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Masters Degrees in Musicology

We have 58 Masters Degrees in Musicology

Masters degrees in Musicology offer advanced study of different forms of musical art, their methods and their functions within society.

Taught MA and MMus degrees are typical for the field, though research-based MRes and MPhil programmes may be available at some institutions. Entry requirements normally include an undergraduate degree in a relevant subject, such as Music or Art History.

Why study a Masters in Musicology?

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Music is a vital form of cultural expression that shapes and is shaped by society around it. This programme allows you to study the critical theories and perspectives that have influenced the way we study music – how it is composed and performed as well as the role it plays in different communities. Read more

Music is a vital form of cultural expression that shapes and is shaped by society around it. This programme allows you to study the critical theories and perspectives that have influenced the way we study music – how it is composed and performed as well as the role it plays in different communities.

Core modules will allow you to explore issues in musicology such as race, class, gender, sexuality, popular music and mass culture, as well as how music has been received and interpreted and how musical ‘canons’ are formed. You’ll also develop your understanding of research methods in musicology, and have the chance to gain knowledge of aesthetic theory or editing and archival studies, allowing you to balance critical and applied forms of musicology.

In addition, you’ll choose from optional modules from across the School of Music allowing you to focus on topics that interest you, from performance or electronic and computer music to composition and psychology of music.

We have a variety of excellent facilities to support your learning, including rehearsal, performance and practice spaces, a lab for studying the psychology of music and studios for sound recording, software development and computer music composition. The Special Collections housed in our beautiful Brotherton Library contain significant collections of music manuscripts, rare printed music and letters from composers and critics to help inform your work.

We also have good working relationships with a range of prestigious arts organisations: we host BBC Radio 3 concerts, Leeds Lieder and the Leeds International Pianoforte Competition, as well as enjoying a close partnership with Opera North and many others in a city with a thriving music and cultural scene.

Course content

You’ll study core modules that develop your understanding of both critical and applied forms of musicology. One of these will allow you to explore issues and topics that have emerged in the past few decades – questions of race, gender, politics, deconstruction and more. You’ll also choose one or two from a cluster of optional modules, giving you an insight into editing and archival studies or introducing you to aesthetic theory.

In addition, you’ll have the chance to pursue another area of musical interest when you select from a range of optional modules. Whether you’re interested in computer music or psychology of music, or you want to continue to improve your performance or composition skills, you can pick one module allowing you to gain specialist knowledge in a field outside of musicology.

Throughout the year you’ll study a core module that develops your knowledge of research methods in music and musicology, laying the foundations for the rest of your studies. You’ll also be able to put the research skills you gain into practice if you choose to do a dissertation by the end of the programme – an independently researched project on a topic of your choice. Alternatively, you can complete a major editorial project, producing an extended edition of professional standard based on original musical sources.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

You’ll study the two core modules below and then choose either - the Dissertation (60 credits) or - the Editorial Project module (60 credits).

  • Professional Studies 30 credits
  • Issues in Critical Musicology 30 credits

Optional modules

Then you’ll choose one or two from the three musicology modules below, and one more from the full list of optional modules offered across the School of Music.

  • Individual Project 30 credits
  • Short Dissertation 30 credits
  • Dissertation 60 credits
  • Composition Studies 30 credits
  • Instrumental or Vocal Recital 30 credits
  • Concerto/Song-Cycle/Extended Work 30 credits
  • Applied Performance Studies 30 credits
  • Editing and Archival Studies 30 credits
  • Short Editorial Project 30 credits
  • Editorial Project 60 credits
  • Aesthetic Theory 30 credits
  • Computer Music Practice 30 credits
  • Computer Music Contexts 30 credits
  • Case Studies in the Applied Psychology of Music 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Critical and Applied Musicology MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Critical and Applied Musicology MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods including seminars and tutorials, as well as vocal/instrumental lessons with our expert tutors. We’re also making more and more use of online learning. However, private study is also integral to this programme, allowing you to pursue your interests more closely and develop research and critical skills.

Assessment

To help you build diverse skills, we also assess you using different methods depending on the modules you choose. These could include presentations, essays, literature reviews, recitals and performances or project work; however, optional modules may also use alternative methods such as recitals and composition portfolios.

Career opportunities

This programme will give you in-depth subject knowledge, as well as specialist knowledge and skills in a different aspect of music studies to broaden your understanding. It will also allow you to gain key research, critical and communication skills that are in demand in a wide range of industries and sectors.

Graduates from the programme move on to a variety of careers. Recent graduates have entered areas such as arts management, librarianship, recruitment, and freelance teaching and performance. Many graduates go on to further study at PhD level in the UK and USA.

We also offer additional support as you develop your career plans: the School of Music boasts a unique Alumni Mentoring Network, where students can be supported by past students as they start to plan their next steps.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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The MMus in Musicology provides students with intensive study in current trends in Musicology at advanced level. Read more
The MMus in Musicology provides students with intensive study in current trends in Musicology at advanced level. The programme combines a broad base in musicological research, including theoretical and methodological approaches from the historiography, analysis, sociology and cultural and critical study of music, with the possibility of specialising in fields such as Popular Music Studies, Screen Music Studies, Historically Informed Performance Practice (scholarly approaches only) and Sonic Arts Aesthetics and Criticism.

Why this programme

◾Provision of placements in musical or cultural and arts organisations
◾Provision of tuition in digital musicology
◾Provision of specialist tuition in creative industries and cultural policy at the Centre for Cultural Policy Research
◾As a UNESCO City of Music, Glasgow is a unique centre of creative activity in diverse fields, from classical orchestras and ensembles, including BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra and Royal Scottish National Orchestra, to legendary venues in popular and traditional music, making it an outstanding place for musicological study.
◾Our facilities include a Concert Hall, three studios, an audio lab and practice rooms
◾We have an excellent collection of modern and historical keyboard instruments including two Steinway Model D grand pianos, an 1840s Broadwood grand piano, a Classical forte-piano, and two harpsichords. Other instruments include a selection of percussion instruments, a consort of viols, Baroque strings, recorders, crumhorns and other wind instruments.

Programme structure

The programme is comprised of four core courses (Research Skills and Digital Musicology, Introduction to Musicology, Current Issues in Musicology and Dissertation in Musicology) to provide students with a firm basis in the current research and methods in musicology. These are complemented by a range of options to allow students to pursue their own specialized interests.

Options will include:
◾Historically Informed Performance Practice
◾Introduction to Popular Music
◾Sonic Arts Aesthetics and Criticism
◾Music, Sound and Screen

There will also be opportunities to engage with interdisciplinary study, with courses available from other subjects within the School:
◾Creative Industries and Cultural Policy (Centre for Cultural Policy Research)
◾Festivals (Film and Television Studies)
◾Making Time: performing and thinking temporalities in the creative arts (History of Art)

Core teaching will be delivered during semesters 1 and 2. Over the summer months you will complete the Dissertation, to be submitted at the end of August. A variety of teaching methods will be used, including seminars and individual supervision. You have the opportunity to take a Placement in a Music or Arts organisation (subject to availability).

Career prospects

This programme prepares students for careers in the music and creative industries as well as related fields, such as the media and broadcasting. Additionally, this programme provides the necessary foundation for pursuing further research in musicology in the form of a PhD.

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Why Surrey?. Our MMus programme is distinctive in its range of musicological, compositional and performance-based elements. Read more

Why Surrey?

Our MMus programme is distinctive in its range of musicological, compositional and performance-based elements.

You will benefit from the diversity of our research strengths, numerous ensemble performance opportunities and expertise in a range of musical fields, including contemporary music for the concert hall, popular music, film music, opera, acoustic, electronic and computer-generated music.

Programme overview

The Musicology pathway of the MMus Music programme is designed to accommodate a flexible approach that reflects staff research expertise, students’ own specialisations and the increasingly polyglot nature of the discipline.

Art and popular music are both catered for within the pathway, drawing on the expertise of staff across these areas.

You will take two compulsory research training modules followed by a combination of compulsory specialism-related modules and optional modules. You may then choose to undertake a dissertation of either 60 or 90 credits.

The programme provides ideal preparation for future research work at PhD level.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Short-course opportunities

The School welcomes applications from students who wish to undertake one module of study from the Masters programme.

Selection process

Potential applicants may make an appointment for an informal interview with the Programme Director if practicable. All applicants will be asked either to submit a sample of written work, a DVD of their performance, or samples of their compositional work, or to sit an audition depending on their chosen specialism.

Research

Our work achieves wide international circulation, both through established scholarly channels and, distinctively, through broadcast media (such as BBC TV, Channel 4, BBC Radio 3 and Radio 4, and National Public Radio in the USA). School staff are much in demand for pre-concert talks at venues such as London’s South Bank and Barbican centres.

The research environment at Surrey is sustained by open discussion and debate, and through the regular airing of work-in- progress. Our work is strengthened by the ready input of our peers and research students at various stages allowing collective engagement to foster innovation.

Educational aims of the programme

The MMus (Musicology) programme aims to provide students with a high quality education in the wide range of theoretical perspectives on and methodological approaches to present day musical study.

It aims to provide students with the necessary skills, techniques and methodologies to work at an advanced level with a critical awareness of the discipline.

The programme aims to reflect current developments within the theory and practice of musicology and, in so doing, to educate students so that they may work confidently and constructively within the musicological culture of the present. The programme aims to offer the necessary preparation for students wishing to undertake doctoral level study in practice-based areas.

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • Key questions in contemporary musicology
  • Disciplinary overlaps in musicology
  • The broad range of approaches to present day musicology

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Frame research questions
  • Critically assess, respond to and operate in current areas of musicology
  • Understand what constitutes musicological evidence
  • Undertake an advanced research project to an appropriate depth

Professional practical skills

  • Writing and delivering conference papers
  • Summarising musicological arguments and debates
  • Choosing appropriate methodologies
  • Accessing appropriate resources
  • Communicating understanding clearly in writing
  • Structuring a large scale piece of written work

Key / transferable skills

  • Communicate and present ideas effectively
  • Reasons critically
  • Organise and plan own work
  • Adopt a proactive approach to problem-solving
  • Make decisions in complex situations

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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The Sydney Conservatorium of Music places a high emphasis on its research activity. We have a vibrant and diverse community of staff and students, many of whom enjoy exceptional careers worldwide as both performers and scholars in the finest musical company. Read more
The Sydney Conservatorium of Music places a high emphasis on its research activity. We have a vibrant and diverse community of staff and students, many of whom enjoy exceptional careers worldwide as both performers and scholars in the finest musical company.

The Master of Music (Musicology) is a two year full-time or four year part-time degree which aims to train students to become independent scholars in their chosen field of musicology and to communicate their findings in appropriate written and spoken forms. The program of study culminates in a thesis on a topic of the candidate's choice which has been approved by the faculty. Musicology at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music embraces many fields including western historical musicology, ethnomusicology, empirical musicology, popular music studies and more.

To ask a question about this course, visit http://sydney.edu.au/internationaloffice/

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Applied Musicology focuses on the musical infrastructure and offers the specific knowledge and skills required for a musicologist to operate successfully within international musical practice. Read more
Applied Musicology focuses on the musical infrastructure and offers the specific knowledge and skills required for a musicologist to operate successfully within international musical practice.

The programme is a reflective training in both current and innovative approaches in musicology, whereas at the same time academic musicological skills are 'translated' into the day-to-day challenges in a musical life.

The programme is designed in a direct dialogue with top of the bill institutions within the musical infrastructure in the Netherlands and beyond; it does not discriminate between classical and popular music. The curriculum augments the knowledge and skills gained through the Utrecht Bachelor programme in Musicology, with its accents on both historical musicology and the relation of music with other media.

Students are accompanied intensively while developing research and reflective skills relevant to questions in contemporary music production, programming, financing and participation. Required skills (for example journalistic writing skills) are trained extensively in classroom labs, coached by professors and professionals.

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Whether as a stand-alone degree or a stepping stone towards MLitt and PhD research degrees, the MA in Musicology offers you the opportunity to develop as a researcher, deepen your critical and communication abilities, and apply these skills to the study of music history, music and culture, and analysis. Read more

Overview

Whether as a stand-alone degree or a stepping stone towards MLitt and PhD research degrees, the MA in Musicology offers you the opportunity to develop as a researcher, deepen your critical and communication abilities, and apply these skills to the study of music history, music and culture, and analysis. The programme is delivered by staff with strong international research reputations, active as scholars, performers, and composers. Their diverse expertise includes areas such as: music and film; opera studies; source studies; European art music in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; music in Ireland; ethnomusicology; popular music; music, gender, and sexuality; analysis; and more. Beyond the modules, seminars, and showcase outlined in the Course Structure, MA in Musicology students may also attend conferences, concerts, and other events that Music Department staff regularly organise. Students also benefit from a first-rate library, access to the University’s language courses, and close proximity to Dublin, enabling access to a further range of research libraries and archives.

The coordinator of this degree is Dr Laura Watson. Applications will typically be processed within three weeks.

See the Department’s webpage http://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/music/our-people for full details of staff interests.

See the website https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/music/our-courses/ma-musicology-0

Course Structure

The programme comprises seven modules in total: six group-seminar modules and a year-round thesis module for which students are allocated individual supervisors. You will encounter a rich spectrum of musicological topics, themes, and approaches in the programme, which reflects the variety of staff research interests. In addition, a year-round research seminar series provides an opportunity to hear guest lectures by visiting musicologists, composers, and performers. Students also present their work in progress at the annual MA Showcase in Semester 2 of Year 2.

Career Options

MA Musicology students develop a portfolio of critical, analytical, and communication skills, while the programme also trains students to work independently and manage their time effectively. These skills serve graduates well in a wide range of employment situations, including areas specific to music such as arts administration and events management. The MA in Musicology is also an excellent option for those considering further postgraduate study.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MHT53

The following information should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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Whether as a stand-alone degree or a stepping stone towards MLitt and PhD research degrees, the MA in Musicology offers you the opportunity to develop as a researcher, deepen your critical and communication abilities, and apply these skills to the study of music history, music and culture, and analysis. Read more

Overview

Whether as a stand-alone degree or a stepping stone towards MLitt and PhD research degrees, the MA in Musicology offers you the opportunity to develop as a researcher, deepen your critical and communication abilities, and apply these skills to the study of music history, music and culture, and analysis. The programme is delivered by staff with strong international research reputations, active as scholars, performers, and composers. Their diverse expertise includes areas such as: music and film; opera studies; source studies; European art music in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; music in Ireland; ethnomusicology; popular music; music, gender, and sexuality; analysis; and more. Beyond the modules, seminars, and showcase outlined in the Course Structure, MA in Musicology students may also attend conferences, concerts, and other events that Music Department staff regularly organise. Students also benefit from a first-rate library, access to the University’s language courses, and close proximity to Dublin, enabling access to a further range of research libraries and archives.

The coordinator of this degree is Dr Laura Watson. Applications will typically be processed within three weeks.

See the Department’s webpage http://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/music/our-people for full details of staff interests.

See the website https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/music/our-courses/ma-musicology

Course Structure

The programme comprises seven modules in total: six group-seminar modules (three per semester) and a year-round thesis module for which students are allocated individual supervisors. You will encounter a rich spectrum of musicological topics, themes, and approaches in the programme, which reflects the variety of staff research interests. In addition, a year-round research seminar series provides an opportunity to hear guest lectures by visiting musicologists, composers, and performers. Students also present their work in progress at the annual MA Showcase in Semester 2.

Career Options

MA Musicology students develop a portfolio of critical, analytical, and communication skills, while the programme also trains students to work independently and manage their time effectively. These skills serve graduates well in a wide range of employment situations, including areas specific to music such as arts administration and events management. The MA in Musicology is also an excellent option for those considering further postgraduate study.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MHT52

The following information should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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The MA in Performance & Musicology degree offers those with strengths in performance opportunities to develop their skills. The pathway is carefully honed to foster and develop postgraduate level performing skills within the rich environment of a strong musicological, compositional and technological research setting. Read more

Overview

The MA in Performance & Musicology degree offers those with strengths in performance opportunities to develop their skills.

The pathway is carefully honed to foster and develop postgraduate level performing skills within the rich environment of a strong musicological, compositional and technological research setting. See https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/music/our-people for more information.

The preparation of a dissertation allows you to develop research skills in an area closely related to your final performance.

The programme’s director is Dr Antonio Cascelli (Lecturer in Performance Studies), a professional accompanist and musicologist.

What You Can Expect
- Funding towards lessons on principal instrument/voice.
- Priority allocation of tutorial time with visiting performers as available.
- Priority practice room access.
- Priority inclusion in the Department’s public lunchtime concert series.
- Opportunities to have performances recorded. Individual tutorial time with a designated advisor.
- Involvement in an annual MA Showcase at which all MA students have the opportunity to present their research and receive feedback on their development
- Expert advice on interpretative issues from musicologists, performers and composers at the cutting edge of their fields.
- Foreign language instruction is also available through the Maynooth University Language Centre. See: http://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/language-centre for detailed information and fees.

See the website https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/music/our-courses/ma-performance-musicology

Entry Requirements

- Internal Maynooth University applicants
Applicants specialising in performance for their UG programme must obtain a minimum of a high II.1 result for Single/Double Recital

Applicants not specialising in performance for their UG programme will be required to demonstrate in audition and interview a standard on proposed principal instrument/voice equivalent to a minimum of a high II.1 bachelor degree. The audition should consist of c. 20 minutes of contrasting music. Vocalists are expected to demonstrate the ability to sing in three languages. Copies of music to be provided for examining panel along with listed programme.

- International applicants
International applicants must have a recognised primary degree considered equivalent to Irish university primary degree level.

Applicants will be required to demonstrate in audition and interview a standard on proposed principal instrument/voice equivalent to a minimum of a high II.1 Irish university bachelor degree. The audition should consist of c. 20 minutes of contrasting music. Vocalists are expected to demonstrate the ability to sing in three languages. Copies of music to be provided for examining panel along with listed programme.

International applicants should contact for full details of the audition process.

International applicants whose first language is not English may be requested to submit samples of written material.

Minimum English language requirements: please visit Maynooth University International Office website for information about English language tests accepted and required scores. The requirements specified are applicable for both EU and non-EU applicants.

Maynooth University’s TOEFL code is 8850

Applications will typically be processed within three weeks.

Course Structure

The programme offers a strong foundational course in research methodology and individual tutorial time with a designated advisor leading to submission of a thesis related to performance repertoire. It features expert advice on interpretative issues from musicologists, performers and composers at the cutting edge of their fields. The programme includes funding towards first study lessons, priority allocation of tutorial time with visiting performers as available, priority practice room access and inclusion in the Department’s public lunchtime concert series, as well as opportunities to have performances recorded.

Career Options

MA Performance and Musicology students develop a portfolio of performance, communication, critical, and analytical skills, while the programme also trains students to work independently and manage their time effectively. These skills serve graduates well in a wide range of working situations, ranging from the freelance solo performing career, to arts administration and events management. The MA in Performance and Musicology is also an excellent option for those considering further postgraduate study or instrumental and vocal training.

Find out how to apply here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/music/our-courses/ma-performance-musicology#tabs-apply

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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The MA in Performance & Musicology degree offers those with strengths in performance opportunities to develop their skills. The pathway is carefully honed to foster and develop postgraduate level performing skills within the rich environment of a strong musicological, compositional and technological research setting. Read more

Overview

The MA in Performance & Musicology degree offers those with strengths in performance opportunities to develop their skills.

The pathway is carefully honed to foster and develop postgraduate level performing skills within the rich environment of a strong musicological, compositional and technological research setting. See https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/music/our-people for more information.

The preparation of a dissertation allows you to develop research skills in an area closely related to your final performance.

The programme’s director is Dr Antonio Cascelli (Lecturer in Performance Studies), a professional accompanist and musicologist.

What You Can Expect
- Funding towards lessons on principal instrument/voice.
- Priority allocation of tutorial time with visiting performers as available.
- Priority practice room access.
- Priority inclusion in the Department’s public lunchtime concert series.
- Opportunities to have performances recorded. Individual tutorial time with a designated advisor.
- Involvement in an annual MA Showcase at which all MA students have the opportunity to present their research and receive feedback on their development
- Expert advice on interpretative issues from musicologists, performers and composers at the cutting edge of their fields.
- Foreign language instruction is also available through the Maynooth University Language Centre. See: http://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/language-centre for detailed information and fees.

See the website https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/music/our-courses/ma-performance-musicology-pt

Entry Requirements

- Internal Maynooth University applicants
Applicants specialising in performance for their UG programme must obtain a minimum of a high II.1 result for Single/Double Recital

Applicants not specialising in performance for their UG programme will be required to demonstrate in audition and interview a standard on proposed principal instrument/voice equivalent to a minimum of a high II.1 bachelor degree. The audition should consist of c. 20 minutes of contrasting music. Vocalists are expected to demonstrate the ability to sing in three languages. Copies of music to be provided for examining panel along with listed programme.

- International applicants
International applicants must have a recognised primary degree considered equivalent to Irish university primary degree level.

Applicants will be required to demonstrate in audition and interview a standard on proposed principal instrument/voice equivalent to a minimum of a high II.1 Irish university bachelor degree. The audition should consist of c. 20 minutes of contrasting music. Vocalists are expected to demonstrate the ability to sing in three languages. Copies of music to be provided for examining panel along with listed programme.

International applicants should contact for full details of the audition process.

International applicants whose first language is not English may be requested to submit samples of written material.

Minimum English language requirements: please visit Maynooth University International Office website (https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/international/study-maynooth/postgraduate ) for information about English language tests accepted and required scores. The requirements specified are applicable for both EU and non-EU applicants.

Maynooth University’s TOEFL code is 8850

Applications will typically be processed within three weeks.

Course Structure

The programme offers a strong foundational course in research methodology and individual tutorial time with a designated advisor leading to submission of a thesis related to performance repertoire. It features expert advice on interpretative issues from musicologists, performers and composers at the cutting edge of their fields. The programme includes funding towards first study lessons, priority allocation of tutorial time with visiting performers as available, priority practice room access and inclusion in the Department’s public lunchtime concert series, as well as opportunities to have performances recorded.

Career Options

MA Performance and Musicology students develop a portfolio of performance, communication, critical, and analytical skills, while the programme also trains students to work independently and manage their time effectively. These skills serve graduates well in a wide range of working situations, ranging from the freelance solo performing career, to arts administration and events management. The MA in Performance and Musicology is also an excellent option for those considering further postgraduate study or instrumental and vocal training.

Find out how to apply here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/music/our-courses/ma-performance-musicology-pt#tabs-apply

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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The Research Master in Musicology offers advanced research training into the study of Western music across different historical periods. Read more
The Research Master in Musicology offers advanced research training into the study of Western music across different historical periods.

Our Research Master's in Musicology will train you in advanced research while giving you academic insight into the theoretical and artistic principles underpinning music across history and cultures. You will also investigate the contextual circumstances influencing the production, distribution, and reception of music.

The Musicology programme at Utrecht University focuses on Western music from the Middle Ages to the present. Although the emphasis of our teaching and research activity is on historical musicology, there are also courses which bring together both historical and systematic approaches. Interdisciplinary work is central to the programme, and there are particularly strong links with Medieval and Renaissance Studies, New Media & Digital Culture, Gender Studies, postcolonial studies, and Computational Humanities. This programme aims to innovate, while at the same time retaining its links to the traditional musicological research fostered at the University over the past 85 years.

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The core of the programme comprises a research methods course designed to prepare students fully for academic research in musicology; a seminar course introducing students to a broad range of themes in contemporary musicology (including ethnomusicology); and a triple-weighted dissertation. Read more
The core of the programme comprises a research methods course designed to prepare students fully for academic research in musicology; a seminar course introducing students to a broad range of themes in contemporary musicology (including ethnomusicology); and a triple-weighted dissertation. The final 30 points can be taken from another Master’s module or two undergraduate modules offered by Music or another department.

Core Modules:

•Research Methods and Resources
•New Orientations in Theory and Musicology
•Dissertation

Optional Modules:

Either:
•Compositional Techniques

OR:
•Two 20 credit modules from the Undergraduate curriculum

OR:
•A 30 credit postgraduate module from another Department with approval from the Director of Postgraduate Studies.

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Whatever your interests, our Musicology course gives you the opportunity not only to develop your research skills, but to complement your training in musicology with studies in other areas of music. Read more

Course summary

Whatever your interests, our Musicology course gives you the opportunity not only to develop your research skills, but to complement your training in musicology with studies in other areas of music.

Our course is a chance for you to mould a programme of study to your own needs and aspirations, and may be approached as preparation for a research degree in music.

However, it is important that a musicologist develops complementary skills and/or knowledge outside their specialism which will help equip them for a future career: professional musicologists typically find themselves, amongst other things, teaching, managing and administering; some even maintain parallel careers as professional performers or composers.

Course structure

The structure of our MA in Musicology is as follows:

Research Methods and Presentation (30 credits)
Dissertation Proposal (30 credits)
Professional Development Option (30 credits)
Professional Development Option (30 credits)
Dissertation (60 credits)

You will learn through a variety of methods, ranging from one-to-one and small-group tutorials to workshops, seminars, lectures and independent study. Support for your research project will be provided by a supervisor who will help guide you as you develop your skills as an independent researcher.

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This flexible pathway provides a solid masters-level foundation in musicology. With a strong focus on theory, methodology and current debates in the discipline, together with appropriate research techniques and presentational styles, it offers excellent preparation for doctoral study and also for applied work. Read more
This flexible pathway provides a solid masters-level foundation in musicology. With a strong focus on theory, methodology and current debates in the discipline, together with appropriate research techniques and presentational styles, it offers excellent preparation for doctoral study and also for applied work. The programme of study consists of four taught course units (each 30 credits) plus a dissertation or critical edition (60 credits). The combination of core and optional course units allows each student to plot a path that best matches his or her special interests and aspirations. Together, the taught units encompass a wide range of topics and approaches - from musicology as cultural history, through musicology and the body, source studies and performance practice, to postcolonial theory and postmodernism. Seminars allow for close collaboration between lecturers and students, with ample opportunity for students to present their own work and receive individual feedback. Discussion and debate forms an important part of most course units.

Aims

This programme aims to:
-Build on undergraduate studies of music and society and the cultural study of music, introducing students to a wide range of advanced methodologies, theories, discourses and practices.
-Enable students to refine and develop their individual skills, talents and interests.
-Prepare students for a career, either inside or outside music, where critical judgement and developed powers of communication are needed.
-Foster the skills in critical thinking, argumentation, and effective written and oral communication necessary for further postgraduate study.
-Enable students to gain an expert and detailed knowledge of a specialist topic, and to formulate ideas that can later be pursued within further research programmes.

Teaching and learning

Most taught course units are delivered via weekly seminars and/or tutorials. Full-time students take two 30-credit course units per semester; part-time students take one. The dissertation or critical edition is supported by one-to-one supervision and is submitted at the beginning of September. (Part-time students may submit in either September or December following their second year of study.)

Seminars feature a range of presentation formats and activities, including presentations by course tutors, student presentations, discussion and debate based on prepared reading or coursework tasks, and workshop-style activities. Members of the academic staff are also available for individual consultations during designated office hours.

Alongside their taught units, students have access to a range of non-assessed seminars, workshops and training sessions offered by the Graduate School of the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures. All postgraduate students are expected to undertake their own programme of self-directed learning and skills acquisition. This may also involve wider reading, language work, computer training and attendance at research seminars in other parts of the university.

Coursework and assessment

There are no formal examinations. Taught course units are assessed by coursework essays or other tasks, normally submitted at the end of each semester (January and May). The precise nature of the assessment varies according to what is appropriate to the course unit in question. In most cases, a choice of questions or topics is offered. All taught units must be satisfactorily completed. The dissertation or critical edition (12,000-15,000 words or equivalent) is based on independent research into a topic agreed in consultation with the supervisor. A Research Outline needs to be presented and approved (usually in February) before students proceed with their dissertation. All coursework is double-marked internally and moderated by the External Examiner. Recitals are heard by at least two internal examiners.

Career opportunities

Graduates of this programme have pursued successful careers in musical and non-musical fields. Some continue to further study via a PhD before securing an academic position. Some go on to teach in schools or further education, both in the UK and overseas. Other areas of work for which advanced musical training has been directly relevant include arts management and the culture industries, music publishing, music journalism, librarianship, music therapy and performance. Careers outside of music have included accountancy, law, social work and human resources. One of our graduates writes of how the skills she honed at Manchester helped prepare her for her first job as an Editorial Assistant at Oxford University Press: `I use my written/essay skills in text editing (prefaces, composer notes, biographies etc.) and in preparing sales copy; analytical skills are continually employed during the editing process; the discipline of editing and proofing your own work is as important in my job as it was in my studies; the research skills that I developed during my time at Manchester have been useful in source research and in checking the factual accuracy of texts; and general skills such as planning and time management have been helpful preparation for the world of work.'

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Summary. This course offers a comprehensive range of options and 3 pathways. musicology (including theory, history and analysis); composition; performance; each pathway offers skills training, orientation modules and individually taught work. Read more

Summary

This course offers a comprehensive range of options and 3 pathways: musicology (including theory, history and analysis); composition; performance; each pathway offers skills training, orientation modules and individually taught work.

Modules

Analytical techniques; critical practice in musicology; research skills 1 and 2; plus 2 relevant optional modules; plus a dissertation, recital or portfolio.

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This programme offers an intense introduction to methodologies and research techniques in musicology, covering both classical and popular music, autonomous works and functional music, for example for religious ceremonies or for the screen. Read more

This programme offers an intense introduction to methodologies and research techniques in musicology, covering both classical and popular music, autonomous works and functional music, for example for religious ceremonies or for the screen.

You’ll learn the methodologies and research techniques necessary to analyse specific source material and learn to address the more philosophical questions raised, such as those of history, canons and archival research, performance studies, fieldwork, semiotics, the body, race, diaspora, gender, sexuality and consumption.

Drawing on the very broad range of research at Edinburgh, it allows you to pursue, in greater depth, an area of special interest and/or to develop more specialised skills to further your career.

Programme structure

The programme is made up of six courses plus a 15,000-word dissertation.

Taught courses include: introduction to musicology; research methods; music, philosophy and politics, popular music and focused research into specific areas of music study.

Teaching is by a combination of staff- and student-led seminars, student presentations and field trips.

The programme is designed to help students become increasingly independent in their study while providing the necessary supervisory support.

The dissertation is written over the summer months on a supervised topic of your choice.

Learning outcomes

Graduates of this programme will be able to apply and devise innovative research methods, critically evaluate arguments and display a variety of transferable skills. They will also be equipped with the skills necessary to pursue higher research degrees.

Career opportunities

On graduating, you will be equipped with the skills necessary to pursue a higher research degree, or take your knowledge into areas such as music teaching, music criticism and journalism, arts administration and curatorship, music librarianship etc.



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