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Full Time MSc Degrees in Computer Science, York, United Kingdom

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Research in Computer Science at York is carried out at the frontiers of knowledge in the discipline. This course gives you the chance to study a range of advanced topics in Computer Science, taught by researchers active in that area. Read more
Research in Computer Science at York is carried out at the frontiers of knowledge in the discipline. This course gives you the chance to study a range of advanced topics in Computer Science, taught by researchers active in that area. This means you will be learning current research results, keeping you at the forefront of these areas. You will also learn a range of theories, principles and practical methods.

The MSc in Advanced Computer Science is a full time, one year taught course, intended for students who already have a good first degree in Computer Science, and would like to develop a level of understanding and technical skill at the leading edge of Computer Science.

You can choose modules on a range of topics, including Cryptography, Functional Programming, Interactive Technologies, Natural Language Processing, Quantum Computation and Model-Driven Engineering.

Course aims
You will gain an in-depth knowledge of topics on the frontiers of Computer Science in order to engage in research or development and application of leading-edge research findings.

By undertaking an individual project, you will become a specialist in your selected area. You will be encouraged to produce research results of your own. This will prepare you to undertake a PhD in Computer Science should you wish to continue studying within the subject.

Learning outcomes
-A knowledge of several difference topics in Computer Science at an advanced level.
-An understanding of a body of research literature in Computer Science in your chosen topic, and the underlying principles and techniques of research in this area.
-An ability to engage in independent study at an advanced level, and develop skills in self-motivation and organisation.

Research Project

You will undertake your individual research project over the Summer term and Summer vacation. This will be a culmination of the taught modules you have taken during the course, which will allow you to focus on a specialist area of interest.

You will be allocated a personal supervisor, who will be an expert in your chosen area of research. You will be hosted by the research group of your supervisor, and you will benefit from the knowledge and resources of the whole group. Being attached to a research group also allows you to take part in their informal research seminars, and receive feedback and help from other members of the group.

You can choose from projects suggested by members of our academic staff. You also have the option of formulating your own project proposal, with the assistance from your personal supervisor.

All project proposals are rigorously vetted and must meet a number of requirements before these are made available to the students. The department uses an automated project allocation system for assigning projects to students that takes into account supervisor and student preferences.

The project aims to give you an introduction to independent research, as well as giving you the context of a research group working on topics that will be allied to your own. You will develop the skills and understanding in the methods and techniques of research in Computer Science.

As part of the assessment of the project, as well as your dissertation, you will give a talk about your work and submit a concise paper which we will encourage you to publish.

Information for Students

The MSc in Advanced Computer Science exposes you to several topics in Computer Science that are under active research at York. The material taught is preparatory to helping to continue that research, and perhaps continuing to a PhD. What we require from you are enthusiasm, hard work and enough background knowledge to take your chosen modules.

The modules on the MSc in Advanced Computer Science are mostly shared with our Stage 4 (Masters level) undergraduates. Your technical background will be different, and we acknowledge this.

During August we will send entrants a document describing the background knowledge needed for each module and, in many cases, references to where this knowledge is available (for example, widely available text books and web pages).

More generally, many of the modules expect a high level of mathematical sophistication. While the kind of mathematics used varies from module to module, you will find it useful to revise discrete mathematics (predicate and propositional calculi, set theory, relational and functional calculi, and some knowledge of formal logic), statistics and formal language theory. You should also be able to follow and produce proofs.

Careers

Here at York, we're really proud of the fact that more than 97% of our postgraduate students go on to employment or further study within six months of graduating from York. We think the reason for this is that our courses prepare our students for life in the workplace through our collaboration with industry to ensure that what we are teaching is useful for employers.

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An MSc by research is taken in one year as a full-time student or in two years as a part-time student. The degree is awarded following the successful completion of a period of research, including the submission of a thesis and its subsequent examination, together with a seminar. Read more
An MSc by research is taken in one year as a full-time student or in two years as a part-time student. The degree is awarded following the successful completion of a period of research, including the submission of a thesis and its subsequent examination, together with a seminar. The thesis is expected to display a particular knowledge of some part or aspect of the field of study, and to make a contribution to knowledge or understanding.

Course Structure

There are various milestones throughout the MSc year which will be assessed through formally required pieces of work. These include seminars, written work and oral deliverables.

Students should aim to submit a thesis at the end of the 12 months registration period. The final deadline for submission falls three months later. No oral examination is held, unless either supervisor or assessor requests one.

Part-time students can take an MSc by research over a two-year period, with the milestones distributed accordingly over this duration.

Centre for Doctoral Training in Intelligent Games and Game Intelligence

The EPSRC Intelligent Games and Games Intelligence (IGGI) Centre for Doctoral Training is a collaboration between the University of York, the University of Essex and Goldsmiths College, University of London. It will train the next generation of researchers, designers, developers and entrepreneurs in digital games.

The Centre is a unique opportunity for students to undertake PhD research in collaboration with our 60 industrial games partners and world-leading academics.

The doctoral programme combines practical skills training with advanced teaching in cutting-edge research topics and the chance to contribute original research to a growing academic area. Students also undertake two industrial placements during the programme, giving first hand industrial experience that will influence their research projects. Graduates will have the skills needed to succeed in a career in games, having also developed strong relationships with the leaders in the UK digital games industry.

Funded by the EPSRC, we have a number of studentships available for October 2016 entry. The studentships cover tuition fees and include an annual stipend of approximately £14,057 at 2105/16 rates (or £16,057 if studying at Goldsmiths with London weighting).

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This course is available full-time over one year, or part-time over three years. It is made up of 8 assessed modules taught in week-long blocks and an individual project module. Read more
This course is available full-time over one year, or part-time over three years.

It is made up of 8 assessed modules taught in week-long blocks and an individual project module.

This course is suitable for those with a Computer Science related degree and is for those students who already possess a strong computer science, software engineering or information technology background.

Security of our systems is one of the most challenging topics of our time. There is an international consensus that the level of security skills will have to be increased in order to respond to the number and sophistication of threats we face.

Our new MSc in Cyber Security is a forward-looking course that gives you the skills and knowledge you need in the core areas of cyber security. It emphasises the important technical material that will help you make effective cyber security decisions, and addresses issues such as:
-Identity
-Trust and reputation
-Cryptography
-Network security
-Malware and intrusion detection
-Risk management
-Development of high assurance systems

If you are looking to follow a career in industry or government, this course will provide you with a broad education in cyber security, that allows you to make technically informed principled decisions. This course will also prepare you if you are seeking a research career in cyber security - a research skills module is a mandatory part of the course.

It has been designed for students who already possess a strong computer science, software engineering or information technology background who want to broaden their knowledge about the specific challenges in cyber security and of possible solutions to those challenges.

Course structure
The MSc in Cyber Security is offered as a one-year full-time course, or can be taken part-time over three years.

The first half of the course is taken up by taught modules. Each module comprises a mix of lectures, problem classes and practical classes, plus a personal study time. In the second half of the course, students undertake an individual research project under the supervision of a member of staff.

Course aims
-To educate students in the theories, principles, practices and technologies of cyber security.
-To provide the knowledge and understanding of the principles underpinning effective approaches to cyberdefence.

Learning outcomes
When you graduate from the MSc in Cyber Security, you will have developed a detailed understanding of the fundamental aspects of cyber security. The course emphasises the important technical material that must be understood in order to make effective cyber security decision making.

You will understand extant threats to current and emerging system types, and understand and be familiar with a range of technologies that can be brought to bear to reduce risks.

This course will equip you for a career in industry or government, particularly in strategic cyber security decision making, or if you are seeking a research career in this area.

Project

The dissertation project undertaken by students over the summer is carried out individually, supervised by a member of academic staff. It may involve working with an external organisation. Students are also encouraged to work with academic staff to create projects of interest to them.

All projects are vetted to ensure suitability for the MSc. Provided academic criteria are met, there is considerable flexibility in the choice of cyber security topics for the project. Though many projects may follow naturally from the taught material, projects may also investigate suitably challenging topics outside that material.

The outputs from this module are a project dissertation together with a conference paper length summary of the work.

Projects are worth 5/9 of the total mark for the MSc.

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The MSc in Human-Centred Interactive Technologies is a full-time, one-year taught course that is intended for students seeking a professional career related to human-computer interaction, user experience, usability or related fields or those wishing to pursue research in the area. Read more
The MSc in Human-Centred Interactive Technologies is a full-time, one-year taught course that is intended for students seeking a professional career related to human-computer interaction, user experience, usability or related fields or those wishing to pursue research in the area. The course is intended for students who already have a good first degree in a computer science or an appropriate discipline related to human-computer interaction or have equivalent industrial experience. The course covers a range of topics associated with designing interactive systems for good usability and enhancing the user experience. The course has been specifically designed for students wishing to specialise in the design and evaluation of interactive technologies.

The MSc Human-Centred Interactive Technologies course was updated for October 2016 entry. The course had been running successfully for eight years, but in that time the landscape of interactive systems has changed considerably, with the growth of iPhones and apps and the introduction of tablet computers. We have also responded to feedback from students who have asked for more integrated modules and more opportunities to practice interaction design.

Course Aims
The aims of the course are:
-To provide a specialist education in the theories of and methods for designing and evaluating interactive technologies
-To provide an opportunity to engage in a rigorous and scholarly manner with a range of current research topics around designing and evaluating interactive technologies
-To provide practical experience of designing and evaluating interactive technologies
-To develop the skills necessary to conduct research, particularly with users, into the design, engineering or science of interactive technologies
-To provide experience of undertaking a sizeable individual project, on a subject related to research in human-centred interactive technologies
-To prepare students for entry into research degrees or industry-based projects

Learning Outcomes
A fundamental objective of the course is to provide students with a sound theoretical knowledge and practical experience of the skills essential to the design and evaluation of interactive technologies. Having completed the course, students will be able to understand theories of the design of interactive technologies and critique individual technologies from a theoretical viewpoint. In particular they will be able to:
(a) choose appropriate methods for empirical investigations for the design, prototyping and evaluation of interactive technologies, including both quantitative and qualitative methods

(b) plan and undertake a range of empirical investigations of existing or proposed interactive technologies at all stages of the development lifecycle

(c) analyse, draw conclusions from and present the results of such investigations, and

(d) conduct a range of expert and theoretical analyses of interactive technologies to investigate their usability, accessibility and appropriateness for different user groups.

Graduates completing the course will be equipped to play leading and professional roles related to the designed and evaluation of interactive technologies in industry, commerce, academia and public service. The MSc in Human-Centred Interactive Technologies is also intended to provide a route into a PhD or research in this rapidly expanding field.

Project

The dissertation project undertaken by students over the summer is carried out individually, which might involve collaboration with another organisation. A collaborative project is still supervised by a member of the Department.

Projects are worth 50% of the total mark for the MSc. Examples of previous projects include:
-A Gesture Language for Interaction with Art and Cultural Artefacts in Museums
-Analysis of WCAG 2.0 Techniques and Remote Evaluation by People with Visual Disabilities
-Cultural issues in design of online banking websites: a Chinese case study
-Evaluating Human Error through Video Games
-Have the Same Image in Mind? Investigation of Personas in Web Design
-Inattention and Immersion in Video Games
-Measuring User Experience of Mobile Phones: a Study with Retrospective Protocol and Emotion Word Prompt List
-The Application of Game Mechanics to a Virtual Learning Environment
-The Design and Evaluation of NHS Pharmacy Dispensing Computer Software
-Using User-Generated Content as Discourses on the Gaming Experience

Careers

Here at York, we're really proud of the fact that more than 97% of our postgraduate students go on to employment or further study within six months of graduating from York. We think the reason for this is that our courses prepare our students for life in the workplace through our collaboration with industry to ensure that what we are teaching is useful for employers.

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University of York Department of Sociology
Distance from York: 0 miles
Designing at the forefront of communication technology. The rapid expansion of digital networks such as YouTube, Wikipedia, Flickr and Facebook have changed user expectations. Read more
Designing at the forefront of communication technology.

Overview

The rapid expansion of digital networks such as YouTube, Wikipedia, Flickr and Facebook have changed user expectations. These advances have created a demand for graduates who understand social and participatory design principles and have the skills to design new interactive technologies.

The MSc in Social Media and Interactive Technologies provides an innovative mix of social and technical skills. You will gain an understanding of the social, political and economic factors that affect the use of interactive technologies, examining how technology is perceived and employed by the user, and you will develop the skills to design and create usable and accessible devices and applications.

Course content

Understand social media and interactive technologies through the key roles they play in society. Explore topics in human-computer interaction, user-centred design, social and cultural theory and human psychology and learn to apply them to the practical problems of designing interactive pages, devices and systems.

Modules for this social media degree are taught by experts from both the Department of Sociology and the Department of Computer Science.

The MSc in Social Media and Interactive Technologies includes eight core modules:
-Understanding Social Media
-Metrics and Society
-Themes and Issues in Contemporary Sociology
-Research Methods for Interactive Technologies
-User-centred Design for Interactive Technologies

You will develop, design, implement and manage your own original research project, supervised by a member of staff with the relevant experience for your topic. You will analyse the data and produce a 15,000-word dissertation based on your research project.

Examples of previous projects include:
-Accessibility of iPhone/iPad apps
-Democracy and participation in York City
-The use of social networking sites by the older generation
-Social robotics and companionship
-Living with the h-index?
-Investigating immersion in games with inattentional blindness
-Immersion and cognitive effort when playing videogames
-Immersion in audio-only games

Careers

You'll develop the skills and knowledge needed to play a leading role in the design and evaluation of interactive technologies in industry, commerce, academia and public service. This social media degree also provides an ideal basis to progress to further study at PhD level.

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You will take eight Assessed Modules plus an Individual Project carried out in the department. Six of the modules cover core Software Engineering methods, practices and tools, and are compulsory. Read more
You will take eight Assessed Modules plus an Individual Project carried out in the department. Six of the modules cover core Software Engineering methods, practices and tools, and are compulsory. For the remaining two modules, you will be able to choose from Natural Language Processing, Topics in Privacy & Security, Evolutionary Computation, Concurrent & Real-Time Programming, and Functional Programming Technology.

Software Engineering has become a crucial discipline in the functioning of the modern world. Information systems, communications, transport, manufacturing and services all require well-engineered and reliable software. The focus of our MSc in Software Engineering is automated and large-scale software engineering, so the course will equip you to deal with the types of systems widely found in industry.

The MSc is a full-time, one-year course for those with some experience or background in Software Engineering. You will learn up-to-date theory and practice in the core areas of Software Engineering, and the main methods and tools used in industry. The course also covers model-driven engineering, service-oriented architectures, software architectures and user-centred design. You will gain a thorough understanding of techniques and practices of software management, including measurement and testing. This in-depth understanding of the role of software in commercial organisations will enable you to develop and maintain large-scale software systems.

You will gain a thorough understanding of techniques and practices of software management, including measurement and testing. These techniques will allow you to understand the role of software in commercial organisations and you will be able to develop and maintain these large scale systems.

Course Aims
When you graduate, you will be able to apply advanced Software Engineering techniques to analyse systems and design solutions, particularly in a commercial context. You will have experience of using state-of-the-art Software Engineering tool suites (e.g., Eclipse and Epsilon). You will also understand the human factors in Software Engineering, and will be able to design systems taking into account the needs of users.

Your individual project gives you the chance to specialise in a specific area of Software Engineering, as you will undertake independent research and apply your results to develop a real solution – an application, tool or technique.

On graduation, you will be equipped to design and maintain large systems in a wide range of industries, or to pursue an academic research career in Software Engineering.

Learning Outcomes
A thorough grounding and practical experience in the use of state-of-the-art techniques for developing software-based systems.
An in-depth understanding of the principles underpinning these techniques, so as to make sound judgements throughout the systems and software engineering life cycle.

Project

Team Project
You are taught a broad range of project management skills, which you will directly apply to a medium-sized software project that is conducted in small student teams.

Individual Project
The course concludes with your individual project. You may choose a topic among the many offered by the academic staff, or you may propose your own topic. Some recent topics were:
-Air Traffic Control application using PostgreSQL
-Automated Development of Graphical Editors built atop Graphiti
-Multi-Agent Reinforcement Learning: Conquest of Mars
-Natural Disaster Planning - A System of Systems Analysis
-Reinforcement Learning for Mobile Cognitive Radio Agents
-Simulation-based Hazard Analysis for Autonomous Robots
-Study of Business Processes in a Complex Enterprise System
-Using heuristics for Monte Carlo Tree Search

Careers

Here at York, we're really proud of the fact that more than 97% of our postgraduate students go on to employment or further study within six months of graduating from York. We think the reason for this is that our courses prepare our students for life in the workplace through our collaboration with industry to ensure that what we are teaching is useful for employers.

Our postgraduate taught courses are specifically designed to meet the needs of industry, and the thorough grounding we provide, alongside the skills you learn from undertaking a Masters degree, will stand you in good stead in the workplace.

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Information Technology is now fundamental in every aspect of our daily lives. IT systems are crucial for delivering every day services such as banking, web based services and information systems. Read more
Information Technology is now fundamental in every aspect of our daily lives. IT systems are crucial for delivering every day services such as banking, web based services and information systems.

The MSc Information Technology is a full time, one year taught course, intended for students who are seeking a professional career in the IT industry. There is no requirement for a first degree in computing, but proficiency in at least one programming language is a requirement.

The course covers a range of topics including advanced programming, user-interface design, software engineering and management.

This course will give you the knowledge of IT from an organisation oriented viewpoint, allowing you to be capable of designing and implementing IT systems for a wide range of organisations.

The course has been specifically designed to suit the requirements of the IT industry, where you will be able to take up technical or management positions. Our graduates enter employment in many roles, including computer programmers, technical authors and research associates.

Course Aims
-Programming: You will gain a thorough grounding of advanced programming concepts using Java including efficient data structures and algorithms and high performance distributed computing.
-User-Interfaces: You will learn the theory of human computer interaction (HCI) and put this into practice in a number of ways, including user centred design of aspects of people's interaction with digital systems.
-Software Engineering: You will learn and be able to apply the principles of software engineering and case studies using UML, software testing techniques, and privacy and security aspect of software systems.

Learning Outcomes
We expect our graduates to be capable of designing and implementing IT systems for a wide range organisations. A thorough understanding of the following subjects are expected:
-Designing user interfaces following sound principles of interface design
-Designing, specifying, implementing and testing software components and systems using UML, Java and a range of software testing techniques
-Dependability of IT systems including topics in privacy and security
-Computer architectures and high performance distributed computing

Project

The dissertation project undertaken by students in Terms 3 and 4 (Summer Term and Vacation Term) is carried out individually, which might involve collaboration with another organisation. The subject matter of projects varies widely; most projects are suggested by members of staff, some by external organisations, and some by students themselves, usually relating to an area of personal interest that they wish to develop further.

A collaborative project is supervised by a member of the Department, but the collaborating organisation will normally provide an external supervisor. Organisations that have collaborated in projects in the past include Glasgow Town Planning Department, British Rail Passenger Services Department, North Yorkshire Police, North Yorkshire Fire Services, NEDO, the Royal Horticultural Society, Biosis UK, Centre Point sheltered housing, York Archaeological Trust, and the University of York Library.

The subject matter of projects varies widely; most projects are suggested by members of staff, some by external organisations, and some by students themselves, perhaps relating to an area of personal interest that they wish to develop further.

All project proposals are rigorously vetted and must meet a number of requirements before these are made available to the students. The department uses an automated project allocation system for assigning projects to students that takes into account supervisor and student preferences.

Examples of previous project include:
-A Study into the User Experience and Usability of Web Enabled Services on Smartphones
-Agent simulation of large scale complex IT systems
-Do People Disclose their Passwords on Social Media?
-Dynamic Sound Generation for Computer Games
-Iterative linear programming as an optimisation method for buyer resources in online auctions evaluated using a Java-based Monte Carlo simulation
-Qchat (Web-based chat application for quantum physicists)
-Software for dyslexic readers: an empirical investigation of presentation attributes
-Web-based IQ Testing Application for Fluid Intelligence Analysis
-Agent simulation of large scale complex IT systems

Information for Students

Whilst the MSc in Information Technology does not require a formal qualification in computing, we do expect you to have some understanding of computer related issues.

As everyone arrives with different experience, we have put together the following summary of what we expect you to know, with some suggestions of how you can prepare before you arrive.

You'll start the course with a focus on writing and developing Java programs. We assume that you are familiar with programming concepts and terminology, so we advise you to review basic programming concepts, such as:
-Variables and their types
-Control structures (e.g. if-statements, loops)
-Subprograms (e.g. procedures, functions)
-Compilation and debugging.

If you have never used Java, you will benefit greatly from doing some reading and trying out Java programming before you arrive. We will teach you from first principles, but the pace will be fast and you will find it easier to keep up if you've practiced with the basics beforehand. Tutorials and practical exercises are the best way for you to prepare, and the Deitel and Deitel book below is a good source of these.

Careers

Here at York, we're really proud of the fact that more than 97% of our postgraduate students go on to employment or further study within six months of graduating from York. We think the reason for this is that our courses prepare our students for life in the workplace through our collaboration with industry to ensure that what we are teaching is useful for employers.

Read less
Computers are now ubiquitous with many devices and systems being controlled by software. Building robust and reliable software systems requires a deeper knowledge of software design principles and programming methodologies. Read more
Computers are now ubiquitous with many devices and systems being controlled by software. Building robust and reliable software systems requires a deeper knowledge of software design principles and programming methodologies.

The MSc Computing is a full time, one year taught course with a focus on programming and programming related aspects. This is to enable our graduates to go on to a professional career in the computing industry in roles such as team leaders or skilled developers.

The course is designed for students who already possess a degree in IT or related discipline or have equivalent industrial experience, and want to deepen their knowledge in software systems. It covers a range of topics including advanced programming, software engineering and testing, privacy and security, advanced user-interface design and high performance computing.

Course aims
-Advanced Programming: You will gain a thorough grounding of advanced programming concepts using Java, concurrent and real-time programming principles.
-User-Interfaces: You will be introduced to introductory and advanced methods in how users interact with systems (Human-Computer Interaction (HCI)).
-Advanced Software Engineering: You will learn the principles of software engineering using UML, formal methods and software testing.

Learning Outcomes
When you graduate from this course, you will have an in-depth understanding of software systems and programming principles and be able to lead a team of developers in the IT industry. You will have a thorough understanding of:
-Advanced programming knowledge including Java and principles for high performance computing.
-Designing and specifying software components and systems using UML.
-In-depth knowledge of user interface design principles.
-Software testing, privacy and security aspect of software engineering and software management.

Project

The individual project is undertaken by students in Terms 3 and 4 (Summer term and Vacation term). The subject matter of projects varies widely; most projects are suggested by members of staff, some by external organisations, and some by students themselves, allowing students to undertake work relating to an area of personal interest that they wish to develop further.

All project proposals are rigorously vetted and must meet a number of requirements before these are made available to the students. The department uses an automated project allocation system for assigning projects to students that takes into account supervisor and student preferences.

Examples of previous project titles include:
-Autosuggestions using Ajax to improve tag based tactile image retrieval
-An Implementation of Mobile Application in Location-aware Service Domain
-Design and Implementation of a Tool Support for Time Bands Modelling
-Image Anomaly Detection and Object Recognition
-Image retrieval using region of interest detection
-Modelling and Simulation of Business Processes
-Reinforcement Learning for the StarCraft Real-Time Strategy Game
-Software for Autistic Children with Communication Difficulties
-The Design, Implementation, and Safety Analysis of a Mobile ePrescription System
-Using Procedural Content Generation to Provide a Set of Game Challenges During a Single Playthrough

Information for Students

The MSc in Computing course is for those with some background in computing, and so we make some assumptions about your existing knowledge and understanding.

You'll start the course with a focus on writing and developing Java programs. We assume that you are familiar with programming concepts and terminology, so we advise you to review basic programming concepts, such as:
-Variables and their types
-Control structures (e.g. if-statements, loops)
-Subprograms (e.g. procedures, functions)
-Compilation and debugging.

If you have never used Java, you will benefit greatly from doing some reading and trying out Java programming before you arrive. We will teach you from first principles, but the pace will be fast and you will find it easier to keep up if you've practiced with the basics beforehand. Tutorials and practical exercises are the best way for you to prepare, and the Deitel and Deitel book below is a good source of these.

Read less
The MSc in Intelligent Robotics will provide the opportunity to learn about the growing area of mobile and autonomous robotics, and intelligent systems. Read more
The MSc in Intelligent Robotics will provide the opportunity to learn about the growing area of mobile and autonomous robotics, and intelligent systems. You will gain experience in an exciting wide range of topics, providing you hands-on experience. You will learn about the development of embedded control systems for robots, intelligent algorithms and their application to robotics, communications and systems programming, all with a focus on the practical implementation, both in hardware and simulation. The MSc culminates in a large group project focussed on collective robotic systems, ranging from ground-based units to flying robots. You will have the opportunity to work in a state of the art, dedicated, robotics laboratory for some of your modules and your final project, see the York Robotics Laboratory website for more details on the lab.

The MSc is intended for students who want to learn about robotic and autonomous systems for employment in related industries, or who are seeking a route into a PhD.

The broad aims of the course are to provide:
-A thorough grounding in the use of scientific and engineering techniques as applied to intelligent robotic systems
-A detailed knowledge of the development and deployment of intelligent robotic systems
-A detailed knowledge of the latest developments in intelligent robotics and an ability to reflect critically on those developments
-A detailed understanding of engineering collective robotic systems with emergent behaviours
-Experience of undertaking a substantial group project, on a subject related to research in autonomous robotic systems

Group Project

The aim of this substantial group project is to immerse the students in a life-like scenario of a group of engineers developing a large scale collective robotic system. The project will involve the design, construction and implementation of the control of a heterogeneous collective robotic system, providing students with practical experience of project management and team skills. The system will include both software (such as individual and collective robotic control, low-level programming) and hardware (such as hardware design or customisation) components. The project will culminate in the design and realisation of a collective robotic system that will undergo various test scenarios in the robotics laboratory.

The project preparation will begin towards the end of the Autumn term when groups will be develop a Quality Assurance manual, that will prepare the students to establish effective group policies, procedures and roles for group members, introducing the Quality Assurance processes applied to medium to large projects in industry. The group will be given a scenario and begin establishing requirements and develop outline designs.

In the Summer term, the project will get under way. Groups of 4-6 students will be formed, assigned a target system to design, and provided with a budget. In this term, the students will prepare a design document that will be followed for the remainder of the project. Detailed system specifications will be established and initial prototypes developed. You will make full use of the Robotics Laboratory and spend the vast majority of your time working on robotic systems and attempting to develop an innovative solution to the problem given. Full technical support is available in the laboratory.

A final presentation of each group is done in September where live demos of the system developed have to be provided. This is combined with a group presentation on the work undertaken and contributions made by each individual. Group documentation is submitted along with an individual report.

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University of York Department of Sociology
Distance from York: 0 miles
New digital technologies are changing how we connect and do business. With improved access to the internet through our smartphones and tablets we have become more connected to each other and to what is happening in the world around us. Read more
New digital technologies are changing how we connect and do business.

Overview

With improved access to the internet through our smartphones and tablets we have become more connected to each other and to what is happening in the world around us. At the same time social media and information applications are transforming business. This innovative MSc in Social Media and Management will give you an understanding of existing and emerging technology and the ability to assess the impact of social media on commercial, public, and third sector organisations in the UK and worldwide.

Course content

Social media and information applications are transforming organisational development, competitiveness and flexible working. From raising a company’s profile to improving client and customer relations, this rapidly evolving sector has already affected the way many businesses work. The potential for further change is huge.

You'll develop business awareness and explore the history of organisations, their environments, and the ways in which both have changed. You'll examine how digital information communications technology (ICT) is managed, and learn to identify and analyse the key innovations made possible by new media. You will investigate new methods of digital data analysis and explore the opportunities and challenges presented by the availability of these new data forms.

The Social Media and Management course is taught by experts from both the Department of Sociology and the York Management School, combining experience from the forefront of sociological and business research.

The Social Media and Management course includes seven core modules:
-Understanding Social Media
-Metrics and Society
-Social Research Methods and Management
-Organisational Analysis
-Business Information Systems
-Innovation and Technology Management
-Continuity and Change in Organisations

Careers

You'll develop the skills and knowledge you need to follow a career in social media management or consultancy as an information analyst in public or private sector organisations. The masters in Social Media and Management course also provides an ideal basis to progress to further study at PhD level.

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Wireless communication and mobile computing are currently the largest growth sectors in electronics and are expected to continue growing in the future. Read more
Wireless communication and mobile computing are currently the largest growth sectors in electronics and are expected to continue growing in the future.

The impact on the consumer market is widespread with new mobile phones and tablets continually under development. Wireless communications is pervasive and extending to many everyday objects including vehicles, personal health, entertainment systems and the internet of things (IoT).

This one year full-time taught MSc integrates electronics, communications and computing from core principles to cutting-edge applications and provides you with valuable skills for future employment in this growth sector. One of the major features of the MSc is the teaching of embedded programming using ARM processors which are included in over 90% of all mobile phones. In addition to learning to program the processor during the group project, you will be involved in interfacing it to wireless nodes and sensors, and building real-world solutions to problems. We will provide you with your own development kit when you arrive.

The course content features:
-Modules in computing (C and embedded programming), electronics, internet, mobile and data communications.
-Specially designed modules to support recent developments in relevant technologies such as programming for embedded and mobile devices.
-A 60 credit group project in which you will develop skills and knowledge that will prepare you for working in industry or undertaking further academic study. The project will involve the design and practical implementation of internet and wireless devices using ARM processors.

Group Project

The project will involve the design and practical implementation of internet and wireless devices using ARM processors.

Facilities

Students taking the Embedded Wireless Systems taught MSc have the use of departmental laboratories equipped with dedicated computing equipment including STMicro ARM processor and expansion boards and licences for Keil uVision embedded C compiler, these will be used in a variety of modules including the group project.

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University of York Department of Archaeology
Distance from York: 0 miles
The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems course will provide you with applied practical experience and critical theoretical engagement with a full range of computing systems and technology used for publishing, archiving, analysing, visualising and presenting archaeological information today. Read more
The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems course will provide you with applied practical experience and critical theoretical engagement with a full range of computing systems and technology used for publishing, archiving, analysing, visualising and presenting archaeological information today.

The University of York’s Archaeology Department has been at the forefront of researching and developing archaeological computer applications since the early days of digital practice in the discipline and has hosted the first online peer-reviewed e-journal for archaeology since 1996. It also hosts the world-leading Archaeology Data Service, which is the UK’s national digital data archive for the historic environment.

• Gain applied practical experience in internet applications, database design and management, GIS technology, CAD and computer modelling systems.
• Build a broad foundation of expertise in archaeological computing applications.
• Access the University of York’s world-leading expertise in e-publishing and digital archiving.
• Develop IT knowledge and skills that are highly valued in heritage-sector careers.
• Access a full suite of research computing hardware and software
• Receive tailored careers advice from staff with significant experience of recruiting within the sector.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

What does the course cover?

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training, research and work placements, you will:
• Develop vital knowledge of the digital and internet technologies used for disseminating, publishing and archiving archaeological information.
• Learn practical skills in 3-D modelling, GIS, CAD and other technologies used for analysing and visualising archaeological information.

The course provides a detailed introduction to the broad range of information systems used in archaeology, and provides the opportunity to apply these systems in practice. The work placement and dissertation enable you to specialise in a particular technique or approach, giving you valuable practical experience in your areas of interest.

Who is it for?

The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems is designed for people who have a basic grounding in computer literacy and an interest in archaeology and heritage, and who wish to follow vocational training in archaeological information systems.

What can it lead to?

Many of our graduates go onto careers in archaeological computing, working in contract units or county-based records organisations. Others have founded their own consultancy businesses. Some apply their computing skills in more mainstream archaeological work, in museums, or in the wider world. Others have pursued further research at doctoral level. Click on the alumni tab above to find out what our alumni and current students have to say about the course.

Content

This one-year MSc course is taught via a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. You will study two core modules, two optional modules and four shorter skills modules of your choice. You will also gain valuable practical experience of applying information systems in the workplace on a work placement module. Finally, in the summer term you will develop your research and presentation skills by producing a dissertation and giving an assessed lecture.

Placement

Your work placement is a key feature of the course, providing valuable experience of using IT in an archaeological work environment. The placement offers you the chance to gain practical experience in a professional, academic or heritage environment. You will be able to work on projects that help you develop new skills or put into practice skills gained from your taught courses.

Aims
-To provide experience of computer applications within a workplace in the historic environment sector.
-To consolidate knowledge and understanding of computer applications from one or more of the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing your placement you should have:
-Gained detailed knowledge of how information technology is applied in the workplace in the historic environment sector, under the guidance of experienced professionals.
-Developed an understanding of the contexts in which IT is applied, and of real world limitations.
-Developed your IT skills in one or more of the core areas covered by the taught programme (i.e. database design, web technologies, digital archiving, electronic publication, CAD, GIS and virtual reality modelling).

Placement providers
Although the organisations offering placements change from year to year, and you have the option of proposing other providers that match your specific interests, the following list is a good indication of some of the choices available:
-Yorkshire Museums Trust
-Archaeology Data Service
-City of York Council
-Internet Archaeology
-York Archaeological Trust
-Centre for Christianity and Culture
-L-P: Archaeology
-On Site Archaeology
-Council for British Archaeology
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-Historic England
-English Heritage
-National Trust

Careers

The MSc in Archaeological Information Systems offers practical, careers-focused training for many essential roles in the professional world of archaeology. By the end of the course you will:
-Have examined how computers are applied in archaeology and their impact on the development of the discipline
-Understand the concept of the internet, be able to find and use relevant information and add materials to it
-Have the skills to evaluate critically the claims made for different computer applications and select the correct application for a given problem
-Have an understanding of authoring tools and be able to create an electronic text
-Have an understanding of database design and be able to design and implement a simple relational database
-Have an understanding of CAD and GIS and be able to create effective applications in each
-Have an awareness of digital archiving principles, resource discovery and metadata

Many graduates from this course go on to careers in archaeological computing with contract and county-based records units, or found their own consultancy businesses. Some apply their computing skills to more mainstream archaeological settings, such as museums, or in a range of the others sectors and roles, including:
-Archive management
-Social media management
-Local government and development
-Computing and IT services
-Business and administration
-Marketing and public relations
-Education

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University of York Department of Mathematics
Distance from York: 0 miles
This one year MSc programme in Statistics and Computational Finance aims to train students to work as professional statisticians, not only at the interface between statistics and finance, but to provide skills applicable in sociology, health science, medical science, biology, and other scientific areas where data analysis is needed. Read more
This one year MSc programme in Statistics and Computational Finance aims to train students to work as professional statisticians, not only at the interface between statistics and finance, but to provide skills applicable in sociology, health science, medical science, biology, and other scientific areas where data analysis is needed.

The emphasis of the programme is on data analysis. It equips students with contemporary statistical ideas and methodologies as well as advanced knowledge, which will make students very competitive to industry, academic and governmental institutions. There are excellent career prospects for employment in industry and the public sector for our graduates. An MSc degree in Statistics and Computational Finance provides attractive employment opportunities in financial industries, government, consultancy companies, research centres, and other industries where data analysis is needed. Students with an interest in academic work may also decide to continue on a PhD programme in Statistics or a related field, for which the MSc in Statistics and Computational Finance provides a sound foundation.

Career opportunities

There are excellent career prospects for students with a background in statistics and data analysis. The programme is designed to equip students with contemporary statistical ideas and methodologies which makes our students very competitive when seeking employment in industry and governmental institutions, as well as in academic careers. The skills taught are applicable in sociology, health science, medical science, biology and other related disciplines where data analysis is needed.

Recent destinations of graduates from the MSc in Statistics and Computational Finance have included:
-PhD in the Department of Mathematics at the University of York (Non-parametric modelling in high dimensional data analysis)
-PhD at Florida State University
-Modelling Analyst (automotive data provider)
-Graduate Technical Analyst (HSBC)
-Research and Development in a Property and Casualty Insurance company, specialising in catastrophe insurance
-Mainframe Software Solution Sales in a major IT brand
-Data Analyst in a health data company
-Trainee Chartered Accountant

Programme structure

To achieve an MSc degree students must complete modules to the value of 180 credits, including 100 credits of core taught modules, 20 credits chosen among the optional taught modules, and a 60-credit dissertation.

Students who successfully complete 60 credits of taught modules may be eligible for the award of a Postgraduate Certificate.

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