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Full Time MSc Degrees in York, United Kingdom

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University of York York Management School
Distance from York: 0 miles
This specialist Masters degree is intended to build on your existing knowledge of accounting and finance. Read more
This specialist Masters degree is intended to build on your existing knowledge of accounting and finance. The programme concentrates on the role of accounting and finance in organisational management and will provide you with a thorough grounding in accounting, finance, financial management, financial reporting, financial markets and investment and risk.

The programme will provide you with the knowledge and skills you will need for a career in the financial service industry or financial consultancy.

Course Structure

Term 1
-Critical Perspectives in Accounting (10 credits)
-Advanced Financial Accounting (20 credits)
-Managerial Economics (10 credits)
-Advanced Management Accounting (20 credits)

Term 2
-Financial Strategy and Governance (20 credits)
-Qualitative Research Methods (10 credits)

Example Options - Choice of 1 from:
-Social and Environmental Accounting (20 credits)
-Financial Markets and Investment (20 credits)
-Managing Public Finances (20 credits)
-Accounting and Risk (20 credits)

Term 3
-Quantitative Methods and Data Analysis (10 credits)

Summer
-Dissertation (60 credits)

Where you’ll go from here

York Masters students have been successful in developing careers in a range of organisations in many parts of the world. Common destinations on leaving are:
-Investment Banking
-Accountancy and Audit
-Computing
-Education (Further and Higher)
-Finance and Banking
-Political Organisation
-Retail

A small number of students each year are keen to continue their studies, enrolling on specialists masters programmes elsewhere in the UK or moving on to The York Management School’s Doctoral programme.

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Research in Computer Science at York is carried out at the frontiers of knowledge in the discipline. This course gives you the chance to study a range of advanced topics in Computer Science, taught by researchers active in that area. Read more
Research in Computer Science at York is carried out at the frontiers of knowledge in the discipline. This course gives you the chance to study a range of advanced topics in Computer Science, taught by researchers active in that area. This means you will be learning current research results, keeping you at the forefront of these areas. You will also learn a range of theories, principles and practical methods.

The MSc in Advanced Computer Science is a full time, one year taught course, intended for students who already have a good first degree in Computer Science, and would like to develop a level of understanding and technical skill at the leading edge of Computer Science.

You can choose modules on a range of topics, including Cryptography, Functional Programming, Interactive Technologies, Natural Language Processing, Quantum Computation and Model-Driven Engineering.

Course aims
You will gain an in-depth knowledge of topics on the frontiers of Computer Science in order to engage in research or development and application of leading-edge research findings.

By undertaking an individual project, you will become a specialist in your selected area. You will be encouraged to produce research results of your own. This will prepare you to undertake a PhD in Computer Science should you wish to continue studying within the subject.

Learning outcomes
-A knowledge of several difference topics in Computer Science at an advanced level.
-An understanding of a body of research literature in Computer Science in your chosen topic, and the underlying principles and techniques of research in this area.
-An ability to engage in independent study at an advanced level, and develop skills in self-motivation and organisation.

Research Project

You will undertake your individual research project over the Summer term and Summer vacation. This will be a culmination of the taught modules you have taken during the course, which will allow you to focus on a specialist area of interest.

You will be allocated a personal supervisor, who will be an expert in your chosen area of research. You will be hosted by the research group of your supervisor, and you will benefit from the knowledge and resources of the whole group. Being attached to a research group also allows you to take part in their informal research seminars, and receive feedback and help from other members of the group.

You can choose from projects suggested by members of our academic staff. You also have the option of formulating your own project proposal, with the assistance from your personal supervisor.

All project proposals are rigorously vetted and must meet a number of requirements before these are made available to the students. The department uses an automated project allocation system for assigning projects to students that takes into account supervisor and student preferences.

The project aims to give you an introduction to independent research, as well as giving you the context of a research group working on topics that will be allied to your own. You will develop the skills and understanding in the methods and techniques of research in Computer Science.

As part of the assessment of the project, as well as your dissertation, you will give a talk about your work and submit a concise paper which we will encourage you to publish.

Information for Students

The MSc in Advanced Computer Science exposes you to several topics in Computer Science that are under active research at York. The material taught is preparatory to helping to continue that research, and perhaps continuing to a PhD. What we require from you are enthusiasm, hard work and enough background knowledge to take your chosen modules.

The modules on the MSc in Advanced Computer Science are mostly shared with our Stage 4 (Masters level) undergraduates. Your technical background will be different, and we acknowledge this.

During August we will send entrants a document describing the background knowledge needed for each module and, in many cases, references to where this knowledge is available (for example, widely available text books and web pages).

More generally, many of the modules expect a high level of mathematical sophistication. While the kind of mathematics used varies from module to module, you will find it useful to revise discrete mathematics (predicate and propositional calculi, set theory, relational and functional calculi, and some knowledge of formal logic), statistics and formal language theory. You should also be able to follow and produce proofs.

Careers

Here at York, we're really proud of the fact that more than 97% of our postgraduate students go on to employment or further study within six months of graduating from York. We think the reason for this is that our courses prepare our students for life in the workplace through our collaboration with industry to ensure that what we are teaching is useful for employers.

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University of York Department of Mathematics
Distance from York: 0 miles
An interdisciplinary masters course covering the breadth of mathematical applications in biology. Read more
An interdisciplinary masters course covering the breadth of mathematical applications in biology.

Are you a biologically inclined mathematician or physicist, or a biologist with an keen interest in modelling and analysis? Do you want to know how to model fish population dynamics and harvests, to decipher the mathematics of viruses, or understand of the swimming behaviour of microrganisms? The new MSc in Advanced Mathematical Biology aims to provide answers to all of these questions, and more.

The MSc will provide insight into processes over a wide range of scales; from highly symmetric capsids (the cases that surround viruses) to the interactions of entire communities in oceans. Advanced statistical methods, systems biology and biological fluid dynamics will be covered, and there will be emphasis on applications to policy and industry throughout. This programme aspires to fill the language gap between technical mathematical concepts and real world applications in the biological and life sciences. Students will gain a comprehensive grounding in cutting edge theory coupled to training in the subtleties of application.

Biological concepts and mechanisms will be discussed during bespoke sessions in “Issues in modern biology,” and developed during interdisciplinary group projects. There will also be a range of challenging elective modules.

The MSc in Advanced Mathematical Biology is an intensive one year taught programme that will prepare students either for a career in industry in the quantitative life sciences or for further academic research in Mathematical Biology.

Placements

An important part of the programme is a summer work-based placement. At the end of the spring term, students will select a placement from a list of academic and industrial institutions across the sector. Students will spend a period of three months working closely with their chosen institution with a placement supervisor. Students will write a dissertation towards the end of the placement, and will be assessed by their academic supervisor who will also consult with the placement supervisor.

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University of York Department of Psychology
Distance from York: 0 miles
The MSc in Applied Forensic Psychology and MSc in Forensic Psychology Studies (for students without Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership with the British Psychological Society) are renowned for producing high calibre graduates. Read more
The MSc in Applied Forensic Psychology and MSc in Forensic Psychology Studies (for students without Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership with the British Psychological Society) are renowned for producing high calibre graduates. Feedback from employers indicates they are consistently impressed with the ability of York graduates to apply theory to practice and this is reflected in the destinations of many of our recent graduates.

The courses provide an equal balance of practice-based, methodological and theoretically driven modules designed to foster autonomy within the bounds of professional practice, independent learning and self-directed reflection. The highly specialist forensic modules, delivered by practising experts in the field, combined with generic practice-based modules, tutorials and the support of a highly experienced core course team, will provide you with the requisite practitioner-based skills, understanding, and knowledge to work effectively and increase your employability in a forensic setting. The MSc in Applied Forensic Psychology will also facilitate chartership within the British Psychological Society Division of Forensic Psychology for students who go on to undertake a further two years of forensic practice as outlined in the conditions for membership.

The MSc Applied Forensic Psychology course is formally accredited by the British Psychological Society.

Content

The MSc in Applied Forensic Psychology and MSc in Forensic Psychology Studies are full-time (51-week), 180-credit programmes divided into seven modules (6 taught, 1 independent study):

The practitioner skills modules will facilitate confidence in your ability to work as a practitioner in a forensic setting and will also provide you with leading edge information technology, presentation and communication skills required for a wide variety of roles.
The research evidence and theory modules will provide a grounding in theory, research methods and statistics that will provide the key skills for employment in a variety of settings (e.g., prisons, secure units, the police, prison and probation services) and the key skills for those who wish to pursue a research degree in a forensic or a related field.

The empirical research project will provide the academic grounding for those wishing to pursue an academic career or gain more specialist knowledge in a particular topic area.

Assessment

Students on both courses are encouraged to write concisely to a high academic standard for a range of different audiences. Hence, assessment methods are varied and include assessed coursework and closed exams:
-Short answer paper
-Briefing paper
-Case formulation
-Open essay
-Research protocol
-Multiple choice paper
-Practical reports
-Empirical research project

Students will be allocated a personal supervisor to monitor their progress throughout the academic year and provide support and guidance if necessary.

Placements

The MSc in Applied Forensic Psychology course does not include a placement component. However, some students may be able to obtain voluntary work experience in forensic settings to complement their studies. In addition, the course team is sometimes able to help secure placements for students who have little or no forensic experience, although this cannot be guaranteed. As well as receiving supervision from the provider, students will also be assigned to a member of the course team who will oversee their performance throughout the placement. Since they are not a required or essential component of the MSc course, placements are not assessed.

You are advised to contact local organisations at the start of the Autumn Term if you are considering undertaking work experience during your studies. Please also be aware that some placement providers (particularly charities) may require volunteers to commit for a full year and this should be borne in mind when arranging accommodation.

Our students have succeeded in securing placements with the following establishments/organisations:
-HMP Doncaster
-HMP Full Sutton
-Durham and Tees Valley Probation Trust
-The Farndon Unit
-Strength to Change, Hull
-Stockton Hall Hospital, York
-North Yorkshire Probation
-Rampton Secure Hospital

In the 2015/16 academic year, students have undertaken work experience with:
-Stockton Hall Hospital, York
-Circles of Support and Accountability
-The Petros Organisation, York
-NSPCC
-The University of York (supporting PhD students)
-YACRO
-Springwood Lodge Hospital, Leeds

On some occasions, students have managed to secure full or part-time employment with the placement provider after graduating from the MSc programme.

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Developing, testing, evaluating and implementing evidence-based healthcare in highly complex situations is becoming increasingly important. Read more
Developing, testing, evaluating and implementing evidence-based healthcare in highly complex situations is becoming increasingly important. Our MSc in Applied Health Research will equip you with the skills necessary to develop a career in the health sector or to design, implement and publish healthcare research.

It offers an excellent grounding in applied health research methods, including quantitative and qualitative methodologies, systematic reviews, randomised controlled trials, epidemiology and health economics.

Our expertise

When you join our department you are joining one of the UK's top health services research, health economics and public health research teams. Our world leading experts help improve human health and prevent illness through the analysis and delivery of leading research.

Course content

The MSc in Applied Health Research involves a one-year full-time or two-year part-time Masters programme (180 credits). You will take taught modules worth a total of 120 credits. The compulsory modules worth 70 credits are:
-Introduction to Regression Analysis (10 credits)
-Epidemiology (10 credits)
-Randomised Controlled Trials (10 credits)
-Systematic Reviews (10 credits)
-Qualitative Health Research (10 credits)
-Health Economics (10 credits)
-Introduction to Health Statistics (10 credits)

In addition you will choose modules worth 50 credits from the following:
-Health and Social Behaviour (20 credits)
-Health Policy - Principles, Practice and the Evidence Base (10 credits)
-Further Regression Analysis (10 credits)
-Understanding Clinical Statistics (10 credits)
-Measurement in Health and Disease (10 credits)
-Infection and Disease (20 credits)*
-Public Health Foundations in Practice (20 credits)*
-Health Research in Practice (10 credits)

* Please note Applied Health Research students can only take either Infection and Disease or Public Health Foundations and Practice

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University of York Department of Archaeology
Distance from York: 0 miles
The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems course will provide you with applied practical experience and critical theoretical engagement with a full range of computing systems and technology used for publishing, archiving, analysing, visualising and presenting archaeological information today. Read more
The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems course will provide you with applied practical experience and critical theoretical engagement with a full range of computing systems and technology used for publishing, archiving, analysing, visualising and presenting archaeological information today.

The University of York’s Archaeology Department has been at the forefront of researching and developing archaeological computer applications since the early days of digital practice in the discipline and has hosted the first online peer-reviewed e-journal for archaeology since 1996. It also hosts the world-leading Archaeology Data Service, which is the UK’s national digital data archive for the historic environment.

• Gain applied practical experience in internet applications, database design and management, GIS technology, CAD and computer modelling systems.
• Build a broad foundation of expertise in archaeological computing applications.
• Access the University of York’s world-leading expertise in e-publishing and digital archiving.
• Develop IT knowledge and skills that are highly valued in heritage-sector careers.
• Access a full suite of research computing hardware and software
• Receive tailored careers advice from staff with significant experience of recruiting within the sector.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

What does the course cover?

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training, research and work placements, you will:
• Develop vital knowledge of the digital and internet technologies used for disseminating, publishing and archiving archaeological information.
• Learn practical skills in 3-D modelling, GIS, CAD and other technologies used for analysing and visualising archaeological information.

The course provides a detailed introduction to the broad range of information systems used in archaeology, and provides the opportunity to apply these systems in practice. The work placement and dissertation enable you to specialise in a particular technique or approach, giving you valuable practical experience in your areas of interest.

Who is it for?

The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems is designed for people who have a basic grounding in computer literacy and an interest in archaeology and heritage, and who wish to follow vocational training in archaeological information systems.

What can it lead to?

Many of our graduates go onto careers in archaeological computing, working in contract units or county-based records organisations. Others have founded their own consultancy businesses. Some apply their computing skills in more mainstream archaeological work, in museums, or in the wider world. Others have pursued further research at doctoral level. Click on the alumni tab above to find out what our alumni and current students have to say about the course.

Content

This one-year MSc course is taught via a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. You will study two core modules, two optional modules and four shorter skills modules of your choice. You will also gain valuable practical experience of applying information systems in the workplace on a work placement module. Finally, in the summer term you will develop your research and presentation skills by producing a dissertation and giving an assessed lecture.

Placement

Your work placement is a key feature of the course, providing valuable experience of using IT in an archaeological work environment. The placement offers you the chance to gain practical experience in a professional, academic or heritage environment. You will be able to work on projects that help you develop new skills or put into practice skills gained from your taught courses.

Aims
-To provide experience of computer applications within a workplace in the historic environment sector.
-To consolidate knowledge and understanding of computer applications from one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing your placement you should have:
-Gained detailed knowledge of how information technology is applied in the workplace in the historic environment sector, under the guidance of experienced professionals.
-Developed an understanding of the contexts in which IT is applied, and of real world limitations.
-Developed your IT skills in one or more of the core areas covered by the taught programme (i.e. database design, web technologies, digital archiving, electronic publication, CAD, GIS and virtual reality modelling).

Placement providers
Although the organisations offering placements change from year to year, and you have the option of proposing other providers that match your specific interests, the following list is a good indication of some of the choices available:
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Archaeology Data Service
-City of York Council
-Internet Archaeology
-York Archaeological Trust
-Centre for Christianity and Culture
-L-P: Archaeology
-On Site Archaeology
-Council for British Archaeology
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-Historic England
-English Heritage
-National Trust

Careers

The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems offers practical, careers-focused training for many essential roles in the professional world of archaeology. By the end of the course you will:
-Have examined how computers are applied in archaeology and their impact on the development of the discipline
-Understand the concept of the internet, be able to find and use relevant information and add materials to it
-Have the skills to evaluate critically the claims made for different computer applications and select the correct application for a given problem
-Have an understanding of authoring tools and be able to create an electronic text
-Have an understanding of database design and be able to design and implement a simple relational database
-Have an understanding of CAD and GIS and be able to create effective applications in each
-Have an awareness of digital archiving principles, resource discovery and metadata

Many graduates from this course go on to careers in archaeological computing with contract and county-based records units, or found their own consultancy businesses. Some apply their computing skills to more mainstream archaeological settings, such as museums, or in a range of the others sectors and roles, including:
-Archive management
-Social media management
-Local government and development
-Computing and IT services
-Business and administration
-Marketing and public relations
-Education

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The MSc in Audio and Music Technology is a one-year full-time taught course for graduates who wish to enhance their skills to go on to a career or further research in the varied fields of audio processing, room acoustics, interactive music and audio applications, voice analysis and synthesis, audio programming and other music technology related areas. Read more
The MSc in Audio and Music Technology is a one-year full-time taught course for graduates who wish to enhance their skills to go on to a career or further research in the varied fields of audio processing, room acoustics, interactive music and audio applications, voice analysis and synthesis, audio programming and other music technology related areas.

The MSc is designed for:
-Graduates of courses in Music Technology or Tonmeister
-Graduates of courses in technology, mathematics, science, engineering or computing who can demonstrate music performance or music production skills
-Graduates of a related subject who can demonstrate an understanding of music theory/digital audio, skills in music production or performance and technical experience or an aptitude for the technical aspects of audio

The course aims to:
-Provide students with a thorough grounding in scientific theory and engineering techniques as applied to digital audio technology
-Develop an understanding of audio processing and acoustic analysis as it relates to speech, singing, music and room/environmental acoustics
-Provide practical experience of audio software programming in a variety of coding languages and a creative approach to audio analysis and synthesis
-Develop communication skills for academic and public engagement purposes, in a variety of writing styles, or for oral presentations

There is a particular emphasis on practical application of theoretical aspects of audio signal processing and acoustic analysis and the programme also helps students to develop other skills such as critical analysis and evaluation, synthesis of theory and practice, creative problem-solving, design and implementation and oral and written communication skills.

The course is also designed to enhance your employability and to prepare you for entering the world of work or research after graduation. Some of the ways we do this are:
-Personal Professional Practitioner module dedicated to enhancing your employability, self-promotion and transferable skills, whether you go on to work in industry or running your own business.
-Hands-on experience of event and project management including the opportunity to design and deliver two events on campus.
-Project Development module furthers your skills in promoting your work/research to the public, presenting to an audience and developing a project plan.
-A substantial piece of individual research or development project, which you undertake over the summer under supervision from a staff member.
-Student section of the Audio Engineering Society regularly runs events with external speakers from the industry - a chance to network with the professionals.
-Group work in some modules allowing you to put your team work and management skills into practice.

Facilities

The course is supported by a wide range of facilities including:
-Three recording studios and Digital Audio Workstation production rooms
-Dedicated listening space with surround sound loudspeaker array
-6-sided anechoic chamber
-Newly equipped Mac Workstation suite specifically for audio app development
-State-of-the art equipment for voice analysis and synthesis
-The opportunity to access audio facilities across campus including the 3Sixty (immersive audio visual space) and the Arthur Sykes Rymer Auditorium (Music Research Centre) as availability allows

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University of York Department of Archaeology
Distance from York: 0 miles
Study at the frontiers of archaeological science. Like a handful of comparable courses, the York MSc in Bioarchaeology provides training in the advanced osteoarchaeological analysis of skeletal remains. Read more
Study at the frontiers of archaeological science

Why choose this course?

Like a handful of comparable courses, the York MSc in Bioarchaeology provides training in the advanced osteoarchaeological analysis of skeletal remains. Uniquely, however, it is the only course in the UK to combine this discipline with the molecular analysis of human remains. Nowhere else can you immerse yourself in the study of stable isotopes, lipid residue analysis, palaeoproteomics and ancient DNA – and play an active role in the development of new techniques in this constantly evolving branch of archaeology. In 2014, seven of the top 100 discoveries in science were in archaeology, and BioArCh staff were involved in three of these.
-Advanced training in human osteoarchaeology, delivered by the UK’s leading practitioners
-Study ancient biomolecules in world-class facilities at the BioArch centre and Department of Biology
-Unique opportunity to combine bioarchaeology with complementary subjects and tailor a course to suit your interests
-Access an incredible range of in-house analytical equipment
-Take part in cutting-edge science and build essential practical skills
-Work alongside leading researchers and academics in a diverse range of specialisms
-Work on diverse material that is often ‘fresh out of the ground’ and make valuable contributions to live projects Receive career and research guidance from staff with significant experience in the sector and a track record of successfully placing PhD students

What does the course cover?

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training and dissertation research, this course provides a thorough grounding in all aspects of bioarchaeology theory, investigation and practice.

Uniquely, you can combine bioarchaeology with a range of subjects and tailor your degree to your own interests. You could adopt a ‘period’ focus, for example, to specialise in the bioarchaeology of the Medieval, Viking, Mesolithic or early prehistoric periods. You could combine human bioarchaeology with zooarchaeology and orientate your course towards more advanced studies of bone function and anatomy. Or you could focus on skills such as GIS modelling and field archaeology.

Who is it for?

This course is designed for students with a passionate interest in the future of archaeology, who want to work at the frontiers of archaeological science. The degree is primarily aimed at those whose previous experience is in archaeology, anthropology, biology or related fields, but we do accept students from diverse backgrounds. The common factor among our student intake is a keen interest in science and in human remains at a biomolecular or bone level.

What can it lead to?

Molecular analysis is used increasingly widely in archaeology, but the range of osteological and molecular skills offered by the course provide valuable training and expertise for a wide range of careers and further study.

Many students go on to take PhDs at York and other institutions around the world. Others pursue a wide range of professional careers, from osteoarchaeology and environmental archaeology to the medical humanities and laboratory technician work.

Careers

By the end of the MSc Bioarchaeology course you will be able to:
-Identify and record human bone assemblages
-Age, sex and assess pathologies from human bones
-Understand advanced methods for analysing bone tissues, including biomolecular methods
-Apply chemical and biomolecular methods to skeletal material
-Understand the processes of decay and diagenesis of bone tissue
-Critically evaluate published research and datasets
-Orally present knowledge and concepts
-Work effectively within a laboratory environment
-Plan, design and undertake a piece of independent research

These skills and techniques are deployed widely in the field of archaeological research and exploration, but they are also valuable for a wide range of careers and further studies.

Many our MSc Bioarchaeology postgraduates go on to further research in bioarchaeological and environmental fields. The BioArch department has a successful track record of placing students on PhD courses in York and institutions worldwide.

Here’s a selection of the career and research destinations of some of our recent students: US graduate school programmes
-Archaeological field units
-Environmental archaeology
-Professional archaeologists – field and laboratory based
-Laboratory technicians
-Demonstrators
-University/research technicians
-Academia
-On-site osteoarchaeologists
-Medical humanities

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University of York Department of Biology
Distance from York: 0 miles
The Department of Biology research has been judged world leading in biochemistry, chronic disease, microbiology, plant biology and ecology and it is competitive internationally in all fields of investigation. Read more
The Department of Biology research has been judged world leading in biochemistry, chronic disease, microbiology, plant biology and ecology and it is competitive internationally in all fields of investigation. With a commitment to interdisciplinary research, our research is arranged in eight foci that use state of the art technology to address three global challenges facing humanity.

Our almost 70 principal investigators are supported by current grants totalling £55 million. Every step of our research is carried out with the indispensable help of postgraduate students. No matter which area of Biology you specialise in, you will be working alongside some of the world’s biggest names in their respective fields, at the cutting edge of scientific exploration.

We have around 120 research students, and we take good care of them. As a research student you can expect:
-A supervisor who directs your research and training
-Your supervisor to spend at least 1 hour per week with you
-A Thesis Advisory Panel of 2 other staff to monitor progress and offer advice
-A progress meeting with your supervisor every 2 months
-A Thesis Advisory Panel meeting every 6 months for which you prepare a report
-A programme of training in research and transferable skills tailored to your needs
-Opportunities to attend seminars by leading scientists from around the world, and to present your own work through posters and talks

Training

All our research students benefit from a balanced programme of training in broader research-related skills that enhance their career prospects. This is tailored to individual needs, taking into account previous experience and future career aims.
-General courses for all students include project planning, writing and presentation, ethics, media, etc.
-Specific courses for individual needs might include advanced science training through our Masters modules in bioinformatics, etc.
-All students are expected to attend a UK GRAD school or similar intensive residential course.
-York Biology employs a Graduate Skills Coordinator who oversees this provision and develops it to meet the needs of all our students.
-Each student has a training record and needs to spend about two weeks each year on training activities
-Our programme is designed to meet and exceed the requirements of the UK research councils.

Careers

A research degree is internationally recognised as a demonstration that you have the skills, intellect and motivation to carry out original research and present it convincingly. It is more or less essential to have a research degree if you plan a career as an independent researcher with responsibility for your own research programme, whether in academia, research institutes, or industry. In this case, the next stage will probably be a postdoctoral position where you will broaden your research experience and perhaps do some teaching and help to supervise other staff and students.

A lifetime of research is not for everyone, though, and there are many other careers in which the skills you develop during your research degree will certainly not be wasted. You will have learnt to think rigorously for yourself, to find information and teach yourself what you need to know, to present your case convincingly in writing and to an audience, to meet deadlines, and to plan your work effectively on short and long timescales. Employers of all kinds recognise and value skills like these.

Facilities

All research students have access to:
-Modern, well-equipped research labs
-Your own desk in a write-up area outside the lab
-The Technology Facility – a very special feature of York – with advanced equipment and expert staff to help you use it; all research students get an annual allowance to use the TF for training and research
-Catering and social areas on site to meet your friends and keep yourself going through those late-running experiments.

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University of York Department of Chemistry
Distance from York: 0 miles
In the Department of Chemistry we offer a range of programmes that can be taken full or part time. Research projects can be carried out in virtually any area of chemistry as long as a suitable project and supervisor can be allocated, meaning you can specialise in your own specific area of interest. Read more
In the Department of Chemistry we offer a range of programmes that can be taken full or part time. Research projects can be carried out in virtually any area of chemistry as long as a suitable project and supervisor can be allocated, meaning you can specialise in your own specific area of interest. You will work under the guidance of an academic supervisor who is expert in that particular field, and alongside other members of the research group including academics, post-doctoral researchers as well as fellow postgraduate students.

As a research student in the Department of Chemistry, you can expect:
-A dedicated supervisor to help direct your research and training
-A Thesis Advisory Panel (TAP) comprising two members of staff to monitor your progress and offer impartial advice
-TAP meetings every six months for which you are required to prepare a report on your research
-Progress meetings with your supervisor approximately every 2 months, and more informal interactions with your supervisor on a day-to-day basis
-Training programmes designed to provide you with research, teaching and transferable skills. This is delivered through our Innovative Doctoral Training in Chemistry Programme
-Seminar programmes from leading scientists, and opportunities to present your own research
-A student mentor to support your transition to postgraduate research and provide collaboration and networking opportunities

Facilities

The Department of Chemistry offers all research students the opportunity to access its state-of-the-art research facilities as required by their research. This includes a range of NMR Spectrometers, Mass Spectrometers, Laser Spectrometers, X-Ray Diffractometers, EPR Spectrometers, Electron Microscopes, and a dedicated Crystallisation Suite.

All Chemistry research students are provided with access to dedicated research space within the Department. This includes allocated writing space with others from your research group, which is usually adjacent to your supervisor’s office to facilitate regular discussions about progress. if your project is laboratory-based, you will also have access to a fume hood or bench space in a purpose-built research laboratory. All research students have access to a communal area for discussions with other researchers.

Careers

During your time at York, you will have the opportunity to develop a wide range of skills, which will support not only your studies, but also prepare you for the world of work beyond your research degree. The Researcher Development Team offer a wide range of training under the Research Development Framework, and the Careers Service provides a wealth of guidance and opportunities to develop the types of skills employers are looking for.

The Chemistry Department has a dedicated Employability and Diversity Officer who arranges a range of careers events for postgraduate chemists each year. She also offers one-to-one careers advice sessions for all graduate students to support you to develop your Curriculum Vitae, complete job applications and prepare for interviews. Your supervisor will also offer support and guidance for your career development.

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University of York Hull York Medical School
Distance from York: 0 miles
The MSc in Clinical Anatomy is a world-class programme, which is designed to provide advanced training in clinically applied human anatomy. Read more
The MSc in Clinical Anatomy is a world-class programme, which is designed to provide advanced training in clinically applied human anatomy. You will learn from expert tutors and clinicians who are leading practitioners and researchers in their fields. You will be taught in small groups, in state-of the-art facilities and will have access to the resources of both the Universities of Hull and York.

You will receive all the help, support and guidance you need to get the most out of your time with us and achieve your academic and career goals. This programme will enhance your knowledge and your skills to undertake and deliver high quality research in clinical anatomy and related disciplines.

State-of-the-art facilities

You will have access to brand new, state-of–the art Thiel embalmed and plastination dissection labs, where you will have regular opportunities to conduct whole body dissections. Thiel embalmed cadavers will enhance your experience greatly by ensuring that cadaveric material is as close to living tissue as possible in colour, texture and flexibility.

Flexible course structure

You can tailor the programme to suit your individual interests and goals. You can choose from a number of exciting elective modules, which are taken in conjunction with the core modules. You will be based primarily on the University of Hull campus, but you may need to travel to York for some of the elective modules.

You can choose to study full time over one year, or part-time over two or three years.

An ideal option for intercalating students

This programme is an ideal option for medical students wishing to intercalate. It will hone and develop your analytical and research skills, as well as your practical skills using state-of-the-art equipment, which will enhance your performance on your undergraduate programme.

Core modules

-Clinical anatomy of the limbs and spine
-Clinical anatomy of the trunk
-Clinical anatomy of the head, neck and brain
-Research Project/Dissertation

Research Electives

-Research Methods & Statistics
-Research Approaches in Health Professions Education

Anatomy Electives

-Tissues of the Body
-Hard Tissue Biology
-Human Evolutionary Anatomy

Education electives

-Learning and Teaching
-Assessment and Feedback
-Contemporary Issues in Health Professions Education

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University of York Hull York Medical School
Distance from York: 0 miles
The MSc in Clinical Anatomy and Education is a world-class programme, which is designed to provide advanced training in clinically applied human anatomy, whilst also developing your skills as an anatomy educator and researcher. Read more
The MSc in Clinical Anatomy and Education is a world-class programme, which is designed to provide advanced training in clinically applied human anatomy, whilst also developing your skills as an anatomy educator and researcher. You will learn from expert tutors and clinicians who are leading practitioners and researchers in their fields. You will be taught in small groups, in state-of the-art facilities and will have access to the resources of both the Universities of Hull and York.

You will acquire and develop the same range of skills and knowledge as students studying the MSc in Clinical Anatomy. In addition, the MSc in Clinical Anatomy and Education provides a comprehensive professional education that focuses on developing you as a teacher and researcher of anatomy. You will be trained in pedagogical techniques that will allow you to teach anatomy to students and healthcare professionals.

State-of-the-art facilities

You will have access to brand new, state-of–the art Thiel embalmed and plastination dissection labs, where you will have regular opportunities to conduct whole body dissections. Thiel embalmed cadavers will enhance your experience greatly by ensuring that cadaveric material is as close to living tissue as possible in colour, texture and flexibility.

Flexible course structure

You can tailor the programme to suit your individual interests and goals. You can choose from a number of exciting elective modules, which are taken in conjunction with the core modules. You will be based primarily on the University of Hull campus, but you may need to travel to York for some of the elective modules.

You can choose to study full time over one year, or part-time over two or three years.

An ideal option for intercalating students

This programme is an ideal option for medical students wishing to intercalate. It will hone and develop your analytical and research skills, as well as your practical skills using state-of-the-art equipment, which will enhance your performance on your undergraduate programme.

Core Modules

-Clinical anatomy of the limbs and spine
-Clinical anatomy of the trunk
-Clinical anatomy of the head, neck and brain
-Research Project/Dissertation

Research Electives

-Research Methods & Statistics module
-Research Approaches in Health Professions Education module

Anatomy Electives

-Tissues of the Body
-Hard Tissue Biology
-Human Evolutionary Anatomy

Education Electives

-Learning and Teaching
-Assessment and Feedback
-Contemporary Issues in Health Professions Education

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University of York Department of Psychology
Distance from York: 0 miles
This MSc is provided jointly by the Department of Psychology and the York Neuroimaging Centre (YNiC), and recruits contributing faculty from other university departments such as The Hull-York Medical School. Read more
This MSc is provided jointly by the Department of Psychology and the York Neuroimaging Centre (YNiC), and recruits contributing faculty from other university departments such as The Hull-York Medical School. The overarching aim of the MSc in Cognitive Neuroscience at York is to provide a bridge between undergraduate study and PhD research in cognitive neuroscience, experimental psychology and imaging methods.

The course has been developed around training and research using neuroimaging techniques, and the experimental and analytical methods on which they depend. Through our specialist modules students are introduced the principles of neuroimaging, gaining hands on experience in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetoencephalography (MEG), eletroencephalography (EEG) or transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), learning how to design, analyze and evaluate neuroimaging experiments, and how such experiments are contributing to our understanding of the brain mechanisms underpining cognition and behaviour. Along the way, students also receive training on generic statistical, writing and research skills, and are exposed to main research topics in cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience. Finally, students complete an extended empirical project, typically using a neuroimaging technique of their choice. The empirical project is supported by the state-of-the-art facilities at YNiC.

Content

Specialist modules place neuroimaging in the wider context of cognitive neuroscientific research and introduce students to the principles of neuroimaging the design of neuroimaging experiments and specialist methods required for the analysis of neuroimaging data. These include:
-Basic principles in neuroimaging
-Research Design and Analysis in Neuroimaging
-Topics in Cognitive Neuroscience
-Programming in Neuroimaging

Empirical project
Project enables students to participate in the design and implementation of a theoretically-motivated piece of pure or applied research in cognitive neuroscience providing hands-on training in advanced brain imaging methods, some of which are being developed at York. Topics are chosen so as to be timely and practicable within the relevant resource and time constraints. We regard it as important that the topic not only engages the interest and enthusiasm of the student, but is also a good match to the specialist expertise and knowledge of the supervisor.

Many of our students' projects are published. Each year we offer projects on a wide variety of topics linked to faculty research interests. For example students have used fMRI to investigate the processing of emotional and social cues, representation of semantic knowledge in the brain, disruption of visual cortex in patients with macular degeneration and brain mechanisms underpinning language understanding, face processing, number processing or anxiety and risky behaviour. Students have also used MEG and TMS to investigate brain mechanisms of memory for words and pictures, connectivity patterns between brain regions and auditory perception. Some of these projects are methodological in nature in that they aim to study the analytical strategies to apply in brain research, or they aim to develop the use of new imaging methods.

General research modules
These provide a solid grounding in contemporary issues in psychology and neuroscience, psychological research methods, professional and generic skills.

Assessment
Modules are assessed through a variety of different assignments and exams including practical reports, essays, multiple choice questions, critical analysis of published papers, short notes on a range of topics, dissertation on the Empirical Project, poster presentation.

Backgrounds

This challenging but rewarding course will best suit applicants who are:
-Interested in the brain and its workings (see What is cognitive neuroscience? in the overview)
-Interested in Psychology as a biological science
-Considering a career in research, especially in psychology, cognitive Neuroscience or imaging methods (many other career choices would be compatible with the general scientific, academic and professional training you will receive as part of the course)
-Comfortable with computers and statistics

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The MSc in Communications Engineering is a one year full-time taught course which makes extensive use of the knowledge and expertise from our well established Communication Technologies Research Group. Read more
The MSc in Communications Engineering is a one year full-time taught course which makes extensive use of the knowledge and expertise from our well established Communication Technologies Research Group.

It is intended to provide students with a good understanding of the techniques and issues in modern communications systems, with an emphasis on wireless and Internet communications. It provides students with:
-A balanced picture of modern communications technology and networks
-A sound theoretical and practical knowledge of radio communication techniques, signal processing, network protocols, and the design and optimisation of communication networks
-The ability to learn new techniques as they are developed
-Experience of the use of industry-standard tools to make them attractive candidates for employers throughout the field of modern communications

Course Content

The course aims to provide a broad-based introduction to modern communications and to provide a solid grounding in the theory and techniques suitable for students wishing to pursue a career in electronic communications.

Facilities

All postgraduate students have access to high performance computer workstations with full network connectivity within the department, as well as to the large number of other computing rooms available around the campus. Dependent on their project, students might also use some of the department's other facilities, including NAMAS-accredited EMC measurement facilities, well-equipped music and media technology suites, electric measurement facilities up to 40 GHz, anechoic chambers, and specialised software for FPGA design, and DSP workstations.

Students on the MSc Communications Engineering also have use of the MSc Project room which provides computing equipment, project facilities and study space.

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An MSc by research is taken in one year as a full-time student or in two years as a part-time student. The degree is awarded following the successful completion of a period of research, including the submission of a thesis and its subsequent examination, together with a seminar. Read more
An MSc by research is taken in one year as a full-time student or in two years as a part-time student. The degree is awarded following the successful completion of a period of research, including the submission of a thesis and its subsequent examination, together with a seminar. The thesis is expected to display a particular knowledge of some part or aspect of the field of study, and to make a contribution to knowledge or understanding.

Course Structure

There are various milestones throughout the MSc year which will be assessed through formally required pieces of work. These include seminars, written work and oral deliverables.

Students should aim to submit a thesis at the end of the 12 months registration period. The final deadline for submission falls three months later. No oral examination is held, unless either supervisor or assessor requests one.

Part-time students can take an MSc by research over a two-year period, with the milestones distributed accordingly over this duration.

Centre for Doctoral Training in Intelligent Games and Game Intelligence

The EPSRC Intelligent Games and Games Intelligence (IGGI) Centre for Doctoral Training is a collaboration between the University of York, the University of Essex and Goldsmiths College, University of London. It will train the next generation of researchers, designers, developers and entrepreneurs in digital games.

The Centre is a unique opportunity for students to undertake PhD research in collaboration with our 60 industrial games partners and world-leading academics.

The doctoral programme combines practical skills training with advanced teaching in cutting-edge research topics and the chance to contribute original research to a growing academic area. Students also undertake two industrial placements during the programme, giving first hand industrial experience that will influence their research projects. Graduates will have the skills needed to succeed in a career in games, having also developed strong relationships with the leaders in the UK digital games industry.

Funded by the EPSRC, we have a number of studentships available for October 2016 entry. The studentships cover tuition fees and include an annual stipend of approximately £14,057 at 2105/16 rates (or £16,057 if studying at Goldsmiths with London weighting).

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