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History & Archaeology×

Full Time MSc Degrees in History & Archaeology, United Kingdom

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This programme is taught by experts and specialists in fields such as European, Mediterranean, science-based, and theoretical archaeology. Read more

Programme description

This programme is taught by experts and specialists in fields such as European, Mediterranean, science-based, and theoretical archaeology. It offers a range of courses from human origins to ancient civilisations and allows you to tailor your studies to suit your interests and take advantage of the experience of our staff, and those in related programmes in history, classics and geography.

You will develop an in-depth understanding of archaeology and its links with the historical, social and natural sciences, as well as the practice of archaeology within and outside an academic setting, incorporating skills and training. The programme prepares you for a professional role in archaeology or further study at doctoral level. We have excellent facilities: dedicated study space, archaeological and computing laboratories, and teaching and reference collections.

Edinburgh is ideal for archaeological study and research, allowing you to benefit from the presence of national and local institutions and heritage agencies, such as the excellent archaeological collections of the National Museum, the archival and bibliographic resources of Historic Environment Scotland, and the expertise and practical advice of staff in several commercial archaeology companies.

Programme structure

Our wide-ranging programme encompasses theory, methodology and practice. You will undertake a varied schedule of learning, including lectures, seminars, practicals, and individual supervisions. We help you to develop your research interests and choose a suitable dissertation topic.

The compulsory courses are:

Frontiers in Archaeology
Research Sources and Strategies in Archaeology
Theoretical Archaeology
You’ll complete three additional courses, chosen from a list of subjects ranging from late hunter-gatherers and early farmers, later European prehistory and the archaeology of Scotland to Byzantine and Roman archaeology, osteoarchaeology, and archaeological illustration and GIS.

Learning outcomes

You will acquire:

a good understanding of the distinctive nature of archaeology and its contribution to a critical and informed understanding of the past
a good understanding of theoretical and methodological debates within archaeology
familiarity with a number of important fieldwork studies
a broad knowledge of archaeological methods, techniques and practices in current use
The programme will help you to develop potential research interests and to explore these with a view to progressing to further research. You will also acquire a range of transferable intellectual and practical skills.

Career opportunities

Archaeology graduates can follow a variety of career options. The programme equips you to go on to advanced study, and also provides a solid foundation for a career. You will gain practical as well as academic experience, teamworking and analytical skills, and will be able to work in a variety of contexts.

Examples of career paths available to archaeology graduates (although some may require additional training) include: higher education, heritage management and agencies, commercial archaeology, environmental assessment, schools, tourist/travel industry, broadcasting and the police.

An archaeology degree does not, of course, restrict you to a career in archaeology. You may develop your own career pathway in unusual ways or branch into related fields, while maintaining a lifelong interest and involvement in archaeological work and research.

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The MSc by Research in History is aimed at students who have a specific topic of interest into which they wish to conduct their own research. Read more

Research profile

The MSc by Research in History is aimed at students who have a specific topic of interest into which they wish to conduct their own research.

The programme provides structured research training while at the same time enabling you to pursue a research project that you design yourself, in consultation with supervisors. It serves as both a self-contained research degree and a preparation for further study for the PhD degree.

History at Edinburgh is one of the largest and most distinguished departments of its kind.

Research interests within History are extremely wide-ranging and include medieval culture, religion, gender, and law; historical theory; early modern witchcraft and the occult; the Italian Renaissance; North America from the colonial era; intellectual history from Machiavelli to Marx; genocide; Nazi and post-war Germany; Russia and the Soviet Union; the Cold War; and political, social, and cultural aspects of the history of China, Japan, and India in the modern era.

In particular, we host expertise in:

-Pre-modern and early-modern history: our research interests lie in the social, political, religious and cultural history of Europe – from the fall of Rome to the Renaissance, with particular emphasis on England, France and Italy.
-Modern British and Irish history: we have particular interests in early modern religion, belief and intellectual history (including the Scottish Enlightenment); social and political history; relations between Britain and Ireland; Irish migration; and international relations and warfare.
-Modern European history: specialisms include astrology and belief; Renaissance Venice; 18th-century political and intellectual history; genocide; France; Germany; Russia and the Soviet Union; and Spain.
-American history: our expertise includes revolutionary and early national America; the Civil War; US diplomatic history in the 19th and 20th centuries; politics in the 20th century; African-American history and the civil rights movement.
-Asian and African history: we research African history; the history of the British Empire and Commonwealth; modern India, Pakistan, and China and Japan since the early modern period.

Training and support

You will be assigned two supervisors who will provide expert academic guidance on your chosen research topic. You will meet regularly to discuss your progress and research plans, as well as drafts of your thesis/dissertation chapters, conference papers and potential articles.

In addition to individual supervision, you will also have access to research training and postgraduate seminars.

Facilities

Our home is the William Robertson Wing, an A-listed building on the southern edge of Edinburgh’s Old Town, which is a UNESCO World Heritage site. Designed by the distinguished 19th-century architect Sir Robert Rowand Anderson, the building – part of the University’s Old Medical School – has recently been refurbished to an exceptional standard, providing state-of-the-art facilities for research, teaching and study.

Graduate students are able to use two further large School study and resource rooms, which are open to all staff and students. There is access to lockers equipped with laptop charging facilities as well as standard lockers.

The building is wireless enabled and includes state of the art teaching rooms, meeting rooms, a common room, a refreshment area, and open social/breakout areas.

Programme structure

You can choose to complete the MSc by Research degree in one of two ways:

-A long dissertation of 30,000 words, accompanied by two compulsory training courses (Historical Research: Skills and Sources and Historical Methodology) and further option courses.
-A 15,000-word dissertation accompanied by the compulsory training courses and two directed reading and research courses (the total word count for all work submitted will be 30,000).

You will be assigned two dissertation supervisors at the outset of the programme.

Learning outcomes

The programme will enable you to:

develop a specific body of advanced knowledge
become competent in advanced historical methodology and in the evaluation of evidence through the close study of relevant primary and secondary sources
become familiar with historiographical debates and modes of historical explanation
develop rigorous historical argument
conceive and execute a coherent project in historical research and writing

Career opportunities

The concentration on research under supervision makes this degree suitable for those contemplating doctoral study, whether in our own School or elsewhere, and many who take this degree follow that route.

But undertaking substantial and independent research and a writing project is equally excellent preparation for a wide variety of careers.

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This programme provides you with thorough research training, an outstanding learning experience, and a wide set of transferable skills in the conception, design and execution of a research project. Read more
This programme provides you with thorough research training, an outstanding learning experience, and a wide set of transferable skills in the conception, design and execution of a research project.

Why this programme

-If you are looking to pursue a specialisation in the history of medicine, led and supported by internationally-regarded historians, this programme is ideal for you.
-Strong links with the University's Hunterian Museum, Anatomy Museum and Art Gallery, will give you access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
-The Centre for the History of Medicine has a reference library, computing facilities, and other equipment providing excellent support for research. We also run research seminars and workshops, and an annual research forum, all of which bring in speakers from throughout the world.
-Our researchers have access to rich archival materials held locally by the Greater Glasgow Health Board, the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow, Glasgow University Archives, Glasgow City Archives and the Special Collections of the Glasgow University Library. Archives elsewhere in Scotland are also easily accessible.

Programme structure

You will take four core courses and two optional courses, you will then produce a dissertation on a topic related to the history of medicine.

Core courses
-Research resources and skills for historians
-Approaches to history
-History of medicine 1: studies in the history of medicine before 1850
-History of medicine 2: studies in the history of medicine from 1850 to 2000.

There are variations to the structure of the programme depending on your choice of an MSc or MLitt.

For the MSc you need to choose two optional courses from the social sciences training courses
-Quantitative methods
-Qualitative methods
-Introduction to social theory for researchers.

Other optional courses are taught in History, Economic and Social History (in the College of Social Sciences), and by related Subject Areas in the School of Humanities (Archaeology, Celtic, Classics) and the College of Arts (such as English Language and French).

You will be taught through a series of seminars and workshops. Internationally recognised historians give guest lectures throughout the year.

Career prospects

Apart from continuing to study a PhD, you can transfer the Arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the modern public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, journalism and teaching.

Read less
This programme provides you with thorough research training, an outstanding learning experience, and a wide set of transferable skills in the conception, design and execution of a research project. Read more
This programme provides you with thorough research training, an outstanding learning experience, and a wide set of transferable skills in the conception, design and execution of a research project.

Why this programme

-If you are looking to pursue a specialisation in the history of medicine, led and supported by internationally-regarded historians, this programme is ideal for you.
-Strong links with the University's Hunterian Museum, Anatomy Museum and Art Gallery, will give you access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
-The Centre for the History of Medicine has a reference library, computing facilities, and other equipment providing excellent support for research. We also run research seminars and workshops, and an annual research forum, all of which bring in speakers from throughout the world.
-Our researchers have access to rich archival materials held locally by the Greater Glasgow Health Board, the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow, Glasgow University Archives, Glasgow City Archives and the Special Collections of the Glasgow University Library. Archives elsewhere in Scotland are also easily accessible.

Programme structure

You will take four core courses and two optional courses, you will then produce a dissertation on a topic related to the history of medicine.

Core courses
-Research resources and skills for historians
-Approaches to history
-History of medicine 1: studies in the history of medicine before 1850
-History of medicine 2: studies in the history of medicine from 1850 to 2000.

There are variations to the structure of the programme depending on your choice of an MSc or MLitt.

For the MSc you need to choose two optional courses from the social sciences training courses
-Quantitative methods
-Qualitative methods
-Introduction to social theory for researchers.

Other optional courses are taught in History, Economic and Social History (in the College of Social Sciences), and by related Subject Areas in the School of Humanities (Archaeology, Celtic, Classics) and the College of Arts (such as English Language and French).

You will be taught through a series of seminars and workshops. Internationally recognised historians give guest lectures throughout the year.

Career prospects

Apart from continuing to study a PhD, you can transfer the Arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the modern public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, journalism and teaching.

Read less
Structured to provide you with the opportunity to study archaeology at an advanced level, this programme allows you to gain an in-depth understanding of the subject in a comparatively short time. Read more

Programme description

Structured to provide you with the opportunity to study archaeology at an advanced level, this programme allows you to gain an in-depth understanding of the subject in a comparatively short time.

You’ll learn about the subject’s history and development, and explore its links with the historical, social and natural sciences. We’ll introduce you to contemporary theoretical approaches and allow you to gain experience in current methodologies and practice.

Importantly, your future in the field of archaeology will also be considered, by giving you the opportunity to draw on the diversity of our academic staff’s expertise in order to explore specific regions or themes that may be of interest to you at a doctoral level.

Programme structure

Your studies will combine lectures, seminars, practicals, essays, research projects and one-to-one meetings covering all areas of archaeology. You will complete six courses and conduct original research for a dissertation on a subject of your choice.

You will take one compulsory course in Research Sources and Strategies in Archaeology.

You will choose five option courses from a list that includes:

Archaeological Illustration
Archaeology of Gender
Byzantine Archaeology
Conceptualising the Neolithic
Etruscan Italy, 1000–300 BC
From Foraging to Farming, the Beginnings of Agriculture in the Mediterranean and Europe
Gallia from the Third Century BC to Augustus
Human Evolution
Island Worlds: Prehistoric Societies in the Mediterranean Sea
Ritual and Monumentality in North-West Europe, 5500–2500 BC
The Scottish Lowlands: Archaeology and Landscape before the Normans

Learning outcomes

You will acquire:

a good understanding of the distinctive nature of archaeology and its contribution to a critical and informed understanding of the past
a good understanding of theoretical and methodological debates within archaeology
a familiarity with a number of important fieldwork studies
a broad knowledge of archaeological methods, techniques and practices in current use

Career opportunities

Archaeology graduates can follow a variety of career options. The programme equips you to go on to advanced study, and also provides a solid foundation for a career.

You will gain practical as well as academic experience, teamworking and analytical skills, and will be able to work in a variety of contexts.

Examples of career paths available to archaeology graduates (although some may require additional training) include: higher education, heritage management and agencies, commercial archaeology, environmental assessment, schools, tourist/travel industry, broadcasting and the police.

An archaeology degree does not, of course, restrict you to a career in archaeology. You may develop your own career pathway in unusual ways or branch into related fields, while maintaining a lifelong interest and involvement in archaeological work and research.

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The area surrounding the Mediterranean presents innumerable opportunities for archaeological research. This programme allows you to explore the rich history of this region at an advanced level through examination of a wide range of periods, geographical areas and themes. Read more

Programme description

The area surrounding the Mediterranean presents innumerable opportunities for archaeological research. This programme allows you to explore the rich history of this region at an advanced level through examination of a wide range of periods, geographical areas and themes.

Through a series of tailored and flexible courses you’ll develop an understanding of specific regions and periods, current theories, methodologies and major research issues, all of which will provide the basis of PhD study, or a solid foundation for future participation in excavation, survey and/or lab work.

Programme structure

You will complete six courses over the course of the programme, which culminates in the production of your independently researched dissertation.

You will take a compulsory course in Research Sources and Strategies in Archaeology.

You will choose five option courses from a list that may include:

Archaeological Illustration
Archaeology of Gender
Bronze Age Civilisations of the Near East and Greece
Byzantine Archaeology: The Archaeology of the Byzantine Empire and its Neighbours AD 500–850
Constantinople and the Cities of Asia Minor
Early Farmers of Cyprus and the Near East
Etruscan Italy, 1000–300 BC
From Foraging to Farming: the Beginnings of Agriculture in the Mediterranean and Europe
Gallia from the Third Century BC to Augustus
Greek Vase Painting
Hellenistic Art and Archaeology
Human Evolution
The Hittites: the Archaeology of an Ancient Near Eastern Civilisation
Island Worlds: Prehistoric Societies in the Mediterranean Sea
Late Antique Visual Culture
Roman Archaeology
Roman Funerary Art
Roman Imperial Monuments
The Hellenistic City

You may also be given permission to choose an added course from any of the non-archaeology taught masters programmes that relate to your study

Learning outcomes

The programme will help you develop potential research interests and explore these with a view to progressing to research. You will also acquire a range of transferable intellectual and practical skills, including:

a good understanding of the distinctive nature of archaeology and its contribution to a critical and informed understanding of the past
a good understanding of theoretical and methodological debates within archaeology
familiarity with a number of important fieldwork studies
a broad knowledge of archaeological methods, techniques and practices in current use

Career opportunities

The programme equips you to go on to advanced study, and also provides a solid foundation for a career. You will acquire practical as well as academic experience in your training and will be able to work in a variety of contexts.

Examples of career options for archaeology graduates (although some may require additional training) include working within universities, heritage management and agencies, commercial archaeology, environmental assessment work, schools, the tourist/travel industry, broadcasting, and the police force.

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The Palaeoanthropology and Palaeolithic Archaeology MSc, run jointly by the Institute of Archaeology and UCL Anthropology, brings together the expertise of the two departments to provide graduate students with an integrated training in the biological and archaeological aspects of human evolutionary studies. Read more
The Palaeoanthropology and Palaeolithic Archaeology MSc, run jointly by the Institute of Archaeology and UCL Anthropology, brings together the expertise of the two departments to provide graduate students with an integrated training in the biological and archaeological aspects of human evolutionary studies.

Degree information

Students gain training in research methods and a scientific grounding in the principles, content and practice of palaeoanthropology and palaeolithic archaeology, including: fossil and archaeological evidence of human evolution; temporal and spatial patterns and processes of evolutionary and environmental change; and the evolutionary background for understanding human adaptation and culture.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (30 credits) four optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules - all students are required to take the following:
-Themes in Palaeoanthropology and Palaeolithic Archaeology

Optional modules - students will be encouraged to select options from the following list up to the value of 60 credits. Alternatively, they may choose from the wider range of Master's options available at the UCL Institute of Archaeology or the Department of Anthropology.
-Advanced Human Evolution
-Archaeology of Early Human Origins
-Archaeology of Hunter-Gatherers from the Emergence of Modern Humans
-Evolution of Human Brain and Behaviour
-Geoarchaeology
-Prehistoric Stone Artefact Analysis
-Palaeoanthropology
-Primate Evolution
-Primate Socioecology
-Zooarchaeology in Practice

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, discussions, seminars, laboratory practicals and student presentations. Assessment is through essays, practical examination and seminar presentations, (depending on the options chosen), and the dissertation.

Careers

A significant number of the graduate students from this programme have gone on to take PhDs at UCL, elsewhere in the UK and in other countries. A number of those have been awarded prestigious scholarships to cover their costs. Other graduates have gone on to work in cultural resource management and museums, and others have used their skills to pursue careers in fields such as teaching and business.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Archaeologist, George Washington Foundation
-DPhil in Archaeology, The University of Oxford
-Senior scientist: archaeology, Tetra Tech
-Research Technician, Research Department Forensic Science.
-PhD Anthropology and Archaeology, Stockholms Universitet (Stockholm University)

Employability
The skills which students develop include the critical evaluation of scholarship across the discipline, design and management of personal research, primary data collection and analysis, and the preparation of detailed reports/dissertations up to publication standard. Although these will relate to anthropology and archaeology, they are invaluable skills for other areas of employment.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology and UCL Anthropology have considerable staff expertise in the fields of palaeoanthropology and palaeolithic archaeology. Staff and research students are currently involved in field projects as well as museum-based studies in Britain, various parts of Europe, the Middle East, and eastern and southern Africa.

Our excellent results in the recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) show that our two departments are both very highly ranked in the UK.

Situated in central London, the university is within easy access of the British Museum and Natural History Museum and their outstanding palaeontological and archaeological collections.

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This programme gives you the opportunity to study ancient history at an advanced level, developing your interest in the ancient world and providing an excellent preparation for further graduate research. Read more

Programme description

This programme gives you the opportunity to study ancient history at an advanced level, developing your interest in the ancient world and providing an excellent preparation for further graduate research.

Edinburgh is one of the leading centres in the UK for the study of ancient history, in the chronological, geographical and methodological scope of the research interests of our staff. The range and content of our courses reflect staff research strengths in Greek, Hellenistic, Roman and Late Antique topics. Greek and Latin language courses are always offered. Our particular strengths lie in the legal, institutional, social and economic history of the Greek and Roman worlds, as well as in political theory and practice, Hellenistic history, and late antique history.

As a student on this programme, you will develop your skills in critical thinking, clear writing and research, verbal presentation and critical analysis. You will be part of a Classics department ranked 5th in the UK, for the combined size and quality of research, in the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014.

Programme structure

Most teaching takes place in small-group seminars and the programme is designed to allow both breadth of coverage and specialisation. The specialised compulsory course will provide you with the key methodological and practical skills required of researchers in all classical subjects, while the options offer a large degree of flexibility, allowing you to develop or consolidate your language skills and explore a diverse range of historical topics in depth. Independent research, in the form of a 15,000-word dissertation, forms a substantial component of the programme, challenging you to build on the material and approaches covered in the taught courses and develop your research skills.

The compulsory course is:

Skills and Methods in Classics
Option courses previously available include:

Agricultural Slavery in the Graeco-Roman World
Archaeology of the Roman Economy
A Period of Ancient History 1
A Period of Ancient History 2
Byzantium and its Neighbours in the Age of Constantine VII
Porphyrogennetos
Elementary Greek PG1
Elementary Greek PG2
Elementary Latin PG1
Elementary Latin PG2
Epicurus and Epicureanism
Intermediate Greek PG1
Intermediate Greek PG2
Intermediate Latin PG1
Intermediate Latin PG2
Late Antique Visual Culture
Martyrdom and Voluntary Death in the Ancient World
The Fall of Rome
The Hellenistic City;
Women in the Classical World

Learning outcomes

considerable familiarity with many aspects of ancient history and the principal challenges, approaches and issues involved in their study
specialist understanding of the intellectual background of ancient history as a distinct discipline
development of existing reading/writing skills, through critical assessment of written work
advanced appreciation of a wide range of methodologies involved in evaluating and employing sources of ancient historical evidence, through participation in core course and assessed work
the option to further develop language skills (normally Greek and Latin), which can be acquired by instruction and assessed exercises
specialist understanding of at least one significant field of research in associated cultural history, developed and assessed through a 15,000-word dissertation.

Career opportunities

The MSc will provide you with the knowledge and skills essential to pursue doctoral research in ancient history or a related field (whether at Edinburgh or elsewhere), and ultimately an academic career. Moreover, the transferable skills you will acquire with this programme will be invaluable for careers in museum work, cultural heritage and conservation, secondary education, library or archive work.

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Study the field that brings past people to life. Past societies responded to and treated their dead in a huge diversity of ways, providing archaeologists with crucial insights into their workings. Read more
Study the field that brings past people to life

Why choose this course?

Past societies responded to and treated their dead in a huge diversity of ways, providing archaeologists with crucial insights into their workings. Funerary archaeology combines analysis of human remains with their archaeological context to take a truly interdisciplinary approach to studying both life and death in the past. The course at York offers the chance to develop skills in a range of different methods and techniques, but all centred on learning how to investigate death and burial in the past. The flexible nature of the course enables you to pursue your own particular period or methodological interests.
-Explore the varied archaeological and methodological approaches to funerary archaeology
-Work alongside internationally renowned specialists in a range of different periods and methodologies, by choosing either the MA or MSc route
-Gain ‘hands on’ experience of the analysis of human remains
-Learn through fieldtrips to local museums and relevant sites, e.g. the prehistoric monuments in the Yorkshire Wolds
-Choose modules to support your own research interests
-Use the latest techniques and equipment to build key practical skills
-Receive advice on developing your career and research interests from knowledgeable staff

What does the course cover?
The course focuses a range of topics from identity, landscape, social structure, commemoration and memory, ritual and belief, and the body. It covers attitudes and repsonses to death from the first evidence for the special treatment of human remains by homids up to the place of funeray rites in modern day societies, but with a particular focus on the interpretively challenging evidence from Prehistory. The analysis of human remains and their archaeological context are both taught in a flexible modular system, that allows you to tailor the course to your particular methodological or period interests.

The MA and MSc pathways offer a chance to specialise in different areas of Funerary Archaeology research. There is also an opportunity to learn valuable practical skills, which are essential for a wide range of archaeological and associated careers.

Who is it for?
This degree is for anyone interested in studying Funerary Archaeology from a range of perspectives, which are at the frontiers of both archaeological method and theoretical approach. It is primarily for students with previous experience in archaeology, anthropology, history, art history, biology or related fields, but students from a wide variety of academic backgrounds are encouraged.

What can it lead to?
The course provides a solid foundation for a wide range of careers and further studies. Postgraduate students at York have gone on to research degrees, academic or teaching careers, museum positions and archaeology posts at local councils, regional authorities, field units, and heritage bodies such as English Heritage.

Careers

By the end of the MA or MSc Funerary Archaeology course you will be able to:
-A thorough understanding of the history of research and the theoretical approaches to Funerary Archaeology
-A broad foundation in the key aspects of studying death and burial in the past
-Identify and record human bone assemblages
-Age, sex and assess pathologies from human bones
-Explore selected methods and periods in detail, through the option modules
-Critically evaluate published research and datasets
-Orally present knowledge and concepts
-Plan, design and undertake a piece of independent research

These skills and techniques are deployed widely in the field of archaeological research and exploration, but they are also valuable for a wide range of careers and further studies.

Many of York's Masters postgraduates go on to further research, academic or teaching careers, museum positions and archaeology posts at local councils, regional authorities, field units and heritage bodies. Some of the organisations our students now work for include:
-Archaeological field units
-Environmental archaeology
-Professional archaeologists – field and laboratory based
-Laboratory technicians
-Demonstrators
-University/research technicians
-Academia
-On-site osteoarchaeologists
-Medical humanities

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The Masters in History provides you with an outstanding learning experience in the company of Glasgow's thirty-strong cohort of historians, and the opportunity to conceive, design and execute a research project/dissertation. Read more
The Masters in History provides you with an outstanding learning experience in the company of Glasgow's thirty-strong cohort of historians, and the opportunity to conceive, design and execute a research project/dissertation. The programme combines training in historical theory, skills and methods with a wide range of specialist taught options which cover all periods from medieval to late modern, in relation to Scotland, Britain, Europe, America and elsewhere.

Why this programme

-Our links with the University’s museum and art gallery, The Hunterian, provide access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
-You will also enjoy access to The Baillie Collection, our prized collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history, which includes printed state papers, Historical Manuscript Commission publications and a select collection of modern monographs.
-If you are looking for the opportunity to pursue your own historical interests in a lively and friendly environment, led and supported by internationally-regarded historians, this programme is ideal for you.

Programme structure

Our pathway structure allows you to tailor your degree to match an interest in one of the following fields:
-Medieval history
-Modern and late modern history
-Scottish history
-Social and cultural history
-Gender history
-Military history

Each programme is built around a hands-on research training course, specialised courses on historical and theoretical themes, and other courses developing your technical skills and other abilities like languages and palaeography.

For your chosen programme, there will be a guided selection of courses that will provide you with specialised knowledge in that field. You will be taught through a series of seminars and workshops. Internationally recognised historians give guest lectures throughout the year.

These courses are taught in history, economic and social history (in the College of Social Sciences), and by related subject areas in the School of Humanities (archaeology, Celtic, classics) and the College of Arts (such as English language and French).

In the final part of the programme, you will select a specialised topic and conduct original primary source research for your dissertation. You are supported in your research and writing up by an assigned supervisor with expertise in your field of enquiry.

Core course
-Research resources and skills for historians

Career prospects

Apart from continuing to study a PhD, you can transfer the Arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the modern public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, journalism and teaching.

Positions held by recent History graduates include Editor Business & History Products, Lead Scholar/Instructor and Secretary.

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This MSc programme concentrates on science-based archaeology and is ideal for people who want to become post-excavation or artefact specialists in the museum or commercial sectors. Read more
This MSc programme concentrates on science-based archaeology and is ideal for people who want to become post-excavation or artefact specialists in the museum or commercial sectors.

There are two pathways to choose from: Artefact, and Landscape and Environment. Each would be suitable for graduates in archaeology or science subjects, who want to start or further their careers in these exciting fields.

The programme would also be useful preparation for further academic research and the skills you'll gain, such as problem-solving and team work, will be attractive to any employer.

The MSc in Archaeology consists of 180 credits of study. You will take a taught programme of 120 credits, comprised of eight modules, each of 15 credits, divided evenly into four modules per semester. You will also be required to complete a 15,000-20,000 word research dissertation which is to be submitted at the end of the academic year. You will be able to tailor the degree programme to suit your interests and requirements as far as possible within the options available.

Why Department of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology?

Academic expertise

Archaeology, Classics and Eygyptology has 39 full-time academic staff, who are all actively engaged in research ranging from early prehistory through to late antiquity.

Here are some of our particularly strong areas:-

African archaeology
ancient languages
archaeology of the Mediterranean and the Near East
archaeological science
Egyptology
European prehistory
Greek and Roman history and culture.
Fieldwork is an important part of research in archaeology and we've projects based internationally, in Egypt, Greece, Bulgaria, Jordan, Turkey, Italy, Zambia and South Africa, as well as in the British Isles.

Taught masters programmes

We offer a unique breadth of taught masters degrees in Ancient History, Archaeology (MA or MSc), Human Evolution, Classics and Egyptology.

You can configure a wide choice of modules to suit your interests and requirements and there are opportunities to learn different approaches and techniques, as well as ancient languages such as Greek, Latin, Akkadian, Sumerian, Egyptian and Coptic.

All of our masters degrees provide intensive training to prepare you for doctoral research and employment.

Excellent resources

The Ancient World and Archaeology has been studied at Liverpool since the 1880s, so we've had plenty of time to build up an enviable library and a fantastic museum.

The Garstang Museum, which is in the ACE building, has outstanding archaeological collections, along with extensive laboratory facilities for conservation, lithics, geomagnetism, stable isotope, trace elements, finds processing and sample preparation.

We also have a GIS suite with facilities for archaeological drawing and offer 24-hour access for taught students to a dedicated Student Resource Centre, complete with PCs, personal lockers, desk space, wi-fi and a networked printer.

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This programme delivers both intensive training in environmental and economic archaeology and an understanding of how these skills might be applied to advance our knowledge of the relationship between people and nature in the making of human history. Read more

About the course

This programme delivers both intensive training in environmental and economic archaeology and an understanding of how these skills might be applied to advance our knowledge of the relationship between people and nature in the making of human history. Studies of contemporary ecology and economy are emphasised as a basis for investigating the past. The ability to reconstruct and understand past environments and economies is critical to both professional and academic archaeology.

Your future

Each of our masters courses is designed to equip you with valuable employment skills and prepare you for your future career. If you’re seeking to move into an archaeology-related field from a different academic or employment background, our courses and supportive staff will help you to realise your ambitions and develop professionally.

Graduates from our MA and MSc courses successfully compete for some of the most sought-after archaeological posts in the world. Our courses help students to develop essential transferable skills, and upon graduation they are also in demand by a wide variety of employers outside of the sector.Many of our graduates decide to continue their studies, carrying out doctoral research in their chosen specialist field, equipped with a solid theoretical and practical grounding from which to develop their research.

World-leading expertise

The character and strength of research carried out by Sheffield’s Archaeology department is captured under the following broad themes. These reflect the range of our research and its cross-disciplinary, embedded nature:

Funerary Archaeology
Landscape Archaeology
Bioarchaeology
Medieval Archaeology
Cultural Materials
Mediterranean Archaeology

Specialist facilities

The Archaeology department is situated on the edge of the main campus, near to Sheffield’s city centre. The department houses world-class reference collections and facilities to support teaching, learning and research in a range of archaeological disciplines. Facilities include specialist lab space dedicated to teaching and research, dedicated study spaces, and a student common room.

Fieldwork opportunities

We offer you the opportunity to get involved in our research projects in the UK, Europe and further afield.

How we will teach and assess you

Our students come from all around the world and the content of our courses reflects this. You can expect a balanced timetable of lectures, seminars and practicals. Many of our masters courses also include a fieldwork or project work component. Our teaching staff are leading scholars in their field. Through their research and field projects they are active in generating new knowledge that feeds directly into their teaching.

Funding, scholarships and bursaries

If you accept a place on one of our courses, you may be eligible to apply for WRoCAH and University of Sheffield studentships. There are also a number of departmental and programme-specific scholarships available each year. See our website for details.

Core modules

Rethinking the Ancient Economy; Reinventing Archaeology; Dynamic Landscapes: investigating ancient environments; Research Design: planning, execution and presentation; Archaeobotany; Archaeozoology; Dissertation.

Indicative optional modules

Advanced Zooarchaeology; GIS for Archaeologists; Advanced Archaeobotany.

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Sheffield’s MSc in Human Osteology and Funerary Archaeology has offered advanced training in the study of archaeological human bones for 25 years. Read more

About the course

Sheffield’s MSc in Human Osteology and Funerary Archaeology has offered advanced training in the study of archaeological human bones for 25 years. This programme will provide you with both the technical skills and knowledge required to undertake analysis of archaeological human remains, and the cultural understanding of funerary practices needed to situate your findings within a broader archaeological and historical context, providing you with the tools to write human history from human remains.

Your future

Each of our masters courses is designed to equip you with valuable employment skills and prepare you for your future career. If you’re seeking to move into an archaeology-related field from a different academic or employment background, our courses and supportive staff will help you to realise your ambitions and develop professionally.

Graduates from our MA and MSc courses successfully compete for some of the most sought-after archaeological posts in the world. Our courses help students to develop essential transferable skills, and upon graduation they are also in demand by a wide variety of employers outside of the sector.Many of our graduates decide to continue their studies, carrying out doctoral research in their chosen specialist field, equipped with a solid theoretical and practical grounding from which to develop their research.

World-leading expertise

The character and strength of research carried out by Sheffield’s Archaeology department is captured under the following broad themes. These reflect the range of our research and its cross-disciplinary, embedded nature:

Funerary Archaeology
Landscape Archaeology
Bioarchaeology
Medieval Archaeology
Cultural Materials
Mediterranean Archaeology

Specialist facilities

The Archaeology department is situated on the edge of the main campus, near to Sheffield’s city centre. The department houses world-class reference collections and facilities to support teaching, learning and research in a range of archaeological disciplines. Facilities include specialist lab space dedicated to teaching and research, dedicated study spaces, and a student common room.

Fieldwork opportunities

We offer you the opportunity to get involved in our research projects in the UK, Europe and further afield.

How we will teach and assess you

Our students come from all around the world and the content of our courses reflects this. You can expect a balanced timetable of lectures, seminars and practicals. Many of our masters courses also include a fieldwork or project work component. Our teaching staff are leading scholars in their field. Through their research and field projects they are active in generating new knowledge that feeds directly into their teaching.

Funding, scholarships and bursaries

If you accept a place on one of our courses, you may be eligible to apply for WRoCAH and University of Sheffield studentships. There are also a number of departmental and programme-specific scholarships available each year. See our website for details.

Core modules

Funerary Archaeology; Quantitative Methods in Anthropology and Archaeology; Research Design: planning, execution and presentation; Biological Anthropology I; Biological Anthropology II; Human Anatomy; Human Osteology; Dissertation.

Indicative optional modules

A 15 credit module can be selected from a range across the Faculty of Arts and Humanities.

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This MSc provides participants with a theoretical understanding of research questions and methodologies in the study of past human-environment interactions, including subsistence and subsistence change. Read more
This MSc provides participants with a theoretical understanding of research questions and methodologies in the study of past human-environment interactions, including subsistence and subsistence change. The Institute of Archaeology has a long research and training tradition in environmental archaeology, and has well-established laboratory facilities and reference collections as a result.

Degree information

Students gain practical experience in laboratory analysis of at least one of either: identification of animal bones, identification of plant macro-remains, sedimentological analyses. They develop an understanding of stratigraphic formation processes and their implications for developing sampling strategies, and are trained to collect and analyse data and report scientific results.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules - students are required to take the following:
-Environmental Archaeology in Practice
-Resources and Subsistence

Optional modules
-Archaeology of the Late Pleistocene and Holocene Hunter Gatherers
-British and European Prehistory: Neolithic to Iron Age
-Funerary Archaeology
-Middle Bronze Age to the Iron Age in the Near East: City-States and Empires
-The Aegean from First Farmers to Minoan States
-The Mediterranean World in the Iron Age
-The Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of the Near East: The emergence of villages and urban societies

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project, normally based on practical laboratory-based research, which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, presentations, laboratory sessions, practicals, and site and museum visits. Assessment is through the dissertation, and a combination of essays, coursework, presentations, practical examination and laboratory reports, depending on the options selected.

Careers

Some graduates of the programme go on to PhD studies but others will be well-placed to pursue a wide range of professional careers both within and beyond archaeology, including employment as environmental specialists for contract archaeology units.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Archeology in South Asia, University of Barcelona.
-Archaeological Technician, Southeast Archeological Center.
-PhD Archaeology, University of Exeter.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study.

The institute boasts a wide range of laboratory facilities relevant to this degree including dedicated laboratories for zooarchaeology (with a comparative collection of Near Eastern and European faunal remains), archaeobotany (with extensive comparative collections for seeds, wood, tubers, phytoliths and pollen); phytolith processing, sedimentology and scanning electron microscopy.

UCL is located in central London, close to the resources of the British Museum, the British Library and the Natural History Museum.

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Top archaeological researchers and heritage professionals use a raft of computational methods including GIS, data mining, web science, ABM, point-process modelling and network analysis. Read more
Top archaeological researchers and heritage professionals use a raft of computational methods including GIS, data mining, web science, ABM, point-process modelling and network analysis. To impress employers you need the flexibility to learn on the job, leverage open data and program open source software. This MSc draws on UCL's unparalleled concentration of expertise to equip you for future research or significantly enhance your employability.

Degree information

Students learn about a wide range of concepts that underpin computational approaches to archaeology and human history. Students become proficient in the archaeological application of both commercial and open source GIS software and learn other practical skills such as programming, data-mining, advanced spatial analysis with R, and agent-based simulation.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Archaeological Data Science
-Complexity, Space and Human History

Optional modules
-Agent-based Modelling of Human History
-Exploratory Data Analysis in Archaeology
-GIS Approaches to Past Landscapes
-GIS in Archaeology and History
-Remote Sensing
-Spatial Statistics, Network Analysis and Human History
-The Archaeology of Complex Urban Sites: Analytical and Interpretative Technology
-Web and Mobile GIS (by arrangement with the UCL Department of Civil and Geomatic Engineering
-Other options available within the UCL Institute of Archaeology

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, tutorials and practical sessions. Careful provision is made to facilitate remote access to software, tutorials, datasets and readings through a combination of dedicated websites and virtual learning environments. Assessment is through essays, practical components, project reports and portfolio, and the research dissertation.

Careers

Approximately one third of graduates of the programme have gone on to do PhDs at universities such as Cambridge, Leiden, McGill, Thessaloniki and Washington State. Of these, some continue to pursue GIS and/or spatial analysis techniques as a core research interest, while others use the skills and inferential rigour they acquired during their Master's as a platform for more wide-ranging doctoral research. Other graduates have gone to work in a range of archaeological and non-archaeological organisations worldwide. These include specialist careers in national governmental or heritage organisations, commercial archaeological units, planning departments, utility companies and consultancies.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Database Administrator, Deloitte
-Data Science Analyst, M2M
-Graphical Information Systems (GIS) Technician, BSG Ecology

Employability
This degree offers a considerable range of transferable practical skills as well as instilling a more general inferential rigour which is attractive to almost any potential employer. Graduates will be comfortable with a wide range of web-based, database-led, statistical and cartographic tasks. They will be able to operate both commercial and oper source software, will be able to think clearly about both scientific and humanities-led issues, and will have a demonstrable track record of both individual research and group-based collaboration.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The teaching staff bring together a range and depth of expertise that enables students to develop specialisms including industry-standard and open-source GIS, advanced spatial and temporal statistics, computer simulation, geophysical prospection techniques and digital topographic survey.

Most practical classes are held in the institute's Archaeological Computing and GIS laboratory. This laboratory contains two Linux servers, ten powerful workstations running Microsoft Windows 7, a digitising table and map scanner.

Students benefit from the collaborations we have established with other institutions and GIS specialists in Canada, Germany, Italy and Greece together with several commercial archaeological units in the UK.

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