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Full Time MSc Degrees in Durham, United Kingdom

We have 68 Full Time MSc Degrees in Durham, United Kingdom

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Our innovative MSc Accounting programme sits within Durham’s portfolio of Masters programmes. A one year full-time programme, it provides an opportunity for you to develop an in-depth understanding of the theory and practice of accounting as well as the critical thinking skills so valued by employers. Read more

Our innovative MSc Accounting programme sits within Durham’s portfolio of Masters programmes. A one year full-time programme, it provides an opportunity for you to develop an in-depth understanding of the theory and practice of accounting as well as the critical thinking skills so valued by employers. The MSc in Accounting covers key accounting topics including financial statements and their preparation, the practical limitations of financial reporting, and the regulatory framework and its complexities.

This is an ideal programme to choose if you’re looking to pursue a career in accountancy, finance and business.

ACCA Academic Professional Partnership Programme

A key feature of the programme is ACCA’s Academic Professional Partnership Programme (APPP) where eligible students who have successfully passed or received exemptions from F1-F9 of the ACCA Fundamental level, alongside studying for their Masters degree, have the option to register with ACCA and receive a recognised level of tuition towards the new Strategic Professional level exam, Strategic Business Reporting (subject to verification). For more information on the ACCA qualification visit http://www.accaglobal.com

To achieve your qualification you will need to successfully complete eight core modules, and a dissertation or business project. Should you choose to study towards the ACCA Academic Professional Partnership Programme you will also be required to sit two Professional Level papers, P1 and P2 of the ACCA qualification.

Core and elective modules

You will study:

  1. Accounting Theory
  2. Auditing and Assurance Services
  3. Contemporary Issues in Accounting and Taxation
  4. Corporate Governance
  5. Corporate Reporting
  6. Financial Planning and Control
  7. Financial Statement Analysis
  8. Research Methods & Methodology in Accounting

Dissertation/Business Project

In the third term you will complete a 12,000 word dissertation which could be a specific project with an organisation. Supervised by a faculty member with relevant experience, you’ll investigate in greater detail a subject that you’ve already studied as part of your programme.

This is an opportunity for you to develop your business insight and present your analysis and ideas in a scholarly and professional manner; combine critical discrimination and a sense of proportion in evaluating evidence and the opinions of others.

Adding to your experience

As part of your programme, you have the opportunity to enjoy presentations by academics and practitioners within your chosen area of interest. Past speakers have included representatives of major global multinationals and leading academics, providing an ideal opportunity to gain practical knowledge and progressive insight.

Course Learning and Teaching

The programme is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars, and practicals. Lectures provide key contents of a particular topic. Occasionally lectures might be delivered by guest speakers who are internationally recognised academic experts or practitioners in their field. Students can also attend the Durham Speaker Series, providing the opportunity to network with senior business leaders, staff and alumni.

Seminars provide the opportunity for smaller groups of students to solve problems and discuss and debate issues based on knowledge gained through lectures and independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Practicals are medium sized group sessions, where students practice computer software, applying topics from lectures and seminars.

Students study 9 core modules including a 12,000 word dissertation to allow students to carry out independent research and develop their skills in analysis and scholarly expression, using an appropriate theoretical framework. They are supported in writing their dissertation through the study of research methods, and attending individual meetings with an allocated supervisor, who monitors their progress and provides advice.

Academic Support:

Throughout the year, students may have the opportunity to participate in extracurricular activities. All students have an Academic Adviser who is able to provide general advice on academic matters. Teaching staff are also available to provide additional support on a one-to-one basis via weekly consultation hours.

Learning Resource:

Outside of timetabled contact hours, students are expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study in preparation for teaching sessions, assignments and other forms of assessment including exams, and general background reading to broaden their subject knowledge. All students have an Academic Adviser who is able to provide general advice on academic matters. Teaching staff are also available to provide additional support on a one-to-one basis via weekly consultation hours.



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Durham University School of Engineering
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
The MSc in Advanced Software Engineering is a taught programme aimed at graduates from computing or related subjects who want to extend their knowledge and expertise in the field of Software Engineering. Read more
The MSc in Advanced Software Engineering is a taught programme aimed at graduates from computing or related subjects who want to extend their knowledge and expertise in the field of Software Engineering. The core modules cover advanced programming and cutting edge software engineering technologies, before leading onto modules on relevant Internet and computing topics.

Course Structure
The course is built from eight taught modules plus one project/dissertation module. Each of the eight modules lasts for approximately four weeks and consists of a combination of lectures, tutorials, private study and a mini project. Each of the modules is designed to build upon the student's growing knowledge and skills.

The final project module involves the design, implementation and evaluation of a significant information systems solution.

Core Modules
- Advanced Java with UML
- Software Dependability
- Advances in Software Engineering
- Enterprise and Distributed Systems
- Research Methods and Professional Issues
- Web Technology
- New Initiatives in Software Engineering
- Information Search for the WWW
- Dissertation

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The MSc in Arab world Studies is intended to provide rigorous, research-driven, interdisciplinary, masters-level education and training. Read more

The MSc in Arab world Studies is intended to provide rigorous, research-driven, interdisciplinary, masters-level education and training. It is committed to providing a supportive learning environment that seeks to combine critical and practical reasoning so as to attain the following aims:

  • The programme is designed to establish a cadre of exceptional researchers, qualified at the Masters level, with skills and knowledge sufficient for the conduct of research in and on the Arab World.
  • To recruit students of high calibre who have not previously completed any substantive research training and who have few or no Arabic language skills.
  • To provide generic training in research methods and methodologies to provide a foundation in a broad range of social science research methods as well as basic research and transferable skills that all students in the social sciences require as deemed appropriate for ESRC recognition.
  • To provide subject-specific training in research methods and methodologies in Politics, relevant also to International Relations and International Studies.
  • To provide language instruction in the Arabic language, such that the student develops appropriate and sufficient competence to utilise the language in their subsequent research, or employment in the Arabic-speaking world.
  • To develop the knowledge, skills and understanding which will prepare students to undertake research for a doctoral degree in Politics, International Relations or International Studies, and which may be required of a professional researcher in these fields of the social sciences.
  • To develop the student's knowledge of the range of existing disciplinary, multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary research on the Arab World.

Course Structure

Year 1

  • Core modules to the value of 70 credits
  • Optional modules to the value of 30 credits.

Year 2

  • Core modules to the value of 40 credits
  • Optional modules to the value of 75 credits, plus
  • Dissertation 60 credits.

Core Modules

  • Arabic Language 1B
  • Perspectives on Social Research
  • The Contemporary Politics of the Middle East
  • Arabic Language 2B
  • Dissertation.

Optional Modules

Optional modules in previous years have included:

  • Statistical Exploration and Reasoning
  • Quantitative Methods in Social Science
  • Applied Statistics
  • Qualitative Methods in Social Science
  • Fieldwork and Interpretation
  • International Relations and Security in the Middle East
  • The Political Economy of Development in the Middle East
  • America and the World: The Making of US Foreign Policy
  • Contemporary Socio-Political Issues in Muslim Religious Thought.

Course Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through five-day induction events in which they are informed about University, the School, the MA/MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

This MSc programme is spread across two-years. In the first year 100 credits is divided into three core and one/two optional modules and then in the second year 175 credits is divided into one core and five optional modules. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 60 credits of not more than 12,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Usually a module has 18 contact hours spread over 9 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2 hours sessions which can either take the form of seminars or one hour of lecture and one hour of tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another.

All modules have written exercise for formative assessments. Upon getting feedback on these assignments, students can meet their lecturers to discuss their marks before then eventually completing a summative assessment. Typically summative assessments are 3000 word essays but some modules may be assessed by examination. Students can also meet their module coordinators during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the later half of the year, they meet their assigned supervisors for a minimum of 6 hours. Students also have access to the academic advisors whenever there is a need.

SGIA has a wide variety of resources available to students such as: computer room/work room with networked PC’s, printing facilities including scanner and photocopier, audio system, Wi-Fi and a relaxation area with satellite television system.

SGIA conducts weekly seminars and organises lectures and conferences which all postgraduate students can attend. These events provide students the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

Career Opportunities

Our students go on to a wide range of successful careers including civil service and other government agencies, UN/INGOs/CSOs, journalism, media, teaching, law, banking and finance, diplomatic services and risk analysis.



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Durham University Department of Archaeology
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
The MSc in Archaeological Science is designed to provide a broad theoretical and practical understanding of current issues and the techniques archaeologists use to investigate the human past. Read more
The MSc in Archaeological Science is designed to provide a broad theoretical and practical understanding of current issues and the techniques archaeologists use to investigate the human past. Its purpose is to provide a pathway for archaeologists or graduates of other scientific disciplines to either professional posts or doctoral research in archaeological science. It focuses particularly on the organic remains of humans, animals and plants which is a rapidly developing and exciting field of archaeometry. Major global themes such as animal and plant domestication and human migration and diet will be explored integrating evidence from a range of sub-disciplines in environmental and biomolecular archaeology Students taking this course will study and work in a range of environmental, DNA, isotope and dating laboratories alongside expert academic staff.

The aim of this programme is to equip students to:
-Devise and carry out in-depth study in archaeological science
-Analyse and interpret results
-Communicate scientific results to a variety of audiences
-Develop the inter-disciplinary skills (cultural and scientific) to work effectively in archaeology

Students will gain a critical understanding of the application of scientific techniques to our study of the human past, and receive intensive training in a specific area of archaeological science. Students will examine the theory underpinning a range of scientific techniques, as well as the current archaeological context in which they are applied and interpreted. This will be achieved through a broad archaeological framework which will educate students to reconcile the underlying constraints of analytical science with the concept-based approach of cultural archaeology. Students will therefore examine both theoretical and practical approaches to particular problems, and to the choice of suitable techniques to address them. They will learn how to assess the uncertainties of their conclusions, and to acknowledge the probable need for future reinterpretations as the methods develop. Following training in one specific archaeological science area of their choice, students will be expected to demonstrate that they can combine a broad contextual and theoretical knowledge of archaeology with their detailed understanding of the methods in their chosen area, through an original research dissertation.

Course Structure

The course consists of four taught modules of 30 credits each and a 60 credit research dissertation. Students will study two core modules in Term 1 and two elective modules in Term1/2 followed by a research dissertation.
Core Modules:
-Research and Study Skills in Archaeological Science
-Topics in Archaeological Science
-Research Dissertation

Optional Modules:
In previous years, optional modules available included:
-Themes in Palaeopathology
-Plants and People
-Animals and People
-Chronometry
-Isotope and Molecular Archaeology
-Practical Guided Study

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops and practical classes. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular area, and identify the main areas for discussion and debate among archaeologists in a specific area or on a particular theme. Seminars and tutorials then provide opportunities for smaller groups of student-led discussion and debate of particular issues or areas, based on the knowledge that they have gained through their lectures and through independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours.

Practical classes and workshops allow students to gain direct experience of practical and interpretative skills in Archaeological Science with guidance from experienced and qualified scientists in Archaeology. Finally, independent supervised study enables students to develop and undertake a research project to an advanced level. Throughout the programme emphasis is placed on working independently outside the contact hours, in order to synthesise large datasets and to develop critical and analytical skills to an advanced level.

The balance of activities changes over the course of the programme, as students develop their knowledge and the ability as independent learners and researchers. In Terms 1 and 2 the emphasis is upon students acquiring the generic, practical skills and knowledge that archaeological scientists need to undertake scientific study in archaeology whilst examining and debating relevant archaeological theory and the 'big questions' to which scientific methods are applied. They also study a choice of specific areas creating their individual research profile and interests.

Students typically attend three hours a week of lectures, and two one hour seminars or tutorials each week. In addition, they may be required to attend three-four hours a week of workshops or practicals based on lectures. The practical work complements desk-based analytical skills which are intended to develop skills applicable within and outside the field of archaeology. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to undertake their own independent study to prepare effectively for their classes, focus their subject knowledge and develop a research agenda.

The balance shifts into Term 3, as students develop their abilities as independent researchers with a dissertation. The lectures and practicals already attended have introduced them to and given them the chance to practice archaeology research methods within specific fields of study. Students have also engaged with academic issues, archaeological datasets and their interpretation which are at the forefront of archaeological research. The dissertation is regarded as the cap-stone of the taught programme and an indicator of advanced research potential, which could be developed further in a professional or academic field. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with whom they will typically have ten one-hour supervisory meetings, students undertake a detailed study of a particular theme or area resulting in a significant piece of independent research. They also interact with scientific lab staff as they carry out their research.

Throughout the programme, all students also have access to an academic adviser who will provide them with academic support and guidance. Typically a student will meet with their adviser two to three times a year, in addition to which all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. The department also has an exciting programme of weekly one hour research seminars which postgraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend..

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Durham University Department of Psychology
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
The MSc in Cognitive Neuroscience is aimed at home and international students who are seeking to build on their undergraduate qualifications to develop their project management skills and theoretical knowledge for a career in research or related disciplines. Read more

The MSc in Cognitive Neuroscience is aimed at home and international students who are seeking to build on their undergraduate qualifications to develop their project management skills and theoretical knowledge for a career in research or related disciplines. In addition, the programme is aimed at those from closely related science backgrounds to build up a knowledge and practical experience of cognitive neuroscience and psychology before embarking on a psychology related career. As the theoretical background to, and techniques of, cognitive neuroscience are rarely available to students at undergraduate level, the main objective of this MSc is to provide students with detailed historical, philosophical, theoretical and practical knowledge of a broad range of cognitive neuroscience techniques. This wide-ranging knowledge will make students extremely strong candidates for future research positions, and provide them with an ability to develop broad research programmes, utilising a range of techniques, as independent researchers.

Course Structure

Teaching is generally organised into a number of 10 week course units involving 2 to 3 hours of lectures, seminars and practicals per week. Each 10 week unit is assessed by means of formative and summative assessments.

The summative assessment counts towards the final degree. For the programme as a whole, this assessment is divided (with small variations across programmes) in equal proportions between examinations (33.3%), written assignments (33.3%) and dissertation (33.3%). 

Core Modules

  • Current Issues in Cognitive Neuroscience (30 credits)
  • Techniques in Cognitive Neuroscience (30 credits)
  • Research Practice (15 credits)
  • Critical Analysis (15 credits)
  • Applied Statistics (30 credits)
  • Dissertation (60 credits).

Course Learning and Teaching

The MSc Cognitive Neuroscience is delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars, practical sessions, workshops and lab placements.

Lectures provide key theoretical information on general topics such as cognition, emotion and neuropsychology and in depth knowledge of a range of techniques used in cognitive neuroscience research (focusing on their strengths and weaknesses). This core knowledge is then enriched by seminars, workshop, practical sessions and lab placements.

While seminars and workshops allow student-led discussions with the aim of developing their critical thinking, their oral communications and their writing skills, practical sessions provide students with in-depth and hands-on knowledge of selected research techniques as well as programming skills (i.e. Matlab included in the Techniques in Cognitive Neuroscience module) - most wanted key abilities in cognitive neuroscience research. Importantly, practicals also include the application of a range of widely-used statistical tests and a critical understanding of research design, project management and data presentation. All skills that are easily transferable to any future career the students might decide to pursue.

Lab placements are a crowning point of the MSc in Cognitive Neuroscience. They allow students to experience directly the “laboratory life” by observing and helping members of staff calibrating lab equipment, recruiting participants and collecting/analysing data. This is a unique opportunity for the students to witness leading experts at work in their own laboratory.

Finally, the dissertation module will give students the opportunity to apply the knowledge of theoretical principles, research skills and statistical techniques during the complete life cycle of a research project, by undertaking a detailed study of a particular area resulting in a significant piece of independent research.

Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to undertake their own independent study to prepare for their classes and broaden their subject knowledge.

Altogether, the program is focused on supplying students with broad theoretical knowledge and hands-on practical experience on cutting-edge research in cognitive neuroscience and psychology before embarking on a psychology related career.



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Durham University School of Engineering
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
The main objective of the course is to educate students in the rapidly growing area of Communications to undertake responsible and challenging posts in academia and industry. Read more
The main objective of the course is to educate students in the rapidly growing area of Communications to undertake responsible and challenging posts in academia and industry.

The course covers the key areas of wireless and wired networks and protocols, digital signal processing and digital electronics. In addition to the technical background provided in these subjects, hands-on experience is gained through a major individual Research and Development project, a group design project and a supporting laboratory programme.

Course Structure

The programme consists of three modules taught through lectures and a laboratory programme, a group design module and an individual research and design project.

Core Modules:
-Communications Systems
-Radio Communications
-Digital Systems
-Design of Wireless Systems
-Research and Development Project

Learning and Teaching

This is a 12-month full time degree course that runs from October to the end of August the following year. The programme consists of a total of five core elements. These are three modules taught by lectures, tutorials and laboratory classes in Communications Systems, Radio Communications and Digital Systems, a group design module on Design of Wireless Systems module and a major individual research and development project.

The three core lecture modules involve a total of 101 hours of lectures, 18 hours of tutorials and seminars and 33 hours of practical laboratory classes.

For the Group Design Module, each group is supervised by one or more members of staff, and guided through the various stages of design. The principal learning outcome from this module is for students to understand the stages in the design of current communication equipment and to understand the importance of information flow within a design team. Students should expect to have around 20 hours of contact time with their academic supervisors over the course of the design module.

A major individual research and development project is also undertaken on the course. This provides an open-ended challenge to each individual student, in collaboration with a staff supervisor. Regular meetings are held with the supervisor to discuss project progress and planning issues. A mid-term assessment is carried out to ensure project is on track. At the end of the project students are required to submit a final report on their work, in the style of a research paper. They are also required to prepare and to present a poster to allow an assessment to be made of their understanding and ability to present their work, plus an oral examination is held to allow detailed questions to be put to the student regarding the technical aspects of their project. Students should expect to have around 25 hours of contact time with their supervisors plus 500 hours of practical work, supported by the School’s technicians and other research workers, over the course of their research projects.

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The main objective of the course is to educate students in the rapidly growing area of Communications to undertake responsible and challenging posts in academia and industry. Read more
The main objective of the course is to educate students in the rapidly growing area of Communications to undertake responsible and challenging posts in academia and industry.

The course covers the key areas of wireless and wired networks and protocols, digital signal processing and digital electronics. In addition to the technical background provided in these subjects, hands-on experience is gained through a major individual Research and Development project, a group design project and a supporting laboratory programme.

Course Structure

The programme consists of three modules taught through lectures and a laboratory programme, a group design module and an individual research and design project.

Core Modules:
-Communications Systems
-Radio Communications
-Digital Systems
-Design of Wireless Systems
-Research and Development Project

Learning and Teaching

This is a 12-month full time degree course that runs from October to the end of August the following year. The programme consists of a total of five core elements. These are three modules taught by lectures, tutorials and laboratory classes in Communications Systems, Radio Communications and Digital Systems, a group design module on Design of Wireless Systems module and a major individual research and development project.

The three core lecture modules involve a total of 101 hours of lectures, 18 hours of tutorials and seminars and 33 hours of practical laboratory classes.

For the Group Design Module, each group is supervised by one or more members of staff, and guided through the various stages of design. The principal learning outcome from this module is for students to understand the stages in the design of current communication equipment and to understand the importance of information flow within a design team. Students should expect to have around 20 hours of contact time with their academic supervisors over the course of the design module.

A major individual research and development project is also undertaken on the course. This provides an open-ended challenge to each individual student, in collaboration with a staff supervisor. Regular meetings are held with the supervisor to discuss project progress and planning issues. A mid-term assessment is carried out to ensure project is on track. At the end of the project students are required to submit a final report on their work, in the style of a research paper. They are also required to prepare and to present a poster to allow an assessment to be made of their understanding and ability to present their work, plus an oral examination is held to allow detailed questions to be put to the student regarding the technical aspects of their project. Students should expect to have around 25 hours of contact time with their supervisors plus 500 hours of practical work, supported by the School’s technicians and other research workers, over the course of their research projects.

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Course Structure. Read more

Course Structure

The MSc will provide students with advanced knowledge of the complex and specialised areas of peacebuilding, among it conflict analysis, conflict prevention, conflict resolution and conflict transformation, community driven reconstruction, peace processes within the context of contemporary conflicts and in the context of broader international (humanitarian) interventions. Integrated into the MSc structure are opportunities to develop operational and vocational skills for example in negotiations, conflict mediation, conflict sensitive programme design and programme management, or urban peacebuilding. Students are provided with theoretical and empirical knowledge and with practical skills that are helpful for current and future employment opportunities. The courses are thus attractive to both graduates and mid-career practitioners. Whilst the academic and applied focus of the MSc comes through a peace and conflict studies analytic lens, course material will also draw from traditional strategic/security and development studies, enabling cross fertilisation between different perspectives. It allows the exploration of unique and new paradigms and practices in the fields of conflict, peace, security, defence, diplomacy, development and humanitarian intervention.

Five core modules worth 75 credits plus a Dissertation worth 60 credits plus three optional modules to the value of 45 credits.

Core Modules

  • Defence, Development and Diplomacy in Conflict: Evolving Actors, Factors and Paradigms
  • Conflict Prevention and Sustainable Peace
  • Responses: Peace Processes and Political Negotiation
  • Recovery and Reconstruction: Consolidating Peace after Violence
  • Capstone Exercise: Humanitarian Intervention Simulation (in MSc-specific roles)
  • Dissertation.

Optional Modules

Optional modules in previous years have included:

  • Religion, Culture and Conflict
  • Conflict Mediation
  • Fieldtrip
  • Conflict Sensitive Programme Management
  • Re-thinking Counter Terrorism
  • Urban Violence - Urban Peacebuilding
  • International Negotiation as Instrument in Conflict Management
  • Policing Post-Conflict Cities
  • Defence Engagement 
  • Conflict Analysis.

Course Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, as well as the general induction programme offered by the School and the university, Durham Global Security Institute (DGSi) students are invited to a programme specific induction. This induction provides an overview of the programme an opportunity to meet members of the team and an opportunity to discuss optional module choices.

 The 180 credits one-year MSc degree programme is divided into five core and three optional modules of 15 credits each. Students also have to submit a dissertation (60 credits) of not more than15,000 words. Practitioners have the option of writing an in-depth policy document as their dissertation.

Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation. Assessment methods include: an examination, essays, presentations, reflective journal, reports, article reviews and policy briefs. 

Although all modules have 18/19 contact hours, the core modules are spread over 9/10 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2-hour sessions which take the form of a one hour lecture and a one hour tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another. The optional modules of the programme are either delivered over two full days, through a mixture of lectures, Q&A sessions, seminar discussions, and role plays or over a single term in 2-hour seminar sessions. There is also the opportunity to participate in a study visit which provides an opportunity to investigate issues ‘in the field’ concerned with conflict prevention, conflict resolution, state and peace-building. Of particular interest is the theory-practice linkage

Students can also meet their module coordinators or programme coordinator during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the latter half of the year, they are required to attend two 4-hour workshops. In addition, they have the opportunity to meet their assigned supervisors for an average of 6 meetings. Students also have access to the MSc Programme Director and the School’s Director of Taught Post Graduate Studies whenever there is a need.

The School hosts events throughout the year which all postgraduate students are invited to attend. Students are also fully integrated into the Durham Global Security Institute which also hosts guest lectures and seminars throughout the year. These events provide students with the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies, and in conflict, peace and security studies.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

Career Opportunities

Our students go on to a wide range of successful careers including civil service and other government agencies, UN/INGOs/CSOs, journalism, media, teaching, law, banking and finance, diplomatic services and risk analysis.



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This programme critically addresses a range of key issues and debates relating to crime and the criminal justice system. Read more

This programme critically addresses a range of key issues and debates relating to crime and the criminal justice system. You will have the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of crime, deviance and criminal justice from critical, theoretical, policy, legal, political and practical perspectives and will address issues of historical and contemporary concern such as terrorism, prostitution, legal and illegal drugs, crime in the night-time economy, forced migration, gender and crime, domestic violence, crime prevention, prison and punishment, policing, youth crime and justice, law enforcement and the use of new technologies. You will also study issues of theoretical and social importance with lecturers who are international experts in their fields.

Course Structure

You will take a range of taught modules primarily in the first two terms of the academic year. You will also undertake a module on research design which enables you to develop a research proposal for your dissertation.

Core Modules

Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice (30 credits)

  • Apply theories of crime and justice to topical issues
  • Theory and practice of criminal justice
  • Analysis of contemporary politics
  • Governance of criminal justice.

Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits)

  • Introduction to social scientific research
  • Establishing cause and interpreting meaning in social sciences
  • Essentials of quantitative and qualitative research in social science research.

Research Design and Progress (15 credits)

  • Formulating research questions
  • Ethical review procedures
  • Research proposal design, evaluation, and development
  • Conversational analysis in practice
  • Qualitative interviewing.

Dissertation (60 credits)

  • A dissertation of up to 15,000 words.

Optional Modules

You may choose modules to the value of 60 credits. 

In previous years, typical modules offered were:

  • Gender, Violence and Abuse (30 credits)
  • Drugs, Crime and Society (30 credits)
  • Crime, Justice and the Sex Industry (30 credits)
  • Cybercrime and cybersecurity (30 credits)
  • Sociology of Forensic Science (30 credits)
  • Prisons, Crime and Criminal Justice (Inside-Out prison exchange programme) (30 credits)
  • Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits)
  • Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
  • Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits).

You will also have the opportunity to take a range of modules from other programmes within the Faculty such as those associated with the MSc in Risk and Security.

Course Learning and Teaching

The MSc Criminology and Criminal Justice is a 1 year full-time programme which may also be taken part-time. The programme’s core consists of a 60 credit dissertation module, one 30 credit module on Criminological Theory, one 15 credit module on Theories of Social Research and one 15 credit module on Research Design. You are also required to undertake 60 further credits of modules from within SASS or other related departments which may be taught in a variety of ways.

Core teaching on the programme falls primarily within the two 10 week terms, the second of which commences one week prior to the undergraduate term. Depending on module choice you may receive between 6 and 8 hours of tuition per week in either or both of these terms.

The programme is taught according to a variety of approaches. Modules such as ‘Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice’ operate a standard 2 hour session within which lecturing, seminar discussion, workshops or presentations may take place. Modules such as ‘Perspectives on Social Research’, ‘Quantitative Methods’ and ‘Qualitative Methods’ operate a weekly lecture series followed by seminar discussion. Other modules such as ‘Statistical Exploration and Reasoning’ operate computer-based practicals. Prisons, Crime and Criminal Justice is an innovative module that emphasises transformative education. It is taught within a prison each week using the Inside-Out dialogical pedagogy whereby university students learn together with prisoners, completing the same readings and assessments, as well as group work and group projects (please see the website for further details). For this module you will need to undertake security clearance and mandatory prison training before being allowed to enter the prison.

Following completion of teaching in terms 1 and 2, the ‘Research Design’ module allows for 4 day long workshops. Reflecting on the process of research design, the module supports the student in formulating the research question for their dissertation.

The MSc programme is research-led at its core. The compulsory module 'Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice' links explicitly with the research activities of the criminology staff; the module ‘Crime Violence and Abuse’ links with the current research activities of the School’s research group of the same name; and ‘Drugs, Crime and Society’ is taught by an internationally renowned expert in the field. You will subsequently undertake a 60 credit dissertation on a topic of your choice supervised by staff who are actively researching in a relevant area. While this module is intended to afford an opportunity for a significant piece of independent and original research, it includes up to four hours of regular supervision which takes place typically from the end of term 2. You will also participate in two one-hour workshops convened by a supervisor and usually alongside others researching in similar areas.

While teaching is intensive, particularly in terms 1 and 2, it is intended that the programme presents options for part-time study. Consequently, teaching is undertaken where possible in timetable slots which take place late in the afternoon.



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With conflicts becoming either increasingly drawn-out, asymmetric wars of attrition or normalise into states of no peace – no war, our understanding of conflict and conflict intervention is shifting. Read more

With conflicts becoming either increasingly drawn-out, asymmetric wars of attrition or normalise into states of no peace – no war, our understanding of conflict and conflict intervention is shifting. Conflicts are rarely determined by military victory, diplomacy or long-term development, but require to securing populations through a comprehensive approach that sees to their political, and economic, as well as their security-related needs. Their outcome will be determined by how well the different arms of government and civil society, both locally and internationally, can work together and how well they understand each others' perspectives.

This inter-disciplinary and custom designed MSc offers the unique opportunity to look at conflict, conflict intervention and post-conflict reconstruction through the lenses of defence, development and diplomacy.

The MSc is designed for graduates with a career in government, the armed forces, inter-governmental organisations, NGOs or academia in mind, and for practitioners looking to enhance their practical skills while placing these within a broader theoretical perspective.

Course structure

Five core modules worth 75 credits plus a Dissertation worth 60 credits plus three optional modules to the value of 45 credits.

Core Modules

  • Defence, Development and Diplomacy in Conflict: Evolving Actors, Factors and Paradigms
  • Conflict Prevention and Sustainable Peace
  • Conflict Intervention: International Law, Counter-Insurgency and Conflict Diplomacy
  • Post-Conflict Reconstruction: Stabilisation, Development and State-Building
  • Capstone Exercise: Humanitarian Intervention Simulation (in MSc-specific roles)
  • Dissertation.

Optional Modules

Optional module in previous years have included:

  • Religion, Culture and Conflict
  • Conflict Mediation
  • Fieldtrip
  • Conflict Sensitive Programme Management
  • Re-thinking Counter Terrorism
  • Conflict Analysis
  • Urban Violence - Urban Peacebuilding
  • International Negotiation as Instrument in Conflict Management
  • Defence Engagement 
  • Policing Post-Conflict Cities.

Course Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through two-day induction events in which they are informed about the University, the School, the MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

The 180 credits one-year MSc degree programme is divided into five core and three optional modules of 15 credits each. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 60 credits of not more than15,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Although all modules have 18/19 contact hours, the core modules are spread over 9/10 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2-hour sessions which take the form of a one hour lecture and a one hour tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another. The optional modules of the programme are delivered over two full days, through a mixture of lectures, Q&A sessions, seminar discussions, and role plays.

Formative assessment is given on seminar contributions, role plays, and formative essays. Students have the opportunity to meet their lecturers to discuss their marks and other issues arising from their course performance. Students also have the opportunity to attend ‘essay surgeries’ in which they can discuss the structure and content of their essays early in the course.

Students can also meet their module coordinators or programme coordinator during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the latter half of the year, they are required to attend two 4-hour workshops. In addition, they have the opportunity to meet their assigned supervisors for an average of 6 meetings. Students also have access to the MSc Programme Director and the School’s Director of Taught Post Graduate Studies whenever there is a need.

SGIA conducts weekly seminars and organises lectures and conferences which all postgraduate students can attend. Students are also fully integrated into the Durham Global Security Institute, which delivers this MSc programme and hosts guest lectures and seminars throughout the year. These events provide students with the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies, and in conflict, peace and security studies.

Throughout the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

Career Opportunities

Our students go on to a wide range of successful careers including civil service and other government agencies, UN/INGOs/CSOs, journalism, media, teaching, law, banking and finance, diplomatic services and risk analysis.



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Durham University School of Engineering
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
The overall aim of the programme is to develop high level skills in a range of techniques and approaches in the area of (Engineering) Design and Operations Engineering. Read more
The overall aim of the programme is to develop high level skills in a range of techniques and approaches in the area of (Engineering) Design and Operations Engineering. There is a high level on industrial interaction.

Course Structure
Three taught 20 credit modules:

- Advanced Design and Manufacture (including in-company teaching days)
- Manufacture and Management
- Enterprise and Operations
- A 30 credit Industrial Project Module - including 3 short burst in-company technical consultancy industrial projects - done in pairs
- A 90 credit R&D thesis incorporating an in-depth individual Research and Development project under the guidance of an experienced academic.

Optional Modules
- It can be possible to exchange the Manufacture and Management module with Applied Mechanics, or Energy Conversion and Delivery, or Digital Signal Processing. These requirement prerequisites - by concession.

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Durham University Department of Psychology
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
This programme is aimed at students who are seeking to build on their undergraduate qualifications to develop a career in research or related disciplines while building their project management skills and knowledge of developmental psychology and cognitive neuroscience. Read more
This programme is aimed at students who are seeking to build on their undergraduate qualifications to develop a career in research or related disciplines while building their project management skills and knowledge of developmental psychology and cognitive neuroscience. In addition, the programme is aimed at those from closely related science backgrounds to build up a knowledge and practical experience of developmental psychology and cognitive neuroscience before embarking on a psychology related career. Students on this course typically go on to pursue careers in research or in clinical psychology.

The programme is aimed at providing advanced research training for students interested in pursuing careers in the fields of research, child development and child health, brain function and cognitive neuroscience methodologies. The Department of Psychology at Durham University has particular strengths in these areas, with teaching reflecting the breadth of knowledge within the department.

Course Structure

Teaching is generally organised into a number of 10 week course units involving 2 to 3 hours of lectures, seminars and practicals per week. Each 10 week unit is assessed by means of one formative assignment and one summative assessment. The summative assessment counts towards the final degree. For the programme as a whole, this assessment is divided (with small variations across programmes) in equal proportions between examinations (33.3%), written assignments (33.3%) and dissertation (33.3%).

Core Modules

Research Practice (15 credits)
Critical Analysis (15 credits)
Applied Statistics (30 credits)
Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience (30 credits)
Dissertation (60 credits)
Choose one module from:
Current Issues in Developmental Psychology & Psychopathology (30 credits)
Current Issues in Cognitive Neuroscience(30 credits)
Choose additional modules to the value of 30 credits.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars and practical classes. Lectures provide key information on a particular topic, such as developmental cognitive neuroscience. Seminars are held in order that small group teaching can take place, with focused discussion on specific topics. Finally, practical classes allow students to gain direct experience, particularly in Applied Statistics and in how to use statistical tools.

The balance of these types of activities varies as a function of the module. This is a year long course, with students also having a summer term during which time work is typically carried out on dissertation related activities. Students typically attend 12 hours a week comprising lectures, tutorials and seminars. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to undertake their own independent study to prepare for their classes and broaden their subject knowledge. Independent study is a key element to the course, with complex factors raised in lectures that do assume some prior knowledge of the topic area.

The programme is divided into three parts. One third, comprising four modules, is of subject specific topics related to developmental psychology, psychopathology and cognitive neuroscience. Students may select one of the two modules (Current Issues in Cognitive Neuroscience or Current issues in Developmental Psychology and Psychopathology) to suit their areas of interest. Each module is delivered via a two to three hours lecture during one term or via seminars. A further three modules focus on research skills such as critical abilities, and statistical knowledge that are necessary to understand developmental psychology and psychopathology and cognitive neuroscience. The final third of the programme is the dissertation module, which reflects the culmination of learning and practical endeavours from throughout the course via the production of an independent and original body of research material. This is performed under one to one supervision with a member of staff, with meetings varying in duration and frequency throughout the year as a function of the needs of the research project.

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Durham University Department of Psychology
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
The aim of the MSc Developmental Psychopathology is to provide advanced research training for students interested in pursuing careers in the field of research, child development and clinical or educational psychology. Read more

The aim of the MSc Developmental Psychopathology is to provide advanced research training for students interested in pursuing careers in the field of research, child development and clinical or educational psychology. The subject-specific and generic postgraduate training provided by the course enables students to develop the knowledge, skills and understanding required of a professional conducting research in clinical, child development or other fields.

Research training forms a key focus of the MSc programme. In addition to providing training in basic research, the course aims to integrate research perspectives from clinical and educational psychology. This distinctive emphasis is reflected in the learning outcomes, structure and assessment of the course.

Course Structure

Teaching is generally organised into a number of 10 week course units involving 2 to 3 hours of lectures, seminars and workshops. Each 10 week unit is assessed by means of formative and summative assessments. The summative assessments count towards the final degree outcome. For the programme as a whole, the assessments include examinations, written assignments, oral presentations and the dissertation. 

Core Modules

  • Advanced Developmental Psychology Review (15 credits)
  • Research Practice (15 credits)
  • Critical Analysis (15 credits)
  • Research Design in Child and Clinical Psychology (15 credits)
  • Current Issues in Developmental Psychology & Psychopathology (30 credits)
  • Applied Statistics (30 credits)
  • Dissertation (60 credits)

Course Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered predominantly through a mixture of lectures, seminars and workshop classes. Lectures provide key information on a particular topic, such as ‘autism spectrum disorder’ or ‘developing interventions’. Seminars are held in order that smaller group teaching can take place, with focused discussion on specific topics. Finally, practical workshop classes allow students to gain direct experience, particularly in Applied Statistics and in how to use statistical tools.

The balance of this type of activity varies as a function of the module. This is a one year course, with students having a summer term to work on their dissertation related activities. Students typically attend approximately 12 hours a week comprising lectures, tutorials and seminars. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to undertake their own independent study to prepare for their classes and broaden their subject knowledge, as well as completing their dissertation. Independent study is a key element to the course, with complex factors raised in lectures that do assume some prior knowledge of the topic area.

The programme is divided into three parts. One third, comprising three modules, is of subject specific topics related to developmental psychology and developmental psychopathology (with a specific focus on neurodevelopmental disorders). A further three modules focus on research skills such as critical thinking abilities and statistical knowledge that are necessary to understand developmental psychology and developmental psychopathology. The final third of the programme is the dissertation module, which reflects the culmination of learning and practical endeavours from throughout the course via the production of an independent and original body of research material. This is performed under supervision with a member of staff, with meetings varying in duration and frequency throughout the year as a function of the needs of the research project and the student.



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Our MSc programmes in Economics will give you the opportunity to equip yourself with the necessary skills and knowledge to pursue a career in economics and related disciplines. Read more

Our MSc programmes in Economics will give you the opportunity to equip yourself with the necessary skills and knowledge to pursue a career in economics and related disciplines.

The programme consists of a set of core and elective modules, culminating in a practice-based business project or a research-based dissertation.

Core and elective modules

You will study:

  • Advanced Macroeconomics 
  • Advanced Microeconomics

Based on your prior knowledge and experience you will be streamed to study one of the following module pairings:

  • Econometrics I and Econometrics II
  • Econometrics I and Microeconometrics
  • Econometric Methods and Microeconometrics
  • Econometric Methods and Financial Modelling and Business Forecasting

You will then choose four elective modules. The list of modules may vary from year to year, but has typically included: Behavioural Finance and Economics; Development Economics; Econometrics II; Environmental Economics and Policy; Environmental Valuation; Experimental Economics and Finance; Game Theory; Industrial Organisation; International Economics; International Finance; Market Microstructure; Microeconometrics; Monetary Economics; Money and Banking; Natural Resource Management; Public Choice; Public Economics.

View module overviews

Dissertation/Business Project or Placement

In the third term you will complete a 12,000 word dissertation which may be undertaken as a consultancy project within an organisation, during a placement or with one of our international partner institutions. Supervised by a faculty member with relevant experience, you’ll investigate in greater detail a subject that you’ve already studied as part of your programme.

This is an opportunity for you to develop your business insight and present your analysis and ideas in a scholarly and professional manner; combine critical discrimination and a sense of proportion in evaluating evidence and the opinions of others.

Additional Resources

The School has made a significant investment in database resources to give you access to both live and historical data from providers which include Thomson Reuters, Bloomberg, Datasteam and Orbis. These state-of-the-art databases give you the opportunity to interrogate the financial records of millions of companies worldwide and add valuable insight to your research.

Adding to your experience

International Opportunities

We’re proud of our strong international connections. Helping you get an inside perspective on global business is a key part of the programme. That’s why we offer a range of opportunities to help you immerse yourself in a country’s business and academic environment, make new contacts and stand out in a competitive job market. These include:

  • Dissertation Abroad

If your ambitions lie beyond the UK, we offer a number of places on our unique Dissertation Abroad scheme. This will involve writing a dissertation at one of our international partner institutions in the period June to August. A number of scholarships are available.

  • International Study Tour

We organise an optional International Study Tour to a European destination, typically Switzerland. This intensive programme takes place over several days, normally in March/April, and offers you a great opportunity to get an ‘inside perspective’ on international business, and to network with key staff within organisations.

Guest Speakers

As part of your programme, you have the opportunity to enjoy presentations by academics and practitioners within your chosen area of interest. Past speakers have included representatives of major global multinationals and leading academics , providing an ideal opportunity to gain practical knowledge and progressive insight.

Course Learning and Teaching

The programme is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars, and practicals. Lectures provide key contents of a particular topic. Occasionally lectures might be delivered by guest speakers who are internationally recognised academic experts or practitioners in their field. Students can also attend the Durham Speaker Series, providing the opportunity to network with senior business leaders, staff and alumni.

Seminars provide the opportunity for smaller groups of students to solve problems and discuss and debate issues based on knowledge gained through lectures and independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Practicals are medium sized group sessions, where students practice computer software, applying topics from lectures and seminars.

Students study 3 core modules including the dissertation, a further 2 compulsory paired modules (which vary depending on students’ prior knowledge) and 4 elective modules chosen from a list of options. This enables them to undertake more in-depth study of particular topics. The 12,000 word dissertation allows students to carry out independent research and develop their skills in analysis and scholarly expression, using an appropriate theoretical framework. They are supported in writing their dissertation through the study of research methods, and attending individual meetings with an allocated supervisor who monitors their progress and provides advice.

Academic Support:

Throughout the year, students may have the opportunity to participate in extracurricular activities. They also have the opportunity to attend an International Study Week at an overseas location at the end of Term 2, which gives students the opportunity to learn about the business, economy and culture of another country, gain an ‘insider perspective’ on international businesses and network with key business staff. 

Learning Resource:

Outside of timetabled contact hours, students are expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study in preparation for teaching sessions, assignments and other forms of assessment including exams, and general background reading to broaden their subject knowledge. All students have an Academic Adviser who is able to provide general advice on academic matters. Teaching staff are also available to provide additional support on a one-to-one basis via weekly consultation hours.

Students also have access to the facilities available at Mill Hill Lane including dedicated postgraduate working spaces, an onsite library and IT helpdesk.



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Durham University School of Education
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
The MSc in Educational Assessment has been developed to meet the need for specialists in educational assessment within schools and more widely within the education system. Read more

The MSc in Educational Assessment has been developed to meet the need for specialists in educational assessment within schools and more widely within the education system. The programme combines the expertise of two leading institutions in assessment, the School of Education and CEM (Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring). You will learn to construct and use tests, classroom assessments, interviews, school inspections and more. The programme is 'hands on'; candidates learn about the theory of assessment and the challenges associated with assessment, but there is also a strong focus on providing training into the conducting of assessment. Completion of the programme will enable you to apply for the status of Fellow with the Chartered Institute of Educational Assessors (CIEA).

The programme aims to produce specialists who are well equipped to work in assessment within many areas of education. We want these specialists to have good knowledge and skills and be well prepared for the tasks they undertake. Specifically, the programme aims:

  • To develop knowledge and awareness of the importance and many roles of assessment in education, and to enable students to engage with debate and to reflect on how to meet the challenges of effective educational assessment;
  • To equip students with knowledge, understanding and relevant skills that will help them develop, deliver and analyse assessment at all levels of education, and to facilitate further research and scholarship in this important field.

This programme is also of interest to international students as having effective assessment is a common challenge to any educational system. Looking around the world, we also find that trends in assessment, such as the drive towards assessment for learning and computer-based assessment, are mostly international rather than local phenomena. The techniques and understanding achieved from the MSc in Educational Assessment, for this reason, are relevant to most nations. The intention of the full-time international programme is to bring together students from different nations and educational systems, including the UK system, to demonstrate and explore general issues in a local context. Generic theories and techniques will be taught, but students are encouraged to choose examples from their own educational system when exploring these in assignments and other tasks.

It is, however, realized that studying in a different country includes extra challenges. We therefore run special tutorial groups for international students. This happens every week during term time, and students are taken through a programme designed to enhance and development the academic skills required at a UK university. These tutorials also have a strong social element, providing an opportunity to meet with staff and students on other programmes (the tutorials share many of the sessions with international students from other postgraduate programmes in the School of Education).

Course structure

The programme comprises four x 30 credit taught modules plus a 60 credit dissertation of up to 15,000 words. On a part-time basis, students study two modules per year in both year one and in year two and the dissertation in year three. On a full-time basis, students study all modules and the dissertation within one year.

Core Modules

  • Standardised Tests and Exams (30 credits) – Part-time students must take this module as a pre-requisite to the Judgement-based Assessment module
  • Classroom Assessment (30 credits)
  • Judgement-based Assessment (30 credits)
  • Research Methods in Education (30 credits)
  • MSc Dissertation (60 credits).

Career Opportunities

Career opportunities in education are wide and include classroom teaching, educational leadership and management, administration and policy development.



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