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Anthropology×

Full Time MSc Degrees in Anthropology, USA

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Biological anthropology is undergoing rapid and significant change in the 21st century. Biological anthropologists are developing broader interests beyond traditional themes in academic departments of anthropology, and finding new job opportunities in and outside of academia. Read more
Biological anthropology is undergoing rapid and significant change in the 21st century. Biological anthropologists are developing broader interests beyond traditional themes in academic departments of anthropology, and finding new job opportunities in and outside of academia. Biological anthropologists can be found in medical schools, schools of public health, many companies producing pharmaceuticals and dietary items, and at major government research organizations such as the Smithsonian Institution, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Biological anthropology draws its students from a wide variety of disciplines that include the natural sciences, social sciences and the humanities.

Biomedical anthropology is an emerging subdisciplinary area within biological anthropology. It represents the interface between biomedicine and the behavioral and social sciences that shape health status. As such, it does more than give lip service to integrating cross-disciplinary approaches. It represents an educational philosophy that has been recommended as part of an innovative graduate training initiative (1995 Reshaping the Graduate Education of Scientists and Engineers, National Academy Press) implemented by the National Science Foundation (NSF Announcement 98:96).

Biomedical anthropology emphasizes biomedical, biobehavioral, epidemiological and evolutionary approaches to understanding the transmission and dissemination of disease, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis, and the dynamic interaction of biological and sociocultural factors that shape health outcomes.

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university which you attended
- Three letters of recommendation
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

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A letter of intent that expresses professional and educational goals as it relates to the program. Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form. Read more
• A letter of intent that expresses professional and educational goals as it relates to the program.
• Submission of three letters of recommendation, using the required recommendation form.
• Résumé or curriculum vitae.

E-mail: • Phone: 315-267-2165

Visit http://www.potsdam.edu/graduate to view the full application checklist and online application.

The Master of Science in Community Health prepares public health professionals to address public health issues in diverse popula- tions. The curriculum fosters development of core public health competencies, training students to plan, implement, and evaluate rural health initiatives. Through coursework, research, and community engagement, students will acquire the practical skills necessary to respond to public health needs in rural settings. Program start date: Fall

Required Program Courses

Minimum of 45 credit hours

HLTH 600, Social/Behavioral Determinants
HLTH 605, Biostatistics HLTH 610, Epidemiology
HLTH 620, Current Topics in Rural Health
HLTH 625, Research and Assessment
HLTH 630, Health Disparities
HLTH 640, Program Planning
HLTH 645, Program Evaluation
HLTH 651, Environmental and Occupational Health
HLTH 655, Health Policy and Administration
HLTH 690, Internship I
HLTH 691, Internship II
HLTH 696, Professional Project I
HLTH 697, Professional Project II

Electives: 3-6 credit hours

Uniqueness of Program

Graduates of the M.S. program will be prepared to identify, prevent and solve health problems as well as develop and evaluate health-related programs and policies, especially those affecting rural health populations. The curriculum is designed to meet the needs of both part-time and full-time students. Many of our graduates will serve as managers, administrators, re- searchers, and educators. The MS offers graduates a breadth of knowledge they can apply to almost any public health topic, such as: STI prevention; promotion of breast or other cancer screenings; substance abuse prevention; or the promotion of physical activity and nutrition.

Testimonials

“Interning at Cornell Cooperative Extension has given me a look at what Community Health is all about. To work directly with the population in need is not only eye-opening, but extremely rewarding. I really feel that I have grown from this experience in a number of ways.” —Emily Nye, CCE Intern

“My internship at Hospice and Palliative Care of St. Lawrence Valley provided me with unforgettable memories and experiences. The projects I was able to complete while interning at Hospice were things I never dreamed possible. The amazing and courageous staff deserves all the thanks in the world for what they do on a day-to-day basis. This internship was truly a once in a lifetime experience.” —Kaley Arsenault, Hospice Intern

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The Social Innovation and Not-for-Profit Management concentration, part of the graduate major in Management, offers students business and management skills applicable to not-for-profit work. Read more
The Social Innovation and Not-for-Profit Management concentration, part of the graduate major in Management, offers students business and management skills applicable to not-for-profit work. A person wishing to work in the not-for-profit field is not necessarily someone who is disinterested in making a profit. It may well be that this individual has invested many years in the for-profit rough-and-tumble world and now feels drawn to giving back to the community in a less aggressive, less competitive endeavor. This field also may appeal to the more humanitarian-minded individual who is just starting a career. The not-for-profit’s primary goal is not to increase shareholder value; rather it is to fulfill some socially desirable need. A not-for-profit venture operates successfully because of keen business savvy and excellent management know-how. The emphasis in this enterprise is on stewardship, and all support—financial and otherwise—must be used as directed by the donors, and management must be held accountable for every aspect of the operation.

The Master of Science (M.S.) in Management is offered by the Department of Management in the Jennings A. Jones College of Business. This program, with three concentrations, offers students planning, communication, and ethical decision-making skills through experiential learning in which they will find themselves in the trenches of the real-world work environment. Each concentration—Social Innovation and Not-for-Profit Management, Organizational Leadership, and Supply Chain Management—includes a capstone project in which students will partner with an organization in the industry or non-profit sector.

Career

If your desire is to enrich the lives of those in need through education and service, then working in a not-for-profit organization can be richly rewarding. Not-for-profit management is no less demanding than upper-level positions in the corporate world. Successful humanitarian and outreach programs require a rock-solid work ethic. Because not-for-profit enterprises depend greatly on a volunteer work force, the need for professional leadership is paramount. Examples of career opportunities include areas such as:

Child advocacy
Communications
Corporate management
Education
Food distribution
Health and aging
Homeless outreach
Housing and economic development
Service industries
Social justice

Because this program is relatively new, employer information is still being compiled. Following are examples of employers of Management graduates and Career Fair participants:

American Cellular
Automatic Data Processing
CalsonicKansei North America
Chick-Fil-A Murfreesboro
Consolidated Electrical Distributors, Inc.
Enterprise
Ettain Group
Insight Global, Inc.
Internal Data Resources
Liberty Mutual
Modern Woodmen of America
Nissan North America
Northwestern Mutual Financial Network
PepsiCo Foodservice
Sherwin-Williams
State Farm Insurance
Target Stores
Tennessee Valley Healthcare System (VA)
The Hershey Company
Walter Meier Manufacturing

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