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Masters Degrees in Architecture, New Zealand

We have 4 Masters Degrees in Architecture, New Zealand

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Become a specialist in the architectural design of interior spaces—the places we live, work, play, eat, shop, exercise and learn. Read more

Become a specialist in the architectural design of interior spaces—the places we live, work, play, eat, shop, exercise and learn. Make a difference to people's wellbeing and create a better future through the innovative design of interior spaces.

Learn to create innovative interiors that respond well to the many demands of spaces—performance, identity, mood and physical comfort. Examine how design can affect the way people experience, interact with and move through an interior.

You'll gain an expansive knowledge of design through considering interiors in a range of contexts—social and cultural, ecological and technological, historical and contemporary. Study Interior Architecture in detail and examine the relationships between materials, people and space.

Learn through a combination of taught courses and a self-directed, design-led research thesis or portfolio.

International recognition

Victoria’s Master of Interior Architecture programme is internationally recognised through affiliation to the International Federation of Interior Architects/Designers (IFI) and the Interior Design/Interior Architecture Educators Association (IDEA).

What you'll study

In your first year, or Part 1, you'll complete seven taught courses—six are compulsory and one elected. You'll learn to successfully apply design strategies through all stages of the design process. Focus on technologies and materials and examine history, theory and criticism in interior architecture. You'll also learn about professional practice including your legal and ethical obligations.

You'll also complete a research-based advanced design project. During this you'll learn to identify questions and explore processes, and develop effective presentation methods to communicate your research findings.

Research year

During the second year, or Part 2, you'll complete a research portfolio or thesis under supervision from academic staff in the School.

Current research topics include:

  • architecture and dystopia
  • housing and public infrastructure
  • parametric design and digital agency
  • contextual shifts
  • responsive environments and robotics
  • people and designed environments
  • corporate spheres and community spaces
  • public ecologies
  • settling regional landscapes
  • indigenous materials
  • history and theory.

You'll be part of a strong culture of research and work with experienced staff who have published a variety of scholarly articles, books and conference papers.

Read more about research in the School of Architecture.

Workload and duration

The MIA can be completed in two years of full-time study or in up to four years if you're studying part time.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

Community

Postgraduate study will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues. Make the most of opportunities to attend events, seminars, workshops and social functions.

You'll also benefit from the expertise of working professionals through the Faculty's connections with local industry.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can also give you information on study at Victoria and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

As an Interior Architecture graduate, you might work as a specialist within an interior design or architecture firm, or in the interior division of a large, multidisciplinary design company.

You might also work as an exhibition designer, stage or screen set designer or retail designer. Other jobs may include lighting designer, furniture designer or environmental designer. You might also make a career in teaching or research.



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Delve deeper into the history and theory of architecture with the research and thesis-based Master of Architecture. . This qualification will be of interest to you if you are already working in the profession and want to deepen your understanding of a particular aspect of architecture. Read more

Delve deeper into the history and theory of architecture with the research and thesis-based Master of Architecture. 

This qualification will be of interest to you if you are already working in the profession and want to deepen your understanding of a particular aspect of architecture. Or you may have recently completed a Bachelor of Architectural Studies (BAS) or Postgraduate Diploma in Architecture History and Theory (PDGipAHT), and want to continue on to do research.

You'll further develop your critical thinking and discussion skills with in-depth study into your area of interest. Increase your understanding of how architectural history and theory are applied to design, so you can express your own ideas and conclusions within a theoretical framework.

Expertise through research

Choose a thesis that reflects your current knowledge of the intellectual, technical, aesthetic and cultural conditions of architecture. Your research topic must have a basis in theory as well as method.

You'll get quality supervision and support from staff with international reputations for teaching, research and publishing.

You may be able to include media such as a drawing portfolio or video with your thesis submission. If you choose to use design as your primary research method in your thesis, it must be explained within a theoretical context.

Past research topics include:

  • architectural and urban design processes
  • sustainability in architecture
  • architectural history, theory and criticism
  • energy and environmental design of buildings, including sustainable design

The MArch does not qualify you for registration as an architect.

Duration and workload

The MArch can be completed within three trimesters or one calendar year of full-time study, or in a minimum of six trimesters if you're studying part time. You have a maximum of three years from enrolment to complete and present your thesis.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues. You'll have opportunities to attend events, seminars, workshops and social functions.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can also give you information on study at Victoria and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

If you are already working in the profession, you'll add a new level of expertise to your practice.

The skills and knowledge you gain will open doors to a range of other jobs including architectural conservator, archivist or museum researcher. You might also find work as a critic or writer, curator, historian or librarian.



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Be part of creating a better outdoor built environment. Get the knowledge and skills to combine the creative design process with science, to influence human interaction with the landscape. Read more

Be part of creating a better outdoor built environment. Get the knowledge and skills to combine the creative design process with science, to influence human interaction with the landscape. Study how the designed landscape is connected to and impacts society, the economy, culture and sustainability.

You'll gain an expert understanding of key design practices and issues, and the effective use of design strategies through all stages of the design process. You'll also learn about the legal and ethical obligations of the professional landscape architect.

Learn to be critically objective and environmentally mindful in your approach to landscape architecture. Study, question and test ideals and theories as you work towards completing your design-based research thesis.

Professional accreditation

Victoria's MLA is one of only three programmes in New Zealand that meets the standards for accreditation with the New Zealand Institute of Landscape Architects (NZILA). After you graduate you'll need to work as a landscape architect for around three years before you can become registered with the NZILA. Your qualification and registration will be recognised throughout New Zealand and internationally.

What you'll study

In your first year, or Part 1, you'll complete seven taught courses—six are compulsory and one elected. You'll study advanced landscape design and the technology used in urban infrastructure. Examine history, theory and criticism in landscape architecture and learn about professional practice.

You'll also study advanced research techniques and complete a studio-based investigation into an area of interest that can be further developed in your thesis year. You'll develop and test your ideas through writing and design.

Research year

During the second year, or Part 2, you'll complete a research portfolio or thesis under supervision from academic staff in the School.

Current research areas in the School include:

  • architecture and dystopia
  • housing and public infrastructure
  • parametric design and digital agency
  • contextual shifts
  • responsive environments and robotics
  • people and designed environments
  • corporate spheres and community spaces
  • public ecologies
  • settling regional landscapes
  • indigenous materials
  • history and theory.

You'll be part of a strong culture of research and work with experienced staff who have published a variety of scholarly articles, books and conference papers.Read more about research in the School of Architecture.

Duration and workload

The Master of Landscape Architecture can be completed in two years of full-time study or in up to four years if studying part time.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

Community

Postgraduate study will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues. Make the most of opportunities to attend events, seminars, workshops and social functions.

You'll also benefit from the expertise of working professionals through the Faculty's connections with local industry.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can also give you information on study at Victoria and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

You'll graduate prepared to work as a landscape architect. You might start your own practice or work in a firm or government organisation. You're likely to collaborate with artists, ecologists, architects, planners and engineers to design a wide range of projects.

Other careers for graduates include parks and recreation planner, site designer and planner or urban designer. You could also work as a civil designer, public infrastructure consultant, sustainable development consultant or landscape assessor.



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Get prepared to work as a professional architect. Hone your skills as a designer, develop your ability to think visually and in three dimensions and learn how to best meet your clients' needs through practical, real-life experiences. Read more

Get prepared to work as a professional architect. Hone your skills as a designer, develop your ability to think visually and in three dimensions and learn how to best meet your clients' needs through practical, real-life experiences.

Learn through a combination of taught courses and a written thesis or research portfolio that involves self-directed, design-led research. You'll graduate with a range of design projects that demonstrate mastery in your area of interest.

Professional accreditation

Your MArch(Prof) from Victoria will be recognised by the New Zealand Registered Architects Board (NZRAB) as fulfilling the academic requirements for registration to practise as an architect. You'll need to spend two to three years gaining practical experience before you can apply to register. The Board will then assess your professional competence.

The MArch(Prof) is also accepted by the Commonwealth Association of Architects (CAA) as fulfilling their academic requirements for membership and registration. However, you will have to meet some other requirements such as evidence of coursework and practical experience.

You'll also meet the academic requirements for professional registration as a practising architect with the industry organisation, the New Zealand Institute of Architects (NZIA).

What you'll study

In your first year, or Part 1, you'll do seven taught courses. Study advanced architectural design and advanced construction theory and practice including the integration of technology. You'll explore contemporary architectural theories and learn about professional practice. You'll also study advanced research techniques, including historical and theoretical approaches.

Research

During the second year, or Part 2, you'll complete a research portfolio or thesis under supervision from academic staff in the School.

Current research areas and topics include:

  • architecture and dystopia
  • housing and public infrastructure
  • parametric design and digital agency
  • contextual shifts
  • responsive environments and robotics
  • people and designed environments
  • corporate spheres and community spaces
  • public ecologies
  • settling regional landscapes
  • indigenous materials
  • history and theory.

You'll be part of a strong culture of research and work with experienced staff who have published a variety of scholarly articles, books and conference papers.

Duration and workload

The Master of Architecture (Professional) can be completed in two years of full-time study or in up to four years part time.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

Community

Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues. You'll have opportunities to attend events, seminars, workshops and social functions.

The Postgraduate Students' Association can also give you information on study at Victoria and provides a voice for you on campus.

Careers

You'll graduate ready for a career in mainstream architecture in a private practice or a government organisation.

However, your broad range of skills will be adaptable to many related careers so you will also find opportunities outside the mainstream profession. These might include urban planner or urban designer, interior designer, stage or movie set designer, property developer, project manager, teacher or researcher or work in construction law.



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