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Full Time MSc Degrees in Languages, Literature & Culture, United Kingdom

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Modern English Literature begins in the extraordinary developments of the 16th and early 17th centuries. Read more

Research profile

Modern English Literature begins in the extraordinary developments of the 16th and early 17th centuries. Under the influence of social, religious and political transformations, and through engagement with classical and continental European culture, new theories and practices of literature appeared that have influenced generations of writers since.

Studying the literature of this period allows us both to enter a world that is not our own, and to see the origins of modern western perspectives and predicaments. This programme offer you the opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of supervised independent research in this field.

We are the oldest department of English Literature in the world, and at the last Research Assessment Exercise were awarded the highest research rating possible, of 5*A. We have one of the largest graduate programmes in this area in the country and a rich research culture covering all aspects of literatures in English.

We offer supervision in all areas of Renaissance literature, and have particular strengths in Renaissance drama and performance, Renaissance poetry, the politics of literature in the Renaissance, religious writing in the Renaissance, Renaissance biographical and autobiographical writing, and the relevance to the study of Renaissance literature of modern and contemporary theory.

The research of staff has made valuable contributions to the areas of literature and philosophy, modernism/postmodernism, medieval and early modern literature, history of the book, romanticism, transatlantic studies and performance studies.

English Literature houses the Centre for the History of the Book and is one of the UK's leading forces in this area. It works closely with the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and with the National Library of Scotland. The latter's recently acquired Murray Archive is crucial for studies in Romanticism, Book History, Bibliography and Archive Studies.

Extensive collections of Renaissance manuscripts and printed books are held in Edinburgh by the University’s own library, the National Library of Scotland, and the National Archives of Scotland. These collections offer excellent research resources and opportunities for graduate study, and are particularly rich in materials relating to Shakespeare and Renaissance drama.

Training and support

The academic staff you will be working with are all active researchers or authors, many of them prize winners and leading scholars in their fields. As well as benefiting from their expert supervision, you will undertake a seminar-based programme of training in core research skills and subject-specific methodologies. You will also have the opportunity to develop other transferable skills through the University’s Institute for Academic Development

We encourage you to share your research and learn from the work of others through a vibrant programme of Work-in-Progress seminars, reading groups, visiting speakers and conferences.

Our postgraduate journal, Forum, is a valuable conduit for research findings, and provides an opportunity for editorial experience.

Facilities

On hand are all the amenities you would expect, such as computing facilities, study areas and a common room and kitchen. Our location gives you easy access to the University’s general facilities, such as the Main Library and our collections, as well as to the National Museum, National Library and National Galleries of Scotland at the heart of the city.

In addition to the impressive range of resources available at the University’s Main Library (more than two million printed volumes and generous online resources) and the nearby National Library of Scotland, we host a number of collections of rare and valuable archival materials, all of which will be readily available to you as a postgraduate student.

Among the literary treasures are the libraries of William Drummond, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Hugh MacDiarmid, Adam Smith, Dugald Stewart and Norman MacCaig, plus the WH Auden collection, the Corson Collection of works by and about Sir Walter Scott and the Ramage collection of poetry pamphlets.

Our cultural collections are highly regarded and include a truly exceptional collection of early Shakespeare quartos and other early modern printed plays, and world-class manuscript and archival collections.

Read less
From the poetry of Dunbar and Henryson to the fiction of James Kelman and A.L. Kennedy, Scottish literature presents an extraordinarily rich and varied subject of study, whether considered as a tradition in its own right or in terms of its interaction with English, European or world literatures. Read more

Research profile

From the poetry of Dunbar and Henryson to the fiction of James Kelman and A.L. Kennedy, Scottish literature presents an extraordinarily rich and varied subject of study, whether considered as a tradition in its own right or in terms of its interaction with English, European or world literatures.

Whether you’re interested in poetry, fiction or drama, the literary dimensions of the Scottish Enlightenment, the relationship between modernism and nationalism, Walter Scott or Irvine Welsh, Muriel Spark or Robert Louis Stevenson, this programme offers you the opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of supervised independent research in your chosen area.

We are the oldest department of English Literature in the world, and at the last Research Assessment Exercise were awarded the highest research rating possible, of 5*A. We have one of the largest graduate programmes in this area in the country and a rich research culture covering all aspects of literatures in English.

We offer supervision in all areas of Scottish literature, and have particular strengths in medieval Scottish writing, in comparative approaches to Scottish literature, in Scotland’s transatlantic connections, in the relationship between literature and philosophy in Scotland, in 18th and 19th century writing and culture, and in modern and contemporary Scottish literature.

The research of staff has made valuable contributions to the areas of literature and philosophy, modernism/postmodernism, medieval and early modern literature, history of the book, romanticism, transatlantic studies and performance studies.

English Literature houses the Centre for the History of the Book and is one of the UK's leading forces in this area. It works closely with the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and with the National Library of Scotland. The latter's recently acquired Murray Archive is crucial for studies in Romanticism, Book History, Bibliography and Archive Studies.

Training and support

The academic staff you will be working with are all active researchers or authors, many of them prize winners and leading scholars in their fields. As well as benefiting from their expert supervision, you will undertake a seminar-based programme of training in core research skills and subject-specific methodologies. You will also have the opportunity to develop other transferable skills through the University’s Institute for Academic Development

We encourage you to share your research and learn from the work of others through a vibrant programme of Work-in-Progress seminars, reading groups, visiting speakers and conferences.

Our postgraduate journal, Forum, is a valuable conduit for research findings, and provides an opportunity for editorial experience.

Facilities

On hand are all the amenities you would expect, such as computing facilities, study areas and a common room and kitchen. Our location gives you easy access to the University’s general facilities, such as the Main Library and our collections, as well as to the National Museum, National Library and National Galleries of Scotland at the heart of the city.

In addition to the impressive range of resources available at the University’s Main Library (more than two million printed volumes and generous online resources) and the nearby National Library of Scotland, we host a number of collections of rare and valuable archival materials, all of which will be readily available to you as a postgraduate student.

Among the literary treasures are the libraries of William Drummond, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Hugh MacDiarmid, Adam Smith, Dugald Stewart and Norman MacCaig, plus the WH Auden collection, the Corson Collection of works by and about Sir Walter Scott and the Ramage collection of poetry pamphlets.

Our cultural collections are highly regarded and include a truly exceptional collection of early Shakespeare quartos and other early modern printed plays, and world-class manuscript and archival collections.

Read less
The literature of the Victorian era offers an extraordinary range of styles, themes and intellectual ideas. This diverse and dynamic literary field reflects a period which witnessed rapid change in almost every area of existence. Read more

Research profile

The literature of the Victorian era offers an extraordinary range of styles, themes and intellectual ideas. This diverse and dynamic literary field reflects a period which witnessed rapid change in almost every area of existence.

Writers such as Dickens, Eliot, the Brontë sisters, Stevenson, Tennyson, Browning, and Christina Rossetti used their work to explore new developments in topics that ranged from religion to sexuality, evolution to imperialism, and mass culture to aestheticism. This programme offers you the opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of supervised independent research in your chosen area.

We are the oldest department of English Literature in the world, and at the last Research Assessment Exercise were awarded the highest research rating possible, of 5*A. We have one of the largest graduate programmes in this area in the country and a rich research culture covering all aspects of literatures in English.

We offer supervision in all areas of Victorian literature, and have particular strengths in social, historical and philosophical approaches to literature, in gender studies, and in the literary culture of the fin de siecle.

The research of staff has made valuable contributions to the areas of literature and philosophy, modernism/postmodernism, medieval and early modern literature, history of the book, romanticism, transatlantic studies and performance studies.

English Literature houses the Centre for the History of the Book and is one of the UK's leading forces in this area. It works closely with the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and with the National Library of Scotland. The latter's recently acquired Murray Archive is crucial for studies in Romanticism, Book History, Bibliography and Archive Studies.

Training and support

The academic staff you will be working with are all active researchers or authors, many of them prize winners and leading scholars in their fields. As well as benefiting from their expert supervision, you will undertake a seminar-based programme of training in core research skills and subject-specific methodologies. You will also have the opportunity to develop other transferable skills through the University’s Institute for Academic Development

We encourage you to share your research and learn from the work of others through a vibrant programme of Work-in-Progress seminars, reading groups, visiting speakers and conferences.

Our postgraduate journal, Forum, is a valuable conduit for research findings, and provides an opportunity for editorial experience.

Facilities

On hand are all the amenities you would expect, such as computing facilities, study areas and a common room and kitchen. Our location gives you easy access to the University’s general facilities, such as the Main Library and our collections, as well as to the National Museum, National Library and National Galleries of Scotland at the heart of the city.

In addition to the impressive range of resources available at the University’s Main Library (more than two million printed volumes and generous online resources) and the nearby National Library of Scotland, we host a number of collections of rare and valuable archival materials, all of which will be readily available to you as a postgraduate student.

Among the literary treasures are the libraries of William Drummond, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Hugh MacDiarmid, Adam Smith, Dugald Stewart and Norman MacCaig, plus the WH Auden collection, the Corson Collection of works by and about Sir Walter Scott and the Ramage collection of poetry pamphlets.

Our cultural collections are highly regarded and include a truly exceptional collection of early Shakespeare quartos and other early modern printed plays, and world-class manuscript and archival collections.

Read less
This programme introduces you to a range of colonial and postcolonial discourse from countries and regions such as Africa, the Americas, Asia, Canada and Oceania. Read more

Research profile

This programme introduces you to a range of colonial and postcolonial discourse from countries and regions such as Africa, the Americas, Asia, Canada and Oceania. You will explore a range of issues contingent upon colonisation, independence, and the formation of postcolonial diasporic communities.

You will be encouraged to develop a knowledge and understanding of the roles played by various forms of writing in the shaping and representation of postcolonial subjectivity and context, and to contextualise postcolonial writing in terms of its chronological and geographical specificities, deepening your knowledge and understanding of selected themes and topics in a way that will enable you to select and execute an independent piece of research.

We are the oldest department of English Literature in the world, and at the last Research Assessment Exercise were awarded the highest research rating possible, of 5*A. We have one of the largest graduate programmes in this area in the country and a rich research culture covering all aspects of literatures in English.

We offer supervision in all areas of postcolonial literature, and have particular strengths in African American and Chicana writing, black British writing, Canadian literature, Indian subcontinental and diasporic writing, New Zealand literature, and Pacific literature.

The research of staff has made valuable contributions to the areas of literature and philosophy, modernism/postmodernism, medieval and early modern literature, history of the book, romanticism, transatlantic studies and performance studies.

English Literature houses the Centre for the History of the Book and is one of the UK's leading forces in this area. It works closely with the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and with the National Library of Scotland. The latter's recently acquired Murray Archive is crucial for studies in Romanticism, Book History, Bibliography and Archive Studies.

Training and support

The academic staff you will be working with are all active researchers or authors, many of them prize winners and leading scholars in their fields. As well as benefiting from their expert supervision, you will undertake a seminar-based programme of training in core research skills and subject-specific methodologies. You will also have the opportunity to develop other transferable skills through the University’s Institute for Academic Development

We encourage you to share your research and learn from the work of others through a vibrant programme of Work-in-Progress seminars, reading groups, visiting speakers and conferences.

Our postgraduate journal, Forum, is a valuable conduit for research findings, and provides an opportunity for editorial experience.

Facilities

On hand are all the amenities you would expect, such as computing facilities, study areas and a common room and kitchen. Our location gives you easy access to the University’s general facilities, such as the Main Library and our collections, as well as to the National Museum, National Library and National Galleries of Scotland at the heart of the city.

In addition to the impressive range of resources available at the University’s Main Library (more than two million printed volumes and generous online resources) and the nearby National Library of Scotland, we host a number of collections of rare and valuable archival materials, all of which will be readily available to you as a postgraduate student.

Among the literary treasures are the libraries of William Drummond, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Hugh MacDiarmid, Adam Smith, Dugald Stewart and Norman MacCaig, plus the WH Auden collection, the Corson Collection of works by and about Sir Walter Scott and the Ramage collection of poetry pamphlets.

Our cultural collections are highly regarded and include a truly exceptional collection of early Shakespeare quartos and other early modern printed plays, and world-class manuscript and archival collections.

Read less
The prose, poetry and drama of the later medieval period (roughly 1350-1550) in England and Scotland offer a remarkably rich subject for advanced literary study. Read more

Research profile

The prose, poetry and drama of the later medieval period (roughly 1350-1550) in England and Scotland offer a remarkably rich subject for advanced literary study.

This programme allows you to pursue individual projects in Scottish and/or English literature within a wider interdisciplinary understanding of the period as a whole. Whether your interests lie in major figures such as Chaucer, Langland, The Gawain Poet, Malory, Skelton, Henryson, Dunbar, Douglas or Lyndsay, in less well-known or anonymous writers, the romance tradition, lyric poetry or drama, or in the relationships between literature, society and politics, you will have the opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of supervised independent research, supported by a flexible choice of taught options in related areas.

We are the oldest department of English Literature in the world, and at the last Research Assessment Exercise were awarded the highest research rating possible, of 5*A. We have one of the largest graduate programmes in this area in the country and a rich research culture covering all aspects of literatures in English.

We offer supervision in all areas of medieval literature, and have particular strengths in verse and prose romance, religious and secular drama, and lyric poetry.

The research of staff has made valuable contributions to the areas of literature and philosophy, modernism/postmodernism, medieval and early modern literature, history of the book, romanticism, transatlantic studies and performance studies.

English Literature houses the Centre for the History of the Book and is one of the UK's leading forces in this area. It works closely with the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and with the National Library of Scotland. The latter's recently acquired Murray Archive is crucial for studies in Romanticism, Book History, Bibliography and Archive Studies.

Training and support

The academic staff you will be working with are all active researchers or authors, many of them prize winners and leading scholars in their fields. As well as benefiting from their expert supervision, you will undertake a seminar-based programme of training in core research skills and subject-specific methodologies. You will also have the opportunity to develop other transferable skills through the University’s Institute for Academic Development

We encourage you to share your research and learn from the work of others through a vibrant programme of Work-in-Progress seminars, reading groups, visiting speakers and conferences.

Our postgraduate journal, Forum, is a valuable conduit for research findings, and provides an opportunity for editorial experience.

Facilities

On hand are all the amenities you would expect, such as computing facilities, study areas and a common room and kitchen. Our location gives you easy access to the University’s general facilities, such as the Main Library and our collections, as well as to the National Museum, National Library and National Galleries of Scotland at the heart of the city.

In addition to the impressive range of resources available at the University’s Main Library (more than two million printed volumes and generous online resources) and the nearby National Library of Scotland, we host a number of collections of rare and valuable archival materials, all of which will be readily available to you as a postgraduate student.

Among the literary treasures are the libraries of William Drummond, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Hugh MacDiarmid, Adam Smith, Dugald Stewart and Norman MacCaig, plus the WH Auden collection, the Corson Collection of works by and about Sir Walter Scott and the Ramage collection of poetry pamphlets.

Our cultural collections are highly regarded and include a truly exceptional collection of early Shakespeare quartos and other early modern printed plays, and world-class manuscript and archival collections.

Read less
This programme examines a range of literary and theoretical contexts, introducing ways that writing and imagination shape and share in cultural and political processes. Read more

Programme description

This programme examines a range of literary and theoretical contexts, introducing ways that writing and imagination shape and share in cultural and political processes.

You will explore the ways literature since 1900 has sought to change and modernise itself, in the context of wider developments of modernity characterising the age.

Your studies will take you through a broad and fascinating field, from the originators of literary ‘modernity’ – including TS Eliot, Ezra Pound, James Joyce and Virginia Woolf – to the present day and the continuing impact of their innovations.

Studying in the world’s first UNESCO City of Literature, you will analyse the most challenging and exciting literature written in English since 1900, and explore the range of historical, intellectual, cultural, political and philosophical factors informing the period’s writing – particularly in its highly innovative modernist and postmodernist phases.

Programme structure

The programme will be taught through a combination of seminars and tutorials. You take one compulsory and one option course in each of two semesters, along with a course in research methods. You will then complete an independently researched dissertation.

Compulsory courses:

Literature and Modernity I: Modernist Aesthetics
Literature and Modernity II: Late Modernism and Beyond
Option courses may include:

Critical Theory: Issues and Debates
Green Thoughts: Landscape, Environment and Literature
Poet-Critics
Modernism and Empire
Contemporary Post-Colonial Writing
Theatre, Performance, Performativity
Queering Fictions in the Twentieth Century
Contemporary American Fiction

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this programme you will have gained:

practical knowledge of the range of theoretical and philosophical ideas informing modern and postmodern literary criticism
knowledge and understanding of the role of literary writing in the formation of contemporary culture
a grounding in the research methods of literary studies

Career opportunities

Graduates of this programme will acquire a thorough knowledge and understanding of literary history and culture post-1900, and a range of transferable skills in research and enquiry, critical thinking and evaluation, and varieties of written and oral communication. This programme will also provide you with research and analytical skills that can be extended into future advanced study in the subject area.

Read less
The programme examines a range of US literary and historical contexts, introducing ways in which the production of an idea of 'America' is variously achieved and contested between 1776 and the present. Read more

Programme description

The programme examines a range of US literary and historical contexts, introducing ways in which the production of an idea of 'America' is variously achieved and contested between 1776 and the present.

You will explore the way literary, cultural, political and philosophical texts have contributed to the development, interrogation and revision of American identity and culture between 1776 and the present day.

You will be introduced to the rich diversity of American writing over the past 250 years by academic staff who can offer outstanding research and teaching expertise in this fascinating field. The compulsory courses, specifically developed for this masters programme, offer you the opportunity to think critically about some of the most pressing concerns in literary and cultural studies.

You will find a wealth of resources on hand at the University’s many libraries and the National Library of Scotland, which holds both the Hugh Sharp Collection (more than 300 volumes) of first editions of English and North American authors, and the Henderson Memorial Library of Books on America (more than 700 volumes), containing 19th and early 20th century works mainly on cultural history, description and travel, sociology and biography, and relating mostly to the Civil War.

Programme structure

You will take two courses per semester, one compulsory and one chosen from a range of options, each consisting of a weekly two-hour seminar. You will also take courses in research skills and methods. After your two semesters of taught courses you will work towards your dissertation, with supervisor support.

Compulsory courses:

Enlightenment to Entropy: Writing the American Republic from Thomas Jefferson to Henry Adams
New Beginnings to the End of Days: Writing the American Republic from Reconstruction to 9/11
Research Skills and Methods.

Option courses may include:

Poet-Critics: the Style of Modern Poetry
Modernism and Empire
Cities of Literature: Metropolitan Modernities
Global Modernisms: Inter/National Responses to Modernity
Victorian Transatlanticism
Contemporary American Fiction
Green Thoughts: Landscape, Environment and Literature
Critical Theory: Issues and Debates

Learning outcomes

Students who successfully complete this programme will gain:

a detailed knowledge of a range of literary writing that responds to and informs concepts of American identity
an understanding of the role of political and ideological structures in the production of national historiographies
a grounding in the research methods of literary studies

Career opportunities

You will develop research and analytical skills that can be extended into future advanced study in English literature. You will also be equipped with skills that could be beneficial for a teaching career or a role within a cultural institution. The array of transferable skills you will acquire, such as communication and project management, will prove highly valuable to potential employers in whatever field you choose to enter.

Read less
The writing and thought of the Romantic period has long been central to the study of modern literatures in English, and recent developments in literary theory have underlined the continuing importance of changing conceptions and practices of literature and philosophy in this period. Read more

Research profile

The writing and thought of the Romantic period has long been central to the study of modern literatures in English, and recent developments in literary theory have underlined the continuing importance of changing conceptions and practices of literature and philosophy in this period.

Whether your interests lie in major figures such as Wordsworth, Scott or Mary Shelley, or more neglected writers such as Joanna Baillie; or in the relationship between literature and philosophy, or literature and society, this programme offers you the opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of supervised independent research in your chosen area.

We are the oldest department of English Literature in the world, and at the last Research Assessment Exercise were awarded the highest research rating possible, of 5*A. We have one of the largest graduate programmes in this area in the country and a rich research culture covering all aspects of literatures in English.

We offer supervision in all areas of romanticism, and have particular strengths in philosophical approaches to romantic literature, in Irish and Scottish romanticism, and in the 18th century background to romantic literature.

The research of staff has made valuable contributions to the areas of literature and philosophy, modernism/postmodernism, medieval and early modern literature, history of the book, romanticism, transatlantic studies and performance studies.

English Literature houses the Centre for the History of the Book and is one of the UK's leading forces in this area. It works closely with the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and with the National Library of Scotland. The latter's recently acquired Murray Archive is crucial for studies in Romanticism, Book History, Bibliography and Archive Studies.

Training and support

The academic staff you will be working with are all active researchers or authors, many of them prize winners and leading scholars in their fields. As well as benefiting from their expert supervision, you will undertake a seminar-based programme of training in core research skills and subject-specific methodologies. You will also have the opportunity to develop other transferable skills through the University’s Institute for Academic Development

We encourage you to share your research and learn from the work of others through a vibrant programme of Work-in-Progress seminars, reading groups, visiting speakers and conferences.

Our postgraduate journal, Forum, is a valuable conduit for research findings, and provides an opportunity for editorial experience.

Facilities

On hand are all the amenities you would expect, such as computing facilities, study areas and a common room and kitchen. Our location gives you easy access to the University’s general facilities, such as the Main Library and our collections, as well as to the National Museum, National Library and National Galleries of Scotland at the heart of the city.

In addition to the impressive range of resources available at the University’s Main Library (more than two million printed volumes and generous online resources) and the nearby National Library of Scotland, we host a number of collections of rare and valuable archival materials, all of which will be readily available to you as a postgraduate student.

Among the literary treasures are the libraries of William Drummond, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Hugh MacDiarmid, Adam Smith, Dugald Stewart and Norman MacCaig, plus the WH Auden collection, the Corson Collection of works by and about Sir Walter Scott and the Ramage collection of poetry pamphlets.

Our cultural collections are highly regarded and include a truly exceptional collection of early Shakespeare quartos and other early modern printed plays, and world-class manuscript and archival collections.

Read less
Critical Theory is an exciting and dynamic field encompassing diverse intellectual approaches to literature, culture, society, and politics. Read more

Research profile

Critical Theory is an exciting and dynamic field encompassing diverse intellectual approaches to literature, culture, society, and politics. It entails reflection on the premises, concepts and categories used in different disciplines.

This programme provides expert-led teaching on the wide range of theoretical approaches that constitute the contemporary critical vocabulary within the humanities.

Seminar-based teaching will allow you to critically engage with theoretical approaches as diverse as poststructuralism, postcolonialism, and the Frankfurt School, and with the work of thinkers such as Heidegger, Derrida and Deleuze.

We are the oldest department of English Literature in the world, and at the last Research Assessment Exercise were awarded the highest research rating possible, of 5*A. We have one of the largest graduate programmes in this area in the country and a rich research culture covering all aspects of literatures in English.

We offer supervision in all areas of English literature, historical and/or theoretical.

The research of staff has made valuable contributions to the areas of literature and philosophy, modernism/postmodernism, medieval and early modern literature, history of the book, romanticism, transatlantic studies and performance studies.

English Literature houses the Centre for the History of the Book and is one of the UK's leading forces in this area. It works closely with the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and with the National Library of Scotland. The latter's recently acquired Murray Archive is crucial for studies in Romanticism, Book History, Bibliography and Archive Studies.

Training and support

The academic staff you will be working with are all active researchers or authors, many of them prize winners and leading scholars in their fields. As well as benefiting from their expert supervision, you will undertake a seminar-based programme of training in core research skills and subject-specific methodologies. You will also have the opportunity to develop other transferable skills through the University’s Institute for Academic Development

We encourage you to share your research and learn from the work of others through a vibrant programme of Work-in-Progress seminars, reading groups, visiting speakers and conferences.

Our postgraduate journal, Forum, is a valuable conduit for research findings, and provides an opportunity for editorial experience.

Facilities

On hand are all the amenities you would expect, such as computing facilities, study areas and a common room and kitchen. Our location gives you easy access to the University’s general facilities, such as the Main Library and our collections, as well as to the National Museum, National Library and National Galleries of Scotland at the heart of the city.

In addition to the impressive range of resources available at the University’s Main Library (more than two million printed volumes and generous online resources) and the nearby National Library of Scotland, we host a number of collections of rare and valuable archival materials, all of which will be readily available to you as a postgraduate student.

Among the literary treasures are the libraries of William Drummond, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Hugh MacDiarmid, Adam Smith, Dugald Stewart and Norman MacCaig, plus the WH Auden collection, the Corson Collection of works by and about Sir Walter Scott and the Ramage collection of poetry pamphlets.

Our cultural collections are highly regarded and include a truly exceptional collection of early Shakespeare quartos and other early modern printed plays, and world-class manuscript and archival collections.

Read less
This programme offers students the opportunity to develop their interests in aspects of American literature, from first colonisation to the present, post-9/11 moment. Read more

Research profile

This programme offers students the opportunity to develop their interests in aspects of American literature, from first colonisation to the present, post-9/11 moment.

We are the oldest department of English Literature in the world, and at the last Research Assessment Exercise were awarded the highest research rating possible, of 5*A. We have one of the largest graduate programmes in this area in the country and a rich research culture covering all aspects of literatures in English.

We offer supervision in all areas of American literature, in topics as diverse as the Black Atlantic, postmodernist fiction, and the poetics of republicanism.

The research of staff has made valuable contributions to the areas of literature and philosophy, modernism/postmodernism, medieval and early modern literature, history of the book, romanticism, transatlantic studies and performance studies.

English Literature houses the Centre for the History of the Book and is one of the UK's leading forces in this area. It works closely with the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and with the National Library of Scotland. The latter's recently acquired Murray Archive is crucial for studies in Romanticism, Book History, Bibliography and Archive Studies.

Training and support

The academic staff you will be working with are all active researchers or authors, many of them prize winners and leading scholars in their fields. As well as benefiting from their expert supervision, you will undertake a seminar-based programme of training in core research skills and subject-specific methodologies. You will also have the opportunity to develop other transferable skills through the University’s Institute for Academic Development

We encourage you to share your research and learn from the work of others through a vibrant programme of Work-in-Progress seminars, reading groups, visiting speakers and conferences.

Our postgraduate journal, Forum, is a valuable conduit for research findings, and provides an opportunity for editorial experience.

Facilities

On hand are all the amenities you would expect, such as computing facilities, study areas and a common room and kitchen. Our location gives you easy access to the University’s general facilities, such as the Main Library and our collections, as well as to the National Museum, National Library and National Galleries of Scotland at the heart of the city.

In addition to the impressive range of resources available at the University’s Main Library (more than two million printed volumes and generous online resources) and the nearby National Library of Scotland, we host a number of collections of rare and valuable archival materials, all of which will be readily available to you as a postgraduate student.

Among the literary treasures are the libraries of William Drummond, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Hugh MacDiarmid, Adam Smith, Dugald Stewart and Norman MacCaig, plus the WH Auden collection, the Corson Collection of works by and about Sir Walter Scott and the Ramage collection of poetry pamphlets.

Our cultural collections are highly regarded and include a truly exceptional collection of early Shakespeare quartos and other early modern printed plays, and world-class manuscript and archival collections.

Read less
Contemporary Japanese culture is a dazzling fusion of western and eastern traditions adapted to a hypermodern way of life. And although these traditions remain resilient, Japan is also firmly in the vanguard of post-industrial nations facing a wide range of domestic issues and diverse global challenges. Read more

Programme description

Contemporary Japanese culture is a dazzling fusion of western and eastern traditions adapted to a hypermodern way of life. And although these traditions remain resilient, Japan is also firmly in the vanguard of post-industrial nations facing a wide range of domestic issues and diverse global challenges.

This programme will help students acquire the in-depth knowledge of Japanese history, culture and society required to understand the challenges Japan faces today, while also placing Japan within the international context as a leading nation in East Asian regional and global developments.

This programme caters for students with or without Japanese language skills. It builds on existing experience, using Japanese source materials and secondary literature for research purposes, while also providing an extensive understanding of scholarship on Japanese society and culture written in English.

With support from staff with proven expertise, you will have the opportunity to enhance your language skills – whatever your current level – and acquire specialist knowledge of Japanese culture, and awareness of the interaction of Japanese and other cultures in the contemporary context.

Programme structure

The programme is taught through a combination of seminars and tutorials. You will take one compulsory and four option courses, as well as a compulsory research skills and methods course. After two semesters of taught courses you will conduct your own research for your dissertation.

Compulsory courses:

State, Society and National Identity in Japan after 1989

Option courses may include:

The Buddhist Brush: Discursive and Graphic Expressions of Japanese Buddhism
Language Communities and Variation in Japanese
Japanese Performing Arts
Japanese Religions in the Modern Era
Japanese Cyberpunk
East Asian International Relations
Portfolio of Written Translation Exercises in Japanese

Learning outcomes

Students who follow the programme will:

develop critical awareness of at least two specific areas of Japanese Studies, both in terms of the indigenous literary and/or critical traditions and in comparison with Western critical thinking
acquire specialist knowledge of Japanese culture and awareness of the interaction of Japanese and other cultures in the contemporary context
use the bibliographic, internet and other relevant resources to advanced level
develop the ability to read and evaluate critically core texts in the specific areas studied

Those with previous experience in Japanese language learning will have the opportunity to develop the necessary linguistic skills to conduct research in defined areas within Japanese Studies by retrieving, selecting, translating and assimilating information from Japanese sources.

Career opportunities

The flexibility of focus this programme offers makes it an ideal foundation for advanced study, potentially leading to an academic career. Teaching or curatorship roles in cultural institutions are alternative career pathways

The transferable skills you gain in communication, project management and presentation will prove a valuable asset to employers in any field.

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This programme is based at the University’s Scottish Centre for Chinese Studies, which has an international reputation for research excellence in modern Chinese literature, media and mass culture. Read more

Programme description

This programme is based at the University’s Scottish Centre for Chinese Studies, which has an international reputation for research excellence in modern Chinese literature, media and mass culture.

It provides you with the opportunity to develop your knowledge and understanding of cultural issues of modern China, and allows you to develop analytical skills as you apply cultural and literary theories to the context of modern China.

You will be trained in the study of Chinese texts, and learn to assess them in the context of current academic discourse in Chinese studies, leading to an understanding of changing perceptions of key issues in Chinese cultural studies.

Programme structure

Over two semesters, you will take compulsory and option courses, plus research skills courses. You will then complete an independently researched dissertation.

Compulsory course:

Keywords of Chinese Modernity

Option courses may include:

Contemporary Chinese Literature
Chinese Silent Cinema: 1920-1935
Gender, Revolution and Modernity in Chinese Cinema
Introduction to Chinese Society and Culture
Literary Criticism and History in Modern China
Chinese Religions: Confucianism, Daoism and 'Popular Religion'
Theories and Methods of Literary Study

Learning outcomes

You will be thoroughly trained in studying modern Chinese texts and in assessing them in the context of current academic discourse in Chinese Studies. You will be able to understand changing perceptions of key issues in Chinese cultural studies and reflect critically on your own academic research.

Career opportunities

You will gain a foundation on which you may choose to pursue doctoral studies, potentially leading to an academic career. Your skills will also be suited to a career in a number of fields that are concerned with Chinese issues.

Alternatively, you may choose to apply the transferable skills you gain in project management, research and communication to an unrelated career.

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One of the University’s larger modern language subject areas, German has earned its place as a significant centre for research, with half of our research ranked as internationally excellent or world leading in the latest Research Assessment Exercise. Read more

Research profile

One of the University’s larger modern language subject areas, German has earned its place as a significant centre for research, with half of our research ranked as internationally excellent or world leading in the latest Research Assessment Exercise.

The size of our graduate school means we are able to support a broad range of German and Austrian cultural and literary research themes, from the medieval period to the present.

Current interests include:

18th century and Romanticism studies
censorship studies
contemporary German literature
cultural and political studies and literary theory
gender studies
German and Austrian Jewish literature
identity studies
literature and culture of the German/Austrian fin-de-siècle
literature and culture of the Weimar Republic and the National Socialist era
migrant literature in German
palaeography and Medieval textual studies
post-Holocaust literature
post-war West and East German literary and cultural studies
the Medieval German epic
theatre and performance studies
travel writing
Turkish-German literature

Training and support

We promote the connection between language and culture through a number of extracurricular programmes, both formal and informal.

You will have the opportunity to take part in our annual play, which is commonly a collaborative effort with a noted German author or playwright.

We organise regular film nights, followed by Stammtisch, and gallery visits are also offered.

We maintain close links with the Scottish arm of the Goethe Institut and the Edinburgh German Circle, which both provide opportunities to make contacts and socialise with the city’s sizeable German community.

Facilities

Testament to our breadth of research expertise and lively graduate school community, our RAE ranking also reflects world-class resources (such as our well-stocked libraries and the expansive Karin McPherson collection of GDR writing) and commitment to publishing, most notably through our production of the esteemed Edinburgh German Yearbook.

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Our researchers are internationally recognised experts in their fields, with three quarters of their research rated world leading, internationally excellent or internationally recognised in the latest Research Assessment Exercise. Read more

Research profile

Our researchers are internationally recognised experts in their fields, with three quarters of their research rated world leading, internationally excellent or internationally recognised in the latest Research Assessment Exercise.

The Hispanic Studies division was rated 5A in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise.

Supervision is provided in the major areas of Spanish, Spanish American and Portuguese literary and cultural studies. Members of staff have research interests in the following fields: Medieval: modern literary theory as applied to medieval texts; mythology and fantasy; oral literature; questions of transmission and textual criticism; Golden Age: Cervantes and the development of fiction; political and social thought; theatre; European Baroque culture; Modern Peninsular: Generation of 98; modern and contemporary fiction; narrative forms; Spanish American and Brazilian: Argentinian culture; women writers; gender, sexuality and representation; and theory.

Training and support

We offer supervision in the major areas of Spanish, Spanish-American and Portuguese literary and cultural studies, with particular research strengths in the 19th century, theatre of all periods, and the visual arts.

Thanks to the breadth of language research undertaken within the graduate school here at Edinburgh, we can also accommodate an interest in cross-cultural research with a programme of joint supervision.

Our staff pursue a diversity of research interests, offering you a wide choice of areas for study. Research staff have interests in the following fields:

Cervantes and the development of fiction
European Baroque culture
gender, sexuality and representation
Golden Age
medieval (modern literary theory as applied to medieval texts)
modern and contemporary fiction
modern peninsular: generation of ’98
mythology and fantasy
narrative forms
oral literature
political and social thought
questions of transmission and textual criticism
Spanish American, Brazilian and Argentinian culture
the essay and newspaper columns
theatre
women writers

Facilities

You will have access to the impressive collections of the University’s Main Library, in addition to the nearby National Library of Scotland and its outstanding collection of early modern Spanish material.

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MLitt in French Studies, German Studies, Italian Studies, Middle Eastern Literary and Cultural Studies, Russian Studies, Spanish and Latin American Studies. Read more
MLitt in French Studies, German Studies, Italian Studies, Middle Eastern Literary and Cultural Studies, Russian Studies, Spanish and Latin American Studies
If you are looking to expand your understanding and knowledge of the literature, culture and history of one of these languages, and /or to continue at PhD level, select your programme from this suite we offer. You need to have an undergraduate degree in the appropriate language (in the case of Middle Eastern Literary and Cultural Studies either Persian or Arabic). The structure of the language and culture-specific MLitt programmes is mirrored in each language, with a common core of modules which all MLitt students take together (Literary and Cultural Theory 1 & 2, and Research and Professional Skills). Then all students in each programme take their specific Literary and Cultural contexts module; so for French, for example, this will be French Literary Revolutions. Then with the Specialised Research module, and finally the Dissertation, the focus becomes much narrower as you identify your specific research interests and topics and the teaching becomes more individualised and geared towards encouraging and directing independent research.

Literary and Cultural Theory 1 & 2 methodically introduce the major figures and schools of literary and cultural theory. Research and Professional Skills covers practical issues such as the publication of journal articles or monographs, writing reviews and reports, IT skills, using bibliographical databases, conferences, from proposing, writing and delivering papers, to publishing proceedings and preparing for interviews.

Literary and Cultural Contexts will provide a solid grounding in the main literary movements and canonical texts in each specific language area. These modules are designed to enable you to better contextualise your own specific area of interest within the broader literary and cultural realities in which they are situated.

Features

* There are six language departments (Arabic and Persian, French, German, Italian, Russian, Spanish) providing discipline-specific programmes plus collaborative programmes in Comparative Literature and Cultural Identity Studies.

* Strong international collaborations through the Erasmus Mundus Masters programme (with partner universities in England, France, Italy, Portugal, Poland, Spain, Canada, Argentina and Mexico).

* Current postgraduate population of 35 PhD students and some 20 students on various taught programmes.

* A diverse and international student body from across Europe, North America, the Middle East, the Far East, and Africa, as well as the UK.

* Strong emphasis on integration of taught and research postgraduates, in particular through the postgraduate seminar series, postgraduate organised workshops, and the annual postgraduate conference – all postgraduates are encouraged to participate in all of these.

* Strong emphasis on students’ personal development, as programmes are designed specifically to promote the transition from undergraduate to more autonomous postgraduate approaches to study and research.

* The recently revised structure of the MLitt programmes combines an integrated interdisciplinarity with subject specific contextualisation, and a broad-based knowledge is developed towards in-depth specialism as the course progresses.

* Particular attention to more practical personal development in the core module Research and Professional Skills, which provides instruction and training in a range of skills useful for an academic career and transferable to other professions.

Postgraduate community

Whilst the six departments in the School of Modern Languages retain their individuality, the School as a whole is very well integrated, with collaborative teaching within and across departments, and this is reflected in the postgraduate community as well. Students on different MLitt programmes will all take some core modules together, and all postgraduates, MLitt, Mundus, and PhD students are encouraged to attend the large number of research seminars and workshops which take place in the School, as well as organising their own specific events. The size of the School and the number of postgraduates provides a friendly informal setting conducive to interdisciplinarity and discussion of ideas and issues in a thought-provoking but relaxed and supportive environment.

Class sizes

Class sizes vary as some modules are common to a number of programmes and so have more students in them, whilst others may be more specialised and therefore smaller.

Careers

Many of our postgraduates go on to careers in the academic field, as university teachers, researchers or administrators. Others find employment in other areas, for example as cultural advisors, translators, or in the public or civil service. Recent graduates have secured posts such as university teachers in the UK and Germany, research assistants, a postgraduate recruitment officer, at GCHQ, a professional translator, an adviser to the CBI, and a subtitler for television.

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