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Full Time MSc Degrees in Anthropology, London, United Kingdom

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Brunel University London School of Social Sciences
Distance from London: 0 miles
Medical anthropology can be described as the study of cultural beliefs and behaviours associated with the origin, recognition and management of health and illness in different social and cultural groups. Read more
Medical anthropology can be described as the study of cultural beliefs and behaviours associated with the origin, recognition and management of health and illness in different social and cultural groups. Despite the name conventionally given to this area of study, medical anthropology is not simply concerned with practices of healing or systems of diagnosis and treatment such as biomedicine. It deals with the more informal systems of health care that exist worldwide (such as self-treatment, folk healers, shamans, traditional birth attendants, and alternative practitioners), as well as those associated with professional Western science-based medicine and caring practices. Additionally, medical anthropology is also concerned with issues which relate to different cultural views of the 'self' in health and disease, as well as shared beliefs, images and practices associated with perceptions of the human body and mind.

The Brunel MSc addresses the above issues in a lively and challenging way. It was the first taught master's degree dedicated to medical anthropology in Europe; and it is the largest MSc medical anthropology programme in the UK. We have the largest number of dedicated and internationally known medical anthropology staff in the country teaching the degree; and around 330 students have graduated with an MSc in medical anthropology from Brunel University. They are now working all over the world in a variety of settings.

Course Content: Modules are subject to variation and students are advised to check with the School on whether a particular module of interest will be running in their year of entry. At the time of printing modules were drawn from the following areas:

Compulsory Modules: Medical Anthropology in Clinical & Community Settings; Anthropology of Biomedicine & Psychiatry; Anthropology & Global Health; Ethnographic Research Methods 1 & 2.
Optional Modules: Kinship & New Directions in Anthropology; Anthropology of Disability & Difference; Anthropology of the Person; Anthropology of the Body.
Plus two unassessed reading modules: History and Theory of Social Anthropology; Issues in Social Anthropology

SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITY
Set up to honour the life and work of leading light in international medical anthropology Professor Cecil Helman (1944-2009) who taught on this course from 1990, The Cecil Helman Scholarship Fund offers between two and four students up to £1,000 to help them to complete field research for their dissertations. The scholarship will be awarded to MSc Medical Anthropology students who demonstrate excellent academic performance and the ability to undertake an original field research project.

Assessment is by essay, practical assignments (eg, analysis of a short field exercise), and a dissertation of approximately 15,000 words. This dissertation is based upon fieldwork undertaken by the candidate. There are no examinations.

Recent examples of dissertations by students taking this course include:
The Management of Alzheimer's disease.
The relationships between nurses and doctors in managing primary care.
Private experiences and public encounters: selfhood and personhood amidst the chaos of homelessness.

Here's what some of our former students have to say:

Birgit: “When I came back from a mission with Médecins sans Frontières in Mozambique, where I had worked on an HIV/AIDS programme, I searched for training opportunities and found out about Medical Anthropology at Brunel. I was thrilled – the subject matter described exactly what I had experienced in project work: divergent perceptions of sickness and health from a Western medical perspective and from a ‘traditional’ point of view.

The difficulties communicating essential health messages threatened the aim of prevention, and a great need was felt to better understand local ideas of mother-child health in the HIV/AIDS epidemic. I was attracted by the perspective to learn how to conduct qualitative studies on health-related issues, and fascinated by the stance to comprehend ‘culture’ not as a normative and static condition, but as a constant process of negotiation and renewal.

I had the great opportunity to return to Mozambique for the dissertation fieldwork, studying traditional concepts of child nutrition and child health. I could pursue questions that were crucial in my past project work, and which were essential to the success of HIV/AIDS prevention. Writing transformed into something very unexpected, especially when working on the dissertation. It became an opportunity to think things through, to contextualize, discuss, explore and explain conclusions. Investigation and writing were two separate and still corresponding parts of an intense learning process. This process also taught me about ethical dilemmas in anthropological enquiry, about methodological constraints and limitations of inference, and it raised questions on what both tradition and human agency may mean.“

Julia: Whilst retaining our core values the NHS is being challenged to adopt new ways of commissioning and delivering quality services that are patient-focused and safe. So where does Medical Anthropology come into this change agenda?

It was not until I started my Masters that I really began to undertstand the concepts of culture, disease and illness, and how fundamental these are in influencing the NHS organisation. The course has challenged me to think differently and has transformed the way I plan and deliver patient-centred care, how I interact with colleagues and how I in turn educate professionals within our organisaiton.

I cannot recommend the course too highly, from the content of the modules to the excellent support of all the staff in the department. I have been provileged to have had this transformational learning opportunity.

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Brunel University London School of Social Sciences
Distance from London: 0 miles
In this new MSc degree, the first of its kind anywhere in Europe, we tackle these and other issues from an anthropological perspective, looking at the social and cultural dimensions of human experience. Read more
In this new MSc degree, the first of its kind anywhere in Europe, we tackle these and other issues from an anthropological perspective, looking at the social and cultural dimensions of human experience. By engaging with debates on these important topics and through the examination of world ethnography (including the UK), participants will learn about selfhood, emotion, madness and identity in cultural context.

This MSc aims to give candidates a solid grounding in key topics in psychological and psychiatric anthropology. Through detailed consideration of cases from Britain and around the world, we explore the ways in which person, emotion, and subjectivity are shaped through cultural practices. Candidates from backgrounds in health, therapy, social work and psychology will be able to challenge the categories and assumptions inherent in standard approaches to psychological and behavioural issues.

Course content: Modules are subject to variation and students are advised to check with the School on whether a particular module of interest will be running in their year of entry. At the time of printing modules were drawn fro the following areas:

Compulsory Modules: Themes in Psychological and Psychiatric Anthropology ; Ethnographic Research Methods Parts 1 and 2
Optional Modules: Anthropology of Education & Learning; Anthropology of Childhood and Youth; Medical Anthropology in Clinical & Community Settings; Anthropology of Biomedicine and Psychiatry, Anthropology & Global Health; Kinship and New Directions in Anthropology; Anthropology of the Body ; Anthropology of the Person
Anthropology of Disability and Difference
Plus two unassessed reading modules: History and Theory of Social Anthropology; Issues in Social Anthropology .

Assessment is by essay, practical assignment (eg analysis of a short field exercise), and a final 15,000 word dissertation.

Here is what some of our former students have to say:

Eileen: "When I started the MSc in Psychological and Psychiatric Anthropology I did not realize that I was embarking on a course that was to alter my life. My background was in Nursing (General and Psychiatry-specializing in Adolescent Mental Health) and I had just completed a first degree in Anthropology in Ireland. All of these experiences, coupled with travelling as much as I could, had left me with a feeling that somehow there was something missing in my life - both personal and academic. Though my path is still somewhat uncertain, the experience of doing the MSc has given a meaning and a depth to my life that I would not have thought possible.

I commuted every week from Dublin for lectures on Wednesday and Thursday in Brunel while continuing to work fulltime as a Clinical Nurse Specialist. Though this was tiring it was the highlight of my week. The academic focus on emotion, identity, and psychological and psychiatric processes brought together my previous study and experience while encouraging me to think in new ways. This is essential in my area of work if one is to respond to the changing needs of families attending the clinic.

My thesis project was 'Personal, Social and Sexual identity amongst and between women in Cairo'. This was greatly supported by my supervisor Dr Andrew Beatty. Despite, as yet, speaking little Arabic, I was welcomed into mosques, hammams, and family homes in Cairo. I was privileged to be included in many intimate conversations and personal scenes.

Though at present I remain in my previous line of work, the experience of the MSc, fieldwork in Cairo, beginning Arabic and spending last summer in a refugee camp in Palestine working with children who are experiencing trauma every day of their lives, has allowed me to see the endless possibilities that open up from taking such a course. (See pictures below)

All of this would not have been possible without the absolute dedication and amazing knowledge and experience of the academic staff. That they were always available to answer questions and talk over ideas, no matter how small we felt they were, meant a lot. It encouraged one to pursue a connection with the world of anthropology. Whether that is just by ongoing reading, a different way of thinking and being in the world, or as I plan, to undertake a PhD or by travelling as I did to Palestine and experiencing the privilege of sharing a way of life and forming life long connections from this, the path of anthropology and the doors and possibilities are endless. They add so much to one’s daily life that I would have to say that taking part in the MSc in Psychological and Psychiatric Anthropology is the best move I have ever made."

Fatima: "I chose this Masters because of its structure – the range of modules and the opportunity to conduct fieldwork abroad impressed me. The fieldwork experience has challenged me to reflect and question my approach to the subject. Furthermore, the main advantages of my MSc studies are the solid research skills, as well as the prestige of doing a Master's in one of the best UK Universities.

The academic staff in the Department are regarded as world leaders in their field. They presented anthropology in a way which was both inspiring and thought provoking. Even the most eminent professors will take the time to discuss research with postgraduates and the help is invaluable.

I also found the lunch time seminars particularly beneficial as they are a great way to meet other postgraduate students and to exchange experiences. I’d advise prospective students to embrace the 'whole' experience as you only get out of it what you put in and if you’re prepared to get involved, the MSc in Psychological and Psychiatric Anthropology is brilliant!

My postgraduate degree at Brunel has caught employers' interest and, in terms of a career, the opportunities are endless. I am currently working in Mental Health in Karachi and hope to secure enough funding for a PhD."

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This MSc aims to provide sufficient knowledge of advanced medically related anthropology to enable students to utilise anthropological approaches in a range of research and professional roles. Read more
This MSc aims to provide sufficient knowledge of advanced medically related anthropology to enable students to utilise anthropological approaches in a range of research and professional roles. We train students in theoretical and applied aspects of the field, preparing them for careers that engage with and impact real-world contexts.

Degree information

Students new to social science develop an understanding of a social science approach to the experience of illness and health, and gain skills required in social anthropological field research and analysis. For students with previous social science training, the programme focuses on the dimensions particular to medical anthropology.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core module (45 credits) optional modules in three distinct fields (45 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Clinical Ethnography
-Medical Anthropology

Optional modules - *Medical anthropology options are available in the following areas:
-Anthropology of Science, Society and Biomedicine
-Ritual Healing and Therapeutic Emplotment
-Anthropology of Ethics and Morality
-Anthropology and Psychiatry

*Students may also choose from among a variety of other options within and beyond medical anthropology

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, small-group presentations and discussion, tutorials, laboratory and practical work, independent directed reading, interactive teamwork, and video film and web based courses. Assessment is through one examination, two essays, optional module requirements and the research dissertation.

Careers

Medical Anthropology is a rapidly expanding interdisciplinary field and graduates of our programme have gone on to develop exciting careers in academia, clinical services, social services, government, and non-governmental organisations.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Medical doctor in specialty training, Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital (NHS)
-MBBS (Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery), Newcastle University
-Research Degree: Anthropology, University College London (UCL)
-Midwife, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
-PhD Population Health Sciences, The University of Edinburgh

Employability
Our approach is broad and open-minded, encompassing analysis of diversity issues in clinical practice, critical medical anthropology, psychology/psychiatry, social impact of genetic technologies, demographics, ethics, and studies of traditional healing. UCL is ranked fifth in the QS World University Rankings and our students benefit from a wealth of resources.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Anthropology was the first in the UK to integrate biological and social anthropology with material culture into a broad-based conception of the discipline. UCL Medical Anthropology at UCL integrates interpretive, critical and applied perspectives.

Our excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercises and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK. We are also one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK, offering a breadth of expertise.

Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the wider anthropological community in London and the department's strong links with European universities and international institutions.

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This MSc provides a thorough grounding in anthropological theory and analysis, an understanding of ethnographic approaches to the study of social worlds, and a strong foundation in research practices. Read more
This MSc provides a thorough grounding in anthropological theory and analysis, an understanding of ethnographic approaches to the study of social worlds, and a strong foundation in research practices. Flexible in its structure, the programme enhances students’ employability by focusing also on the interface between anthropological research and professional practices.

Degree information

The programme aims to develop knowledge and understanding of major theoretical, ethnographic and methodological debates in social anthropology. Students develop an understanding of human cultural worlds through in-depth historical study, gain knowledge of specific societies and specialist approaches, and enhance their independent research skills through practical training in research methods.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Critical Issues in Social Anthropology
-Research Methods

Optional modules
-Anthropology of Art and Design
-Social Forms of Revolution
-Mass Consumption and Design
-Anthropology and Psychiatry
-The Anthropology of Islam in Diaspora
-Medical Anthropology
-Anthropology of Latin America
-Documentary Film and the Anthropological Eye
-Social Construction of Landscape
-History and Aesthetics of Documentary
-Risk, Power and Uncertainty

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, small group presentations and discussion, tutorials, laboratory and practical work, independent directed reading, interactive teamwork, and video, film and web based courses. It includes a research seminar series with invited speakers. Assessment is through unseen examination, essays, and the research dissertation.

Careers

Recent students on the course have pursued careers in fields including government, business, development, social research and consultancy, and the media, as well as in academia as professional anthropologists.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Editor, Xinhua News Agency
-History of Crime, Université Catholique de Louvain (Catholic Univers
-PhD Anthropology, Harvard University
-Junior Research Executive, BDRC Continental
-PhD Researcher, Max Planck Society

Employability
In addition to the analytical, interpretative and writing skills honed by its core academic training, the course includes a unique orientation towards the interface between anthropological research and professional practice, allowing students to focus on the anthropology of professions including medicine, development, education, the law, the creative industries. Our close co-operation with UCL’s bespoke careers services, provides opportunities for internships and placements during the programme or following its completion.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Anthropology was the first in the UK to integrate biological and social anthropology with material culture into a broad-based conception of the discipline. It is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK in terms of both staff and research student numbers, offering an exceptional breadth of expertise.

Our excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK.

Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the wider anthropological community in London and the department's strong links with European universities and international institutions.

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Digital technologies are now ubiquitous in nearly every part of our lives, and today's students need to become proficient with digital technologies as research and communication tools. Read more
Digital technologies are now ubiquitous in nearly every part of our lives, and today's students need to become proficient with digital technologies as research and communication tools. The Digital Anthropology MSc at UCL combines technical skill with anthropological research methodologies in order to train students for research and involvement in this emergent world.

Degree information

Students gain skills training in digital technologies, from internet and digital film editing to e-curation and digital ethnography; study the anthropological theories of virtualism, materiality/immateriality and social networks; and develop an understanding of the consequences of digital culture through the ethnographic study of its social and regional impact in a global and comparative context.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of one core module (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Digital Anthropology and Digital Anthropology Practical

Optional modules
-The Anthropology of Art and Design
-Mass Consumption and Design
-The Anthropology of the Built Environment
-Advanced Topics in Digital Ethnography
-Documentary Film and the Anthropological Eye
-Practical Ethnographic and Documentary Filmmaking
-Digital Infrastructure: Materiality, Information and Politics
-Anthropology and Photography
-Social Construction of Landscape

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 15,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practicals and laboratory sessions. It includes a weekly seminar series, with invited international speakers. Assessment is through essays, methodology practicals, written examination and the substantial research dissertation.

Careers

In addition to its importance for careers such as in media, design and museums, digital technology is also integral to development, theoretical and applied anthropology. Companies and institutions collaborating with the MSc are: British Telecom, UCL Computer Sciences, UCL Information Studies, Microsoft Research Cambridge, Skype, Intel, the British Museum, NESTA, NOKIA, the Home Office and Inventi V.

The programme is also developing relationships with: Cultural Informatics Research Centre for the Arts and Humanities (CIRCAh), Slade Centre for Electronic Media in Fine Art, Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis, Centre for Museums, Heritage and Cultural Studies, UCL Interaction Centre, UCL Digital Humanities and UCL Urban Laboratory.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Digital Strategist, Canopy Brand Group.
-Researcher, River Research
-Principal Lecturer and Course Director, University of the Arts, London
-Assistant Print Analyst, GroupM
-Graduate Worker, Dare

Employability
New media and technology companies are showing considerable interest in Digital Anthropology as a degree that qualifies students for positions in all fields of user interaction and research. In the last few years students graduating from the MSc have been recruited by the best international agencies doing research on users' digital practices. In the non-profit sector students have joined organisations involved in policymaking, open access and citizen journalism. The subject is also a good grounding for students who are interested in continuing to a variety of PhD programmes.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Digital Anthropology MSc at UCL is becoming a world leader in the training of researchers in the social and cultural dimensions of information technologies and digital media.

UCL Anthropology is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK and offers an exceptional breadth of expertise. Our excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK. The programme combines ethnographic methods, critical thinking and practical explorations of the digital world and encourages in-depth research to develop the next generation of understanding about the impact, consequences, aesthetics and politics of digital technologies and infrastructures.

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Brunel University London School of Social Sciences
Distance from London: 0 miles
This MSc was the first degree of its kind in the world when it was established and is still unique in its thorough-going anthropological perspective on what it is to be a child or to be young. Read more
This MSc was the first degree of its kind in the world when it was established and is still unique in its thorough-going anthropological perspective on what it is to be a child or to be young. Its key organising principle is that understanding children requires the study of how their relations with others - peers, older and younger children, parents, teachers and other adults - inform their practices, identities and world views.

Through an examination of ethnographic cases from the around the world (including the UK), participants will learn about the different ways in which childhood and youth are understood and conceptualised, along with the different educational forms and processes through which cultural knowledge is transmitted and acquired, and how culture impacts upon these processes.

Course content: Modules are subject to variation and students are advised to check with the School on whether a particular module of interest will be running in their year of entry. At the time of printing modules were drawn from the following areas:
Compulsory Modules: Anthropology of Childhood and Youth; Anthropology of Education & Learning; Ethnographic Research Methods Parts 1 and 2 .
Optional Modules: Kinship and New Directions in Anthropology; Anthropology of the Body ; Anthropology of the Person
Anthropology of Disability and Difference
Plus two unassessed reading modules: History and Theory of Social Anthropology; Issues in Social Anthropology .
It may also be possible to choose from these modules offered by the School of Sport & Education and the School of Health Sciences & Social Care: Foundation Disciplines of Education* Literature Policy and Analysis* International Development, Children and Youth* Global Agendas on Young People, Rights and Participation* Applied Learning for Children, Youth and International Development* (* these modules will be taught on different days from the normal attendance days.)

Assessment is by essay, practical assignments (eg, analysis of a short field exercise), and a dissertation of approximately 15,000 words. This dissertation is based upon fieldwork undertaken by the candidate. There are no examinations.

The specific topics and/or research problems discussed in the dissertation are a function of the student’s particular research interest in the domain of the anthropology of children, child development and youth, and the data generated by the student’s own fieldwork.

Recent examples of dissertations by students:
The language of learning: how children become learners
ESL children and their friendships
A Greek community school in a London district: ethnic socialisation among third generation children
Youth marginalisation, affiliation and livelihoods in Sierra Leone

Careers:
Candidates will acquire analytical and research skills that can be used in a wide range of careers. In addition to providing a firm grounding for doctoral research on childhood and youth, graduates will find that the degree enhances professional development in fields such as teaching, social work, counselling, educational and child psychology, health-visiting, nursing and midwifery, paediatric specialisms, non-governmental agencies and international development. Every year, some of our graduates also go on to do further research for a PhD in child-focused anthropology as members of the Centre for Child-Focused Anthropological Research (C-FAR).

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The MSc Social Anthropology is an excellent and intensive introduction to the discipline of social anthropology. The programme is intended to give students a thorough grounding in anthropology, both in terms of its ethnographic diversity and its theoretical development. Read more

About the MSc programmes

The MSc Social Anthropology is an excellent and intensive introduction to the discipline of social anthropology. The programme is intended to give students a thorough grounding in anthropology, both in terms of its ethnographic diversity and its theoretical development. Teaching is directly informed and enhanced by the strong tradition of fieldwork-based research within the Department.

Compulsory components include a course in Anthropology which examines the relationship between theory and ethnography in modern social and cultural anthropology, and a 10,000 word dissertation on an approved topic of your choice.

This programme is suitable for graduates with a degree in any discipline, and prior knowledge of anthropology is not essential. It is suitable either as an introduction to the subject for those intending to proceed with other careers, or is an ideal preparation for further research work in the anthropology and related disciplines.

Graduate destinations

The programme is an ideal preparation for research work in anthropology and related fields.

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This is a specialist stream within our general MSc Social Anthropology programme focusing on the anthropological study of human learning and cognition. Read more
This is a specialist stream within our general MSc Social Anthropology programme focusing on the anthropological study of human learning and cognition. You will examine cognitive development from a cross-cultural perspective in a Department which combines a strong tradition of fieldwork-based research with innovative experimental research.

Compulsory components include a general core course in Social Anthropology, a specialist core course in The Anthropology of Learning and Cognition, and a 10,000 word dissertation on an approved topic within the subfield of anthropology of learning and cognition subfield.

This programme will be of special interest to those who want to study the psychological mechanisms that make human cultures possible and want to study human psychology from a cross-cultural perspective. It is suitable for graduates with a degree in any discipline, and prior knowledge of anthropology is not essential. It is suitable either as an introduction to the subject for those intending to proceed with other careers, or is an ideal preparation for further research work in anthropology and related disciplines.

Graduate destinations

The programme is an ideal preparation for research work in anthropology and related fields.

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Contemporary concerns with environment and development require a combination of biological and social anthropological approaches to examine the ecology of resource use in developing societies. Read more
Contemporary concerns with environment and development require a combination of biological and social anthropological approaches to examine the ecology of resource use in developing societies. This MSc evaluates the environmental implications and outcomes of these activities in terms of human subsistence and welfare via a systematic, theoretical and methodological training.

Degree information

Drawing on the strengths of our broad-based department and expertise in human ecology, social anthropology and demography, key areas of investigation include: the implications of changing environments for production systems and human welfare, the sustainable use of natural resources in developing countries and the environmental and welfare impacts of changing patterns of resource use with development.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of three core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules:
-Resource Use and Impacts
-Anthropological Research Methods
-Statistics

Optional modules - choose two options from within the department - and in some cases outside the department - including at least one of the following that have been designed specifically for this programme:
-The Ecology of Human Groups
-Population and Development
-Anthropology of Development

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars, group presentations, tutorials, interactive teamwork, video, and film and web based courses. It includes a non-examined weekly seminar series with both internal and invited speakers. Assessment is through essays, seen and unseen examinations, and the research dissertation.

Careers

Graduates of this programme have gone on to a wide range of relevant careers in research, teaching, consultancy, policy and advocacy work in universities, governmental bodies, national and international NGOs and international research organisations such as the CGIAR.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Public Researcher and Administrator, Global Canopy Program
-Education for Sustainable Development Researcher, Change Agents
-Anthropologist, Fundación Etnollano
-International Health Programme Officer, Royal College of General Practitioners
-Volunteer Co-Ordinator, Marine Research and Education Fund of Andenes (MAREFA)

Employability
The Master's integrates both natural and social science approaches and combines this with training in the methodological and practical dimensions of field work. The interdisciplinary perspective and demonstrable research skills obtained are an ideal training ground for students wishing to work with government, national or international NGOs or conduct further PhD research in the fields of environment and/or development. In addition to specialist knowledge and fieldwork experience, other skills graduates acquire include presentation and IT, research design and development, qualitative and quantitative analysis, project management, team building and leadership, fundraising and critical analysis and evaluation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Anthropology is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK offering an exceptional breadth of expertise. Our results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK.

Teaching staff are all actively engaged in research or consultancy work in the area of environment and development. A strong alumni network within the Human Ecology Research Group and dedicated programmes of invited speakers allow for significant networking opportunities.

Students are also encouraged to take advantage of the wider anthropological community in London.

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This programme is offered by the Department of Anthropology with the assistance of the Department of International Development. Anthropology and development are tightly entwined. Read more

About the MSc programme

This programme is offered by the Department of Anthropology with the assistance of the Department of International Development.

Anthropology and development are tightly entwined: this programme brings together essential elements of both. It combines crucial anthropological insights into - and critiques of - economic globalisation and social transformation with the study of theories about development: both historical experiences and cutting-edge policy debates.

The core Anthropology components of the programme offer a comprehensive study of how anthropologists, from their unique vantage point, have understood globalisation and other economic transformations, as well as giving crucial insights into how they evaluate, criticise and contribute to development. Focussing on both 'Big D' development (schemes of improvement or projects) and 'little d' development (change which occurs as the result of economic growth or modernisation), the programme shows how anthropologists have both changed practices from within as well as critiqued them from the outside. It offers anthropological insights into new forms of production, consumption, exchange and financial circulation that have emerged since the 1980s.

The core International Development component of the programme provides students with key insights into the processes involved in overcoming poverty and creating healthy, wealthy and sustainable social change. The programme uses cutting-edge theory in the social sciences to understand the processes, policy and practice of development.

Graduate destinations

The programme provides ideal preparation for research work in anthropology, international development and related fields.

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This programme is offered by the Department of Anthropology with the assistance of the Department of International Development. Anthropology and development are tightly entwined. Read more

About the MSc programme

This programme is offered by the Department of Anthropology with the assistance of the Department of International Development.

Anthropology and development are tightly entwined: this programme brings together essential elements of both. It combines crucial anthropological insights into - and critiques of - economic globalisation and social transformation with proactive approaches to beneficial change.

The core International Development component of the programme uses classical institutional theory and new institutional economics to understand the role of institutions and organisations in development, giving you the theory and practical tools to drive social transformations forward.

The Development Management Project will allow you to apply your knowledge as together with a team, you undertake "live" consulting work for real-world, public, private, and non-profit organisations.

The core Anthropology components of the programme offer a comprehensive study of how anthropologists have understood globalisation and other economic transformations. You will learn how anthropologists have both changed practices from within as well as critiqued them from the outside. The programme also offers anthropological insights into new forms of production, consumption, exchange and financial circulation that have emerged since the 1980s.

Graduate destinations

The programme provides ideal preparation for research work in anthropology, international development and related fields.

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Tailor-made to the needs of health care practitioners, this research-intensive programme is driven by contemporary policy debates. Read more

Summary

Tailor-made to the needs of health care practitioners, this research-intensive programme is driven by contemporary policy debates. It will give you the opportunity to develop, undertake and publish your own original research.

On this course you will look at how different societies and people understand and react to health and illness. The course will cover the range of societies in our world, looking at responses to health from using ritual to cutting edge technologies and organ transplantation. You will also focus on how our evolving healthcare methods impact on how people see themselves, their families and communities.

As well as providing a wide knowledge base, this course will encourage you to develop your expertise in a number of areas in the anthropology of health, honing your critical, interpretative and evaluative skills, and undertaking continuous personal and professional development.

You will be supported by experienced staff whose research has made a significant impact on global society, and receive training in qualitative and quantitative anthropological research methods relevant to undertaking an extended research project. Based on the wide variety of staff expertise, some of the topics you can currently research may include HIV/AIDS care and intervention, pharmaceuticals, wellbeing and arts health, religion and traditional health care systems, human variation and adaptation. The research that you undertake will be of journal quality and published.

Studying the anthropology of health at Roehampton will give you a global perspective on the discipline, and a wide view of possible career paths. In an increasingly globalised world, you will be equipped with the necessary skills to understand and interpret the cultural patterns in diverse health fields and organisations, enabling you to progress to PhD-level study or a career in the complex and cultural field of healthcare.

Content

In this programme you will have a comprehensive introduction to the anthropology of health. Initial modules will allow you to study the diverse ideas and practice in healthcare, and how these impact on individual and community formation. For example, how do new reproductive technologies impact on notions of kinship within a family and community? How do different medical systems within a community relate to each other? How do organ transplants influence concepts of personhood and the self?

You will also study, through a selection of case studies, the idea of health, wellbeing and illness as states within a continuous process, using the idea of a life-cycle as a model. This module will investigate the ways in which people strive to lead healthy and fulfilling lives and respond to episodes of ill-health and unease. It places medical issues in a context of people’s quest for continuity and their struggles to cope with uncertainty.

Other modules on the course will cover topics such as sociocultural/biological/evolutionary concepts of health; mental and environmental health; food/nutrition; leisure and wellbeing; arts health; and disability. You will also explore lifecycles to understand health issues such as: birth to death, reproduction, ageing and the body, in/fertility, new reproductive technologies, life history narrative, childhood, puberty, rites of passage.

You will undertake an extended piece of original research showing a sustained engagement with an issue in the anthropology of health. It is supported by supervision and is the culmination of the MRes Anthropology of Health programme. This dissertation is supported by the preparation of a policy document or paper for publication.

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This Master's degree will be of particular interest to anyone wishing to develop an anthropological understanding of global development, policy and practice and their local impacts. Read more
This Master's degree will be of particular interest to anyone wishing to develop an anthropological understanding of global development, policy and practice and their local impacts. Its combination of anthropology with other international development disciplines provides a good grounding for anyone wishing to use an anthropological perspective when working in multidisciplinary teams. It provides a solid base for those planning a career in development agencies, the non-governmental sector and other international organisations, and for those working in such institutions who wish to take a larger role in the direct provision of services or policy development. It is also relevant for people interested in policy research, in journalism and in undertaking advanced research in international development, anthropology and related fields.

The programme will help you to develop a critical and theoretical understanding of the issues, processes and institutions central to global poverty, inequality and development. It will help you to develop a thorough understanding of theories and methods in anthropology and to apply these to the field of international development. It will enable you to contrast anthropological perspectives on development with those of other disciplines.

The programme's core modules aim to improve your skills in evaluation and analysis, enabling you to participate critically in debates on the changing nature of the multilateral, bilateral and non-governmental institutions designed to address development issues, the context in which they operate and the constraints they face.

You will also have the opportunity to choose from a range of thematic option modules and to undertake a dissertation that examines development from an anthropological perspective. The option modules and dissertation allow you to tailor your programme according to your personal or career interests.

The transferable skills you will develop/enhance during the programme include the capacity to analyse debates and issues in development, team-working, and written and oral communication. You will also learn to locate and analyse qualitative and quantitative data on development from printed and electronic sources.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

We offer multiple approaches to the study of societies and cultures, human geography, and sustainability, poverty and development, as well as community and citizenship, at local, regional and global levels.
This programme is ideal if you want to further your knowledge of, or are planning a career in, development agencies, international organisations, NGOs, or related areas.
Develop transferable skills, including critical analysis of debates and issues in development, team-working, written and oral communication, and qualitative and quantitative data analysis.
One of the unique strengths of our Department of Geography, Environment and Development Studies is the breadth of research interests of our staff. Subsequently, we offer a very wide range of courses that reflect the disciplinary breadth of development and globalisation, while also allowing you to engage with other disciplines, such as anthropology and sociology.
You will be surrounded by committed fellow students from all cultures, backgrounds and career stages who are eager to share their experience and expertise with their peers.
Ours is a vibrant research culture, powered by a shared passion for learning and intellectual engagement among our academics and students. We have a strong commitment to social justice, which informs and shapes much of our cutting-edge research.
We have strong links with the London International Development Centre, which can enhance your employability.
We offer excellent student support and have a wide range of world-class research resources.

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University College London Institute of Archaeology
Distance from London: 0 miles
This MSc provides students with a foundation in the analysis of human remains, both in archaeological and modern forensic settings. Read more
This MSc provides students with a foundation in the analysis of human remains, both in archaeological and modern forensic settings. With a solid grounding in skeletal and dental anatomy, students learn about morphological variation, development, methods for biological profiling, human disease and forensic approaches to trauma and taphonomy.

Degree information

Students will learn procedures for interpretation and analysis of human skeletal remains - considering both archaeological and modern forensic contexts. There is a unique opportunity to analyse recently excavated human remains, utilising methods and techniques learned during the programme. While the focus of this programme is primarily on modern humans, late Pleistocene hominids are also considered.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), one optional module (15 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Dental Anthropology
-Forensic Anthropology
-Methodology and Issues in Bioarchaeology and Palaeoepidemiology
-Morphology and Palaeopathology of the Human Skeleton
-Variation and Evolution of the Human Skull

Optional modules
-Anthropological and Archaeological Genetics
-Archaeology of Early Modern Humans
-Forensic Archaeology
-Forensic Geoscience (by arrangement with the Jill Dando Centre for Forensic Sciences)
-Funerary Archaeology
-Human Evolution (by arrangement with the Department of Anthropology)
-Palaeoanthropology (by arrangement with the Department of Anthropology)
-Zooarchaeology in Practice
-Other Master's options available at the Institute of Archaeology.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and practical classes. This MSc has strong links with the Forensic Archaeological Science MSc which gives individual programmes an interesting mix of participants and provides many opportunities for discussion. Assessment is through essays, class tests, reports and the dissertation.

Careers

Some graduates of the programme go on to PhD studies, while others go on to work in a range of archaeological and non-archaeological organisations as osteoarchaeological specialists, the police, curators and political researchers.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse archaeology department in the UK, offering students a range of opportunities.

This particular MSc is unique, offering a combination of bioarchaeological and forensic principles for the study of human remains unlike anything else available in the UK. Students further benefit from access to a large collection of skeletal material for study, including dental and palaeopathology reference collections. Access to sophisticated equipment and techniques (laser scanner, SEM, thin sectioning, CT) is also available.

Some lectures will take place at the Royal College of Surgeons and students have access to their teaching collections and museums, including the Wellcome Museum of Anatomy and Pathology.

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This MSc Law, Anthropology and Society draws on the established strengths of the Department of Law and the Department of Anthropology. Read more

About the MSc programme

This MSc Law, Anthropology and Society draws on the established strengths of the Department of Law and the Department of Anthropology. Both Departments rank alongside the most highly rated departments in the subjects worldwide and have important relationships with professional and regulatory bodies.

This interdisciplinary programme forms part of LSE's innovative graduate teaching and research in legal and social science theory. It offers an excellent and intensive introduction to the aspects of anthropological and social theory, essential to the analysis of law in society, and provides training in appropriate research methods. It is aimed at students interested in developing cross-cultural perspectives on law and who wish to go on either to undertake further research in the area, or to develop their interest in an area of professional legal practice.

The compulsory course draws on anthropological themes and texts to develop an innovative perspective on contemporary legal norms and institutions. You will also be expected to choose courses to the value of two full units from a range of options in the Department of Law and/or in the Department of Anthropology.

Graduate destinations

The programme provides an ideal preparation for practical or research work on law in the context of social relations. It enhances a wide range of career paths including policy, research and communications roles within local and national government, charities, public relations and the media.

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