• University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Oxford Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
Nottingham Trent University Featured Masters Courses
OCAD University Featured Masters Courses
Vlerick Business School Featured Masters Courses
Barcelona Technology school Featured Masters Courses
University of the West of England, Bristol Featured Masters Courses
United Kingdom
London×
0 miles
Anthropology×

Full Time MSc Degrees in Anthropology, London, United Kingdom

We have 39 Full Time MSc Degrees in Anthropology, London, United Kingdom

  • Anthropology×
  • United Kingdom
  • London×
  • MSc×
  • Full Time×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 39
Order by 
Brunel University London School of Social Sciences
Distance from London: 0 miles
Brunel was the first university in Europe to establish a Master's degree in Medical Anthropology. Since then we have continued to develop our programme to reflect the changing world in which we live. Read more

About the course

Brunel was the first university in Europe to establish a Master's degree in Medical Anthropology. Since then we have continued to develop our programme to reflect the changing world in which we live.

In short, Medical Anthropology can be described as the study of cultural beliefs and practices associated with the origin, recognition and management of health and illness in different social and cultural groups.

Literally hundreds of students – doctors, nurses, physiotherapists, social workers and other medical professionals among them – can testify to the quality of our programme, having used it either to enhance their professional practice, to change career or to develop their research interests for future studies.

Anthropology at Brunel is well-known for its focus on ethnographic fieldwork: as well as undertaking rigorous intellectual training, all our students are expected to get out of the library and undertake their own, original research – whether in the UK or overseas – and to present their findings in a dissertation. Students take this opportunity to travel to a wide variety of locations across the world – see “Special Features” for more details.

Attendance for lectures full-time: 2 days per week - for 24 weeks
Attendance for lectures part-time: 1 day per week - for 24 weeks (in each of 2 years)

Aims

The degree aims to equip students with a broad, general understanding of anthropology and how it might be applied to medical and health-related problems.

You will develop a deeper understanding of how people’s ideas about the world, as well as the structural constraints within which they find themselves, have an impact on their understanding and experience of health, sickness and disease.

You’ll achieve this through close study of key texts in medical anthropology, the original fieldwork experiences of your lecturers, and through designing and undertaking your own research project.

If you’ve wondered about some or all of the questions below – all of which are addressed in the degree – this could be the course for you:

How does poverty contribute to the profiles of diseases such as diabetes and tuberculosis?
Why are some diseases, such as leprosy or AIDS/HIV, feared and stigmatized?
Why do some biomedical interventions seeking to control infectious and non-infectious diseases work, and others fail?
What might stop some patients seeking conventional treatments for cancers and other conditions – even when they are offered for free – despite the apparent efficacy of the medicines available?
How does one make the distinction between the healthy and the pathological? Is being ‘disabled’, for example, always a negative state, or might some consider it just another, equally valid, way of being?
What are the effects of political, economic and other social conditions on people’s experiences of what, from a biomedical perspective, might be considered the same diseases?
How and why is it appropriate to combine insights emerging from clinical and epidemiological research with ethnographic understandings of health, illness and disease?

The Brunel Medical Anthropology MSc addresses these issues and more in a lively and challenging way, through a programme of lectures, class discussions, and your own – personally directed – final dissertation research project.

Course Content

The main objectives of the course are to provide a rigorous grounding in key topics and perspectives in medical anthropology, and to equip candidates with a range of research skills to enable them to complete research successfully.

The MSc consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full-time

Compulsory modules:

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Dissertation in Medical Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the Arena of Global Health
Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings

Optional modules:

The Anthropology of the Body
Anthropology of the Person
Kinship, Sex and Gender
Anthropological Perspectives of Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of War
Ethnicity, Culture and Identity

Part-time

Year 1

Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings
Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the Arena of Global Health

Year 2

Dissertation in Medical Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
and optional modules

Assessment

Assessment is by essay, practical assignments (e.g. analysis of a short field exercise) and a dissertation of up to 15,000 words. This dissertation is based upon fieldwork undertaken by the candidate. There are no examinations.

Special Features

All our degrees (whether full- or part-time) combine intensive coursework, rigorous training in ethnographic research methods, and a period of fieldwork in the summer term (final summer term if part-time) leading to up to a 15,000 word dissertation.

Students are free to choose their own research topic and geographic area, in consultation with their academic supervisor. In all cases, the dissertation research project provides valuable experience and in many cases it leads to job contacts – forming a bridge to a future career or time out for career development.

In recent years, students have undertaken fieldwork in locations across the world, including India, Mexico, Bolivia, Papua New Guinea, China, Nepal, Peru, Morocco, and New Zealand as well as within the UK and the rest of Europe.

Special scholarships

Cecil Helman Scholarship Fund
Set up to honour the life and work of leading light in international medical anthropology Professor Cecil Helman (1944-2009), the Doctor Cecil Helman Scholarship Fund provides fieldwork support for between two and four students on our MSc Medical Anthropology course.

Dr Helman taught at Brunel University London from 1990, and became a Professor of Social Sciences in 2005. In 2004, he was awarded the American Anthropological Association’s career achievement award, and the following year he won the Royal Anthropological Institute's Lucy Mair medal.

As well as leading the way in Medical Anthropology, Dr Helman exercised his artistic talents through his paintings, poems, fables, and short fiction – all of which revolved around a theme of the human side of medicine and the narratives that surrounded the doctor-patient relationship.

Scholarship
The Cecil Helman Scholarship Fund offers between two and four students up to £1,000 to help them to complete field research for their dissertations.

Selection
The scholarship will be awarded to MSc Medical Anthropology students who demonstrate excellent academic performance and the ability to undertake an original field research project.

Read less
Brunel University London School of Social Sciences
Distance from London: 0 miles
Do our categories of behaviour – normal and abnormal – translate across cultures?. Why do ethnic minorities have different experiences of mental health?. Read more

About the course

Do our categories of behaviour – normal and abnormal – translate across cultures?
Why do ethnic minorities have different experiences of mental health?
Is there a ‘human nature’ underneath all the cultural differences?

Anyone interested in psychological processes, feeling and expression, memory and trauma, culture and personality, will have asked themselves questions of this kind. However, they are less likely to have asked themselves how (or if) we can recognise and analyse different emotions in other cultural settings.

In this new MSc degree, the first of its kind anywhere in Europe, we tackle these and other issues from an anthropological perspective, looking at the social and cultural dimensions of human experience.

By engaging with debates on these important topics and through the examination of world ethnography (including the UK), participants will learn about selfhood, emotion, madness and identity in cultural context.

Anthropology at Brunel is well-known for its focus on ethnographic fieldwork: as well as undertaking rigorous intellectual training, all our students are expected to get out of the library and undertake their own, original research – whether in the UK or overseas – and to present their findings in a dissertation. Students take this opportunity to travel to a wide variety of locations across the world – see “Special Features” for more details.

Attendance for lectures full-time: 2 days per week - for 24 weeks
Attendance for lectures part-time: 1 day per week - for 24 weeks (in each of 2 years)

Aims

This MSc gives candidates a solid grounding in key topics in psychological and psychiatric anthropology.

Through detailed consideration of cases from Britain and around the world, we explore the ways in which person, emotion, and subjectivity are shaped through cultural practices.

Candidates from backgrounds in health, therapy, social work and psychology will be able to challenge the categories and assumptions inherent in standard approaches to psychological and behavioural issues.

Course Content

The MSc consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full-time

Compulsory modules:

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Dissertation in Psychological and Psychiatric Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
Themes in Psychiatric Anthropology
Themes in Psychological Anthropology

Optional modules:

Anthropology of the Body
Anthropology of the Person
Kinship, Sex and Gender
The Anthropology of Childhood
The Anthropology of Youth
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the arena of Global Health
Anthropology of Education
Anthropology of Learning
Ethnicity, Identity and Culture
Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings

Part-time

Year 1

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Themes in Psychiatric Anthropology
Themes in Psychological Anthropology

Year 2

Dissertation in Psychological and Psychiatric Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
and optional modules

Assessment

Assessment is by essay, practical assignment (e.g. analysis of a short field exercise), and dissertation. There are no examinations.

Special Features

This degree looks at psychological and psychiatric topics from an anthropological perspective. There is an overlap with psychology and psychiatry in the things we look at (identity, consciousness, cognition, mental health, etc), but the approach is quite different; indeed, the findings can be startlingly different.

In all cases, we explore the point of view and experience of the insider, the ‘native’, in a range of cultures, we analyse this inside view in relation to the social and cultural environment. What we seek is a dynamic conception of human nature that is true to experience as well as illuminating broader social processes of which the individual may be only partly aware.
 
This degree challenges standard assumptions about normality and deviance, social and personal identity, the boundaries of the self, and the constituents of experience.

For those employed in the health, social and educational sectors, it will enhance professional practice and broaden understanding. But for every student it will open up new avenues.

The programme is run by experts in their field, who have worked in countries across the globe including Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, sub-Saharan Africa, Melanesia, India and Sri Lanka, as well as Britain.

All our degrees (whether full- or part-time) combine intensive coursework, rigorous training in ethnographic research methods, and a period of fieldwork in the summer term (final summer term if part-time) leading to an up to 15,000 word dissertation.

Students are free to choose their own research topic and geographic area, in consultation with their academic supervisor. In all cases, the dissertation research project provides valuable experience and in many cases it leads to job contacts – forming a bridge to a future career or time out for career development.

In recent years, students have undertaken fieldwork in locations across the world, including India, Mexico, Bolivia, Papua New Guinea, China, Nepal, Peru, Morocco, and New Zealand as well as within the UK and the rest of Europe.

Read less
This MSc aims to provide sufficient knowledge of advanced medically related anthropology to enable students to utilise anthropological approaches in a range of research and professional roles. Read more
This MSc aims to provide sufficient knowledge of advanced medically related anthropology to enable students to utilise anthropological approaches in a range of research and professional roles. We train students in theoretical and applied aspects of the field, preparing them for careers that engage with and impact real-world contexts.

Degree information

Students new to social science develop an understanding of a social science approach to the experience of illness and health, and gain skills required in social anthropological field research and analysis. For students with previous social science training, the programme focuses on the dimensions particular to medical anthropology.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core module (45 credits) optional modules in three distinct fields (45 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Clinical Ethnography
-Medical Anthropology

Optional modules - *Medical anthropology options are available in the following areas:
-Anthropology of Science, Society and Biomedicine
-Ritual Healing and Therapeutic Emplotment
-Anthropology of Ethics and Morality
-Anthropology and Psychiatry

*Students may also choose from among a variety of other options within and beyond medical anthropology

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, small-group presentations and discussion, tutorials, laboratory and practical work, independent directed reading, interactive teamwork, and video film and web based courses. Assessment is through one examination, two essays, optional module requirements and the research dissertation.

Careers

Medical Anthropology is a rapidly expanding interdisciplinary field and graduates of our programme have gone on to develop exciting careers in academia, clinical services, social services, government, and non-governmental organisations.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Medical doctor in specialty training, Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital (NHS)
-MBBS (Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery), Newcastle University
-Research Degree: Anthropology, University College London (UCL)
-Midwife, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
-PhD Population Health Sciences, The University of Edinburgh

Employability
Our approach is broad and open-minded, encompassing analysis of diversity issues in clinical practice, critical medical anthropology, psychology/psychiatry, social impact of genetic technologies, demographics, ethics, and studies of traditional healing. UCL is ranked fifth in the QS World University Rankings and our students benefit from a wealth of resources.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Anthropology was the first in the UK to integrate biological and social anthropology with material culture into a broad-based conception of the discipline. UCL Medical Anthropology at UCL integrates interpretive, critical and applied perspectives.

Our excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercises and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK. We are also one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK, offering a breadth of expertise.

Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the wider anthropological community in London and the department's strong links with European universities and international institutions.

Read less
This MSc provides a thorough grounding in anthropological theory and analysis, an understanding of ethnographic approaches to the study of social worlds, and a strong foundation in research practices. Read more
This MSc provides a thorough grounding in anthropological theory and analysis, an understanding of ethnographic approaches to the study of social worlds, and a strong foundation in research practices. Flexible in its structure, the programme enhances students’ employability by focusing also on the interface between anthropological research and professional practices.

Degree information

The programme aims to develop knowledge and understanding of major theoretical, ethnographic and methodological debates in social anthropology. Students develop an understanding of human cultural worlds through in-depth historical study, gain knowledge of specific societies and specialist approaches, and enhance their independent research skills through practical training in research methods.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Critical Issues in Social Anthropology
-Research Methods

Optional modules
-Anthropology of Art and Design
-Social Forms of Revolution
-Mass Consumption and Design
-Anthropology and Psychiatry
-The Anthropology of Islam in Diaspora
-Medical Anthropology
-Anthropology of Latin America
-Documentary Film and the Anthropological Eye
-Social Construction of Landscape
-History and Aesthetics of Documentary
-Risk, Power and Uncertainty

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, small group presentations and discussion, tutorials, laboratory and practical work, independent directed reading, interactive teamwork, and video, film and web based courses. It includes a research seminar series with invited speakers. Assessment is through unseen examination, essays, and the research dissertation.

Careers

Recent students on the course have pursued careers in fields including government, business, development, social research and consultancy, and the media, as well as in academia as professional anthropologists.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Editor, Xinhua News Agency
-History of Crime, Université Catholique de Louvain (Catholic Univers
-PhD Anthropology, Harvard University
-Junior Research Executive, BDRC Continental
-PhD Researcher, Max Planck Society

Employability
In addition to the analytical, interpretative and writing skills honed by its core academic training, the course includes a unique orientation towards the interface between anthropological research and professional practice, allowing students to focus on the anthropology of professions including medicine, development, education, the law, the creative industries. Our close co-operation with UCL’s bespoke careers services, provides opportunities for internships and placements during the programme or following its completion.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Anthropology was the first in the UK to integrate biological and social anthropology with material culture into a broad-based conception of the discipline. It is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK in terms of both staff and research student numbers, offering an exceptional breadth of expertise.

Our excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK.

Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the wider anthropological community in London and the department's strong links with European universities and international institutions.

Read less
Digital technologies are now ubiquitous in nearly every part of our lives, and today's students need to become proficient with digital technologies as research and communication tools. Read more
Digital technologies are now ubiquitous in nearly every part of our lives, and today's students need to become proficient with digital technologies as research and communication tools. The Digital Anthropology MSc at UCL combines technical skill with anthropological research methodologies in order to train students for research and involvement in this emergent world.

Degree information

Students gain skills training in digital technologies, from internet and digital film editing to e-curation and digital ethnography; study the anthropological theories of virtualism, materiality/immateriality and social networks; and develop an understanding of the consequences of digital culture through the ethnographic study of its social and regional impact in a global and comparative context.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of one core module (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Digital Anthropology and Digital Anthropology Practical

Optional modules
-The Anthropology of Art and Design
-Mass Consumption and Design
-The Anthropology of the Built Environment
-Advanced Topics in Digital Ethnography
-Documentary Film and the Anthropological Eye
-Practical Ethnographic and Documentary Filmmaking
-Digital Infrastructure: Materiality, Information and Politics
-Anthropology and Photography
-Social Construction of Landscape

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 15,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practicals and laboratory sessions. It includes a weekly seminar series, with invited international speakers. Assessment is through essays, methodology practicals, written examination and the substantial research dissertation.

Careers

In addition to its importance for careers such as in media, design and museums, digital technology is also integral to development, theoretical and applied anthropology. Companies and institutions collaborating with the MSc are: British Telecom, UCL Computer Sciences, UCL Information Studies, Microsoft Research Cambridge, Skype, Intel, the British Museum, NESTA, NOKIA, the Home Office and Inventi V.

The programme is also developing relationships with: Cultural Informatics Research Centre for the Arts and Humanities (CIRCAh), Slade Centre for Electronic Media in Fine Art, Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis, Centre for Museums, Heritage and Cultural Studies, UCL Interaction Centre, UCL Digital Humanities and UCL Urban Laboratory.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Digital Strategist, Canopy Brand Group.
-Researcher, River Research
-Principal Lecturer and Course Director, University of the Arts, London
-Assistant Print Analyst, GroupM
-Graduate Worker, Dare

Employability
New media and technology companies are showing considerable interest in Digital Anthropology as a degree that qualifies students for positions in all fields of user interaction and research. In the last few years students graduating from the MSc have been recruited by the best international agencies doing research on users' digital practices. In the non-profit sector students have joined organisations involved in policymaking, open access and citizen journalism. The subject is also a good grounding for students who are interested in continuing to a variety of PhD programmes.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Digital Anthropology MSc at UCL is becoming a world leader in the training of researchers in the social and cultural dimensions of information technologies and digital media.

UCL Anthropology is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK and offers an exceptional breadth of expertise. Our excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK. The programme combines ethnographic methods, critical thinking and practical explorations of the digital world and encourages in-depth research to develop the next generation of understanding about the impact, consequences, aesthetics and politics of digital technologies and infrastructures.

Read less
Brunel University London School of Social Sciences
Distance from London: 0 miles
The Anthropology of Childhood, Youth and Education MSc was the first degree of its kind in the world when it was established and is still unique in its thoroughgoing anthropological perspective on what it is to be a child or to be young. Read more

About the course

The Anthropology of Childhood, Youth and Education MSc was the first degree of its kind in the world when it was established and is still unique in its thoroughgoing anthropological perspective on what it is to be a child or to be young.

Its key organising principle is that understanding children requires the study of how their relations with others - peers, older and younger children, parents, teachers and other adults - inform their practices, identities and world views.

This course addresses the following issues from an anthropological perspective:
Do children of ‘different cultures’ live ‘different worlds’?
How does education impact upon children’s worlds and upon social and cultural practices more broadly?
How do everyday processes of learning – both formal and informal - help to shape children’s ideas of and engagement with society at large?
What is the role of schools in the transmission and acquisition of cultural values to children and youth?
And why are adults’ ideas about childhood and youth so important for what children learn and aspire to become?

The distinctiveness of this degree derives from an anthropological approach that focuses on the importance of children’s and youth’s perspectives, and on the role that education (formal and informal) plays in children’s learning processes and in the transmission and acquisition of cultural knowledge.

Anthropology at Brunel is well-known for its focus on ethnographic fieldwork: as well as undertaking rigorous intellectual training, all our students are expected to get out of the library and undertake their own, original research – whether in the UK or overseas – and to present their findings in a dissertation. Students take this opportunity to travel to a wide variety of locations across the world – see “Special Features” for more details.

Attendance for lectures full-time: 2 days per week - for 24 weeks
Attendance for lectures part-time: 1 day per week - for 24 weeks (in each of 2 years)

Aims

Through an examination of ethnographic cases from around the world (including the UK), you will learn about the different ways in which childhood and youth are understood and conceptualised.

You will explore the different educational forms and processes through which cultural knowledge is transmitted and acquired, and how culture impacts upon these processes.

Course Content

The course is designed to show postgraduate students how anthropological approaches can be used to gain access to and understand children and young people's lived experience, their ideas about the world and themselves, and their relations with peers and adults. In so doing, it aims to provide a rigorous grounding in key anthropological ideas and research methods and to show how a comparative social analysis illuminates our understanding of ourselves and other people.

The MSc consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full time

Compulsory modules:

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
Dissertation in Childhood, Youth and Education
The Anthropology of Childhood
The Anthropology of Youth

Optional modules:

Anthropology of the Body
Anthropology of the Person
Kinship, Sex and Gender
Ethnicity, Identity and Culture
Global Agendas on Young People, Rights and Participation*
Foundation Disciplines of Education*
Literature Policy and Analysis*
International Development, Children and Youth

Part-time

Year 1 compulsory modules:

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
The Anthropology of Childhood
The Anthropology of Youth
Anthropology of Education
Anthropology of Learning

Year 2 compulsory modules:

Dissertation in Childhood, Youth and Education
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
and optional modules

Special Features

Our course team has worked in countries across the globe including South, West and East Africa, Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, India and Sri Lanka, as well as Britain.

All our degrees (whether full- or part-time) combine intensive coursework, rigorous training in ethnographic research methods, and a period of fieldwork in the summer term (final summer term if part-time) leading to a 15,000 word dissertation.

Students are free to choose their own research topic and geographic area, in consultation with their academic supervisor. In all cases, the dissertation research project provides valuable experience and in many cases it leads to job contacts – forming a bridge to a future career or time out for career development.

In recent years, students have undertaken fieldwork in locations across the world, including India, Mexico, Bolivia, Papua New Guinea, China, Nepal, Peru, Morocco, and New Zealand as well as within the UK and the rest of Europe.

Teaching and Assessment

Teaching

You will be taught via a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials and film.

Assessment

Assessment is variously by essay, practical assignments (e.g. analysis of a short field exercise), and a dissertation of approximately 15,000 words. This dissertation is based upon fieldwork undertaken by the candidate. There are no examinations.

Read less
Why study at Roehampton. Ideal preparation for those who work in a diverse and multicultural healthcare setting or graduates who would like to pursue a PhD. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • Ideal preparation for those who work in a diverse and multicultural healthcare setting or graduates who would like to pursue a PhD.
  • This course will give you the opportunity to carry out a substantial research project on a topic of your choice, including diet and nutrition, psychiatric and psychological anthropology, and ageing and the body.
  • Flexible study for part-time students.
  • Many MRes students publish their work in international journals and contribute to contemporary policy debates.

Course summary

Tailor-made for graduates who would like to specialise in the field of health and wellbeing and health care practitioners interested in the anthropological approaches to the field. This research-intensive programme is driven by contemporary policy debates. It will give you the opportunity to develop, undertake and publish your own original research.

On this course you will look at how different societies and people understand and react to health and illness. The course will cover the range of societies in our world, looking at responses to health from using ritual to cutting edge technologies and organ transplantation. You will also focus on how our evolving healthcare methods impact on how people see themselves, their families and communities.

As well as providing a wide knowledge base, this course will encourage you to develop your expertise in a number of areas in the anthropology of health, honing your critical, interpretative and evaluative skills, and undertaking continuous personal and professional development.

You will be supported by experienced staff whose research has made a significant impact on global society, and receive training in qualitative and quantitative anthropological research methods relevant to undertaking an extended research project. Based on the wide variety of staff expertise, some of the topics you can currently research may include HIV/AIDS care and intervention, pharmaceuticals, wellbeing and arts health, religion and traditional health care systems, human variation and adaptation. The research that you undertake will be of journal quality and published.

Studying the anthropology of health at Roehampton will give you a global perspective on the discipline, and a wide view of possible career paths. In an increasingly globalised world, you will be equipped with the necessary skills to understand and interpret the cultural patterns in diverse health fields and organisations, enabling you to progress to PhD-level study or a career in the complex and cultural field of healthcare.

Content

In this programme you will have a comprehensive introduction to the anthropology of health. Initial modules will allow you to study the diverse ideas and practice in healthcare, and how these impact on individual and community formation. For example, how do new reproductive technologies impact on notions of kinship within a family and community? How do different medical systems within a community relate to each other? How do organ transplants influence concepts of personhood and the self?

You will also study, through a selection of case studies, the idea of health, wellbeing and illness as states within a continuous process, using the idea of a life-cycle as a model. This module will investigate the ways in which people strive to lead healthy and fulfilling lives and respond to episodes of ill-health and unease. It places medical issues in a context of people’s quest for continuity and their struggles to cope with uncertainty.

Other modules on the course will cover topics such as sociocultural/biological/evolutionary concepts of health; mental and environmental health; food/nutrition; leisure and wellbeing; arts health; and disability. You will also explore lifecycles to understand health issues such as: birth to death, reproduction, ageing and the body, in/fertility, new reproductive technologies, life history narrative, childhood, puberty, rites of passage.

You will undertake an extended piece of original research showing a sustained engagement with an issue in the anthropology of health. It is supported by supervision and is the culmination of the MRes Anthropology of Health programme. This dissertation is supported by the preparation of a policy document or paper for publication.

Modules:

  • Health and Well-being
  • Lifecycles
  • Research Methods in Anthropology
  • Dissertation

Career options

The programme will prepare you for PhD study in Anthropology (health and related areas), senior healthcare policy and advisory work, advanced healthcare delivery in diverse and multicultural settings, and overseas development work.

Email Now



Read less
About the MSc programme. The MSc Social Anthropology is an excellent and intensive introduction to the discipline of social anthropology. Read more

About the MSc programme

The MSc Social Anthropology is an excellent and intensive introduction to the discipline of social anthropology. The programme gives you a thorough grounding in anthropology, both in terms of its ethnographic diversity and its theoretical development.

Teaching is directly informed and enhanced by the strong tradition of fieldwork-based research within the Department. Compulsory components include a course which examines the relationship between theory and ethnography in modern social and cultural anthropology, and a 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic of your choice.

This programme is suitable for graduates with a degree in any discipline, and prior knowledge of anthropology, while beneficial, is not essential. It is suitable either as an introduction to the subject for those intending to proceed with other careers, or is an ideal preparation for further research work in anthropology and related disciplines.

Graduate destinations

The programme is an ideal preparation for research work in anthropology and related fields.

Further information on graduate destinations for this programme



Read less
About the MSc Programme. This is a specialist stream within our general MSc Social Anthropology programme focusing on the anthropological study of human learning and cognition. Read more

About the MSc Programme

This is a specialist stream within our general MSc Social Anthropology programme focusing on the anthropological study of human learning and cognition. You will examine cognitive development from a cross-cultural perspective in a Department which combines a strong tradition of fieldwork-based research with innovative experimental research.

Compulsory components include a general core course in Social Anthropology, a specialist core course in The Anthropology of Learning and Cognition, and a 10,000 word dissertation on an approved topic within the subfield of anthropology of learning and cognition subfield.

This programme will be of special interest to those who want to study the psychological mechanisms that make human cultures possible and want to study human psychology from a cross-cultural perspective. It is suitable for graduates with a degree in any discipline, and prior knowledge of anthropology is not essential. It is suitable either as an introduction to the subject for those intending to proceed with other careers, or is an ideal preparation for further research work in anthropology and related disciplines.

Graduate destinations

The programme is an ideal preparation for research work in anthropology and related fields.

Further information on graduate destinations for this programme



Read less
Contemporary concerns with environment and development require a combination of biological and social anthropological approaches to examine the ecology of resource use in developing societies. Read more
Contemporary concerns with environment and development require a combination of biological and social anthropological approaches to examine the ecology of resource use in developing societies. This MSc evaluates the environmental implications and outcomes of these activities in terms of human subsistence and welfare via a systematic, theoretical and methodological training.

Degree information

Drawing on the strengths of our broad-based department and expertise in human ecology, social anthropology and demography, key areas of investigation include: the implications of changing environments for production systems and human welfare, the sustainable use of natural resources in developing countries and the environmental and welfare impacts of changing patterns of resource use with development.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of three core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules:
-Resource Use and Impacts
-Anthropological Research Methods
-Statistics

Optional modules - choose two options from within the department - and in some cases outside the department - including at least one of the following that have been designed specifically for this programme:
-The Ecology of Human Groups
-Population and Development
-Anthropology of Development

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars, group presentations, tutorials, interactive teamwork, video, and film and web based courses. It includes a non-examined weekly seminar series with both internal and invited speakers. Assessment is through essays, seen and unseen examinations, and the research dissertation.

Careers

Graduates of this programme have gone on to a wide range of relevant careers in research, teaching, consultancy, policy and advocacy work in universities, governmental bodies, national and international NGOs and international research organisations such as the CGIAR.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Public Researcher and Administrator, Global Canopy Program
-Education for Sustainable Development Researcher, Change Agents
-Anthropologist, Fundación Etnollano
-International Health Programme Officer, Royal College of General Practitioners
-Volunteer Co-Ordinator, Marine Research and Education Fund of Andenes (MAREFA)

Employability
The Master's integrates both natural and social science approaches and combines this with training in the methodological and practical dimensions of field work. The interdisciplinary perspective and demonstrable research skills obtained are an ideal training ground for students wishing to work with government, national or international NGOs or conduct further PhD research in the fields of environment and/or development. In addition to specialist knowledge and fieldwork experience, other skills graduates acquire include presentation and IT, research design and development, qualitative and quantitative analysis, project management, team building and leadership, fundraising and critical analysis and evaluation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Anthropology is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK offering an exceptional breadth of expertise. Our results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK.

Teaching staff are all actively engaged in research or consultancy work in the area of environment and development. A strong alumni network within the Human Ecology Research Group and dedicated programmes of invited speakers allow for significant networking opportunities.

Students are also encouraged to take advantage of the wider anthropological community in London.

Read less
About the MSc programme. Anthropology and development are tightly entwined. this programme brings together essential elements of both. Read more

About the MSc programme

Anthropology and development are tightly entwined: this programme brings together essential elements of both. It combines crucial anthropological insights into – and critiques of – economic globalisation and social transformation with the study of theories about development: both historical experiences and cutting-edge policy debates. 

This programme is offered by the Department of Anthropology with the assistance of the Department of International Development. 

The core Anthropology components of the programme offer you a comprehensive study of how anthropologists, from their unique vantage point, have understood globalisation and other economic transformations, as well as giving crucial insights into how they evaluate, criticise and contribute to development. Focusing on both 'Big D' development (schemes of improvement or projects) and 'little d' development (change which occurs as the result of economic growth or modernisation), the programme shows you how anthropologists have both changed practices from within as well as critiqued them from the outside. It also provides anthropological insights into new forms of production, consumption, exchange and financial circulation that have emerged since the 1980s.

The core International Development component of the programme provides you with key insights into the processes involved in overcoming poverty and creating healthy, wealthy and sustainable social change. The programme uses the latest theory in the social sciences to understand the processes, policy and practice of development.

Graduate destinations

The programme provides ideal preparation for research work in anthropology, international development and related fields. 

Further information on graduate destinations for this programme 



Read less
About the MSc programme. Anthropology and development are tightly entwined. This programme brings together essential elements of both. Read more

About the MSc programme

Anthropology and development are tightly entwined. This programme brings together essential elements of both. It combines crucial anthropological insights into, and critiques of economic globalisation and social transformation with proactive approaches to beneficial change.

This programme is offered by the Department of Anthropology with the assistance of the Department of International Development.

The core international development component of the programme uses classical institutional theory and new institutional economics to understand the role of institutions and organisations in development, giving you the theory and practical tools to drive social transformations forward. The Development Management Project will allow you to apply your knowledge as, together with a team, you undertake 'live' consulting work for real-world, public, private, and non-profit organisations.

The core Anthropology components of the programme offer a comprehensive study of how anthropologists have understood globalisation and other economic transformations. Focusing on both 'Big D' development (schemes of improvement or projects) and 'little d' development (change which occurs as the result of economic growth or modernisation), the programme shows you how anthropologists have changed practices from within as well as critiqued them from the outside. It also provides anthropological insights into new forms of production, consumption, exchange and financial circulation that have emerged since the 1980s

Graduate destinations

The programme provides ideal preparation for research work in anthropology, international development and related fields. 

Further information on graduate destinations for this programme 



Read less
This Master's degree will be of particular interest to anyone wishing to develop an anthropological understanding of global development, policy and practice and their local impacts. Read more
This Master's degree will be of particular interest to anyone wishing to develop an anthropological understanding of global development, policy and practice and their local impacts. Its combination of anthropology with other international development disciplines provides a good grounding for anyone wishing to use an anthropological perspective when working in multidisciplinary teams. It provides a solid base for those planning a career in development agencies, the non-governmental sector and other international organisations, and for those working in such institutions who wish to take a larger role in the direct provision of services or policy development. It is also relevant for people interested in policy research, in journalism and in undertaking advanced research in international development, anthropology and related fields.

The programme will help you to develop a critical and theoretical understanding of the issues, processes and institutions central to global poverty, inequality and development. It will help you to develop a thorough understanding of theories and methods in anthropology and to apply these to the field of international development. It will enable you to contrast anthropological perspectives on development with those of other disciplines.

The programme's core modules aim to improve your skills in evaluation and analysis, enabling you to participate critically in debates on the changing nature of the multilateral, bilateral and non-governmental institutions designed to address development issues, the context in which they operate and the constraints they face.

You will also have the opportunity to choose from a range of thematic option modules and to undertake a dissertation that examines development from an anthropological perspective. The option modules and dissertation allow you to tailor your programme according to your personal or career interests.

The transferable skills you will develop/enhance during the programme include the capacity to analyse debates and issues in development, team-working, and written and oral communication. You will also learn to locate and analyse qualitative and quantitative data on development from printed and electronic sources.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

We offer multiple approaches to the study of societies and cultures, human geography, and sustainability, poverty and development, as well as community and citizenship, at local, regional and global levels.
This programme is ideal if you want to further your knowledge of, or are planning a career in, development agencies, international organisations, NGOs, or related areas.
Develop transferable skills, including critical analysis of debates and issues in development, team-working, written and oral communication, and qualitative and quantitative data analysis.
One of the unique strengths of our Department of Geography, Environment and Development Studies is the breadth of research interests of our staff. Subsequently, we offer a very wide range of courses that reflect the disciplinary breadth of development and globalisation, while also allowing you to engage with other disciplines, such as anthropology and sociology.
You will be surrounded by committed fellow students from all cultures, backgrounds and career stages who are eager to share their experience and expertise with their peers.
Ours is a vibrant research culture, powered by a shared passion for learning and intellectual engagement among our academics and students. We have a strong commitment to social justice, which informs and shapes much of our cutting-edge research.
We have strong links with the London International Development Centre, which can enhance your employability.
We offer excellent student support and have a wide range of world-class research resources.

Read less
University College London Institute of Archaeology
Distance from London: 0 miles
This MSc provides students with a foundation in the analysis of human remains, both in archaeological and modern forensic settings. Read more
This MSc provides students with a foundation in the analysis of human remains, both in archaeological and modern forensic settings. With a solid grounding in skeletal and dental anatomy, students learn about morphological variation, development, methods for biological profiling, human disease and forensic approaches to trauma and taphonomy.

Degree information

Students will learn procedures for interpretation and analysis of human skeletal remains - considering both archaeological and modern forensic contexts. There is a unique opportunity to analyse recently excavated human remains, utilising methods and techniques learned during the programme. While the focus of this programme is primarily on modern humans, late Pleistocene hominids are also considered.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), one optional module (15 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Dental Anthropology
-Forensic Anthropology
-Methodology and Issues in Bioarchaeology and Palaeoepidemiology
-Morphology and Palaeopathology of the Human Skeleton
-Variation and Evolution of the Human Skull

Optional modules
-Anthropological and Archaeological Genetics
-Archaeology of Early Modern Humans
-Forensic Archaeology
-Forensic Geoscience (by arrangement with the Jill Dando Centre for Forensic Sciences)
-Funerary Archaeology
-Human Evolution (by arrangement with the Department of Anthropology)
-Palaeoanthropology (by arrangement with the Department of Anthropology)
-Zooarchaeology in Practice
-Other Master's options available at the Institute of Archaeology.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and practical classes. This MSc has strong links with the Forensic Archaeological Science MSc which gives individual programmes an interesting mix of participants and provides many opportunities for discussion. Assessment is through essays, class tests, reports and the dissertation.

Careers

Some graduates of the programme go on to PhD studies, while others go on to work in a range of archaeological and non-archaeological organisations as osteoarchaeological specialists, the police, curators and political researchers.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse archaeology department in the UK, offering students a range of opportunities.

This particular MSc is unique, offering a combination of bioarchaeological and forensic principles for the study of human remains unlike anything else available in the UK. Students further benefit from access to a large collection of skeletal material for study, including dental and palaeopathology reference collections. Access to sophisticated equipment and techniques (laser scanner, SEM, thin sectioning, CT) is also available.

Some lectures will take place at the Royal College of Surgeons and students have access to their teaching collections and museums, including the Wellcome Museum of Anatomy and Pathology.

Read less
About the MSc programme. This programme provides a unique interdisciplinary, broad social science perspective on the study of religion. Read more

About the MSc programme

This programme provides a unique interdisciplinary, broad social science perspective on the study of religion. It offers you the opportunity to investigate the increasing prevalence of religious and secular dynamics across the globe and how concepts of religion interweave with aspects of today’s society, in theory and practice.

The programme tackles topics of key importance, from policy-relevant connections between religion and public life, and religion and politics, to more theoretical debates about the nature of belief, ritual, and questions of being. It allows you to explore the role of religion in the developing world, and illuminates Western models of religion and secularisation through comparison with those in the global south. The Department’s strong tradition of fieldwork is an important element of the programme, with the core course giving you an in-depth knowledge of case studies based on your lecturers’ own expert primary research on religion.

The programme is intended for graduates of the humanities and social sciences, but will be of interest to those with a traditional theological background, or with pastoral or vocational training, or careers in journalism, charity or NGO work, or teaching, as well as those who would like to consider religion from an alternative and complementary perspective.

Graduate destinations

The programme is an ideal preparation for research work in the study of religion. Many graduates from the Department go on to complete PhDs. It will also provide a foundation for those wishing to find employment in the civil service, policy and diplomacy, education, social work, journalism and NGOs.

Further information on graduate destinations for this programme



Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X