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Politics & Government×

Full Time MSc Degrees in Politics & Government, Durham, United Kingdom

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We live in an increasingly globalised world. Nuclear proliferation, terrorism, failed states, global poverty and inequality, financial market instability, biodiversity losses, and climate change - are among the global challenges we face and which demand global cooperation if they are to be to adequately resolved. Read more
We live in an increasingly globalised world. Nuclear proliferation, terrorism, failed states, global poverty and inequality, financial market instability, biodiversity losses, and climate change - are among the global challenges we face and which demand global cooperation if they are to be to adequately resolved.

The MSc Global Politics provides students with the tools to understand and critically assess these challenges and the forms of cooperation required to address them.

The programme's core modules concentrate on the institutional drivers of global politics and offer an incisive overview of the main theoretical and applied moral debates concerning the ethics of globalization. It is also possible to choose modules from other departments with approval of the School of Government and International Affairs, for example:
-Anthropology of Global Health (ANTH43615)
-Environmental Economics and Policy (ECON40615)
-Globalisation and Global Health Politics (HEAL3031)

Student Profile

"The close-knit nature of the Global Politics MSc has allowed me to closely engage both with our lecturers, and fellow students in the program. The course has inspired us to debate economic and moral issues pertaining to World politics long after classes are over and made me feel part of an intellectual community not simply enrolled in a degree." Sam George

Course Content

The MSc Global Politics thus aims to provide students with knowledge of the political, economic, cultural and moral debates about how and to what extent the effects of globalisation can be governed.

It will provide the means for students to develop the analytical and conceptual skills necessary to understand and discuss:
-The key international and transnational structures, organisations and institutions that have developed in the era following the Second World War
-The range of the academic debates in the area of global governance
-Policy developments and innovations in the fields of economics, security, and environment

The moral justification for different and sometimes competing regimes of global governance.
Students will also benefit from the wide range of academic resources within the School of Government and International Affairs, the Law School, the Department of Geography, and the School of Economics, Business and Finance, making the MSc Global Politics a truly unique interdisciplinary programme.

The programme consists of:
Core Modules:
-Theoretical Approaches to Global Governance
-Global Governance Institutions
-Theories of Global Justice
-Ethical Aspects of Global Governance
-Dissertation: 12,000 word research dissertation providing students with the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of one field of global politics

Optional Modules - A choice of up to four modules from the list of elective modules both within the School of Government and International Affairs and within other Schools and Departments at Durham University.

Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through five-day induction events in which they are informed about University, the School, the MA/MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

The 180 credits one-year MSc degree programme is divided into four core and four optional modules of 15 credits each. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 60 credits of not more than 12,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Usually a module has 18 contact hours spread over 9 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2 hours sessions which can either take the form of seminars or one hour of lecture and one hour of tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another.

All modules have written exercise for formative assessments. Upon getting feedback on these assignments, students can meet their lecturers to discuss their marks before then eventually completing a summative assessment. Typically summative assessments are 3000 word essays but some modules may be assessed by examination. Students can also meet their module coordinators during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the later half of the year, they meet their assigned supervisors for a minimum of 6 hours. Students also have access to academic advisors whenever there is a need.

SGIA has a wide variety of resources available to students such as: computer room/work room with networked PC’s, printing facilities including scanner and photocopier, audio system, Wi-Fi and a relaxation area with satellite television system.

The School hosts events throughout the year which all postgraduate students are invited to attend. These events provide students the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies. Global Politics students also typically benefit from participation in Global Policy Institute events.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

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This MSc Programme is specifically focused to provide research training simultaneously with Arabic language training. It is designed to include all the pertinent requirements of the one-year research-training masters degree (the ‘1' of the ‘1+3' model) as set out in the ESRC Postgraduate Training Guidelines. Read more
This MSc Programme is specifically focused to provide research training simultaneously with Arabic language training. It is designed to include all the pertinent requirements of the one-year research-training masters degree (the ‘1' of the ‘1+3' model) as set out in the ESRC Postgraduate Training Guidelines. All the research training or subject-specific modules are taught at Durham and are components of ESRC recognised research training masters at Durham. On completion of the programme, it is anticipated that students will have fulfilled the requirements of a normal ESRC research training masters, as well as having attained their language proficiency.

Students will need to negotiate their particular optional choices and pathways in discussion with the Programme Director, Professor Ehteshami. Students share a common generic methodologies and Arabic skills base, but have freedom to develop particular strength in fields of their choice.

Student Profiles

"This 2-year Masters programme focuses primarily on Arabic language training and social science research methods, and is therefore ideal for students wishing to turn their interest in the region into a career in academia, political risk, consultancy, or other similar fields. Having had minimal experience in foreign language learning before the programme, I have been impressed by the Arabic lessons here at Durham and I benefited enormously from attending Arabic school in Jordan during the Summer. I have also been impressed by the course’s emphasis on interdisciplinary learning and the department’s willingness to allow me freedom to choose modules outside of the provisional curriculum. Having taken rewarding modules across five separate departments, I have managed to study according to my own interests. Upon finishing this course, I will be starting an interdisciplinary PhD looking at poverty alleviation in Jordan." Martin Price, 2015/16

"The MSc Arab World Studies is an academic-oriented and well-structured taught programme in Durham University where probably represents the highest level of the Middle Eastern Studies in Britain. It provides the training in research methods, professional and specific regional research of the Middle East and North Africa, as well as the Arabic language, which I personally think is the best part of this programme. Within the two years’ time together with a remarkable ten weeks placement in an Arab nation, I’ve worked hard to learn this language which I’ve never touched before. And at the final part of my PG life, I find myself a trilingual person. This not only has given me a fresh and deep perspective to understand the Arab World, but also may benefit my career a lot in the future. Sometimes the study can be tough and intensive, but for me, it is never boring to challenge myself!” Hongxi Xu, 2015/16

"Learning Arabic with the Arab World Studies programme has been extremely beneficial, complementing learning about the Middle East very well. It has certainly brought an additional exposure to understanding the Middle East, particularly as the programme sends students on a study period abroad to the region. Studying Arabic is certainly a challenging task but very rewarding, as is this interdisciplinary masters as a whole.” Sarah Grand-Clement, 2014/15

Course Content

The MSc in Arab world Studies is intended to provide rigorous, research-driven, interdisciplinary, masters-level education and training. It is committed to providing a supportive learning environment that seeks to combine critical and practical reasoning so as to attain the following aims:
-The programme is designed to establish a cadre of exceptional researchers, qualified at the Masters level, with skills and knowledge sufficient for the conduct of research in and on the Arab World.
-To recruit students of high calibre who have not previously completed any substantive research training and who have few or no Arabic language skills.
-To provide generic training in research methods and methodologies to provide a foundation in a broad range of social science research methods as well as basic research and transferable skills that all students in the social sciences require as deemed appropriate for ESRC recognition.
-To provide subject-specific training in research methods and methodologies in Politics, relevant also to International Relations and International Studies.
-To provide language instruction in the Arabic language, such that the student develops appropriate and sufficient competence to utilise the language in their subsequent research, or employment in the Arabic-speaking world.
-To develop the knowledge, skills and understanding which will prepare students to undertake research for a doctoral degree in Politics, International Relations or International Studies, and which may be required of a professional researcher in these fields of the social sciences.
-To develop the student's knowledge of the range of existing disciplinary, multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary research on the Arab World.

Course Structure
Year 1
-Core modules to the value of 70 credits
-Optional modules to the value of 30 credits

Year 2
-Core modules to the value of 40 credits
-Optional modules to the value of 75 credits, plus
-Dissertation 60 credits

Core Modules
-Arabic Language 1B
-Perspectives on Social Research
-The Contemporary Politics of the Middle East
-Arabic Language 2B
-Dissertation

Optional Modules - Optional modules in previous years have included:
-Statistical Exploration and Reasoning
-Quantitative Methods in Social Science
-Applied Statistics
-Qualitative Methods in Social Science
-Fieldwork and Interpretation
-International Relations and Security in the Middle East
-The Political Economy of Development in the Middle East
-America and the World: The Making of US Foreign Policy
-Contemporary Socio-Political Issues in Muslim Religious Thought

Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through five-day induction events in which they are informed about University, the School, the MA/MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

This MSc programme is spread across two-years. In the first year 100 credits is divided into three core and one/two optional modules and then in the second year 175 credits is divided into one core and five optional modules. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 60 credits of not more than 12,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Usually a module has 18 contact hours spread over 9 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2 hours sessions which can either take the form of seminars or one hour of lecture and one hour of tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another.

All modules have written exercise for formative assessments. Upon getting feedback on these assignments, students can meet their lecturers to discuss their marks before then eventually completing a summative assessment. Typically summative assessments are 3000 word essays but some modules may be assessed by examination. Students can also meet their module coordinators during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the later half of the year, they meet their assigned supervisors for a minimum of 6 hours. Students also have access to the academic advisors whenever there is a need.

SGIA has a wide variety of resources available to students such as: computer room/work room with networked PC’s, printing facilities including scanner and photocopier, audio system, Wi-Fi and a relaxation area with satellite television system.

SGIA conducts weekly seminars and organises lectures and conferences which all postgraduate students can attend. These events provide students the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

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Durham University School for Medicine & Health
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
The MSc in Public Policy and Global Health examines public policy, health and inequality issues and locates these discussions within a wider health systems context. Read more
The MSc in Public Policy and Global Health examines public policy, health and inequality issues and locates these discussions within a wider health systems context.

Course structure

There are no optional modules in the degree, in 2015 modules available were:
-Global Health Issues and Governance (15 credits)
-Public Policy, Health and Health Inequalities (15 credits)
-Health Systems Analysis and Comparison (15 credits)
-The Dynamics of Evidence Informed Policy (15 credits)
-Gender, Sex, Health and Politics (15 credits)
-Qualitative Methods Applied to Policy and Health Research (15 credits)
-Epidemiology and Statistics (15 credits)
-Placement in Public Policy and Global Health (15 credits)
-Dissertation in Public Policy and Global Health (60 credits)

The MSc is aimed at students, public health practitioners and managers in the publicly funded health organisations and systems (especially but not solely the NHS), local government bodies, regional agencies, and the voluntary and community sectors. Although intended to appeal to practitioners, the course emphasis is on policy implementation and decision making. It will develop critical judgement in health and policy analysis, hone your research skills and extend your capability to plan, undertake and excel in research in these areas.

A Postgraduate Diploma in Public Policy and Health (comprised of the taught MSc modules without the dissertation) is also available, as is a Postgraduate Certificate.

Learning and Teaching

Each Masters programme in The Integrated Health Sciences Suite is structured as four core modules (common to all component masters), four subject specific and optional modules, and a dissertation which is equivalent in weight to four taught modules.

The taught modules are mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars and tutorials. Typically lectures provide the key concepts and theories whilst tutorials and seminars allow students to work through application of concepts to practice in more detail promoting analysis of theory and reflection on its application. Dependent on the learning objectives of particular modules, case studies, role plays and simulation games are also cooperated to provide experiential based learning. The aim here is to assist students to arrive at new insights into the practical applications of theory. All taught modules also include an expectation that students will learn through structured reading thus obtaining greater familiarity with key texts and a deeper understanding of the subject knowledge generally. Within the seminar/tutorial format of the modules students are required to make oral presentations. These provide opportunities to develop oral and written skills in communicating clearly in an interprofessional manner.

The precise time allocation between lectures, seminars and tutorials is partially dependent on the student numbers in individual modules. Modules with smaller student numbers will tend towards greater reliance seminar formats than modules with larger student numbers (i.e. in modules with small student numbers lecture formats will be interspersed with more interactive and participative forms of learning). All taught modules within the Integrated Health Sciences Suite are taught over 10 weeks with a minimum of two hours of face-to-face contact per module per week. All modules within the master suite are research-based and the importance of research in each programme is emphasised in the additional face to face time given to the health research methods modules which are structured for three hours of direct teaching per week per module. Certain subject specific modules within the suite are structured for 2.5 hours of face-to-face teaching per week.

The dissertation module is primarily taught through independent study, research (including library research) and analysis which allows the student to conduct, as an individual initiative, a substantial piece of academic work in their chosen academic field, write it up and present it in a scholarly fashion. This provides students with the opportunity to engage with academic issues at the forefront of research and promotes independent lifelong learning skills from a variety of sources. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with whom they will typically have three or four one-to-one supervisory meetings, students personalised and detailed academic study results in a significant piece of independent research of relevance to their intended future or current work. Students’ contact time with supervisors is jointly agreed between students and supervisors, and will vary according to this stage of the dissertation and the progress being made. However there is an expectation that students will have access to supervisors at least once every three weeks for the duration of the dissertation for a maximum of two hours at a time.

Throughout the programme, all students also have access to an academic adviser who will provide them with academic support and guidance. Typically a student will meet with their adviser two to three times a year.

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The MSc is designed for practitioners looking to enhance their skills in the context of broader theoretical models, as well as graduates with a career in government, the armed forces, inter-governmental organisations, NGOs or academia in mind. Read more
The MSc is designed for practitioners looking to enhance their skills in the context of broader theoretical models, as well as graduates with a career in government, the armed forces, inter-governmental organisations, NGOs or academia in mind.

The intensive professional workshops are open to practitioners who are not on the MSc programmes as Continuing Professional Development courses, enhancing students' opportunities for networking and learning from other practitioners' perspectives.

Courses are taught by a mixture of academics and practitioners, and cover both critical and problem-solving approaches. Conflict dynamics are analysed drawing on multiple disciplines, including security studies, peace studies, anthropology, law, archaeology, history and political theory. Modules include both traditional term-long modules and short, usually more skills-oriented, continuing professional development courses as well as fieldtrips (e.g. past fieldtrips were organised to Labanon, Napal, Kenya, Sri Lanka and Kosovo).

Student Profiles

“Doing MSc Defence, Development and Diplomacy was an enriching experience for me mainly because of a huge diversity of students participating from all corners of the world having their own unique views on contemporary issues, academically engaged professors with profound knowledge and experience and equally stimulating academic environment of Durham. I was particularly amazed at how professors always motivated us to think critically on contemporary issues and existing knowledge system dealing with them, develop extended understanding of pressing issues that we are facing today, and offer innovative solutions to those problems.” Salina Chaulagain, 2015/16

“Complementing my background in Middle Eastern Studies and Political Science, the MSc DDD has equipped me with tools used by practitioners and taught me to problematise, analyse and empathise with people in a conflict-ridden world.” Clemens Chay, 2014/15

“This programme uniquely addresses the issue of siloed thinking present in the interwoven sectors of defence, development, and diplomacy. The course is grounded on a “critical thinking” versus “problem solving” approach, and unswervingly focuses on the theory-practice connection. Most importantly, though, I cannot say enough about the caliber of my DGSi peer group. I am thankful not only for their friendship, but for the professional insights they will be able to offer in years to come. As a military officer, I am grateful for the ability to pick up the phone and gain a better understanding of the dynamics of a conflict or an operation from one of my former Durham peers.” Eric Davids, 2014/15

Course Structure

With conflicts becoming either increasingly drawn-out, asymmetric wars of attrition or normalise into states of no peace – no war, our understanding of conflict and conflict intervention is shifting. Conflicts are rarely determined by military victory, diplomacy or long-term development, but require to securing populations through a comprehensive approach that sees to their political, and economic, as well as their security-related needs. Their outcome will be determined by how well the different arms of government and civil society, both locally and internationally, can work together and how well they understand each others' perspectives.

This inter-disciplinary and custom designed MSc offers the unique opportunity to look at conflict, conflict intervention and post-conflict reconstruction through the lenses of defence, development and diplomacy.

The MSc is designed for graduates with a career in government, the armed forces, inter-governmental organisations, NGOs or academia in mind, and for practitioners looking to enhance their practical skills while placing these within a broader theoretical perspective.

Five core modules worth 75 credits plus a Dissertation worth 60 credits plus three optional modules to the value of 45 credits.

Core Modules
-Defence, Development and Diplomacy in Conflict: Evolving Actors, Factors and Paradigms
-Conflict Prevention and Sustainable Peace
-Conflict Intervention: International Law, Counter-Insurgency and Conflict Diplomacy
-Post-Conflict Reconstruction: Stabilisation, Development and State-Building
-Capstone Exercise: Humanitarian Intervention Simulation (in MSc-specific roles)
-Dissertation

Optional Modules - Optional module in previous years have included:
-Religion, Culture and Conflict
-Conflict Mediation
-Fieldtrip
-Conflict Sensitive Programme Management
-Re-thinking Counter Terrorism
-Conflict Analysis
-Urban Violence - Urban Peacebuilding
-International Negotiation as Instrument in Conflict Management
-Policing Post-Conflict Cities

Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through two-day induction events in which they are informed about the University, the School, the MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

The 180 credits one-year MSc degree programme is divided into five core and three optional modules of 15 credits each. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 60 credits of not more than15,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Although all modules have 18/19 contact hours, the core modules are spread over 9/10 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2-hour sessions which take the form of a one hour lecture and a one hour tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another. The optional modules of the programme are delivered over two full days, through a mixture of lectures, Q&A sessions, seminar discussions, and role plays.

Formative assessment is given on seminar contributions, role plays, and formative essays. Students have the opportunity to meet their lecturers to discuss their marks and other issues arising from their course performance. Students also have the opportunity to attend ‘essay surgeries’ in which they can discuss the structure and content of their essays early in the course.

Students can also meet their module coordinators or programme coordinator during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the latter half of the year, they are required to attend two 4-hour workshops. In addition, they have the opportunity to meet their assigned supervisors for an average of 6 meetings. Students also have access to the MSc Programme Director and the School’s Director of Taught Post Graduate Studies whenever there is a need.

SGIA conducts weekly seminars and organises lectures and conferences which all postgraduate students can attend. Students are also fully integrated into the Durham Global Security Institute, which delivers this MSc programme and hosts guest lectures and seminars throughout the year. These events provide students with the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies, and in conflict, peace and security studies.

Throughout the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

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The focus of governments and humanitarian NGOs has progressively shifted towards conflict prevention and building sustainable peace. Read more
The focus of governments and humanitarian NGOs has progressively shifted towards conflict prevention and building sustainable peace. Yet to prevent conflict or to build a secure and inclusive state and society after conflict involves a complex set of skills straddling conflict analysis, conflict mediation and negotiation, peace processes, state stabilisation, post-conflict reconstruction, peace building and early warning.

This inter-disciplinary, custom-designed MSc offers the opportunity to develop operational and vocational skills for conflict prevention and peacebuilding within the context of the latest theories on conflict and conflict prevention. Students will acquire the analytical skills to map conflict dynamics, design conflict sensitive projects and develop early warning mechanisms, enabling them to better predict, and so avoid, the outbreak of violent conflicts. They will also gain the skills necessary to assess and evaluate the impact and outcomes of interventions.

The MSc is designed for practitioners looking to enhance their existing skills, as well as graduates with a career in conflict prevention, conflict mediation, or post-conflict reconstruction in mind. It is particularly aimed at those seeking to work or already working in the (I)NGO sector, governmental departments or inter-governmental organisations.

While rooted in peace and conflict studies, the MSc draws on strategic and security studies as well as development studies, enabling much needed cross-fertilisation between these traditionally divergent perspectives. It draws on real-life case studies as well as interactive role plays, and exposes students to both cutting-edge academic developments and the latest practitioner experience, with a particular focus on bottom-up approaches.

Courses are taught by a mixture of academics and practitioners, and cover both critical and problem-solving approaches. Conflict dynamics are analysed drawing on multiple disciplines, including security studies, peace studies, anthropology, law, archaeology, history and political theory. Modules include both traditional, term-long modules and short, usually more skills-oriented continuing professional development courses as well as fieldtrips (e.g. fieldtrips have been organised to Nepal, Kenya, Lebanon, Sri Lanka and Kosovo).

Student Profiles

"What I really like about DGSi programs is that they are able to match a great theoretical understanding of the issues I am interested in with a clear focus on the practical skills that are required for working in the field." Lianne Vostermans, 2013/14

“Having co-sponsorship from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office of the UK and Durham University, I was able to accomplish my Chevening scholarship doing MSc Conflict Prevention and Peacebuilding (CPP) at Durham Global Security Institute (DGSi). Although it was found to be quite intensive and intellectually challenging, I have no doubt that this master programme will equip junior diplomats like me with necessary knowledge and skills, especially in security and peacebuilding domains, so that we can contribute our best capacities in the making of the world a more peaceful home to the whole mankind.” Chan Aye, 2015/16

“I chose the Conflict Prevention and Peacebuilding Master because of its interdisciplinary character, topics and the combination between theory and practice. During the course I have had the opportunity to meet very many interesting scholars, practitioners and very intelligent and diverse fellow students, from different cultural and academic backgrounds. The course gave me insight in things I had only read about in books before by confronting us with people who have actually been in the field, and by taking us there ourselves through the study trip and fieldwork opportunities for our dissertations. I have learned to look at conflict situations from new perspectives, something I hope to use in future employment in order to help create a more peaceful world.” Marit Jansen, 2014/15

Course Structure

The MSc will provide students with advanced knowledge of the complex and specialised areas of peacebuilding, among it conflict analysis, conflict prevention, conflict resolution and conflict transformation, community driven reconstruction, peace processes within the context of contemporary conflicts and in the context of broader international (humanitarian) interventions. Integrated into the MSc structure are opportunities to develop operational and vocational skills for example in negotiations, conflict mediation, conflict sensitive programme design and programme management, or urban peacebuilding. Students are provided with theoretical and empirical knowledge and with practical skills that are helpful for current and future employment opportunities. The courses are thus attractive to both graduates and mid-career practitioners. Whilst the academic and applied focus of the MSc comes through a peace and conflict studies analytic lens, course material will also draw from traditional strategic/security and development studies, enabling cross fertilisation between different perspectives. It allows the exploration of unique and new paradigms and practices in the fields of conflict, peace, security, defence, diplomacy, development and humanitarian intervention.

Five core modules worth 75 credits plus a Dissertation worth 60 credits plus three optional modules to the value of 45 credits.

Core Modules
-Defence, Development and Diplomacy in Conflict: Evolving Actors, Factors and Paradigms
-Conflict Prevention and Sustainable Peace
-Responses: Peace Processes and Political Negotiation
-Recovery and Reconstruction: Consolidating Peace after Violence
-Capstone Exercise: Humanitarian Intervention Simulation (in MSc-specific roles)

Dissertation.
Optional Modules - Optional modules in previous years have included:
-Religion, Culture and Conflict
-Conflict Mediation
-Fieldtrip
-Conflict Sensitive Programme Management
-Re-thinking Counter Terrorism
-Urban Violence - Urban Peacebuilding
-International Negotiation as Instrument in Conflict Management
-Policing Post-Conflict Cities
-Conflict Analysis

Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, as well as the general induction programme offered by the School and the university, Durham Global Security Institute (DGSi) students are invited to a programme specific induction. This induction provides an overview of the programme an opportunity to meet members of the team and an opportunity to discuss optional module choices.

The 180 credits one-year MSc degree programme is divided into five core and three optional modules of 15 credits each. Students also have to submit a dissertation (60 credits) of not more than15,000 words. Practitioners have the option of writing an in-depth policy document as their dissertation.

Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation. Assessment methods include: an examination, essays, presentations, reflective journal, reports, article reviews and policy briefs.

Although all modules have 18/19 contact hours, the core modules are spread over 9/10 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2-hour sessions which take the form of a one hour lecture and a one hour tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another. The optional modules of the programme are either delivered over two full days, through a mixture of lectures, Q&A sessions, seminar discussions, and role plays or over a single term in 2-hour seminar sessions. There is also the opportunity to participate in a study visit which provides an opportunity to investigate issues ‘in the field’ concerned with conflict prevention, conflict resolution, state and peace-building. Of particular interest is the theory-practice linkage

Students can also meet their module coordinators or programme coordinator during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the latter half of the year, they are required to attend two 4-hour workshops. In addition, they have the opportunity to meet their assigned supervisors for an average of 6 meetings. Students also have access to the MSc Programme Director and the School’s Director of Taught Post Graduate Studies whenever there is a need.

The School hosts events throughout the year which all postgraduate students are invited to attend. Students are also fully integrated into the Durham Global Security Institute which also hosts guest lectures and seminars throughout the year. These events provide students with the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies, and in conflict, peace and security studies.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

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