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United Kingdom
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Medicine×

Full Time MSc Degrees in Medicine, Dundee, United Kingdom

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University of Dundee Dentistry
Distance from Dundee: 0 miles
Forensic dentists are required in all countries to provide dental expertise to courts and legal systems. Dentists wishing to work in this field often find it difficult to gain the necessary skills. Read more
Forensic dentists are required in all countries to provide dental expertise to courts and legal systems. Dentists wishing to work in this field often find it difficult to gain the necessary skills. This 1 year course addresses those aspects of forensic odontology which are most frequently the subject of expert testimony in courts and have the most relevance to forensic odontology internationally.

Why study this course at Dundee?

Internationally, there are few opportunities for dentists to gain expertise in forensic odontology in a structured manner from a University with a dental school and an active forensic medicine department.

As a student in Forensic Odontology you will work closely with other postgraduate students in Forensic Medicine, Forensic Science and Forensic Toxicology. You will develop a deep understanding of the role of other forensic disciplines and identify when, where and how forensic odontology links with the wider forensic community. This provides a unique multi-disciplinary nature to the course.

What is so good about this course?

Acquiring this qualification will be a key step in the development of professional expertise in forensic odontology. The programme will enable graduates to acquire knowledge, understanding and skills in forensic odontology and research. Uniquely, they will learn interdisciplinary skills that are essential for dealing with forensic issues in real life.

Who should study this course?

This course is designed for dentists wishing to work in Forensic Odontology.

Aims of the course?

The aim of the course is to provide dentists with a professional qualification that delivers core knowledge, experience and intellectual skills in forensic odontology, forensic medicine, science and research.

Teaching & Assessment

How you will be taught

A blended approach to teaching is adopted to enable you to learn in a variety of ways. Methods of teaching include seminars, case scenarios, lectures, guided self-directed learning, demonstrations and observation in a working forensic mortuary.

How you will be assessed

There are a wide range of assessment methods within each module including: written assignments, oral presentations and computer aided assessment exercises.

What you will study

Topics covered include:

Dental Identification
Disaster Victim Identification
Age estimation from dental sources
Dental report writing and giving evidence
Detailed anatomy and development of teeth and oral structures
Bite mark identification
Critical appraisal of literature
Practical experience in mortuary
Research dissertation

You will study 4 modules:

Forensic Odontology
Forensic Odontology Research Project
Forensic Medicine
Forensic Science

Employability

Acquiring this qualification will be a key step in the development of professional expertise in forensic odontology.

You will gain:

Skills, knowledge and experience in aspects of forensic odontology which are most frequently the subject of expert testimony in course.
A deep understanding of the role of other forensic disciplines, resulting in in-depth knowledge of where and how forensic odontology links with the wider forensic community.
The necessary skills to plan, execute and write-up a research project.

The interdisciplinary aspect of this course, and the focus on the important aspects of forensic odontology will ensure that you are in a position to contribute to forensic service provision in your region/country.

Please note that acceptance to the course does not entitle you to work as a dentist in the UK, either during the course or after graduation.

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University of Dundee Science & Engineering
Distance from Dundee: 0 miles
The programme is a full-time taught postgraduate degree course leading to the degree of MSc in Biomedical Engineering. Read more
The programme is a full-time taught postgraduate degree course leading to the degree of MSc in Biomedical Engineering. It has an international dimension, providing an important opportunity for postgraduate engineers to study the principles and state-of-the-art technologies in biomedical engineering with a particular emphasis on applications in advanced instrumentation for medicine and surgery.

Why study Biomedical Engineering at Dundee?

Biomedical engineers apply engineering principles and design methods to improve our understanding of living systems and to create new techniques and instruments in medicine and surgery.

The taught modules in this course expose students to the leading edge of modern medical and surgical technologies. The course also provides concepts and understanding of the role of entrepreneurship, business development and intellectual property exploitation in the biomedical industry, with case examples.

The research project allows students to work in a research area of their own particular interest, learning skills in presentation, critical thinking and problem-solving. Project topics are offered to students during the first semester of the course.

UK qualifications are recognised and respected throughout the world. The University of Dundee is one of the top UK universities, with a powerful research reputation, particularly in the medical and biomedical sciences. It has previously been named 'Scottish University of the Year' and short-listed for the Sunday Times 'UK University of the Year'.

Links with Universities in China:

This course can be taken in association with partner universities in China with part of the course taken at the home institution before coming to Dundee to complete your studies. For students from elsewhere it is possible to take the entire course at Dundee.

What's so good about Biomedical Engineering at Dundee?

The University of Dundee has had an active research programme in biomedical engineering for over 20 years.

The Biomedical Engineering group has a high international research standing with expertise in medical instrumentation, signal processing, biomaterials, tissue engineering, advanced design in minimally invasive surgery and rehabilitation engineering.

Research partnerships:

We have extensive links and research partnerships with clinicians at Ninewells Hospital (largest teaching hospital in Europe) and with world renowned scientists from the University's College of Life Sciences. The new Institute of Medical Science and Technology (IMSaT) at the University has been established as a multidisciplinary research 'hothouse' which seeks to commercialise and exploit advanced medical technologies leading to business opportunities.

This course has two start dates - September or January, and lasts for 12 months.

How you will be taught

The structure of the MSc course is divided into two parts. The taught modules expose students to the leading edge of modern biomedical and surgical technologies. The course gives concepts and understanding of the role of entrepreneurship, business development and intellectual property exploitation in the biomedical industry, with case examples.

The research project allows students to work in a research area of their own particular interest, learning skills in presentation, critical thinking and problem-solving. Project topics are offered to students towards at the beginning of second semester of the course.

What you will study

The course is divided into two parts:

Part I (60 Credits):

Bioinstrumentation (10 Credits)
Biomechanical Systems (20 Credits)
Biomaterials (20 credits)
Introduction to Medical Sciences (10 Credits)
Part II (120 Credits) has one taught module and a research project module. It starts at the beginning of the University of Dundee's Semester 2, which is in mid-January:

The taught module, Advanced Medical and Surgical Instrumentation (30 Credits), exposes students to the leading edge of modern medical and surgical technologies. It will also give concepts and understanding of the role of entrepreneurship, business development and intellectual property exploitation in the biomedical industry, with case examples.
The research project (90 Credits) will allow students to work in a research area of their own particular interest and to learn skills in presentation, critical thinking and problem-solving. Project topics will be offered to students before Part II of the course. We shall do our best to provide all students with a project of their choice.
The time spent in Dundee will also give students a valuable educational and cultural experience.

How you will be assessed

The course is assessed by coursework and examination, plus dissertation.

Careers

An MSc degree in Biomedical Engineering will prepare you for a challenging and rewarding career in one of many sectors: the rapidly growing medical technology industry, academic institutions, hospitals and government departments.

A wide range of employment possibilities exist including engineer, professor, research scientist, teacher, manager, salesperson or CEO.

The programme also provides the ideal academic grounding to undertake a PhD degree leading to a career in academic research.

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University of Dundee Medicine
Distance from Dundee: 0 miles
Infertility is a common problem with approximately 1 in 7 couples of reproductive age being diagnosed as infertile - equating to 72.5 million people globally - and there is an increasing demand for assisted reproductive technology (ART). Read more
Infertility is a common problem with approximately 1 in 7 couples of reproductive age being diagnosed as infertile - equating to 72.5 million people globally - and there is an increasing demand for assisted reproductive technology (ART). This course will provide a robust and wide ranging education in human clinical embryology and ART.

Professor Barratt, Programme Director of the new programme MSc Human Clinical Embryology and Assisted Conception has been confirmed as one of the lecturers at the forthcoming Campus Workshop "From gametes to blastocysts – a continuous dialogue" to be held in Apex City Quay Hotel, Dundee, 7-8th November 2014. This programme is organised by the ESHRE Special Interest Group Embryology.

Why study Human Clinical Embryology and Assisted Conception at Dundee?

The MSc in Human Clinical Embryology and Assisted Conception is a new taught master’s programme which has been designed to provide a robust and wide ranging education in human clinical embryology and ART (assisted reproductive technology). Students will gain a systematic understanding of clinical embryology and ART whilst developing high level laboratory skills in various aspects of clinical embryology, andrology and ART.

The emphasis of the course is on humans and clinical ART/embryology and offers practical experience in handling and preparing HUMAN gametes.

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The University of Dundee has excellent clinical links and a close working relationship with the NHS and students will benefit from a scientifically rigorous programme with teaching drawn from experienced embryologists, scientists and clinicians.

A key benefit of the programme is that it offers a unique opportunity to gain substantial exposure to an NHS IVF clinic (NHS Tayside). This will allow students to observe the practice and management of a working IVF clinic and benefit from teaching by staff involved in ART, and will be of considerable benefit for those wanting a clinical based career. The NHS Tayside IVF clinic has recently benefitted from a substantial investment in its facilities which has created a high quality clinical environment.

The blend of scientific, practical skills and the integration with an NHS facility giving students first hand experience and exposure to the workings of an NHS IVF clinic will provide students with an excellent base to enter a career in ART either in a clinical or research setting.

How you will be taught

The MSc is full time programme (September to August) and will consist of 5 taught modules and a research project. The course consists of a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, discussion and journal clubs as well as self-directed study. The research project will be carried out under either in the research laboratory or in the IVF clinic.

What you will study

The course is divided into 6 modules:

Module 1: Fundamental science (Semester1)
Module 2 Advanced Applied laboratory skills in ART (Semester 1 and 2)
Module 3: Statistics (Semester 1)
Module 4: Running a successful ART laboratory and clinical service (Semester 2).
Module 5: Clinical Issues and Controversies in ART (Semester 2)
Module 6: Research Project (Semester 3)

How you will be assessed

The programme is assessed using a variety of traditional and more innovative approaches. We use essays, portfolios, folders of evidence, research proposals, learning contracts, exams, OSCEs, and assessed online activities such as debates and team work.

Careers

Due to the increased demand for infertility treatment there has been a substantial growth in the demand for high quality laboratory and clinical staff in this area.

Approximately 1:7 couples are infertile and IVF is the predominant treatment for infertility contributing ~2% of the births in the UK and up to 5% in some EU countries. IVF is a rapidly growing field and as an example of this the number of cycles treated in the UK has increased by almost 30% in the last 4 years (http://www.hfea.gov.uk).

Following successful completion of the MSc students could apply for a training position in ART e.g. in embryology and/or andrology. Alternatively the MSc would be an ideal preparation for undertaking a PhD or applying for a research position. Clinically qualified graduates would gain valuable skills to enable them to specialise in reproductive medicine and assume responsibility within an ART clinic.

Skills that students will acquire include:

* In-depth understanding of basic reproductive physiology and a detailed knowledge of human ART;
* Sperm preparation and cryopreservation
* Recruitment of patients and donors for research
* Preparation of ethical approvals and appreciation for the ethical issues in ART
* Detailed work with human eggs and sperm (including assessment of gamete quality)
* Time lapse imaging of human embryos
* Business planning for running an ART laboratory and clinical service.
* QA and QC in the ART laboratory
* Troubleshooting in an ART lab
* The role of media and marketing in the development of an ART service.
* Detailed and practical knowledge of the HFEA and legislative and regulatory framework.
* Knowledge of basic IVF laboratory techniques e.g. preparation of dishes, witnessing
* Appreciation of the clinical diagnostic and pathways in ART

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University of Dundee Medicine
Distance from Dundee: 0 miles
Technology has always been central for the diagnosis and treatment in orthopaedics, biomechanics and rehabilitation, and the use of technology has never been greater than it is at the present time. Read more
Technology has always been central for the diagnosis and treatment in orthopaedics, biomechanics and rehabilitation, and the use of technology has never been greater than it is at the present time. For instance, twenty-five years ago there was only one type of artificial hip and today there are more than forty. This rapid development has considerable implications for all those working in the fields of orthopaedics and rehabilitation. This programme aims to provide an understanding of the principles involved in the development, application and evaluation of orthopaedics, biomechanics and rehabilitation technology.

The programme consists of two seperate courses, the Postgraduate Diploma in Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Technology and the MSc in Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Technology. For each course there are four groups of distance learning modules. In addition, the MSc course includes a project. The courses must be completed within a period of two to five years from the start date.

This programme is delivered by the Orthopaedic & Trauma Surgery Department.

In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise, to reflect the multi-disciplinary aspect of the research carried out at the Orthopaedic & Trauma Surgery Department where the majority of staff are tutors on this programme, the respective staff were returned into Unit of Assessment 25 (General Engineering - Biomedical Engineering) and Unit of Assessment 8 (Primary Care and Other Community Based Clinical Subjects) where 90% and 85% of our quality profile was deemed of international class.

Aims of the Programme

The programme is intended to provide students with an understanding and knowledge of the technological aspects of orthopaedics and rehabilitation.

Programme Content

The programme consists of four taught modules: Introductory Topics, Biomechanics, Rehabilitation Technology and Orthopaedic Technology. In addition, those studying for an MSc, undertake a research project in a relevant area.

Each student is assigned a tutor, who is available for direct contact by telephone; a telephone answering service is available after office hours, and you may also contact your tutor by email, post or fax. Email is the preferred option for all tutor contact.

For detailed information on the syllabus, visit the course website.

Methods of Assessment

The modules are assessed by a combination of written examination and continuous assessment. In addition, the research project, undertaken by those studying towards an MSc, is assessed by dissertation and oral examination.

Coursework:
At the end of each module group you submit an assignment to your tutor(s) for assessment. A copy of the assignment is returned to you with your marks and the original is retained by the University. The assignment forms the coursework element of the final assessment.

Examinations:
Written examinations are held during March every year in Dundee and also by arrangement at fully approved examination centres throughout the United Kingdom and overseas. You will sit either four or five examinations, depending on the introductory modules you have studied. You must complete all the modules in a module group, including the assignment, before you can sit the exam(s) for that group. You may choose to sit all the exams together or spread them throughout your course.

Dissertation:
The Masters project is assessed by dissertation and viva (oral examination). Vivas are held during September each year in Dundee. Course regulations require MSc students to pass the final assessment for the Diploma course before they may submit their dissertation.

Learning Materials

For each module, you receive learning materials consisting of a module guide and one or more study guides. The module guide for each module provides information about the structure, recommended reference materials and the tutor support system. Modules consists of several individual units, each unit dealing with a different aspect of the module. For every unit there is a study guide that explains the objectives of that unit (what you will have learned by the end of the unit) and leads you through the learning material, section by section, using text, illustrations, activities, exercises and references to the recommended textbooks.

You monitor your own progress through the unit by completing the self-assessment questions, which are placed at regular intervals throughout the text, and checking your answers against those provided in the study guide. At the end of each study guide, there is a short exercise which you complete and return to your tutor for marking.

Tutor Support

When you need to discuss any aspects of your study, you may contact your tutor for support. Your tutor is available for direct contact by telephone at set times during the week, as specified in the module guide for each module. A telephone answering service is available after office hourse and you may also contact your tutor by email, post or fax.
You recieve a regular newsletter and are encouraged to contact other students, even to form local groups where possible, to share ideas.

Students wishing to pursue the MSc must complete the Diploma within 3 years part-time or 9 months full-time. The MSc must be completed within a period of 1 year full-time or 2-5 years part-time.

Fees must be paid in full prior to commencing the course (in-house only).

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University of Dundee Medicine
Distance from Dundee: 0 miles
This programme is delivered by the Institute of Motion Analysis & Research within the Department of Orthopaedic & Trauma Surgery at the TORT Centre. Read more
This programme is delivered by the Institute of Motion Analysis & Research within the Department of Orthopaedic & Trauma Surgery at the TORT Centre.

The Institute of Motion Analysis and Research (IMAR) was established in 2003 by combining the Foot Pressure Analysis Laboratory and the Dundee Gait Laboratory at the Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery Department, University of Dundee. However, gait analysis has been at the forefront of development in this field for the past 25 years and foot pressure measurement for the past 16 years, which gives us a tremendous bank of knowledge on which to draw. IMAR's main goal is to promote excellence in teaching and research and to provide a comprehensive clinical service in the field of motion analysis.

A third laboratory dedicated to Sports Biomechanics is currently nearing completion to augment and support the current facilities of IMAR.

In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise, to reflect the multi-disciplinary aspect of the research carried out, the respective staff at IMAR were returned into Unit of Assessment 25 (General Engineering - Biomedical Engineering) and Unit of Assessment 8 (Primary Care and Other Community Based Clinical Subjects) where 90% and 85% of our quality profile was deemed of international class. This is an excellent outcome taking into consideration that IMAR was only established in 2003.

Aims of the Programme

The programme is intended to provide students with an understanding and knowledge of the technological aspects, and the fundamental and advanced concepts of motion measurement and clinical analysis.

Programme Content

This is a modular course, which includes a foundation module, plus the following subjects:
Motion Measurement
Fundamentals in Motion Analysis
Advanced Motion Analysis
For more details, visit the course website.

In addition, those studying for an MSc undertake a research project in a relevant area.

Methods of Assessment

The modules are assessed by a combination of written examination and continuous assessment. In addition, the research project, undertaken by those studying towards an MSc, is assessed by dissertation and oral examination.

Coursework:
At the end of each unit you submit an assignment to your tutor for assessment, along with an assignment card containing a signed declaration that the work submitted is your own. A copy of the assignment is returned to you with your marks and the original is retained by the University. The assignments form the coursework element of the final assessment for both courses.

Examinations:
Written examinations are held during March/ April each year in Dundee. Under special circumstances exams can also be sat by arrangement at approved examination centres (for example, at British Council Offices) outside, and in the United Kingdom. If you sit an examination outside Dundee you will be responsible for paying any costs the examination centre may charge

You must complete all the modules in a module group, including the assignment, before you can sit the exam(s) for that particular group. You may choose to sit all the exams at one time or spread them throughout your course .

Dissertation:
The MSc project is assessed by dissertation and viva (oral examination). Vivas are held in Dundee.

Available Courses

MSc (distance learning) - Normally up to 36 months £8,650
PGDip (distance learning) - Normally up to 36 months* £5,650
PGCert (distance learning) - Normally up to 18 months £2,825
MSc (in house) 12 months - £10,000

If taken in-house, the start date for this course is September. The distance learning start date can be at any point in the year.
*PG Dip to be normally completed in 24 months if the MSc is being considered.

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University of Dundee Science & Engineering
Distance from Dundee: 0 miles
The MSc Medical Imaging programme is intended to provide a Masters-level postgraduate education in the knowledge, skills and understanding of engineering design of advanced medical and biotechnology products and systems. Read more
The MSc Medical Imaging programme is intended to provide a Masters-level postgraduate education in the knowledge, skills and understanding of engineering design of advanced medical and biotechnology products and systems. Students will also acquire a working knowledge of the clinical environment to influences their design philosophy.

Why study Medical Imaging at Dundee?

With biotechnology replacing many of the traditional engineering disciplines within the UK, this programme will allow you to develop the skills to apply your engineering or scientific knowledge to technologies that further the developments in this field. As a result, employment opportunities will be excellent for graduates, both in research and in industry.

We have an active research group, and you will be taught by leading researchers in the field.

What's so good about Medical Imaging at Dundee?

The MSc in Medical Imaging at the University of Dundee will:

Provide knowledge, skills and understanding of medical imaging technologies, particularly in modern biomedical, radiological and surgical imaging instrumentation, biomaterials, biomechanics and tissue engineering

Enhance your analytical and critical abilities, competence in multi-disciplinary research & development

Provide broad practical training in biology and biomolecular sciences sufficient for you to understand the biomedical nomenclature and to have an appreciation of the relevance and potential clinical impact of the research projects on offer

Allow you to experience the unique environment of clinical and surgical aspects in medical imaging in order to provide an understanding of the engineering challenges for advanced practice

Provide core training in electrical, microwave, magnetic, acoustic and optical techniques relevant to the life sciences interface and

Provide broad experience of analytical and imaging techniques relevant for biology, biomolecular and clinical sciences
provide core training in acoustic ultrasound technologies.

Who should study this course?

This course is suitable for students who are recent graduates of mechanical engineering courses or other related programmes.

This course has two start dates - January & September, and lasts for 12 months.

How you will be taught

The programme will involve a variety of teaching formats including lectures, tutorials, seminars, hands-on imaging classes, laboratory exercises, case studies, coursework, and an individual research project.

The teaching programme will include visits to and seminars at IMSaT and clinical departments at Ninewells Hospital and Medical School and Tayside University Hospitals Trust, including the Clinical Research Centre, the Departments of Medicine, Surgery, Dentistry and ENT, the Vascular Laboratory and Medical Physics.

A high degree of active student participation will be encouraged throughout. Taught sessions will be supported by individual reading and study. You will be guided to prepare your research project plan and to develop skills and competence in research including project management, critical thinking and problem-solving, project report and presentation.

What you will study

The course is divided into two parts:

Part I has 60 credits:

Biomechanics (20 Credits)
Biomaterials (20 Credits)
Bioinstrumentation (10 Credits)
Introduction to Medical Sciences (10 Credits)

Part II has one taught module and a research project module. It starts at the beginning of the University of Dundee's Semester 2, which is in mid-January:

Taught module: Advanced Biomedical Imaging Technologies (30 Credits).
Research project (30 Credits for diploma or 90 Credits for MSc)

How you will be assessed

The taught modules will be assessed by a combination of written examinations and coursework. The research project will be assessed by a written thesis and oral presentation.

Careers

This Master's programme provides you with the skills to continue into research in areas such as biomedical and biomaterials engineering as well as progression into relevant jobs within the Mechanical Engineering and Mechatronics industries.

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University of Dundee Medicine
Distance from Dundee: 0 miles
The Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, at the University of Dundee, was founded in 1967 when the University of Dundee split from St Andrews’ University and established an independent teaching medical school. Read more
The Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, at the University of Dundee, was founded in 1967 when the University of Dundee split from St Andrews’ University and established an independent teaching medical school. The department is based in the Tayside Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Technology (TORT) Centre. The current staff includes a professor, two clinical senior lecturers, two non-clinical senior lecturers, one clinical and one non-clinical lecturer, one research assistant and four clinical fellows, who are supported by various staff members.

With a tradition of teaching and research in the field of mechanisms of disease, treatment of disorders of the musculoskeletal system and biomedical and rehabilitation engineering. The founder, Professor Ian Smillie, gained a worldwide reputation in knee surgery and the role of the meniscus. His successor, Professor George Murdoch, founded and developed the Dundee Limb Fitting Centre and the Tayside Rehabilitation Engineering Services, which have acquired an international reputation for the treatment of the amputee and assessment of gait analysis. His successor, Professor David Rowley, sustained the department’s international reputation and innovation in the area of joints replacement complemented by a worldwide service in Clinical Audit Outcomes

Overview

The MSc in Orthopaedic Science programme will provide a robust and wide-reaching education in the fundamental physical sciences relating to orthopaedic surgery. It is the only programme amongst the few comparable MSc programmes in the UK with a specific focus on the theoretical and practical application of technology within orthopaedics. Additionally, it equips trainees with the knowledge of fundamental science required for the FRCS exit exam.

Aims of the Programme

The aim of this programme is to provide students with a Masters level postgraduate education in the knowledge and understanding of the fundamental physical sciences relating to orthopaedic surgery. It also aims to provide experience in the design and execution of a substantive research project in the field of orthopaedic, biomechanics and rehabilitation technology and its underlying science.
By the end of the programme, students should have a systematic understanding and knowledge of the physical sciences and technology relevant to orthopaedics, a critical awareness of current research questions in the field and the appropriate practical and analytical skills in order to be able to:

- Understand and interpret complex scientific concepts.
- Critically evaluate current research.
- Understand and utilise relevant technology, and have the ability to evaluate and critique methodologies.
- Develop and test scientific hypotheses, including the design of laboratory research projects aimed at addressing specific hypothesis-driven questions.
- Undertake the practical and technical aspects of a laboratory-based project.
- Communicate complex scientific concepts to specialist and non-specialist audiences, both verbally and in writing.
- Demonstrate an understanding of whether specific research outcomes make a significant, novel contribution to the field.

Programme Content

The programme will be taught part-time by distance learning over a period of normally 3 to 5 years, or one year full time in house. It is comprised of five compulsory 30-credit taught modules and one 60 credit research project module.

Module 1 - Mechanics
Module 2 - Biomechanics
Module 3 - Rehabilitation Technology
Module 4 - Orthopaedic Technology
Module 5 - Statistics

Methods of Teaching and Assessment

Modules 1-5:
Teaching in modules 1-5 will be delivered through distance learning module components, each comprised of a module component guide and several component units. Tutor support will be available via email, web conferencing, written correspondence and telephone.

Assessment of modules 1-5 will be by examination with the option of sitting exams upon completion of each individual module or upon completion of all five modules. Assessment is weighted (80%) by exam and (20%) by coursework.

Successful completion of the PGDip modules 1-5 is required to progress to the research project component. Successful completion of course work will normally be required prior to sitting the examination papers. Each of the two components of assessment for the PGCert and PGDip (course work and examination) must have a minimum grade of D3 to pass and progress to the full MSc programme.

Module 6 - Research Project:
During the research project, learning will be partly experiential, partly directed and partly self-directed. The research project will be assessed through the presentation of a thesis, and the final mark will be moderated through an oral exam (60 credits).

why study at Dundee?

In 2013 the MCh (Orth) Dundee, course was granted full accreditation by the Royal College of Surgeons of
England. This accreditation is extremely important and comes as the department is celebrating the 20th
anniversary of the course. This is the only face-to-face course accredited by the College outside of England.

“It was a great learning experience. Coming here, my overall
personality has changed. I have learnt the right way to write
a thesis and also got to know the recent advancements in
field of Orthopaedic surgery” International Student Barometer, 2009

Career Prospects

The programme will prepare graduates for a research-focused clinical career in the NHS or academia, and is particularly well positioned to prepare graduates for entry into a clinical academic career path.

If taken in-house, the start date for this course is September. The distance learning start date can be at any point in the year.
* The taught elements are conducted by self-directed learning modules as with distance learning but the project will be undertaken in-house. The candidate will be attached to a consultant firm as an observer.

Students wishing to pursue the MSc must complete the Diploma within 3 years part-time or 9 months full-time. The MSc must be completed within a period of 1 year full-time or 2-5 years part-time.

Fees must be paid in full prior to commencing the course (in-house only).

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University of Dundee Medicine
Distance from Dundee: 0 miles
The Quality Diabetes Care programme will be of interest to health care professionals (e.g. doctors, nurses, pharmacists, dieticians, podiatrists) working in diabetes care settings. Read more
The Quality Diabetes Care programme will be of interest to health care professionals (e.g. doctors, nurses, pharmacists, dieticians, podiatrists) working in diabetes care settings. It will equip participants with skills for modern evidence based management of diabetes patients, and offer practical experience in organisational management, reflective practice and quality improvement.

Why study Quality Diabetes Care at Dundee?

Dundee has a particular international reputation for Diabetes research, education and informatics developments. With the growing prevalence of diabetes (currently around 5% in the UK with a doubling of rates predicted over the next 15 years), there is an increasing need for generalists to upskill in diabetes care.

This course will equip you with essential skills and modern evidence based practice for clinical management of diabetes patients. In addition, this programme offers knowledge and practical experience in organisational management, reflective practice and quality improvement.

Much of the work can be completed flexibly in your own free time, and has been designed around the needs of students who are also working full time.

Aims of the programme

The programme aims to:
- Provide a comprehensive programme to enable understanding of diabetes care (from patient to organisational management) for health care professionals
- Establish a stimulating environment for research, teaching and learning about diabetes
- Ensure a high quality evidence based approach in patient management, teaching, research and evaluation.
- Ensure a critical understanding of current issues in diabetes management.
- Enable students with theory and practical tools for healthcare quality improvement.
- Establish students with a basic grounding in educational/ behaviour change theory with application to patient and professional education
- Encourage students to apply critical analysis to complex problem solving.
- Allow development of generic attributes and skills including reflective practice, professionalism, literature appraisal and academic writing
- Encourage a culture of multidisciplinary working in the workplace.

Who should study this course?

This programme will be of interest to health care professionals (e.g. doctors, nurses, pharmacists, dieticians, podiatrists) working either as generalists or in specialist diabetes care settings.

How is this course taught?

The teaching approach is one of blended learning with fixed face to face teaching (lectures, group work, case discussions, workshops, simulation exercises, quizzes) blended with online activities, case based studies and workplace assessment. Much of the later work can be completed flexibly in the students own free time, and has been designed around the needs of students who are also working full time.

The face to face component requires attendance in Dundee, 3 times throughout the year (2 consecutive days teaching each time). The remainder of the course delivered is online.

Other material will be delivered via an online learning zone through online activities in the form of:
Recorded lectures
Quizzes
Interactive e-learning material
Forums
Discussion Board debates
Group
Wikis
Case Discussions

Much of the private study will be self-directed and relate to various work place projects (see assessments). Students are expected to undertake approx. 8 - 12 hours of work per week, either as self directed study or undertaking specific activities associated with the course.

What will you study?

Year 1: PG Certificate
The proposed Year 1 PG certificate programme will be taught over a period of 12 months. It will be taught and assessed as 3 x 20 credit compulsory modules (SCQF level 11 credits), namely:

Diabetes Clinical Care (20 credits)
Diabetes Organisational Care (20 credits)
Enhanced Patient Care and Professional Development (20 credits)


Year 2: PG Diploma
Students who decide to progress to the diploma stage will have the option of doing a further two modules totalling 60 credits. These modules will develop further advanced skills in clinical care and organisation, healthcare quality improvement and research methodology to allow students to develop their own diabetes service more effectively and embed skills required for their 3rd year dissertation (thesis).

Two of the modules also run as part of the MSc in Quality Improvement:
Quality Improvement in Action (30 credits)
Developing Research and Evaluation Skills (compulsory for students continuing to Year 3) (30 credits)

The third optional module for year 2 is
Advanced Diabetes Clinical Practice (30 credits)

Year 3: MSc Dissertation
Year 3 will involve students undertaking a more substantial project in the field of either Diabetes Care with either a Clinical/ Quality Improvement or Educational theme. Students will be allocated an appropriate university supervisor. This work will be presented as a 10-15,000 word thesis.

How is this course assessed?

Each modules will be assessed individually. Assessments include completion of clinical case scenarios, work place projects, and associated reflective essays in an attempt to embed learning and reflection into real life clinical practice. Quality improvement modules will require additional topic specific written work and on-line activities.

Careers

We would envisage this course/ qualification being of interest to health care professionals (e.g. doctors, nurses, pharmacists) working either as generalists or in diabetes care settings. The qualification may be used by primary care doctors for personal development/ CPD accumulation, and to enable them to set up and enhance their own diabetes specialist services.

For the secondary care training doctors, or allied health professionals, the qualifications could be used to help general career progression or be used to aid a move into specialist diabetes care services either within primary or secondary care.

This qualification is NOT equivalent to accreditation onto the diabetes medical specialist register e.g. allowing the individual to operate as a diabetes consultant.

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The MSc in Human Anatomy is a unique Master's programme created in response to the need to provide training in human gross anatomy for those who wish to improve their understanding of the structure and function of the human body, as well as those for whom this is a new area of study. Read more
The MSc in Human Anatomy is a unique Master's programme created in response to the need to provide training in human gross anatomy for those who wish to improve their understanding of the structure and function of the human body, as well as those for whom this is a new area of study. The programme aims to provide expertise for those intending to use the knowledge gained in a learning and teaching environment.

The programme is the only one of its kind in the UK
It combines whole body dissection with practicing techniques for the presentation of material for learning and teaching
Provides an introduction to anatomical preservation and presentation techniques
Full body dissection of Thiel embalmed (soft fix) cadavers
Opportunity for self-directed original research

What does the course involve?

The programme is based around human gross anatomy, being supplemented by relevant embryology, neuroanatomy, clinical and surgical anatomy topics and anatomical techniques. Many components are examined entirely by course work through seminar presentations, essays, practical techniques and the development of web-based teaching tutorials and websites.

Both semesters 1 and 2 have a strong emphasis on gross anatomy through whole body dissection working in groups of no more than four per cadaver. Semester 1 also has modules in Embryology and Developmental Anatomy and in Anatomical techniques, while semester 2 has modules in Neuroanatomy and in Clinical and Surgical Anatomy Topics.

Semester 3 allows students to focus on an independent and novel research project in one of the following areas:

Thiel cadaveric anatomy
The anatomy of a specific region of clinical/surgical interest
Functional anatomy
Anatomy and biomechanics
Education

Our reputation

The College of Life Sciences at the University of Dundee was ranked ahead of all other Universities in Scotland and is one of the UK's top 5 universities in the category of Biological Sciences out of 51 Universities.
Staff have international reputations in practice and research.
The award-winning staff of the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID) are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, cranio-facial reconstruction and the study of the human body.

Benefits of studying with us

Study human gross anatomy in the renowned Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification
Access to Thiel embalmed cadavers
Introduction to anatomical preservation and presentation techniques and skills
Exposure to a wide range of IT and personal presentation skills

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This one-year degree is designed for students who already hold a first degree (BA or BSc) in Forensic Anthropology or a related subject, and is intended to provide advanced training in subject areas which are germane to current professional requirements, but which are not available collectively at any other institution in the world. Read more
This one-year degree is designed for students who already hold a first degree (BA or BSc) in Forensic Anthropology or a related subject, and is intended to provide advanced training in subject areas which are germane to current professional requirements, but which are not available collectively at any other institution in the world.

Why study Anatomy & Advanced Forensic Anthropology at Dundee?

Forensic anthropology is the analysis of human remains for the medico-legal purpose of establishing identity. The discipline has adopted a pivotal role in UK and International investigations in cases of inter-personal violence and homicide, repatriation, mass disasters and war crimes.

Recent mass fatality incidents have highlighted the requirement for national and international disaster victim identification (DVI) capability, and cemented the forensic anthropologist’s role as a significant component within the multi-disciplinary response facility.

Traditionally the forensic anthropologist has dealt with human skeletal remains resulting from unexplained deaths; this professional definition is unrealistically restrictive given the multi-disciplinary nature of the demands of human identification in the twenty-first century. In particular there is a significant requirement for anatomically-trained forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with both soft and hard tissues in order to fulfil the requirements of DVI deployment.

Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification

This course is taught within the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identfication (CAHID) and is located in the Medical Sciences Institute at the University of Dundee, Scotland.

Prof Sue Black heads the Centre, she was awarded an OBE for her International Human Identification work from mass graves and co-authored Developmental Juvenile Osteology and The Juvenile Skeleton.

The award-winning staff of this Centre are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, craniofacial identification and the study of the human body.

The core remit of the Centre is the study of anatomy. The Centre delivers high quality anatomy teaching at all levels, via whole body dissection which allows students to develop a sound knowledge of the human body. The Centre relies on the generosity of donors for the ability to teach students to the highest standard possible.

The Centre was awarded a prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education in November 2013. Presented in recognition of 'world class excellence', the Queen’s Anniversary Prizes are among the

Aims of the Programme

The aim of this programme is to provide training in anatomically-based forensic anthropology, and specifically to provide advanced training in musculoskeletal anatomy, juvenile osteology, comparative forensic osteology and DVI training.

What you will study

Course Structure:
This is a one year full time taught Masters programme in which all modules are compulsory. The research dissertation can be in the form of original laboratory research in an area pertinent to anatomy and forensic anthropology.

Human Gross Anatomy (Semesters 1 & 2):
Provides the opportunity to conduct whole body dissection, with particular emphasis on functional and musculoskeletal anatomy
Exposure to human form and function with direct relevance to the identification process
Only institution in the UK offering the opportunity to dissect cadavers which have been embalmed using the Thiel soft-fix method, which provides life-like preservation of the soft tissues.

Developmental Juvenile Osteology (Semester 1):
Focuses on the development of the human juvenile skeleton as a means to understanding adult skeletal form
Through practical examination, each bone of the body will be studied from its embryological origin, through key developmental milestones, until the attainment of its adult form
Practical sessions will focus on the unique Scheuer collection of juvenile skeletal remains.
Forensic Anthropology as Expert Evidence

Covering the more specialised skills including forensic anatomy, trauma analysis and age estimation in the living this module will cover the skills required to present your analyses in a court of law.

Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) training (Semesters 1 & 2):
Provides a thorough understanding of the DVI process in the UK and abroad
Developed by experienced practitioners, it is based on the National DVI Training course for the UK DVI team
Delivers a robust theoretical underpinning for anyone undertaking DVI work on a practical basis.

MSc Research Project (Semester 3):
Students will undertake an advanced level practical project supervised by a research-active practitioner
CAHID staff have significant experience in many areas of forensic human identification, including juvenile osteology, facial anthropology, facial reconstruction, age assessment in the living and dead, analysis of sexual dimorphism and ancestry, soft tissue biometric systems, human provenance, skeletal pathology and trauma, and virtual anthropology

How you will be assessed

A variety of assessment methods will be employed including practical spot exams, online assessment and traditional essay based examination.

Careers

There is a significant requirement for anatomically-trained forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with both soft and hard tissues in order to fulfill the requirements of DVI deployment. This degree will train individuals to be competent in specialist areas of anatomy and forensic anthropology.

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