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Full Time MSc Degrees in History & Archaeology, Glasgow, United Kingdom

We have 18 Full Time MSc Degrees in History & Archaeology, Glasgow, United Kingdom

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University of Glasgow College of Social Sciences
Distance from Glasgow: 0 miles
This programme provides you with thorough research training, an outstanding learning experience, and a wide set of transferable skills in the conception, design and execution of a research project. Read more
This programme provides you with thorough research training, an outstanding learning experience, and a wide set of transferable skills in the conception, design and execution of a research project.

Why this programme

-If you are looking to pursue a specialisation in the history of medicine, led and supported by internationally-regarded historians, this programme is ideal for you.
-Strong links with the University's Hunterian Museum, Anatomy Museum and Art Gallery, will give you access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
-The Centre for the History of Medicine has a reference library, computing facilities, and other equipment providing excellent support for research. We also run research seminars and workshops, and an annual research forum, all of which bring in speakers from throughout the world.
-Our researchers have access to rich archival materials held locally by the Greater Glasgow Health Board, the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow, Glasgow University Archives, Glasgow City Archives and the Special Collections of the Glasgow University Library. Archives elsewhere in Scotland are also easily accessible.

Programme structure

You will take four core courses and two optional courses, you will then produce a dissertation on a topic related to the history of medicine.

Core courses
-Research resources and skills for historians
-Approaches to history
-History of medicine 1: studies in the history of medicine before 1850
-History of medicine 2: studies in the history of medicine from 1850 to 2000.

There are variations to the structure of the programme depending on your choice of an MSc or MLitt.

For the MSc you need to choose two optional courses from the social sciences training courses
-Quantitative methods
-Qualitative methods
-Introduction to social theory for researchers.

Other optional courses are taught in History, Economic and Social History (in the College of Social Sciences), and by related Subject Areas in the School of Humanities (Archaeology, Celtic, Classics) and the College of Arts (such as English Language and French).

You will be taught through a series of seminars and workshops. Internationally recognised historians give guest lectures throughout the year.

Career prospects

Apart from continuing to study a PhD, you can transfer the Arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the modern public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, journalism and teaching.

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University of Glasgow College of Social Sciences
Distance from Glasgow: 0 miles
The Masters in History provides you with an outstanding learning experience in the company of Glasgow's thirty-strong cohort of historians, and the opportunity to conceive, design and execute a research project/dissertation. Read more
The Masters in History provides you with an outstanding learning experience in the company of Glasgow's thirty-strong cohort of historians, and the opportunity to conceive, design and execute a research project/dissertation. The programme combines training in historical theory, skills and methods with a wide range of specialist taught options which cover all periods from medieval to late modern, in relation to Scotland, Britain, Europe, America and elsewhere.

Why this programme

-Our links with the University’s museum and art gallery, The Hunterian, provide access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
-You will also enjoy access to The Baillie Collection, our prized collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history, which includes printed state papers, Historical Manuscript Commission publications and a select collection of modern monographs.
-If you are looking for the opportunity to pursue your own historical interests in a lively and friendly environment, led and supported by internationally-regarded historians, this programme is ideal for you.

Programme structure

Our pathway structure allows you to tailor your degree to match an interest in one of the following fields:
-Medieval history
-Modern and late modern history
-Scottish history
-Social and cultural history
-Gender history
-Military history

Each programme is built around a hands-on research training course, specialised courses on historical and theoretical themes, and other courses developing your technical skills and other abilities like languages and palaeography.

For your chosen programme, there will be a guided selection of courses that will provide you with specialised knowledge in that field. You will be taught through a series of seminars and workshops. Internationally recognised historians give guest lectures throughout the year.

These courses are taught in history, economic and social history (in the College of Social Sciences), and by related subject areas in the School of Humanities (archaeology, Celtic, classics) and the College of Arts (such as English language and French).

In the final part of the programme, you will select a specialised topic and conduct original primary source research for your dissertation. You are supported in your research and writing up by an assigned supervisor with expertise in your field of enquiry.

Core course
-Research resources and skills for historians

Career prospects

Apart from continuing to study a PhD, you can transfer the Arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the modern public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, journalism and teaching.

Positions held by recent History graduates include Editor Business & History Products, Lead Scholar/Instructor and Secretary.

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University of Glasgow College of Arts
Distance from Glasgow: 0 miles
The first of its kind in the world, Ancestral Studies is an innovative new interdisciplinary programme. Read more

The first of its kind in the world, Ancestral Studies is an innovative new interdisciplinary programme. Uniting teaching across humanities and sciences, Ancestral Studies explores the social and biological contours of identity, allowing you to study across multiple disciplines, create your own curriculum and pursue self-directed unique research.

Why this programme

  • A truly interdisciplinary degree programme taught collaboratively by world leading academic departments
  • An emphasis on building practical skills through professional masterclasses and skills workshops
  • An immersive learning experience drawing upon the unique Scottish landscape and its rich history 
  • The opportunity to contribute to, and shape, a new academic field of research

Programme structure

This course can be taken full or part time (at the convener’s discretion). It is comprised of two core modules and several optional taught modules. This structure allows you to shape your own curriculum and tailor it to your interests (insofar as staffing and course availability allows). You will work closely with the convener to shape a meaningful and intellectually cogent programme of study. Over the summer you will complete a dissertation or professional report dependent upon your interests.

Core and Optional Courses

Core Courses

Research Methods for Ancestral Studies introduces you to key research methodologies and practices drawn from a range of disciplines. You will receive an introduction to specialist and transferable skills such as working with archives and online genealogical resources, visual culture, heritage landscapes, museums and material culture. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation of primary sources. 

Approaches to Ancestral Studies provides a conceptual framework for exploring core themes of the discipline through weekly topics drawn from multiple disciplines. You will consider questions of identity (genetic and social), examine current trends in family history and heritage research and address questions of past generations and their experiences of place, language and material culture. You will be exposed to theoretical, critical and practical insights from across the arts, humanities and sciences to explore ancestry, relational identity, intellectual inheritance and memory works.

Optional courses

Optional courses will be drawn from a range of disciplines and will therefore change on a yearly basis. You will work with the programme convener to choose a complement of optional courses that will align with your interests. These courses may be taken from History, Archaeology, Celtic and Gaelic, and more (depending on course offerings in any particular year).

Dissertation

MSc students will complete a dissertation. Innovative, cross-disciplinary dissertations are encouraged and will be supervised/co-supervised within the appropriate Schools.  

Career prospects

The combination of practical and theory based learning will equip graduates of Ancestral Studies with a well-balanced and broad set of transferrable skills. You will have practical research skills in primary and secondary sources (from artefacts to archives), the ability to critically evaluate sources, to debate and formulate your own arguments and theories, and to present your research to your peers.

Potential career paths include academic and commercial archaeology, a variety of positions within museums, galleries, archives and libraries, or within the growing Ancestral Tourism sector.



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University of Glasgow College of Arts
Distance from Glasgow: 0 miles
Material culture and artefact studies combines the archaeological recovery and specialist examination of an object with its presentation, management and understanding within a cultural context. Read more

Material culture and artefact studies combines the archaeological recovery and specialist examination of an object with its presentation, management and understanding within a cultural context.

Why this programme

  • This MSc in Material Culture & Artefact Studies will prepare you to participate at both a practical and theoretical level within the field of specialist artefactual analysis.
  • You will be able to undertake a work placement to gain valuable work experience in a museum, archaeological unit or other cultural institution.
  • You will benefit from the involvement of staff from Glasgow Museums, National Museums Scotland and other institutions within Scotland, and will have the opportunity to work with collections from local museums, including the University’s own Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery.

Programme structure

The taught component consists of core courses and optional courses, running over two semesters.

Assessment is normally focused on written performance, but oral presentation skills and other modes of assessment allow you to develop your writing skills in a number of formats. This is in addition to the practical emphasis on developing your ability to interpret and analyse artefacts.

For the MSc you can opt to do either a dissertation or an extended work placement (assessed by work placement eportfolio and either a research report or a student exhibition design).

Core courses

  • Material culture in context
  • The process of artefact studies.

Optional courses include modules such as:

  • Lithic analysis
  • Independent study
  • Critical themes in the display and reception of objects
  • Early medieval artefacts 
  • Viking and late Norse artefacts (AD 750-1350). 
  • Optional courses drawn from Archaeology or from other programmes across the University can be taken by agreement with the programme convener.

Career prospects

The two strands to the degree enable you to prepare for further doctoral research whilst also providing opportunities for valuable vocational experience in a commercial environment.

The wealth of experience and knowledge provided by the interdisciplinary nature and focus of the degree and the networks and relationships developed during their time here, has stood past graduates in good stead upon graduation. They have found full-time positions with Historic Scotland, Headland Archaeology Ltd, Guard Archaeology Ltd. While others are working with various heritage organisations and some are continuing with their postgraduate studies.

Several of our international graduates have found employment working at the Smithsonian, Washington D.C and at the Pink Palace Museum, Memphis Tennessee. Others continue to work in the Cultural Resource Management sector. Several students have gone on to further doctoral research at Glasgow University and beyond, on prehistoric stone tools, Shetland lace knitting, Bronze Age ceramics and medieval settlement.



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The MSc International Heritage Visualisation will equip candidates with the knowledge and skill sets required to create digital records and visualisations of heritage sites and objects of local, national and international significance. Read more
The MSc International Heritage Visualisation will equip candidates with the knowledge and skill sets required to create digital records and visualisations of heritage sites and objects of local, national and international significance.

Candidates will become familiar with the range of skills needed for the meaningful 3D documentation of cultural sites and heritage assets, and the ability to present them effectively for use by the varied user groups and audiences engaged in areas such as cultural heritage management, conservation, academic research, tourism and beyond.

The course is structured using a combination of lectures, seminars and hands on recording (including the use of laser scanning and photogrammetry) and model development to enable students to understand the process of creating original 3D datasets from critical approaches and project planning through to technical execution and delivery. Utilising experienced professionals from the fields of heritage management, buildings recording and 3D modelling the candidates will benefit from the courses' novel approach to fostering multi-disciplinary study in heritage, architectural visualisation, animation, interactive software development and archaeological practice.

Programme Structure:

Stage 1

Core Research Skills for Postgraduates
3D Modelling & Animation
Digital Documentation of Cultural Heritage
Interactive Heritage Visualisation

Stage 2

Data Acquisition & Processing
2 School of Simulation and Visualisation/GSA Electives. Recommended electives include courses in advanced 3D modelling, audio for interactive environments, and a number of electives offered by the Mackintosh School of Architecture.

Stage 3

MSc Research Project (60 credits)
Part time study is also available. Please see the Part Time Study Guide for more information.

Scholarships and Funded Places

Arange of scholarships are available which cover partial or full fees. More information can be found here.

Entry requirements:

You should have a Honours degree or equivalent professional practice in any of the following disciplines:

History, archaeology, geography, cultural studies, architecture, the built environment, building surveying, city planning
3D art and design, product design, digital media, digital arts, 3D modelling and animation
Computer science or computer graphics

High calibre graduates from other disciplines may be considered if they are able to demonstrate an interest and ability in the field of heritage visualisation.

IELTS 6.0 for overseas applicants for whom English is not their first language.

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University of Glasgow College of Arts
Distance from Glasgow: 0 miles
The Masters in Museum Studies will help you develop the knowledge, understanding and skills required of today’s versatile museum professional. Read more

The Masters in Museum Studies will help you develop the knowledge, understanding and skills required of today’s versatile museum professional. It has been designed in conjunction with employers to meet their needs for well-rounded museum professionals trained in the latest theoretical and practical approaches.

Why this programme

  • Glasgow’s civic and university collections are the richest and most diverse outside of London and are of international standing.
  • Taught alongside staff from the University's own museum and art gallery, The Hunterian, the degree programme provides a combination of academic and practitioner input.
  • If you want to develop a career in the cultural heritage sector, this programme has been developed for you.
  • Three versions of the degree allow you follow standard or specialist strands.
  • There are great opportunities for you to take practice based courses or work placements at the museums and galleries that partner the programme.
  • We welcome applicants from across the arts and sciences, current professionals or career changers, from the UK or abroad.

Programme structure

Three different strands of the MSc Museum Studies are offered.

The Theory and Practice strand is our standard Museum Studies programme where the museum itself is the primary object of study.

Two specialist strands: Collecting and Provenance; and Artefact and Material Culture, enable you to combine courses in Museum Studies with specialist courses from Masters programmes provided by Archaeology and History of Art.

Each strand will give you a different mix of core and optional courses. All students take two 20 credit common core courses in Museology and Research and Professional Skills. You also take four 20 credit courses from your strand (a combination of strand core and optional courses) and one 60 credit research project.

Career prospects



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University of Glasgow College of Arts
Distance from Glasgow: 0 miles
Our History Masters covers all periods from medieval to late modern, focusing on Scotland, Britain, Europe and America. You’ll study historical skills and methods and produce a research dissertation based on primary sources. Read more

Our History Masters covers all periods from medieval to late modern, focusing on Scotland, Britain, Europe and America. You’ll study historical skills and methods and produce a research dissertation based on primary sources. History at Glasgow rates joint 4th in the UK for research excellence and impact. Our research directs our postgraduate teaching so that you'll explore cutting-edge topics.

Why this programme

  • Glasgow is an outstanding resource hub for the study of History. On campus, the University Library holds superb printed and manuscript collections from the medieval to the present. You can also use the Baillie Collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history.
  • The University’s Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery provides access to primary source materials in fields such as fine art, numismatics and ethnography. The city is home to world-class museums and galleries, the Mitchell Library and Glasgow Women’s Library.
  • History staff contribute to the Masters programmes in American Studies, War Studies and Global Security, and you can take taught options from these and other programmes, enabling you to tailor the programme to your interests.
  • We are a dynamic and supportive research community, where you’re encouraged to take part in many research-led initiatives such as seminar programmes.

Programme Structure

You’ll take:

  • One core course
  • Five optional courses

You’ll also produce a dissertation.

Semester 1: September to December

  • Research, Resources and Skills for Historians (RRSH) (Core course)
  • Two (or three) optional courses

Semester 2: January to March

  • Research, Resources and Skills for Historians (RRSH) (Core course)
  • Three (or two) optional courses

Summer: April to September

Dissertation

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is mainly seminar and discussion-based, in small classes. Technical skills are taught through lectures and workshops associated with the core course, while the conceptual foundations for gender history are taught through the weekly seminars. Independent and self-reflective critical work is fostered through written assignments and seminar presentations, culminating in the dissertation.

Career prospects

The research skills and methods you’ll gain on this programme give you the transferable skills for positions in the public and private sectors, including heritage policy and projects, media and teaching. The programme is also a good foundation for a PhD. 



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University of Glasgow College of Social Sciences
Distance from Glasgow: 0 miles
This programme is an advanced study of historical and contemporary developments in the economy, politics, culture and society of Russia and the countries of Eastern Europe and Eurasia. Read more
This programme is an advanced study of historical and contemporary developments in the economy, politics, culture and society of Russia and the countries of Eastern Europe and Eurasia.

Why this programme

-This programme is for those planning careers in major public, commercial and voluntary institutional settings who wish to acquire a specialised knowledge of Central and Eastern Europe and proficiency in one of the region's languages.
-Language and other study trips to the region are available. You will be offered the opportunity to spend a month in Russia. Some financial support is available to help you fund these trips.
-Choose between three specialist pathways: Central and East European Studies, Russian Studies, and Eurasian Studies.
-You will examine the history of communism and why it collapsed. You will learn about the impact of international organisations (e.g. the European Union, NATO) and of major world powers on the region as well as retaining an appreciation of the region’s internal diversity in a variety of spheres (cultural, economic, ethnic, political and social).
-You can participate in our extensive range of conferences, workshops, business days, seminars and networking activities involving representatives of the business, policy-making and third sector communities.
-The University Library holds one of the best Russian, Central and East European collections in the world.

Programme structure

You will take four core and one optional course, as well as complete a dissertation as a piece of independent research. You will select a specialist pathway, which includes a specialist core courses and a language. (choices vary depending on pathway).

Core courses
All pathways
-Issues in Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies
-Research methods for studying Russia, Eastern Europe & Eurasia

Central and East European Studies
-Geopolitics of Central and Eastern Europe OR Statehood and nationality in Central and Eastern Europe
-Language options: Czech, Estonian, Hungarian, Latvian OR Polish

Russian Studies
-Gender and identity in Soviet & Post-Soviet Russia OR Russian foreign policy
-Language: Russian

Eurasian Studies
-Contested states: The South Caucasus after 1991 OR Rethinking Central Asian security
-Language options: Russian OR Chinese

Optional courses
-Contested states: The South Caucasus since 1991
-De facto states in the Post-Soviet space
-Developments in Czech society since 1989
-Gender and identity in Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia
-Media and democratisation in Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union
-Political modernisation: The Georgian case
-Post-Soviet Russia: Renegotiating global and local identities
-Post-Soviet Ukraine: a case study in socio-economic and political transformation
-Rethinking Central Asian security
-Russian foreign policy
-Statehood and nationality in Russia, Central and Eastern Europe
-The geopolitics of Central Europe

Career prospects

Many of our graduates have gone on to establish careers as lecturers and researchers at universities in the UK, Norway, Greece, Italy, and Poland or have become secondary school teachers. Our graduates have also been very successful in establishing careers with organisations such as BBC World Service, British Army, British Civil Service, British Council, Centre for Defence Information (Moscow), Coalition to Stop the Use of Child Soldiers, European Policies Research Centre, University of Strathclyde (Glasgow), European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (London), Jamestown Foundation (Washington D.C), KPMG, Ministry of Defence, UK, Open Society Foundation (Bratislava), Open Society Institute (Budapest), Operation Mobilisation, Czech Republic and the Trust for Civil Society in Central & Eastern Europe (Warsaw).

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University of Strathclyde School of Humanities
Distance from Glasgow: 0 miles
The MSc in Health History explores the last two-and-a-half centuries to seek the origins and impacts of our modern health experiences and expectations, together with the reasons they've changed so rapidly. Read more

Why this course?

The MSc in Health History explores the last two-and-a-half centuries to seek the origins and impacts of our modern health experiences and expectations, together with the reasons they've changed so rapidly. It examines a variety of issues such as:
- the development of psychiatry since its birth in the 19th century
- the rise of regulation for drugs and medicines
- the impact of warfare on medical technologies
- the challenges faced by those seeking to transform the health of British children

The degree is suitable for those from humanities, social science and health science backgrounds as well as those who have worked in the health professions.

The MSc Health History is organised around the expertise of staff in the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare (CSHHH) Glasgow. The CSHHH is a research collaboration between historians of medicine and of health and healthcare at Glasgow Caledonian and Strathclyde universities.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/healthhistory/

You’ll study

Modules can be built into a Masters degree. This can form the basis for future doctoral research funded by:
- the Wellcome Trust
- the Arts & Humanities Research Council
- the Economic & Social Research Council

Compulsory modules:
- Sources, Skills & Methods for Historians 1
- Sources, Skills & Methods for Historians 2

Option classes:
Choose four from:
- Health & Healthcare in the Long 19th Century
- Pharmaceuticals, Ethics & Health, 1800 to 1980
- Governing Highs & Health: History & the Control of Drugs, c1800 to c1945
- Work & Occupational Health in the 20th Century: Comparative Perspectives
- Food & Health in the West during the 20th Century
- The Politics of Health in 20th-century Britain
- Child Health & Industrialisation, c1750 to 1870
- Medicine & Warfare, 1800 to 2000

- Dissertation
MSc students also write a dissertation of 10,000 words. You’ll research a topic of your choice, under the supervision of a member of the programme staff. You’ll be able to use the extensive archive holdings relating to the history of medicine and of health and healthcare available in Glasgow and elsewhere in Central Scotland.

- Seminars
The CSHHH Glasgow seminar series is designed to showcase the latest research from across the subject area at the centre. All students on the MSc are expected to attend these sessions.

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.
To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

To recognise academic achievement, the Dean's International Excellence Award offers students a merit-based scholarship of up to £3,000 for entry onto a full-time Masters programme in the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences.
http://www.strath.ac.uk/studywithus/scholarships/humanitiessocialsciencesscholarships/deansinternationalexcellenceawards/

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/studywithus/scholarships/

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University of Strathclyde School of Humanities
Distance from Glasgow: 0 miles
This taught postgraduate programme aims to introduce you to advanced level study of history, while deepening your historical understanding and awareness. Read more

Why this course?

This taught postgraduate programme aims to introduce you to advanced level study of history, while deepening your historical understanding and awareness.

You’re offered a wide choice of classes as well as rigorous training in historical research methods and sources. You can choose to study thematic, historiographical or theoretical topics across a broad chronological and geographical range. There’s also the possibility of specialising in a particular area such as:
- international relations history in the 19th and 20th centuries
- early modern Scottish history

You’ll study

There’s a wide choice of classes within a flexible curriculum.

Core modules:
- Sources, Skills and Methods for Historians 1
- Sources, Skills and Methods for Historians 2

Option modules:
Choose from:
- Palaeography, c1500-c1800
- Britain, France and the United States, 1945-1958: Diplomacy, Strategy and Alliance
- Transatlantic Influences: the United States and Europe after 1958
- Nationalism and Nation-states in the Arab Middle East, 1900-1945
- Plantations by Land and Sea, 1540-1700
- Pharmaceuticals, Ethics and Health, 1800-1980
- Segregation, Migration and War: African-Americans, 1910-1930
- The Patriarchal Family in Early Modern Society
- Governing Highs and Health: History and the Control of Drugs
- Work and Occupational Health in the 20th Century
- Themes in the History of Health and Colonial Medicine in South Asia
- War, Sacrifice and the Nation in Europe, 1789-1918
- Scotland and Ulster in the early modern North Atlantic World
- The Lordship of the Isles
- Food and Health in the West during the 20th Century

Note: Not all classes will be on offer in any one year. Others may also be chosen from Level 5 classes offered by the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences.

- Dissertation
MSc students also write a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

To recognise academic achievement, the Dean's International Excellence Award offers students a merit-based scholarship of up to £3,000 for entry onto a full-time Masters programme in the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences.
http://www.strath.ac.uk/studywithus/scholarships/humanitiessocialsciencesscholarships/deansinternationalexcellenceawards/

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/studywithus/scholarships/

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University of Glasgow College of Social Sciences
Distance from Glasgow: 0 miles
This programme is designed to build your understanding of the tourism, heritage and development sectors. Drawing upon a multidisciplinary team to do this, it uses academic approaches from the social sciences and the arts to investigate key themes. Read more
This programme is designed to build your understanding of the tourism, heritage and development sectors. Drawing upon a multidisciplinary team to do this, it uses academic approaches from the social sciences and the arts to investigate key themes. These include motivation, impacts, sustainable development, cultural and natural heritage, interpretation and management within this field.

Why this programme

◾The programme gives you the opportunity to develop a vast repertoire of knowledge and expertise in the subject area through interdisciplinary and critical approaches to study.
◾International in scope, it provides a worldwide perspective of tourism, as well as showcasing the variety and significance of this global industry. The programme covers a wide range of international case studies. We use examples from Europe, the Americas, Asia, as well as Scotland and the UK.
◾The Dumfries campus hosts the Solway Centre for Environment and Culture, and is a centre of expertise in environmental and sustainability issues.
◾A summer work placement with a variety of tourism and heritage related companies or attractions is possible.
◾The local region of Dumfries has fine examples of natural and cultural heritage, including reserves, museums, theme towns and castles.
◾You will also benefit from the combined industry experience of our guest lecturers.

Programme structure

You will complete three core and three optional courses, followed by a dissertation (which may include a work placement). You will be taught through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, fieldwork and project work. Some of the courses will also include study trips.

Core courses
◾Heritage, interpretation and development
◾Heritage, management and context
◾Tourism and regional development.

Optional courses
◾Climate change: impacts on ecology
◾Environment, technology and society
◾Environmental communication
◾Environmental ethics and behavioural change
◾Environmental politics and society
◾Event management
◾Reading the environment: old and new world romanticisms
◾Tourism marketing
◾Tourism, sustainability and climate change
◾Writing the environment: modern and contemporary nature writing.

Career prospects

There are a number of interesting roles within tourism and heritage bodies in the public and private sectors such as working for tour companies, heritage attractions, museums, and hotel groups. You could also work as a consultant in business, as part of a local government team and on planning bodies. In addition, there are jobs available in education, particularly at college and university level. Your degree may enable you to consider studying for a research degree to consolidate your expertise.

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University of Glasgow College of Arts
Distance from Glasgow: 0 miles
This Masters enables you to specialise in the history of medicine, led and supported by internationally regarded historians. Read more

This Masters enables you to specialise in the history of medicine, led and supported by internationally regarded historians. The two core courses provide you with an introduction to major topics in the history of medicine of the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries, and to the methodologies, qualitative and quantitative, which historians have employed to explore them. Topics covered include: practitioner/patient interaction, history of diagnosis, obstetrics, professionalisation and medical education, history of hospitals, medical ethics, infant health and nutrition, Jewish medicine, medical technology, sexuality, disability, public health and gender. You will be introduced to the major bibliographical tools and archival resources for the history of medicine.

Why this programme

  • Strong links with the University's Hunterian Museum, Anatomy Museum and Art Gallery, will give you access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
  • The Centre for the History of Medicine has a reference library, computing facilities, and other equipment providing excellent support for research. We also run research seminars and workshops, and an annual research forum, all of which bring in speakers from throughout the world.
  • Our researchers have access to rich archival materials held locally by the Greater Glasgow Health Board, the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow, Glasgow University Archives, Glasgow City Archives and the Special Collections of the Glasgow University Library. Archives elsewhere in Scotland are also easily accessible.

Programme structure

You’ll take:

  • Three core courses
  • Optional courses (to a total of 60 credits; usually three 20 credit courses)

You’ll also produce a dissertation.

Semester 1: September to December

  • History of Medicine 1: studies in the history of medicine before 1850. (Core course)
  • Research, Resources and Skills for Historians (RRSH) (Core course)
  • One optional course OR two optional courses

Semester 2: January to March

  • History of Medicine 2: studies in the history of medicine from 1850 to 2000 (Core course)
  • Research, Resources and Skills for Historians (RRSH) (Core course)
  • Two optional courses OR one optional course

Summer: April to September

Dissertation

Career prospects

The research skills and methods you’ll gain on this programme give you the transferable skills you need for positions in the public and private sectors, including heritage policy and projects, media and teaching. The programme is also a good foundation for a PhD.



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University of Glasgow College of Social Sciences
Distance from Glasgow: 0 miles
This programme is designed to build your understanding of the tourism, heritage,and sustainability sectors. Drawing upon a multidisciplinary team to do this, it uses academic approaches from the social sciences and the arts to investigate key themes. Read more
This programme is designed to build your understanding of the tourism, heritage,and sustainability sectors. Drawing upon a multidisciplinary team to do this, it uses academic approaches from the social sciences and the arts to investigate key themes. These include motivation, impacts, sustainable development, cultural and natural heritage, interpretation and management within this field.

Why this programme

◾The programme gives you the opportunity to develop a vast repertoire of knowledge and expertise in the subject area through interdisciplinary and critical approaches to study.
◾International in scope, it provides a worldwide perspective of tourism, as well as showcasing the variety and significance of this global industry. The programme covers a wide range of international case studies. We use examples from Europe, the Americas, Asia, as well as Scotland and the UK.
◾The Dumfries campus hosts the Solway Centre for Environment and Culture, and is a centre of expertise in environmental and sustainability issues.
◾A summer work placement with a variety of tourism and heritage related companies or attractions is possible.
◾The local region of Dumfries has fine examples of natural and cultural heritage, including reserves, museums, theme towns and castles.
◾You will also benefit from the combined industry experience of our guest lecturers.

Programme structure

You will complete fore core and two optional courses, followed by a dissertation (which may include a work placement). You will be taught through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, fieldwork and project work. Some of the courses will also include study trips.

Core courses
◾Heritage, interpretation and development
◾Heritage, management and context
◾Tourism and regional development
◾Tourism, sustainability and climate change.

Optional courses
◾Climate change: impacts on ecology
◾Environment, technology and society
◾Environmental communication
◾Environmental ethics and behavioural change
◾Environmental politics and society
◾Event management
◾Reading the environment: old and new world romanticisms
◾Tourism marketing
◾Writing the environment: modern and contemporary nature writing.

Career prospects

There are a number of interesting roles within tourism and heritage bodies in the public and private sectors such as working for tour companies, heritage attractions, museums, and hotel groups. You could also work as a consultant in business, as part of a local government team and on planning bodies. In addition, there are jobs available in education, particularly at college and university level. Your degree may enable you to consider studying for a research degree to consolidate your expertise.

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University of Glasgow College of Arts
Distance from Glasgow: 0 miles
The Masters in Gender History provides the opportunity to develop and deepen analysis of the workings of gender in the past. Read more

The Masters in Gender History provides the opportunity to develop and deepen analysis of the workings of gender in the past. Alongside the University of Glasgow’s Centre for Gender History, which brings together one of the largest concentrations of gender historians in the UK, the programme encourages comparisons across time and cultures as well as allowing in-depth research into particular questions.

Why this programme

  • You’ll be taught by research specialists in Gender History and have the chance to tailor the programme to your own interests and practice.
  • Glasgow is home to world-class museums, galleries and libraries, including Glasgow Women’s Library, the only dedicated museum in the UK with a large archive and collection on to women’s lives, histories and achievements.
  • A masterclass for postgraduates with an interest in Gender History is led by a distinguished visiting speaker in conjunction with the Gender and History public lecture hosted by the Centre for Gender History each year.
  • Gender History is increasingly relevant within professional and voluntary sectors.

Programme structure

You’ll take:

  • Three core courses
  • Optional courses (to a total of 60 credits; usually three 20 credit courses)

You’ll also produce a dissertation.

Semester 1: September to December

  • Gender, Politics and Power (Core course)
  • Research, Resources and Skills for Historians (RRSH) (Core course)
  • One optional course OR two optional courses

Semester 2: January to March

  • Gender, Culture and Text (Core course)
  • Research, Resources and Skills for Historians (RRSH) (Core course)
  • Two optional courses OR one optional course

Summer: April to September

Dissertation

Career prospects

The research skills and methods you’ll gain on this programme give you the transferable skills you need for positions in the public and private sectors, including heritage policy and projects, media and teaching. The programme is also a good foundation for a PhD.

Positions held by recent History graduates include Editor Business & History Products, Lead Scholar/Instructor and Secretary.



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University of Strathclyde Department of Architecture
Distance from Glasgow: 0 miles
Architectural conservation - the action of conserving built heritage while maintaining its values - is practiced differently across the world; sometimes not at all due to cultural and economic constraints. Read more

Why this course?

Architectural conservation - the action of conserving built heritage while maintaining its values - is practiced differently across the world; sometimes not at all due to cultural and economic constraints.

It is an emerging area of work which requires specialist training and knowledge to deal with its multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary nature. It also requires the development of a critical approach for the analysis and design of the intervention, informed by the shared international principles and the specific nature and context of the historic building to be conserved.

We need to attract new talent to the field of architectural conservation. To work with historic buildings is an enriching experience, which combines the creative aspects of designing a new building with the in-depth research required to understand in full the building and its context. Working with historic buildings is also a great training to improve the design of new buildings, as you learn a great deal about the importance of design ideas, innovation, durability and care. It is also a very sociable work, interacting with a variety of people from all backgrounds, joining forces in helping current generations to enjoy historic buildings, to create community identities around them, and to transmit the buildings and their values to the future.

Glasgow and its surrounding area provide an excellent location for the course, with architectural heritage from all periods, from Roman to Medieval, Georgian, Victorian and contemporary, without forgetting the better known C. R. Mackintosh and Alexander ‘Greek’ Thomson’s buildings. Strathclyde has a lively international community of staff and students and we enjoy a privileged position in the centre of Glasgow.

Study mode and duration:
- MSc: 12 months full-time; 24 months part-time
- PgDip: 9 months full-time; 18 months part-time
- PgCert: 5 months full-time; 9 months part-time

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/architecturaldesignfortheconservationofbuiltheritage/

You’ll study

The course is a platform for:
- collaboration with both practice and research partners
- architectural critique
- discussion and debate

All full-time students take instructional classes and a design project in the first two semesters. MSc students then complete a dissertation project.

Compulsory taught classes are delivered intensively, making them more accessible to part-time students and Continuing Professional Development (CPD). Areas explored in classes include:
- theory
- history
- survey
- investigations
- legislation
- materials
- structures

The course is informed by the outcomes of the research being carried out at the Architectural Design and Conservation Research Unit (ADCRU). It is a platform for collaboration with both practice and research partners; architectural critique, discussion and debate are fundamental parts of the course.

Open Access

Open Access modules are offered on individual modules from the MSc programme. They can be taken as stand-alone CPD options or gradually built towards a qualification.

Open Access students may transfer onto a part-time MSc or PgDip programme to complete their studies (subject to a maximum period of time).

Guest Lecturers/speakers

You’ll benefit from a large number of government, local authority and industry partners, who’ll lecture on up-to-date current practices, with a diverse point of views.

Facilities

- Studios
There are two fully-networked design studios; one dedicated to student self-study, the other to interactive design teaching.

- Library
In addition to the main University library, we have our own, on-site, reference library. Our collection is developed in direct response to the teaching delivered in the department.

- Workshop
A full range of hand and portable power tools are available (complete with instruction).

- PC Lab
Our lab computers have AutoCad and InDesign.

We also offer plotter printing, scanning and laser cutting services.

Accreditation

The course is fully recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC). The IHBC is the principal professional body for building conservation practitioners and historic environment specialists working in United Kingdom.

The course also conforms to the internationally recognised Guidelines for Education and Training in the Conservation of Monuments, Ensembles and Sites adopted by the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS). These criteria are used by professional institutes for the assessment of evidence and professional accreditation in conservation.

Learning & teaching

The course is balanced between theory and practice. It’s delivered through:
- lectures
- workshops
- studio-based, and seminar-led learning, by staff and visiting experts from the UK and overseas

The course is a platform for collaboration with both practice and research partners; architectural critique, discussion and debate are fundamental parts of the course.

Assessment

Formative assessment will take place throughout the course.
You’ll be assessed through lectures, seminars, interim Studio Reviews and workshops, supported by student presentations, symposia and peer feedback.
Methods of teaching vary; some subjects are formally taught using lectures and seminars, others use a mix of methods which may incorporate small projects.
The main architectural conservation project is a studio based project which involves one-to-one tuition and appraisals in review seminars. Team teaching techniques are used in several projects and increasing use is made of student peer group reviews. Summative assessment will be through:
- studio reviews
- individual written essays and reports
- oral presentations
- dissertation - directly linked to the conservation project

Careers

Areas of employment for graduates are numerous. They can work as independent professionals in conservation or for architectural firms all over the worlds. The completion of the Masters will give a variety of opportunities:
- IHBC affiliate member with option to progress to full membership
- RIBA Conservation Registrant (CR) and/or RIAS Accredited Conservation Architect
- progress to RIBA Conservation architect (CA), RIBA Specialist Conservation architect (SCA) and/or RIAS Accredited or Advance Conservation Architect
- progress to Conservation Accreditation Register for Engineers (CARE), the joint register between the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) and Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE)

"We work with a large number of government, local authority and industry partners, offering potential placement opportunities for students to work after their postgraduate degree study."

Heritage is recognised as a sector of international strategic importance. Local authorities and communities are also very interested in preserving their heritage. The conservation of historic buildings becomes more and more a day to day activity for architects and engineers.

Potential careers include:
- conservation architect in architectural firms
- conservation engineer in engineering firms
- conservation Officer in local authorities
- work in UK government agencies: Historic Scotland, English Heritage, CadW and the Environment and Heritage Service in Northern Ireland
- architect/conservation officer in other countries for government and local authorities
- work in UK and internationally architect/conservation officer for conservation organisations and charities such as UNESCO, ICOMOS, Council of Europe, ICCROM

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/

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