Sonic Arts Network (UK). Also from overseas, there are links to Oxford Music on Line (Oxford Uni Press), Cambridge, UK, St Paul's Concert Series, Herne Hill, London, the Interlochen Arts Academy, USA and the Australian Centre for Interactive Design – Queensland Conservatorium of Music.

Career Opportunities

By the end of your MMus, you'll be working at a professional level in your chosen field. If your passion is performance, you may choose to pursue a career as a studio musician or solo performer, in a chamber group or orchestra, or do experimental or theatrical work. You may prefer to go on to work in broadcasting or in radio, television or recording production. Perhaps you'd like to work in film or video music production, or in multi-media creation. You could alternatively work as a musical director or producer.

You may use your MMus to work in a role as an arts administrator, communications coordinator or in community development (for tribal authorities). You may like to work in human-computer interface development or as an educator, in the primary, secondary or tertiary sectors. Perhaps you'd like to work as a journalist or as a librarian or information consultant and music technician.



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The Master of Professional Writing (MPW) involves taking a core paper, designed specifically to enhance your workplace readiness, as well as elective papers which range across a variety of fields from creative writing to writing for promotional purposes and advertising, for digital media and for scholarly and professional publication. Read more

The Master of Professional Writing (MPW) involves taking a core paper, designed specifically to enhance your workplace readiness, as well as elective papers which range across a variety of fields from creative writing to writing for promotional purposes and advertising, for digital media and for scholarly and professional publication.

If creative writing is your passion, then you will have the opportunity to specialise in this. The Creative Writing Thesis gives selected students the option of producing a manuscript of publishable quality – whether poetry, fiction or creative nonfiction – in a stimulating and supportive workshop environment of fellow writers, and supervised by award-winning authors. The selection of students for the Creative Writing Thesis is by assessment of a portfolio of poetry and prose, and a manuscript proposal outlining the creative project.

When studying towards the MPW you will be able to include a professional writing internship and be offered an on-campus writing mentor, who will provide professional advice and direct you towards writing opportunities.

Industry Connections

The staff contributing to the Professional Writing programme have long-standing relationships with the broader writing community at a number of levels:

  • They have established senior profiles as publishers of creative and scholarly writing, as editors of literary and scholarly materials, and as peer reviewers for local and international journals.
  • The creative writing staff have won significant local and international prizes for short fiction, poetry and creative non-fiction.
  • They publish across a wide range of academic and popular media, including reviews, opinion columns, feature articles, works of scholarly reference, book chapters, scholarly articles, researched scholarly editions, and researched books.
  • They are called on to judge local and international literary prizes, and to assess applications for substantial public and private funding for literary grants, including the annual University of Waikato Writers’ Residency (co-funded by Creative New Zealand) and the Sargeson Grimshaw Writing Fellowship.
  • Contributing staff in Screen and Media maintain international networks in scriptwriting and script development.
  • Staff maintain professional links with local and international organisations who co-ordinate, sponsor and enhance the interests of professional writing in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Career Opportunities

MPW graduates will have excellent transferrable skills in devising, producing and editing text. If you include a formal internship in your programme of study, or take up the option of informal professional mentoring, you will make connections in the professional writing community, and enhance your CV with relevant workplace experience.

Potential careers include editing, long-form researched journalism, policy analysis and policy writing, report writing, script writing, speech writing, teaching, website content editing, writing for digital and broadcast media, writing for stage and screen, writing for travel and tourism and writing for public relations and marketing.

Potential employers include biotechnology industries; cultural sector/arts organisations; energy provision sector; higher education sector; libraries and archives; local and district councils; manufacturing and technology; national government, NGOs; non-profit and philanthropic sector; primary industries; print and digital news media; publishing industry; telecommunications; theatre, film and broadcast media production houses; transport, tourism and travel.



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Advance your knowledge in the area of design that interests you, enhancing your theoretical and practical design expertise. You'll further develop your critical thinking and discussion skills, increase your understanding of design and learn to express your own ideas and conclusions within a theoretical framework. Read more

Advance your knowledge in the area of design that interests you, enhancing your theoretical and practical design expertise.

You'll further develop your critical thinking and discussion skills, increase your understanding of design and learn to express your own ideas and conclusions within a theoretical framework.

Offered by the School of Design, the Master of Design is an opportunity to explore design-based research under the supervision of staff who are widely acknowledged as leaders in their fields.

You'll need a solid understanding of design research methodology to be successful in your studies. Explore your topic through a written thesis or a research project in the form of a design-based composition.

Research topics

Consider your current knowledge of the intellectual, technical, aesthetic and cultural conditions of design theory and practice when choosing your thesis topic.

Past research areas include:

  • design-led futures
  • gaming
  • interaction
  • digital imaging
  • live theory
  • design history
  • human factors in design research
  • design and culture.

You may be able to study the Master of Design by distance. 

Duration and workload

The MDes can be completed within three trimesters of full-time study, or in six trimesters if you're studying part time. You have up to three years from enrolment to complete and present your thesis.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues. You'll have opportunities to attend events, seminars, workshops and social functions.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can also give you information on study at Victoria and provides a voice for you on campus.



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Get the specialist skills and knowledge you need to be a successful professional in the design industry. In this three-trimester programme, you'll learn the art of bringing ideas to life—from conception to design to construction. Read more

Get the specialist skills and knowledge you need to be a successful professional in the design industry. In this three-trimester programme, you'll learn the art of bringing ideas to life—from conception to design to construction.

Choose one of three majors—Industrial Design, Media Design, and Culture+Context Design—in this industry-focused, professional qualification with the School of Design. Assess new technologies and investigate the social, cultural, environmental and economic implications of design on our world.

Through a combination of coursework and supervised research you'll gain a greater understanding of the process of creating value through design.

Design Research Innovation Labs (DRIL)

You'll do much of your work in the Design Research Innovation Laboratory (DRIL), giving you a stimulating and supportive environment for inspiration and discovery. Choose a research group with DRIL that fits with your current knowledge and career goals, and your intended thesis or research portfolio topic.

Work with commercial and cultural organisations on applied research projects, build your communication and collaboration skills and get ready for an exciting career in design.

What you'll study

In the first trimester you'll study the 30-point Research Methods course. Examine a variety of design research techniques to help inform and guide your thesis project. Gain the skills you need to identify a design research topic, frame a research question, define the scope and develop your proposal.

You'll further develop your knowledge and expertise in design research in the second trimester. You'll join a Design Research Innovation Laboratory (DRIL) and nominate a supervisor so you can begin your 90-point thesis. You'll also complete one 400-level, 30-point course in your major subject area while continuing to work on your thesis project within your DRIL.

In the third trimester you'll focus on completing your design research thesis project with the guidance and support of your DRIL stream coordinators and supervisor.

Design Research Innovation Laboratory (DRIL)

DRIL research groups receive support from government, industry and external grants. They produce a range of commercially viable solutions that contribute to the advancement of design research.

You'll choose from one of five research groups within DRIL:

Through DRIL you'll work closely with staff, students and industry collaborators on research projects that address a wide range of contemporary design challenges.

Duration and workload

The MDI can be completed in three trimesters of full-time study or in six trimesters if you are studying part time. It usually takes full-time students between 13 and 18 months to complete.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues.

You'll have opportunities to attend events, seminars, workshops and social functions. The Postgraduate Students' Association can give you information on study at Victoria and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

You'll be ready for a career in many design-oriented fields within the public and private sectors. You might work as an industrial, interior or product designer, an art director, visual effects artist, jeweller, exhibition designer, digital animator or a web designer.

Because you'll gain a broad range of skills during your studies, you'll also be able to find opportunities for careers beyond the mainstream profession.



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You will learn...…. Comprehensive knowledge of design processes. How to formulate creative strategies and develop them through self-assessment. Read more

You will learn...…

  1. Comprehensive knowledge of design processes.
  2. How to formulate creative strategies and develop them through self-assessment.
  3. How to independently research, master and integrate new design technologies and tools.
  4. To demonstrate effective group/team work skills and written and oral communication skills
  5. To demonstrate the professional and enterprise skills necessary for working effectively in visual effects related ICT organisations

Programme outline

This is a full-time, 180-point Master's programme. You will complete this qualification in three consecutive trimesters over 12 months, delivered at Victoria University's Miramar Creative Centre.

Trimester One

  • MDDN451 Creative Coding for Digital Content

Covers computer graphics techniques that are used as current practice in the film industry through a range of projects ranging from generating special effects to the algorithmic treatment of media.

And one of the following two courses MDDN421 or MDDN422

  • MDDN421 Compositing and Motion Graphics

Learn and practice skills relating to previsualisation, production planning and coordination for creating assets, effects and content for Visual Effects and Motion Graphics.

  • MDDN422 Creature Rigging and Simulation

Covers skills and techniques for creating and working with human, creature and mechanical rigs and controls for digital character animation.

Trimester Two

  • CCDN412 Mātauranga Design

Engage with toi (Māori creativity) and mātauranga (Māori understanding) in the production of both visual and material cultural design that honours our place and past in Aotearoa New Zealand. Guided by traditional Māori protocols and knowledge, students will learn how to understand and interact with Māori symbols and visual spatial strategies in ways that are culturally sound and appropriate.

  • CCDN422 Design professional Practice

Covers advanced investigations into topics relevant to professional practice for design today including branding, marketing, networking, presentation and portfolio.

And one of the following two courses MDDN431 or MDDN432

  • MDDN431 Lighting and Rendering

Learn about traditional applications of lighting such as portraiture, practical studio lighting, and cinematography and engage with digital tools to apply traditional lighting techniques to digital media.

  • MDDN432 Character Animation

Gain relevant skills for creating compelling and emotive animated sequences of digital characters.

Trimester Three: Research Practicum

  • MDDN541: Research Practicum Project - 60 points

This studio consists of a supervised practicum, working on a design studio based research and project, generally as a placement in the visual effects industry.

Your career options

Graduate with a sought-after combination of technical knowledge and experience appropriate for working in the Visual Effects industry or other creative digital fields.

Compositor

Combine footage and CG assets together to produce visual effects for film and media.

3D Animator

Bring digital characters to life with expressive movement and emotions.

Motion Graphics

Animate typography, graphical elements and imagery to produce compelling animations.



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Become a specialist in the architectural design of interior spaces—the places we live, work, play, eat, shop, exercise and learn. Read more

Become a specialist in the architectural design of interior spaces—the places we live, work, play, eat, shop, exercise and learn. Make a difference to people's wellbeing and create a better future through the innovative design of interior spaces.

Learn to create innovative interiors that respond well to the many demands of spaces—performance, identity, mood and physical comfort. Examine how design can affect the way people experience, interact with and move through an interior.

You'll gain an expansive knowledge of design through considering interiors in a range of contexts—social and cultural, ecological and technological, historical and contemporary. Study Interior Architecture in detail and examine the relationships between materials, people and space.

Learn through a combination of taught courses and a self-directed, design-led research thesis or portfolio.

International recognition

Victoria’s Master of Interior Architecture programme is internationally recognised through affiliation to the International Federation of Interior Architects/Designers (IFI) and the Interior Design/Interior Architecture Educators Association (IDEA).

What you'll study

In your first year, or Part 1, you'll complete seven taught courses—six are compulsory and one elected. You'll learn to successfully apply design strategies through all stages of the design process. Focus on technologies and materials and examine history, theory and criticism in interior architecture. You'll also learn about professional practice including your legal and ethical obligations.

You'll also complete a research-based advanced design project. During this you'll learn to identify questions and explore processes, and develop effective presentation methods to communicate your research findings.

Research year

During the second year, or Part 2, you'll complete a research portfolio or thesis under supervision from academic staff in the School.

Current research topics include:

  • architecture and dystopia
  • housing and public infrastructure
  • parametric design and digital agency
  • contextual shifts
  • responsive environments and robotics
  • people and designed environments
  • corporate spheres and community spaces
  • public ecologies
  • settling regional landscapes
  • indigenous materials
  • history and theory.

You'll be part of a strong culture of research and work with experienced staff who have published a variety of scholarly articles, books and conference papers.

Read more about research in the School of Architecture.

Workload and duration

The MIA can be completed in two years of full-time study or in up to four years if you're studying part time.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

Community

Postgraduate study will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues. Make the most of opportunities to attend events, seminars, workshops and social functions.

You'll also benefit from the expertise of working professionals through the Faculty's connections with local industry.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can also give you information on study at Victoria and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

As an Interior Architecture graduate, you might work as a specialist within an interior design or architecture firm, or in the interior division of a large, multidisciplinary design company.

You might also work as an exhibition designer, stage or screen set designer or retail designer. Other jobs may include lighting designer, furniture designer or environmental designer. You might also make a career in teaching or research.



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Take your musical skills and knowledge to the next level and focus on research with the MMus. Read more

Take your musical skills and knowledge to the next level and focus on research with the MMus. This one-year Master's programme will further your knowledge in either composition (including sonic arts), performance, musicology, ethnomusicology, music theory or music education, and is also designed to prepare you for research at PhD level.

Available subjects

Pathway to the MMus

If you have a Bachelor of Music (Honours), First or Second Class, and want to continue your studies, then the MMus is a good choice for you. Each subject has its own entry requirements you'll need to have met before enrolling. Performance students will need to do an audition and Composition students submit a portfolio. All students will need to outline their research plans and goals in a statement of research intent when they apply.

You'll also need to submit a research proposal within one month of enrolment for approval by the NZSM Postgraduate Committee.

Music thesis

All or most of your Master's study will involve completing a research thesis. You can choose to include 30 points worth of coursework in your programme.

Musicology students will complete a written 120-point thesis of up to 40,000 words which may include some creative work that helps explain your research. Or you can complete a 90-point written thesis of up to 30,000 words, which may also include some creative work, and 30 points from approved 400- or 500-level courses.

Composition and Performance students complete a 120-point thesis made up of a written exegesis of up to 25,000 words and significant creative work. Or you can do a 90-point thesis comprising creative work and a written report of between 10,000 and 20,000 words, and 30 points from approved 400- or 500-level courses.

Research proposal

You'll need to submit a research proposal within one month of enrolment for approval by the NZSM Postgraduate Committee. Composition and Performance students will need to outline the scope of your proposed recital or portfolio, and include an annotated bibliography demonstrating your awareness of the relevant literature and of how it relates to your creative work.

Workload and duration

You'll normally complete your MMus within one year, but may take up to a year and six months from first enrolling. Part-time students can take up to four years to complete it.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week.



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Build on your Honours degree or Postgraduate Diploma and get the high-level music skills and critical perspective you need for a career in music or a related field. Read more

Build on your Honours degree or Postgraduate Diploma and get the high-level music skills and critical perspective you need for a career in music or a related field. This one-year Master's programme will further your knowledge in either composition, sonic arts or performance and is also designed to prepare you for the Doctor of Musical Arts.

Study at New Zealand's most prestigious music school and learn from world-class musicians and academics who are leaders in their fields.

Available subjects

Coursework

Choose 30 points worth of courses at 400 or 500 level. You'll need to select topics that explore critical perspectives relating to your creative work, such as aesthetics, performance practice and critical analysis. Your courses must contain substantial written components.

Thesis

You'll complete a 90-point creative research thesis on an approved topic of your choice.

Composition students will complete a portfolio of compositions or sound-based works, and a written report of between 10,000 and 20,000 words.

Performance students will express their research through one or two public recitals, and a written report of around 10,000 to 20,000 words.

Research proposal

You'll need to submit a research proposal within one month of enrolment for approval by the NZSM Postgraduate Committee. Performance students will express their research through one or two public recitals, and a written report of between 10,000 and 20,000 words.

Workload and duration

You'll normally complete your MMA within one year, but may take up to a year and six months from first enrolling. Part-time students can take up to four years to complete it.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week.



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A career in music therapy. Learn how to use music to support the development and wellbeing of people with complex emotional, intellectual, physical or social needs. Read more

A career in music therapy

Learn how to use music to support the development and wellbeing of people with complex emotional, intellectual, physical or social needs.

You'll get a comprehensive grounding in music therapy. Study the theory and put it into practice in a clinical or social community setting. Then take what you've learned from your practical experience and apply that to your research project.

Studying at the New Zealand School of Music (NZSM), you'll learn from dedicated staff with many years' experience as music therapists.

If you have a mature and compassionate attitude, curiosity and a knack for critical thinking, and a passion for practical, creative music-making then this programme is for you.

Professional registration

The programme was developed in association with Music Therapy New Zealand(MThNZ). You'll be encouraged to join this organisation during your training so you can start building links with other professionals and the supporting community.

Once you've completed your degree you'll be able to apply for accreditation as a Registered Music Therapist through the Music Therapy Registration Board of MThNZ.

Available qualifications

  • Master of Music Therapy by coursework and research
  • Master of Music Therapy by research

Most students do the Master of Music Therapy by coursework and research, which is in two parts. In Part 1 you'll do coursework and in Part 2 you'll do casework and research.

If you're already a music therapist with an appropriate postgraduate qualification you can go straight to Part 2—the Master of Music Therapy by research.

How you'll study

Learn through practical musical and placement study, theory and research. You and your tutors will work closely together in small groups to problem-solve, reflect on theory and practice, and consider questions that can lead to practice-based research.

What you'll study

In Trimester One you'll do courses covering the principles and methods used in music therapy. In Trimester Two you'll do courses on the exploration of music from cultures other than your own, and learn how this applies to your practice, along with courses on approaches to music therapy research and a workplace practicum.

For Part 2, you'll do a range of music therapy casework, followed by a supervised practice-based research project linking to what you observe and experience on your placement. For the Master of Music Therapy by research, your study may be practice-based or more theoretical, depending on your interests and research questions. Both options are full-year courses.

Community placement

You'll do placements both through your Part 1 practicum and your Part 2 casework. Your placement will be clinically supervised by lecturing staff in Part 1 and by external registered music therapists in Part 2. You'll also be supported by on-site liaison staff who may be music therapists, specialist teachers or other healthcare professionals.

Placement opportunities may include clinical practice in:

  • special schools and special units of mainstream schools—primary and secondary
  • central regional health schools for young people with mental health needs
  • child development centres and paediatric wards of hospitals
  • specialist pre-school units for conductive education of children with physical and neurological needs
  • visual resource centres
  • deaf education units
  • specialist hospital and community units for adults with neurological disorders and psychiatric conditions such as eating disorders and complex dual-diagnoses—learning difficulties and psychiatry
  • centres for adolescents and adults with intellectual handicaps
  • dedicated music and allied therapy centres in Auckland and Christchurch
  • aged-care
  • drug and alcohol rehabilitation services
  • hospice and palliative care

Duration

The Master of Music Therapy by coursework and research can be completed in two years of full-time study or in three to five years part time.

The Master of Music Therapy by research can be completed in one year full-time or in two to three years part-time.

Workload

If you are studying full-time you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. This programme is demanding, so you need to be cautious about how much paid work you take on. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

You can estimate your study workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Where you'll study

You'll do Part 1 in Wellington. You may be able to do Part 2 in Auckland or Christchurch if suitable professional supervision is available. Talk to the programme administrator to learn more.

Research topics

You'll be able to choose your practice-based research project based on what you observe and experience in your casework.



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Are you excited by the idea of turning innovative ideas into real products or services? Get the knowledge and skills you need to take ideas to market. Read more

Are you excited by the idea of turning innovative ideas into real products or services? Get the knowledge and skills you need to take ideas to market. Whether you're wanting to commercialise a scientific discovery, an invention or idea for any new product or service, the MInnComl will give you a head start in the marketplace.

The programme draws from a range of disciplines and is ideal for people with a background in engineering, science, business, law or design.

Real-world project

You’ll complete an individual project that fits with your career goals—you might create a new product or improve an existing one, explore commercialising scientific research, or solve a need you’ve identified in the market. If you don't know what project you want to work on, you'll be helped to find one.

Past students have explored projects that include methane inhibitors in cattle, power pole maintenance, training provision in developing countries, new beverages and environmentally sustainable toothbrushes.

Earn your Master's while you spend a year working on your project. Work with the support of mentors, industry experts, structured classes and an Advisory Board made up of fellow students.

You can work on a project as part of your current job, or you can develop your own idea, or work on a project alongside a commercial or research-based organisation. Victoria has relationships with a range of organisations and will help you make the match.

Valuable skills

After completing a Master of Innovation and Commercialisation, you'll be able to:

  • identify opportunities and assess the feasibility of new products and markets
  • understand the research, design and manufacturing and commercialisation processes
  • understand intellectual property, regulatory requirements and funding options
  • work effectively in a multidisciplinary team
  • work effectively with commercial and research organisations
  • prepare a business case for a product.

What you'll study

You’ll complete three courses and the 120-point commercialisation project. You’ll first take an introductory course in developing and commercialising innovation-based projects, and you must achieve at least a B+ in this to continue the programme.

Next you’ll complete two courses that explore strategy and product validation, and product development and commercialisation. As you work through these courses you’ll begin researching your own project—a product feasibility study and development plan.

All courses are compulsory and each involves a combination of workshops, lectures, guest speakers and team work.

Duration and workload

The MInnComl will take you 12 months to complete over three trimesters—from March to February. You can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for most of the year.

You can potentially complete the programme part time. Talk to the programme director about how this can be done.

Find out more about Innovation and Commercialisation at Victoria.



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