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University of Edinburgh, Full Time MSc Degrees in Law

We have 2 University of Edinburgh, Full Time MSc Degrees in Law

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This programme provides an excellent opportunity to study new global developments in the field of crime, criminal law, justice and security. Read more

This programme provides an excellent opportunity to study new global developments in the field of crime, criminal law, justice and security. The MSc is suitable both for students familiar with law, politics or criminology from undergraduate study and for those who are new to these subjects.

As a student on this programme, you will have access to the expertise and insight of our active community of researchers, international scholars and local practitioners. The programme is truly interdisciplinary with teaching provided by academics from both Edinburgh Law School and the School of Social & Political Science.

The two compulsory courses on the programme introduce you to different forms and contexts of global crime and how we respond to these, whilst the wide range of courses allows you to tailor the programme to your area of interest.

You will benefit from top-quality training in research methods and skills essential both for doctoral study, or employment in the field of criminal justice and security.

Programme structure

You must complete 180 credits of study – 60 credits are taken in the compulsory dissertation and the remaining 120 credits are taken in taught courses.

You will experience a range of teaching styles on these courses, led by members of the Law School academic community and experienced legal and industry practitioners.

You are expected to prepare in advance by reading the required materials and by reflecting on the issues to be discussed, and your participation in classes will be assessed.

For the dissertation you will have a supervisor from whom you can expect guidance and support, but the purpose of the dissertation is to allow you to independently design and conduct a piece of research and analysis.

Please note that due to unforeseen circumstances or lack of demand for particular courses, we may not be able to run all courses as advertised come the start of the academic year.

Learning outcomes

Students who complete the MSc will acquire an advanced understanding of the major contemporary debates and theoretical perspectives on crime, justice and security in a global context, and will enhance their research and analytic skills.

Career opportunities

Our graduates have found employment in a range of settings including commercial security consultancy and management, banking and anti-money laundering work, research, and civil service and third sector roles. Some have gone on to further professional or academic study in crime-related fields, and those with existing professional experience have been promoted in their workplace.



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This programme provides a platform to learn about and engage with the latest criminological research and apply this to current theory and debate in this interdisciplinary field. Read more

This programme provides a platform to learn about and engage with the latest criminological research and apply this to current theory and debate in this interdisciplinary field. This MSc is suitable both for those who have studied criminology at undergraduate level and for those who are new to the subject.

As a student on this programme you will be part of our vibrant community of active researchers, international scholars and local practitioners in criminology and criminal justice. You will have ample opportunity to draw from our academics’ research, which is both theoretical and empirical and makes a difference to the world both locally and globally.

You will benefit from top-quality training in criminological research methods and skills essential both for the further study of criminology (we have a strong cohort of criminology PhD students, some recruited from this MSc) and for employment in the criminal justice field.

Programme structure

You must complete 180 credits of study – 60 credits are taken in the compulsory dissertation and the remaining 120 credits are taken in taught courses.

You will study with members of the Law School academic community. You are expected to prepare in advance by reading the required materials and by reflecting on the issues to be discussed, and your participation in classes will be assessed.

For the dissertation you will have a supervisor from whom you can expect guidance and support, but the purpose of the dissertation is to allow you to independently design and conduct a piece of research and analysis.

Please note that due to unforeseen circumstances or lack of demand for particular courses, we may not be able to run all courses as advertised come the start of the academic year.

Learning outcomes

Students who complete the MSc have the opportunity to acquire a more sophisticated understanding of major contemporary debates in criminology in both its theoretical and applied aspects, and to achieve enhanced understanding and skills in research practice and method.

Career opportunities

Graduates from this MSc have gone on to a wide range of careers, including working with offenders and victims, for various agencies including police, prisons/correctional services, and governmental and non-governmental agencies.

Many have gone on to careers as academics or criminology researchers.



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