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Full Time MSc Degrees in Anthropology, Durham, United Kingdom

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Durham University Department of Anthropology
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
Our degree offers a unique opportunity to learn about anthropological approaches to the study of health drawing on both sociocultural and evolutionary perspectives. Read more
Our degree offers a unique opportunity to learn about anthropological approaches to the study of health drawing on both sociocultural and evolutionary perspectives. The course provides a strong grounding in ethnographic approaches to the study of health, the political ecology of health and the application of anthropology to contemporary public health concerns, as well as a diverse range of options in areas such as theories of the body and evolutionary medicine. We aim to provide strong training in both theory and methods.

The full-time course runs for a full year, from October to September. Full-time students attend classes between October and December (Michaelmas Term) and January and March (Epiphany), with further teaching and assessment in April and May (Easter Term), and then work, under the supervision of a specialist supervisor, to complete a dissertation in September. Core modules introduce the Anthropology of Global Health and Public Health Anthropology, and anthropological methods. Students can choose to focus on qualitative or quantitative methods or to train in both.

Each module we offer has a credit value. To obtain a Master’s degree you must register for and pass modules to the value of 180 credits. In recognition of the emphasis we place on independent research skills, the dissertation is a 60 credit module.

Compulsory modules

-Dissertation
-Public Health Anthropology
-Anthropology of Global Health.
Student choose at least one of the following:
-Computational Methods for Social Sciences
-Fieldwork and Interpretation
-Statistical Analysis in Anthropology

Students will then choose 180 credits from a selection of the following.

Previous optional modules have included:

-Academic and Professional Skills in Anthropology
-Evolutionary Perspectives on Western Diseases
-Advanced Anthropology of Mental Health and Illness
-Science, Culture and Ethics: Advanced Perspectives
-Evolutionary Perspective on Reproductive and Infant Health
-Society, Energy, Environment and Resilience
-Thinking Anthropologically
-Anthropology and Development
-Body, Politics and Experience
-Evolutionary and Ecological Topics in Medicine and Health
-Interrogating Ethnography
-Key issues in Socio-Cultural Theory
-Foreign language option

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a mixture of interactive lectures, seminars, student-led seminars, practical sessions and workshops, in addition to one-to-one dissertation supervision. Typically, lectures deliver key information on progressively more advanced themes and topics. Seminars provide an opportunity to reflect in more depth upon material delivered in lectures and gathered from independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Student-led seminars give students an opportunity to engage with academic issues at the cutting-edge of research in Anthropology, in a learning environment focused on discussion and debate of current issues.

We place an emphasis on independent learning. This is supported by the University’s virtual learning environment, extensive library collections and informal contact with tutors and research staff. We consider the development of independent learning and research skills to be one of the key elements of our postgraduate taught curriculum and one which helps our students cultivate initiative, originality and critical thinking.

Full-time students have on average 6-8 hours of formal teaching and learning contact per week. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to devote significant amounts of time to reading, discussing and preparing for classes, assignments and project work. Following the May assessment period, students undertake their dissertation. This crucial piece of work is a significant piece of independent research that constitutes a synthesis of theory, method and practice in anthropology and is supported by an individual supervisor and a dissertation course leader.

Throughout the programme, all students meet regularly with the degree tutor, who provides academic support and guidance. Furthermore, all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. In term time, the department also has an extensive programme of departmental and research group seminars which postgraduate students are encouraged and expected to attend. The undergraduate Anthropology Society also organises its own visiting lecturer programme. We ensure that we advertise any other relevant seminars and lectures in Durham, Newcastle and further afield, and encourage students to attend relevant conferences.

Before the academic year starts, we provide information on preparation for the course. On arrival we have induction sessions and social events, headed by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and attended by both academic and administrative staff. Students also attend an “Introduction to Research Groups in Anthropology”.

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Durham University Department of Anthropology
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
This course is designed to provide expertise in the study of evolutionary and adaptive processes in primates, both human and non-human, in relation to both extinct and living species. Read more
This course is designed to provide expertise in the study of evolutionary and adaptive processes in primates, both human and non-human, in relation to both extinct and living species. There is a particular focus on primate behaviour, evolutionary psychology, cultural evolution and palaeoenvironments, drawing on the world-class expertise of members of our large Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group.

Many of our former students have gone on to do PhDs, but the course also provides advanced training for those wishing to prepare for a career working in fields such as primate conservation or in museum or educational contexts.

The course is designed for those with an undergraduate degree in anthropology, psychology, biology, zoology or a related discipline.

Course content

This course is designed to provide expertise in the study of evolutionary and adaptive processes in primates, both human and non-human, in relation to both extinct and living species. There is a particular focus on primate behaviour, evolutionary psychology, cultural evolution and palaeoenvironments, drawing on the world-class expertise of members of our large Evolutionary Anthropology Research Group.

All students take the following modules, which provide an essential foundation in theory and methods for Evolutionary Anthropology.

Compulsory modules:
-Dissertation
-Evolutionary Theory
-Statistical Analysis in Anthropology.

Student will then choose 90 credits from a selection of the following:

Previous optional modules have included:
-Academic and Professional Skills in Anthropology
-Evolutionary Perspectives on Western Diseases
-Primate Behaviour
-Cultural Evolution
-Evolutionary Psychology
-Palaeoanthropology and Palaeoecology
-Evolutionary and Ecological Topics in Medicine and Health
-Foreign language option.

Please see http://www.durham.ac.uk/anthropology/postgraduatestudy/taughtprogrammes/evolutionaryanthropology for further information.

Learning and Teaching

The MSc (full-time) consists of two terms of teaching, during which students are introduced to the range of research questions and methods, and a dissertation, involving the design, development and implementation of an independent research project. Students work closely with academic staff, and have the opportunity to become involved in active research projects.

The programme is delivered through a mixture of interactive lectures, seminars, student-led seminars, practical sessions and workshops, in addition to one-to-one dissertation supervision. Typically, lectures deliver key information on progressively more advanced themes and topics. Seminars provide an opportunity to reflect in more depth upon material delivered in lectures and gathered from independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Student-led seminars give students an opportunity to engage with academic issues at the cutting-edge of research in Anthropology, in a learning environment focused on discussion and debate of current issues.

We place an emphasis on independent learning. This is supported by the University’s virtual learning environment, extensive library collections and informal contact with tutors and research staff. We consider the development of independent learning and research skills to be one of the key elements of our postgraduate taught curriculum and one which helps our students cultivate initiative, originality and critical thinking.

Students take required taught modules worth a total of 30 credits, and four optional modules, totalling 90 credits plus a 60-credit dissertation. Full-time students have on average 6-8 hours of formal teaching and learning contact per week. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to devote significant amounts of time to reading, discussing and preparing for classes, assignments and project work. Following the May assessment period, students undertake their 60 credit dissertation. This crucial piece of work is a significant piece of independent research that constitutes a synthesis of theory, method and practice in anthropology and is supported by an individual supervisor and a dissertation leader.

Throughout the programme, all students meet regularly with the degree tutor, who provides academic support and guidance. Furthermore, all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. In term time, the department also has an extensive programme of departmental and research group seminars which postgraduate students are encouraged and expected to attend. The undergraduate Anthropology Society also organises its own visiting lecturer programme. We ensure that we advertise any other relevant seminars and lectures in Durham, Newcastle and further afield, and encourage students to attend relevant conferences.

Before the academic year starts, we provide information on preparation for the course. On arrival we have induction sessions and social events, headed by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and attended by both academic and administrative staff. Students also attend an “Introduction to Research Groups in Anthropology”.

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Durham University Department of Anthropology
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
*Why do energy efficiency measures often fail?. *How will we transition into a post-carbon energy system?. *Why do some energy technologies spread, while others disappear?. Read more
*Why do energy efficiency measures often fail?
*How will we transition into a post-carbon energy system?
*Why do some energy technologies spread, while others disappear?
*How can people be persuaded to change their energy habits?

The MSc in Energy and Society investigates energy systems from all angles. On this course you will look at energy in practice, what it means to make an energy transition, what we mean by energy justice, and how energy practices change.

The programme brings in leading experts in energy studies at Durham from Anthropology, Engineering, Economics, Law, Geography, Geosciences and many other departments. It is taught through intensive block-teaching, field-study, original dissertation research and a range of optional modules that complement the core teaching. You will learn about current and new energy technologies, histories of energy, how to understand energy policy, and how to study energy practices.

A broad range of optional subjects enables you to tailor the course according to your particular interests – you can take modules in law, international politics, advanced engineering, geography, risk, development or resilience, depending on your prior qualifications. In your fully supported personal research project you will deepen your expertise in your chosen area.

The full-time course consists of two terms of teaching, during which students are introduced to the range of research questions and methods, and a dissertation, involving the design, development and implementation of an independent research project. Students work closely with academic staff, and have the opportunity to become involved in active research projects.

Compulsory modules

-Dissertation
-Energy in Practice (Field Study)
-Context and Challenges in Energy
-Energy Society and Energy Practices

Optional modules from across the University and have previously included:

-Academic and Professional Skills in Anthropology
-Fieldwork and Interpretation
-Group Renewable Energy Design Project
-Key Issues in Sociocultural Theory
-Society, Energy, Environment and Resilience
-Computational Methods for Social Sciences
-Anthropology and Development
-Negotiating the Human
-Statistical Analysis in Anthropology
-Energy, Markets and Risk
-Renewable Energy and the Environment
-Risk Frontiers

Please see http://www.durham.ac.uk/anthropology/postgraduatestudy/taughtprogrammes/mscenergyandsociety for further information on modules.

Dissertation

We place an emphasis on independent learning. This is supported by the University’s virtual learning environment, extensive library collections and informal contact with tutors and research staff. We consider the development of independent learning and research skills to be one of the key elements of our postgraduate taught curriculum and one which helps our students cultivate initiative, originality and critical thinking.

The dissertation is a significant piece of independent research that constitutes a synthesis of theory, method and practice in anthropology and is supported by an individual supervisor and the dissertation coordinator.

Previous dissertations and research projects as part of the course have been undertaken in partnership with DONG Energy UK, Haringey Borough of London, National Energy Action, Durham County Council, energy enterprises and community energy schemes.

Careers

This course attracts high quality applicants from all over the world and delivers highly-skilled graduates who are able to communicate across disciplines and countries to further environmental progress and energy justice. Graduates of the MSc will be in demand from industry, community organisations, Non-Governmental Organisations and governments around the world. Graduates have gone on to work in Energy justice organisations, local authorities, energy consultancies and further Doctoral study.

Student support

Throughout the programme, all students meet regularly with the degree tutor, who provides academic support and guidance. Furthermore, all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. In term time, the department also has an extensive programme of departmental and research group seminars which postgraduate students are encouraged and expected to attend. The undergraduate Anthropology Society also organises its own visiting lecturer programme. We ensure that we advertise any other relevant seminars and lectures in Durham, Newcastle and further afield, and encourage students to attend relevant conferences.

Before the academic year starts, we provide information on preparation for the course. On arrival we have induction sessions and social events, headed by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and attended by both academic and administrative staff. Students also attend an “Introduction to Research Groups in Anthropology”.

Postgraduate study at Durham University

The MSc Energy and Society is based in Durham University’s Department of Anthropology in association with the Durham Energy Institute. Durham has one of the largest Anthropology departments in the world with 40 research active academic teaching staff working across the full range of the discipline. Our Anthropology department is ranked in the top 50 of the prestigious QS World University Subject Rankings. The overall QS rankings also placed Durham 54th in the world for citations, recognising the impact and influence of its research among other academics, and 31st globally for employer reputation, giving recognition to the quality of, and international demand for, Durham’s graduates.

Students on this course can become members of the Durham Energy Institute (DEI) community and can attend its wide range of seminars and events, benefitting from its extensive network of contacts in the energy sector. DEI ( http://www.durham.ac.uk/dei/ ) covers the spectrum of energy research from technological innovation, to the social, political and economic dimensions of energy. DEI addresses energy challenges collaboratively through strong partnerships with industry, international partners, governments, community groups and other academic institutions. This ensures our research is relevant, timely and effective.

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Durham University Department of Anthropology
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
This course provides students with the skills to apply anthropological theory and methods to the study of development. Read more
This course provides students with the skills to apply anthropological theory and methods to the study of development. The programme is taught by an active, interdisciplinary team involved in world-class research on development issues with a focus on achieving environmental and social sustainability through participatory approaches and active collaborations with projects for empowerment in the Global South. Geographical areas of expertise include Sub-Saharan Africa, South America, South Asia, South-East Asia, the Middle East, Europe and Melanesia.

The MSc is based around core modules focusing on sustainability, culture and development. Options allow you to pursue special interests. The dissertation offers the opportunity to conduct independent research under the supervision of an expert in your chosen topic.

Compulsory modules

-Dissertation
-Fieldwork and Interpretation
-Society, Energy, Environment and Resilience
-Thinking Anthropologically
-Anthropology and Development

Students will then choose 60 credits from a selection of the following (previous optional modules have included):
-Academic and Professional Skills in Anthropology
-Art in Ecological Perspective
-Computational Methods for Social Sciences
-Context and Challenges in Energy and Society
-Key Issues in Sociocultural Theory
-Public Health Anthropology
-Religion, Contention and Public Controversy
-Anthropology of Global Health
-Body, Politics and Experience
-Energy Society and Energy Practices
-Interrogating Ethnography
-Statistical Analysis in Anthropology
-Foreign language option

Please see http://www.durham.ac.uk/anthropology/postgraduatestudy/taughtprogrammes/sustainability for further information on modules.

Learning and Teaching

The MSc in Sustainability, Culture and Development (full-time) consists of two terms of teaching, during which students are introduced to the range of research questions and methods, and a dissertation, involving the design, development and implementation of an independent research project. Students work closely with academic staff, and have the opportunity to become involved in active research networks and projects.

The programme is delivered through a mixture of interactive lectures, seminars, student-led seminars, film showings and discussion, workshops, and optional fieldtrips, in addition to one-to-one dissertation supervision. Typically, lecture formats deliver key concepts and case study comparisons on progressively more advanced themes and topics. Research seminars provide an opportunity to reflect in more depth upon material delivered in modules and gathered from independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Student-led seminars give students an opportunity to engage with academic issues at the cutting-edge of research in Anthropology, in a learning environment focused on discussion and debate of current issues.

As a Level 4 course we place an emphasis on independent learning. This is supported by the University’s virtual learning environment, extensive library collections and informal contact with tutors and research staff. We consider the development of independent learning and research skills to be one of the key elements of our postgraduate taught curriculum and one which helps our students cultivate initiative, originality and critical thinking.

Full-time students take required taught modules worth a total of 60 credits (av 1.5 hours per week per module), and two or more optional modules, also totalling 60 credits (average 2.3 hours per week). Thus, they have on average 6.1 hours of formal contact per week (a mixture of interactive lectures, seminars, student-led seminars, practical sessions and workshops). Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to devote significant amounts of time to reading, discussing and preparing for classes, assignments and project work. From week 10, students begin formal supervision for their 60 credit dissertation. This crucial piece of work is a significant piece of independent research that constitutes a synthesis of theory, method and practice in anthropology and is supported by an individual supervisor (10 hours, representing approximately monthly meetings December-September), the degree director (as necessary), and other relevant members of staff (e.g. regional specialists).

Throughout the programme, all students have access to the degree director and deputy director who provide them with academic support and guidance. Furthermore, all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. In term time, the department also has an extensive programme of departmental and research group seminars which postgraduate students are encouraged and expected to attend. We ensure that we advertise any other relevant seminars and lectures in Durham, Newcastle and further afield, and encourage students to attend relevant conferences, such as the RAI and ASA.

Before the academic year starts, we make contact with incoming students via the postgraduate office. On arrival we have induction sessions and social events, headed by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and attended by both academic and administrative staff. Students also attend an 'Introduction to Research Groups in Anthropology', as well as a specific introduction to the Anthropology in Development Research Group. This allows students to identify key staff.

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Durham University Department of Anthropology
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
Evolutionary Medicine is a growing and exciting new field that is highly interdisciplinary in nature. We offer the only MSc in Evolutionary Medicine in the world, taught by a unique grouping of world-class researchers specialising in evolutionary approaches to the study of health and disease. Read more
Evolutionary Medicine is a growing and exciting new field that is highly interdisciplinary in nature. We offer the only MSc in Evolutionary Medicine in the world, taught by a unique grouping of world-class researchers specialising in evolutionary approaches to the study of health and disease. A major theme of the course is the mismatch between the environment in which humans evolved and the contemporary environment, and implications for obesity and related metabolic disorders, reproductive health and infant care. Optional courses are offered in palaeopathology and cultural evolution, and in the wider anthropology of health.

Course content

The programme is designed for students preparing for doctoral research in evolutionary medicine, or for those who would like to apply an evolutionary perspective to their work in health. It is a popular intercalated degree for medical students.

The course is suitable for those with an undergraduate degree in anthropology, psychology, biology, health sciences, nutrition or a related discipline, and for health professionals.

Evolutionary Medicine is a growing and exciting new field that is highly interdisciplinary in nature. We currently offer the only MSc in Evolutionary Medicine in the world, taught by a unique grouping of world-class researchers specialising in evolutionary approaches to the study of health and disease. A major theme of the course is the mismatch between the environment in which humans evolved and the contemporary environment, and implications for obesity and related metabolic disorders, reproductive health and infant care. Optional modules previously offered included palaeopathology and cultural evolution, and in the wider anthropology of health.

The full-time course runs for a full year, from October to September. Students attend classes between October and December (Michaelmas Term) and January and March (Epiphany), with further teaching and assessment in April and May (Easter Term), and then work, under the supervision of a specialist supervisor, to complete a dissertation in September. Students take three core taught modules, designed to provide a foundation in evolutionary theory, quantitative methods used in evolutionary medicine, and an introduction to evolutionary medicine. There is also a range of optional modules available to allow students to focus on areas of particular interest.

Each module we offer has a credit value. To obtain a Master’s degree you must register for and pass modules to the value of 180 credits. In recognition of the emphasis we place on independent research skills, the dissertation is a 60 credit module.

Compulsory modules:
-Dissertation
-Evolutionary Theory
-Evolutionary and Ecological Topics in Medicine and Health
-Statistical Analysis in Anthropology

Previous optional modules have included:
-Academic and Professional Skills in Anthropology
-Evolutionary Perspectives on Western Diseases
-Public Health Anthropology
-Anthropology of Global Health
-Cultural Evolution
-Evolutionary Psychology
-Themes in Palaeopathology
-Evolutionary Perspectives on Reproductive and Infant Health
-Foreign language option.

Please see http://www.durham.ac.uk/anthropology/postgraduatestudy/taughtprogrammes/evolutionarymedicine for further information on modules.

Learning and Teaching

Evolutionary Medicine is a growing and exciting new field that is highly interdisciplinary in nature. We offer the only MSc in Evolutionary Medicine in the world, taught by a unique group of world-class researchers specialising in evolutionary approaches to the study of health and disease. A major theme of the course is the mismatch between the environment in which humans evolved and the contemporary environment, and implications for obesity and related metabolic disorders, reproductive health and infant care. Optional courses are offered in palaeopathology and cultural evolution, and in the wider anthropology of health.

The course runs for a full year, from October to September. Students attend classes between October and December (Michaelmas Term) and January and March (Epiphany), with further teaching and assessment in April (Easter Term), and then work, under the supervision of a specialist supervisor, to complete a dissertation in September. Students take three core taught modules, designed to provide a foundation in evolutionary theory, quantitative methods used in evolutionary medicine, and an introduction to evolutionary medicine. There is also a range of optional modules available to allow students to focus on areas of particular interest.

Each module we offer has a credit value. To obtain a Master’s degree you must register for and pass modules to the value of 180 credits. In recognition of the emphasis we place on independent research skills, the dissertation is a 60 credit module.

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Durham University Department of Archaeology
Distance from Durham: 0 miles
Palaeopathology is the study of past disease in human remains; it is a sub-discipline of bioarchaeology (study of human remains from archaeological sites). Read more
Palaeopathology is the study of past disease in human remains; it is a sub-discipline of bioarchaeology (study of human remains from archaeological sites). This lecture, seminar and laboratory based MSc equips students with the theoretical and practical skills knowledge of how to study and interpret data collected from human remains. The emphasis is on health and well-being using a multidisciplinary approach, linking biological evidence for disease with cultural data (the bioarchaeological approach). This course is unique in the world and it takes a holistic view of disease, as seen in a clinical contexts today, and prepares students for undertaking significant research projects in this subject, or working in contract archaeology, and many other fields. It is aimed at graduates mainly in archaeology and anthropology with or without past experience of knowledge in this field, and for those who aspire to continue into a PhD programme or work in contract archaeology. However, past students have come from a variety of subject backgrounds, and destination data illustrate a wide range of employments take these students.

Course Structure

Two taught modules in the Epiphany term (Research and Study Skills in Archaeological Science and Identification and Analysis of the Normal Human Skeleton), and two taught modules in Michaelmas term (Palaeopathology: Theory and Method; Themes in Palaeopathology), with the double module dissertation over Easter term and the summer (submitted early September).

Core Modules

-Research and Study Skills in Archaeological Science
-Identification and Analysis of the Normal Human Skeleton
-Palaeopathology: Theory and Method
-Themes in Palaeopathology
-Dissertation (double module)

Learning and Teaching

The programme is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars and practical classes. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular area, and identify the main areas for discussion and debate in bioarchaeology. Seminars then provide opportunities for smaller groups of students to discuss and debate particular issues or areas, based on the knowledge that they have gained through their lectures and through independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Finally, practical laboratory classes allow students to gain direct practical skills in the recording and interpretation of data from skeletal remains. The latter provide an important element of the programme in allowing independent and group work, as well as hands-on experience under laboratory conditions, essential for a potential future working environment.

The balance of these types of activities changes over the course of the programme, as students develop their knowledge and ability as independent learners, giving them the opportunity to engage in research, professional practice, and developing and demonstrating research skills in a particular area of the subject.

In Term 1 students typically attend 4 hours a week of lectures and 2.5 hours of laboratory sessions, in addition to seminars over the term. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to undertake their own independent study to prepare for their classes and broaden their subject knowledge. External speakers specializing in specific subject areas from “industry” and academia are brought in to engage the students on issues in research, but also in the profession.

In Term 2 the balance shifts from learning the basic skills required for recording and interpreting skeletal data (age at death, sex, normal variation), to further developing skills for palaeopathological data recording and their interpretation and understanding the limitations. In addition, the Themes module aims to develop in students a critical approach to the evaluation of multiple forms of evidence, beyond that for human remains, for the reconstruction of specific themes. It focuses on discussion and debate of different related issues. In Term 2 students typically attend 4 hours a week of lectures and 2.5 hours of laboratory sessions, in addition to seminars over the term. Again, external speakers specializing in specific subject areas from “industry” and academia are brought in to engage the students on issues in research, but also in the profession.

The move towards greater emphasis on independent learning and research continues in Term 3 and beyond, where the research skills acquired earlier in the programme are developed through the dissertation research project. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with whom they will typically have three one-to-one supervisory meetings, students undertake a detailed study of a particular area, resulting in a significant piece of independent research. The dissertation is regarded as a preparation for further professional or academic work. In Term 3 students are given the opportunity to attend a Careers Session in the Department where past graduates of the course talk about their career trajectories since graduating.

Throughout the programme, all students have access to an “academic adviser”, or in the case of this MSc the two Directors (Professor Charlotte Roberts and Dr Rebecca Gowland), who provide them with academic support and guidance. Typically a student meets their adviser two to three times a year, in addition to which all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. The department also has an exciting programme of weekly one hour research seminars which postgraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend. Additionally, the students who attend the MSc Palaeopathology course are provided with the opportunity to attend journal paper critique sessions each term, and human bioarchaeology seminars given by PhD students.

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