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Full Time MSc Degrees in Bangor, United Kingdom

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Bangor University Bangor Business School
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
The course aims to develop an individual’s understanding of the role of accounting for decision-making both inside and outside organisations. Read more
The course aims to develop an individual’s understanding of the role of accounting for decision-making both inside and outside organisations.

The course involves advanced study of organisations, their management, the role of accounting for internal and external users, and the changing external context in which they operate. Students will develop the ability to apply knowledge and understanding of accounting to complex issues.
Course Structure

The course is a full-time programme lasting 12 months. It consists of two parts:

Part 1:

Is a wholly taught component, contributing 120 credits. All taught modules carry a credit weighting of 15 credits. Part 1 is taught during the two semesters which make up the academic year.

Part 2:

This consists of either a supervised Dissertation of around 10,000 words, or a structured Advanced Taught Programme of Summer Study that is specific to accounting.

Compulsory modules:

Accounting Theory
Research Methods
International Taxation: Policy and Practice
Financial Analysis
Management Accounting
Advanced Financial Reporting

Optional modules (choose 2):

Corporate Social Responsibility
Corporate Risk Management
Advanced Auditing and Assurance
International Financial Management
Islamic Accounting and Financial Reporting

Career Prospects

The course provides preparation for a career in accounting by developing both theoretical and practical skills at a professional, or as preparation for research or further study in accounting. Graduates of a Masters programme in accounting may obtain employment in a variety of careers in accounting or management related areas.

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Bangor University Bangor Business School
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
The course will enable students to develop an advanced knowledge of accounting and banking, which will be of particular interest to students who wish to pursue a career in the financial industry. Read more
The course will enable students to develop an advanced knowledge of accounting and banking, which will be of particular interest to students who wish to pursue a career in the financial industry.

The overall aim of the course is to develop an integrated understanding of the role of banking and accounting for decision-making both inside and outside organisations. Students will undertake an advanced study of organisations, including financial institutions, their management, the role of accounting for internal and external users, and the changing external context in which they operate. Students will develop the ability to apply their knowledge and understanding of accounting and banking to complex issues.
Course Structure

The course is a full-time programme lasting 12 months. It consists of two parts:

Part 1:

Is a wholly taught component, contributing 120 credits. All taught modules carry a credit weighting of 15 credits. Part 1 is taught during the two semesters which make up the academic year.

Part 2:

This consists of either a supervised Dissertation of around 10,000 words, or a structured Advanced Taught Programme of Summer Study that is specific to accounting and banking.

Compulsory modules:

Accounting Theory
International Banking
Research Methods
Financial Analysis
Advanced Financial Reporting
Bank Financial Management

Optional modules (choose 2):

Corporate Risk Management
Management Accounting
International Financial Management
Financial Intermediation
Financial Institutions Strategic Management

Career Prospects

The programme provides preparation for a career in accounting or in financial institutions by developing skills at a professional level. Whilst graduates of a Masters programme in accounting and banking may obtain employment in a variety of related careers they will also appeal to a wide range of employers in management related areas. Some students would progress into further postgraduate research study in accounting or banking.

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Bangor University Bangor Business School
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School - London Centre. Changes in the business environment create the need for individuals wishing to pursue a senior management role to be aware of contemporary accounting and finance developments. Read more
This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School - London Centre.

Changes in the business environment create the need for individuals wishing to pursue a senior management role to be aware of contemporary accounting and finance developments.

Understanding these theoretical and practical issues is critical for managers who often have to make rapid and far-reaching decisions about the short term financial operations and long term strategies of firms.

The MSc in Accounting and Finance offers you a unique opportunity to develop an appreciation of the causes and significance of current developments in the financial and corporate sectors, and to study advanced theory and practice relating to accounting and finance.

The aim of the programme is to provide graduates and other individuals that have practical accounting and financial training with the knowledge and skills necessary to pursue a senior level professional career in accounting, financial services or related sectors of the economy.

Issues you will tackle as part of your MSc Accounting and Finance degree programme include:

How are the financial accounts of companies formulated, and how do they differ across jurisdictions?
What agency issues are important in the creation of company accounts?
How does accounting theory inform financial and management accounting practice?
How does regulation impact on the performance of firms, and how do accounting practices highlight profit and/or loss realisation?
What empirical techniques can be used to evaluate company performance?
In what ways have financial accounting requirements and auditing been influenced by recent company failures?
What are the relationships between risk and return governing investment in company shares and other derivative instruments?
Which factors are most likely to influence the evaluation and implementation of international investment projects?
How can we calculate a suitable cost of capital to appraise the capital investment decision?
How should institutional investors go about constructing a portfolio of assets to maximise returns on behalf of investors?
How are futures, options, derivatives and swaps used to manage balance sheet and off-balance sheet risks?
What are the key principles of international portfolio management in a world of fast and unpredictable movements in exchange rates?
How can financial forecasts be used in business valuation, and what techniques should be used to improve trend analysis and interfirm comparison?

With these needs in mind, the MSc Accounting and Finance programme at Bangor is designed to develop participants’ existing skills through a scheme of specialist advanced study. An important objective is to provide participants with relevant analytical training, so that they are familiar with the latest theoretical and practical developments relating to accounting and finance. The programme provides a coherent theoretical framework for the various subject areas, but the emphasis throughout is on advanced practical application of accounting and financial techniques in a real-world setting.
Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods: This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

Accounting Theory: This module critically evaluates a widespread and widely based set of theories that underpin any explanation of accounting behaviour and accounting regulatory output.

International Financial Markets: This module provides an overview of financial instruments in a multi-currency world, taking account of insights from portfolio theory concerning the relationship between risk and return, the diversification of risk, and the pricing of assets.

Advanced Financial Reporting and Regulation: This module provides an advanced treatment of the main theoretical principles underlying financial reporting, and the practical implications of alternative regulatory regimes.

Financial Analysis: This module analyses the techniques that are used to evaluate a company’s financial position and performance.

Management Accounting: This module provides an understanding of the uses of financial data in measuring and evaluating business performance, and in setting the strategic aims of the organisation.

Optional modules (choose 2):

Corporate Risk Management: This module provides an analysis of pure risk and its management.

Islamic Accounting and Financial Reporting: This module develops a critical awareness of theoretical and practical approaches to Islamic accounting and financial reporting. Islamic accounting standards are compared with IFRS, and the content and impact of academic research in this area is examined.

Islamic Finance: This course provides an insight into topical issues relating to Islamic financial instruments and related risk management issues.

Financial Econometrics: This module provides advanced coverage of econometric methods and practices that are used to model financial and business data. You will develop the independent capability to design, estimate and evaluate appropriate econometric models using econometric software.

International Financial Management: In this module, the financial management of multinational companies, and the influence of the macroeconomic, fiscal, currency and political environments on business and financial decision-making are examined in an international and global context.

Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management: This module evaluates the development of investment strategies for bonds, equities and derivatives that are designed to achieve optimal risk-return outcomes, and examines the measurement and evaluation of the performance of a portfolio of investments.

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Bangor University School of Healthcare Sciences
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
Core Modules. Leadership, Quality, Innovation and Change. This module aims to develop the skills and knowledge required by health care professionals to creatively lead the cultural change required to place patients and clients at the centre of care delivery. Read more
Core Modules:

Leadership, Quality, Innovation and Change: This module aims to develop the skills and knowledge required by health care professionals to creatively lead the cultural change required to place patients and clients at the centre of care delivery.
Work-based Learning: This module enables learning and personal development through individual work based activities and the dissemination of practice that will improve patient care.
Methods or e-Research Methods: This module is an introduction to research methods and presents a platform for you to engage in both quantitative and qualitative research approaches and develop an ability to utilise specific research techniques.
Dissertation – supervised research project (20,000 words)
Optional Modules:

In year 2, students can select 60 credits from a range of modules available from the School MSc portfolio such as:

Physiology and Patho-physiology
History Taking and Consultation Skills
Physical Examination and Diagnostics
Epidemiology
Introduction to Health Economics
Accountability in Health and Social Care
Ill Adult Management
Non-medical Prescribing
Diabetes
Nutrition
Professional Development Portfolio
Dementia

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Bangor University School of Healthcare Sciences
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
Constant modernisation of global health services and continued emphasis on extending roles requires healthcare professionals to be flexible, competent practitioners. Read more
Constant modernisation of global health services and continued emphasis on extending roles requires healthcare professionals to be flexible, competent practitioners. They must be able to cope with change and use complex decision making skills whilst employing a broad knowledge base for clinical practice. This course has been designed for international nurses or allied health professionals who wish to study at an advanced level and respond to these changes.

The course aims to develop your professional and clinical knowledge, skills and attributes so that you can contribute to the contemporary health and social care challenges in your home country. The course has been developed to enhance your applied research skills in addition to your professional clinical knowledge and skills. Your enhanced knowledge and skills will enable you to understand and respond to the pathophysiological, psychological and social processes which underlie our patients, clients and communities experience of illness, health and disease.#

What does this programme offer?
This programme will facilitate your personal and professional development by providing opportunities to develop:

Enhanced clinical skills attractive to employers in a range of clinical environments and roles
Knowledge and skills to enhance your leadership qualities
Understanding of research activity and different methods of research applied to your area of specialisation or interest
Higher-level problem solving skills using critical analysis using appropriate forms of evidence or theory and reflection on practice
Your academic skills through broad Masters level education
Knowledge of contemporary global health challenges such as rising chronic illness
Networks with UK registered nurses, allied health professionals and academics to develop your knowledge of the NHS and UK health systems including primary (community) and acute care
What will I study?
In semester one you will study the programme’s core modules:

Physiology and Pathophysiology: developed to enhance the healthcare professional’s knowledge of the physiological and pathophysiological processes which, together with social and psychological phenomena, underlie health and disease.
Consultation Skills: focuses on communication and using a medical model for taking a clinical history. The consultation is a private and intimate interaction between and this module aims to challenge practice and highlight issues such as effective engagement and barriers to therapeutic communication.
Physical Examination and Diagnostics: designed to equip practitioners with skills including advanced access in general practice, community home visiting, minor illness surgeries, intermediate care and theory of undertaking minor surgery.
In semester two there is an opportunity to study from a wide menu of optional modules which can tailored to your individual interests or role in addition to the core research methodology module.

Optional modules include; renal nursing, epidemiology, introduction to health economics, leadership, quality, innovation and change, accountability in health and social care, ill adult management, diabetes, nutrition, promoting mental health, fundamental principles of risk management, holistic person-centred counselling skills.##

You will need to successfully complete your research dissertation module to be awarded your MSc.

# This programme does not provide UK professional registration with the NMC or HCPC; this can only be achieved through successful completion of an overseas nursing programme.

## Depending on module availability.

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Bangor University School of Psychology
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
This programme is aimed at those wishing to specialise in applied behaviour analysis. The course is designed to develop advanced theoretical and practical knowledge of the basic principles of behaviour analysis and the application of the principles within clinical and research settings. Read more
This programme is aimed at those wishing to specialise in applied behaviour analysis. The course is designed to develop advanced theoretical and practical knowledge of the basic principles of behaviour analysis and the application of the principles within clinical and research settings. The programme has been developed by Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBA) in collaboration with the Behavior Analysts Certification Board (BACB). It covers their entire Task List specifications and is recognised by the BACB as providing the content eligibility criteria necessary to sit the full BCBA exam.

The course consists of two parts. Part One comprises taught modules designed around the BACB Task List. The first four modules introduce the basic theory and practice of the science and the second four offer more detailed analysis of both applied and research procedures. On successful completion of Part One, you will proceed to Part Two - a clinical research study, planned and conducted in collaboration with your BCBA-qualified research supervisor.
Teaching is done through a combination of taught workshops, seminars, specialised computer-based instructional packages and practical 'hands-on' research experience. We provide a high quality teaching and learning environment that is intellectually stimulating and that uses the principles of behaviour analysis. This requires innovative course content and instructional procedures, measurement of learning, flexible communication among students and staff, and a friendly and supportive environment.
The full course leads to a Master's degree, but it is designed to be flexible to meet the differing needs of our students. For example, you may choose to take a smaller number of modules for a Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma, or for CPD purposes.

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Bangor University School of Ocean Sciences
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
This MSc is a full-time one-year course, consisting of 9 months taught course and 3 months research project, and assessed by coursework and examinations. Read more
This MSc is a full-time one-year course, consisting of 9 months taught course and 3 months research project, and assessed by coursework and examinations. The course provides theoretical and practical training in measuring, quantifying and understanding the physical processes within the geological marine environment. It provides a sound scientific basis on which to decide how best to design and execute marine surveys, be they geophysical, sedimentological or geological, for the required purpose.

The MSc in Applied Marine Geoscience evolved from its predecessor, the Marine Geotechnics course which boasted a 30 year pedigree.

A series of modules have been designed to explain the processes that form and characterise a wide variety of sedimentary environments, from the littoral zone to the deep ocean. Those controls range from the dynamical, chemical, climatic to geological; all are inter-related. The student also gains knowledge and understanding of survey techniques in order to map these environments and thereby gain a better understanding of the processes that shape them. The final facet of the course involves an explanation of how these sedimentary materials react to imposed loads - how they behave geotechnically.

From past experience it is found that students on completion of the course will find employment in the offshore hydrocarbons industry, geophysical contract companies (both offshore and terrestrial), geotechnical engineering companies, river and harbour boards or government establishments. The course may also lead students to further academic research studies.

Aims of the course
The aim of the course is to provide the world with people who

understand the inter-relationships between the forces which shape the marine geological environment,
have mastered the practical and analytical techniques necessary to study those controls and survey the geological settings
can critically analyse their findings and present them at a standard and in a form required by end-users, be they commercial or academic.
Whilst the form and style of presentation of work may differ, the skills required by doctoral students and those by potential employers (the marine geoservices industry) overlap to a large extent. Specifically identifying aspects of the course in this light, we aim to enable the students to:

be skilled in planning and acquiring good quality data in the laboratory and in the field in a safe manner
be able to work as a team in the acquisition of larger data-sets
appreciate the importance of recognising the limitations of model-based interpretation of data
review and critically analyse previous work both before and after undertaking data acquisition or modelling
understand the fundamental workings of the offshore geoservices industry
In a more general sense, the course is designed to act as a conversion course for a physical scientist who wants to hone their research skills whilst at the same time getting a grasp of how those skills are applied to solve both academic and commercially based problems. An important part of the course philosophy is the idea that the challenges that face marine geoscientists can often only be solved by taking a multi-disciplinary approach and we instil this idea of wider thought into our graduates.

The course aims to place the student in a strong position to go on to doctoral studies on issues such as palaeoclimatology, geophysics or sedimentology; or enter directly into the offshore industry e.g. to geohazard analysis, or offshore renewable energy exploitation.

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This course focuses on sport and exercise physiology. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Read more
This course focuses on sport and exercise physiology. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Within the modular structure all students undertake core/compulsory modules in:

Research Skills;
Independent Study (a one to one supervised programme of work leading to the development of the proposal for the Research Project);
Supervised Experience – a module tailored to the needs of the individual and could include directed work with a specified client group or individual;
Research Project relevant to the programme being studied.
Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

Independent Study
The Independent Study should consist of a critical and concise review of the research literature pertaining to a particular research question. A rationale for the proposed research question must be provided, along with a sound methodology for exploring the research question, planned analyses, and expected outcomes. Further, anticipated problems such as resources, equipment, possible ethical issues, informed consent forms, a statement of feasibility of the project and expected costs must be discussed.

Supervised Experience
The content of this module will be largely student specific and include activities (workshops, directed reading, client based work) that will develop the individual’s personal applied support skills. Initially, students complete an individual self-assessment of their current skills/knowledge base and set personal goals to enable them to improve their applied support skills. All students will attend units (workshops) on Ethics in Research and consultancy, communication and counselling skills and how to conduct a needs assessment. Specific physiology and psychology workshops (eg Imagery) will also take place.

Students will complete a contract of intended activities agreed with their supervisor in the first four weeks of their programme of study. This contract may, where appropriate, include the intention to apply to British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) to commence a formally logged Supervised Experience.

A portfolio will then be developed; the portfolio records activities including meetings with supervisor, attendance at workshops, meetings and a plan of work with at least one client, and thought/evaluations of all meetings and workshops (ie evidence of reflective practice).

Overview and Format of the Research Project module
The Research Project is an independent piece of research, and acts as the culmination of the academic challenges faced by the student. The module comprises 60 credits (ie equivalent to three double modules) and will formally equate to some 600 hours of student time.

Students work closely with their supervisor to develop the work on their research proposal submitted during the Independent Study module. As External Examiners have noted, throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field, with the resulting projects being published in international, peer reviewed journals.

Specifically, this will involve a review of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to the area of enquiry. The supervisor provides excellent expert guidance throughout the process.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

External Examiner for Physiology Programmes (May 2011)

"I viewed a range of Research Projects this year. As always they are aligned to staff expertise – I strongly support this focus as I think it enriches the student experience to work with a knowledgeable and often highly motivated staff member."

In addition to the core modules listed above, students choose an optional module from:

Sport Psychology;
Effective Coaching;
Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete.
Students also undertake two further compulsory modules in Clinical Exercise Physiology and Performance Physiology.

The programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

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This course focuses on developing a student’s scientific understanding of the human mind, behaviour and experience, and of the complex interactions between these and the domain of sport and exercise. Read more
This course focuses on developing a student’s scientific understanding of the human mind, behaviour and experience, and of the complex interactions between these and the domain of sport and exercise. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Within the modular structure all students undertake core/compulsory modules in:

Research Skills;
Independent Study (a one to one supervised programme of work leading to the development of the proposal for the Research Project);
Supervised Experience – a module tailored to the needs of the individual and could include directed work with a specified client group or individual;
Research Project relevant to the programme being studied.
Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

Independent Study
The Independent Study should consist of a critical and concise review of the research literature pertaining to a particular research question. A rationale for the proposed research question must be provided, along with a sound methodology for exploring the research question, planned analyses, and expected outcomes. Further, anticipated problems such as resources, equipment, possible ethical issues, informed consent forms, a statement of feasibility of the project and expected costs must be discussed.

Supervised Experience
The content of this module will be largely student specific and include activities (workshops, directed reading, client based work) that will develop the individual’s personal applied support skills. Initially, students complete an individual self-assessment of their current skills/knowledge base and set personal goals to enable them to improve their applied support skills. All students will attend units (workshops) on Ethics in Research and consultancy, communication and counselling skills and how to conduct a needs assessment. Specific physiology and psychology workshops (e.g. Imagery) will also take place.

Students will complete a contract of intended activities agreed with their supervisor in the first four weeks of their programme of study. This contract may, where appropriate, include the intention to apply to British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) to commence a formally logged Supervised Experience.

A portfolio will then be developed; the portfolio records activities including meetings with supervisor, attendance at workshops, meetings and a plan of work with at least one client, and thought/evaluations of all meetings and workshops (i.e. evidence of reflective practice).

Overview and Format of the Research Project module
The Research Project is an independent piece of research, and acts as the culmination of the academic challenges faced by the student. The module comprises 60 credits (ie equivalent to three double modules) and will formally equate to some 600 hours of student time.

Students work closely with their supervisor to develop the work on their research proposal submitted during the Independent Study module. As External Examiners have noted, throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field, with the resulting projects being published in international, peer reviewed journals.

Specifically, this will involve a review of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to the area of enquiry. The supervisor provides excellent expert guidance throughout the process.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

External Examiners’ Report (May 2012)

“Overall, students on these programmes (MSc Applied Sport and Exercise Psychology) are producing work of a very good quality. It is clear that the programme develops students’ theoretical and research knowledge base, critical thinking and evaluation skills, understanding of research methods and a range of analytical techniques, and communication and professional skills to a very high level.”

In addition to the above, students undertake an optional module from either Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete or Effective Coaching. They also study two additional compulsory modules in Sport Psychology and Exercise Psychology.

The programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours (including formal contact).

Read less
This course provides a focus on sport and performance. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Read more
This course provides a focus on sport and performance. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Within the modular structure all students undertake core/compulsory modules in:

Research Skills;
Independent Study (a one to one supervised programme of work leading to the development of the proposal for the Research Project);
Supervised Experience – a module tailored to the needs of the individual and could include directed work with a specified client group or individual;
Research Project relevant to the programme being studied.
Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

Independent Study
The Independent Study should consist of a critical and concise review of the research literature pertaining to a particular research question. A rationale for the proposed research question must be provided, along with a sound methodology for exploring the research question, planned analyses, and expected outcomes. Further, anticipated problems such as resources, equipment, possible ethical issues, informed consent forms, a statement of feasibility of the project and expected costs must be discussed.

Supervised Experience
The content of this module will be largely student specific and include activities (workshops, directed reading, client based work) that will develop the individual’s personal applied support skills. Initially, students complete an individual self-assessment of their current skills/knowledge base and set personal goals to enable them to improve their applied support skills. All students will attend units (workshops) on Ethics in Research and consultancy, communication and counselling skills and how to conduct a needs assessment. Specific physiology and psychology workshops (eg Imagery) will also take place.

Students will complete a contract of intended activities agreed with their supervisor in the first four weeks of their programme of study. This contract may, where appropriate, include the intention to apply to British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) to commence a formally logged Supervised Experience.

A portfolio will then be developed; the portfolio records activities including meetings with supervisor, attendance at workshops, meetings and a plan of work with at least one client, and thought/evaluations of all meetings and workshops (ie evidence of reflective practice).

Overview and Format of the Research Project module
The Research Project is an independent piece of research, and acts as the culmination of the academic challenges faced by the student. The module comprises 60 credits (ie equivalent to three double modules) and will formally equate to some 600 hours of student time.

Students work closely with their supervisor to develop the work on their research proposal submitted during the Independent Study module. As External Examiners have noted, throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field, with the resulting projects being published in international, peer reviewed journals.

Specifically, this will involve a review of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to the area of enquiry. The supervisor provides excellent expert guidance throughout the process.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

Students also choose optional modules from:

Performance Physiology;
Sport Psychology;
Exercise Psychology;
Clinical Exercise Physiology;
Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete:
Effective Coaching.
The programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

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The course focuses on the application of physiology and psychology to outdoor activities. It aims to develop students’ practical and theoretical knowledge as well as their ability to propose possible alternative hypotheses to current thinking. Read more
The course focuses on the application of physiology and psychology to outdoor activities. It aims to develop students’ practical and theoretical knowledge as well as their ability to propose possible alternative hypotheses to current thinking.

As with other MSc programmes, this MSc been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests. It is intended that the skills learnt on this programme will enable students to apply theory to professional practice. The programme benefits from being taught by staff with a wide a range of physiological and psychological expertise.

Within the modular structure all students undertake core/compulsory modules in:

Research Skills;
Independent Study (a one to one supervised programme of work leading to the development of the proposal for the Research Project);
Supervised Experience – a module tailored to the needs of the individual and could include directed work with a specified client group or individual;
Research Project relevant to the programme being studied.
Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

Independent Study
The Independent Study should consist of a critical and concise review of the research literature pertaining to a particular research question. A rationale for the proposed research question must be provided, along with a sound methodology for exploring the research question, planned analyses, and expected outcomes. Further, anticipated problems such as resources, equipment, possible ethical issues, informed consent forms, a statement of feasibility of the project and expected costs must be discussed.

Supervised Experience
The content of this module will be largely student specific and include activities (workshops, directed reading, client based work) that will develop the individual’s personal applied support skills. Initially, students complete an individual self-assessment of their current skills/knowledge base and set personal goals to enable them to improve their applied support skills. All students will attend units (workshops) on Ethics in Research and consultancy, communication and counselling skills and how to conduct a needs assessment. Specific physiology and psychology workshops (eg Imagery) will also take place.

Students will complete a contract of intended activities agreed with their supervisor in the first four weeks of their programme of study. This contract may, where appropriate, include the intention to apply to British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) to commence a formally logged Supervised Experience.

A portfolio will then be developed; the portfolio records activities including meetings with supervisor, attendance at workshops, meetings and a plan of work with at least one client, and thought/evaluations of all meetings and workshops (ie evidence of reflective practice).

Overview and Format of the Research Project module
The Research Project is an independent piece of research, and acts as the culmination of the academic challenges faced by the student. The module comprises 60 credits (i.e. equivalent to three double modules) and will formally equate to some 600 hours of student time.

Specifically, this will involve a review of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to the area of enquiry. The supervisor provides excellent expert guidance throughout the process.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

In addition to the core modules listed above, students undertake an additional compulsory Higher Skills module. On completion of this module students should be sufficiently knowledgeable and skilled to work in scientific and outdoor related disciplines. Due to current industry regulation and insurance requirements, the attainment of nationally recognised vocational qualifications is essential to gain employment in outdoor activities. This module will enable students to progress towards, or actually attain, National Governing Body (NGB) awards in outdoor activities. Pending approval of prior learning/experience, this module may not need to be pursued. However, an additional 20 credits would need to be studied instead.

Finally, students are able to choose one optional module from:

Performance Physiology;
Sport Psychology;
Effective Coaching;
Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete.
The programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

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Bangor University Bangor Business School
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School - London Centre. Banking and financial services represents a highly competitive and rapidly changing sector in every modern economy. Read more
This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School - London Centre.

Banking and financial services represents a highly competitive and rapidly changing sector in every modern economy. Changes in customer requirements, technology, competitive conditions and regulation create the need for managers, traders and analysts to make rapid and often far-reaching decisions about their short term operations and long term strategies. The MSc and MA in Banking and Finance degree courses at Bangor offer you a unique opportunity to study advanced theory and practice relating to financial services, and to develop an appreciation of the causes and significance of current developments in this vitally important and dynamic sector of the economy.

Issues you will tackle as part of your MA/MSc Banking and Finance degree programme include:

Why are the banking systems in different countries (such as the UK, Germany, Japan and the US) so diverse?
What determines the structure, performance and efficiency of banking and financial markets?
Why do banks and financial intermediaries exist?
What are the main theories of the banking firm?
How relevant are financial intermediaries in a world of increasing securitization and with the evolution of virtual banking?
How do banks optimally allocate capital?
Does bank regulation increase or decrease risks?
How do we measure the risks undertaken by banks?
Can regulators reduce the likelihood of systemic (system-wide) risk?
What are the relationships between risk and return governing investment in company shares and other derivative instruments?
Can market risk be priced accurately? Can credit risk be priced accurately?
How should institutional investors go about constructing a portfolio of assets to maximise returns on behalf of investors?
How can we assess the investment performance of pension funds, insurance companies and unit trusts?
How do banks use futures, options, derivatives and swaps to manage their balance sheet and off-balance sheet risks?
What are the key principles of international portfolio management in a world of fast and unpredictable movements in exchange rates?
How do banks manage their business so as to maintain customer relationships, improve operational efficiency and add shareholder value?

With these needs in mind, the MSc and MA Banking and Finance programmes at Bangor are designed to develop participants' existing skills through a scheme of specialist advanced study. An important objective is to provide participants with relevant analytical training, so that they are familiar with the latest theoretical and practical developments relating to banking, finance and capital markets. These programmes provide a coherent theoretical framework for the various subject areas, but the emphasis throughout is on advanced practical application of financial techniques in a real-world setting.

The availability of parallel MSc and MA degrees in Banking and Finance allows you to choose between registering for a more technical MSc degree (including a compulsory element in Financial Econometrics), and a less technical MA degree (for which Financial Econometrics is optional). The MSc degree may be more suitable for applicants with some previous background in mathematics, statistics or econometrics, while the MA degree is more suitable for applicants who prefer to adopt a predominantly non-quantitative approach to their studies. However, both degrees include a compulsory module in Research Methods, which includes coverage of both quantitative and non-quantitative research techniques.

ESRC Recognition

The MA Banking and Finance is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as the first year of a 1+3 PhD training programme.

Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules

Research Methods: This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks, and other financial services firms.

International Financial Markets: This module provides an overview of financial instruments in a multi-currency world, taking account of insights from portfolio theory concerning the relationship between risk and return, the diversification of risk, and the pricing of assets.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk.

Financial Crises and Bank Regulation: This module examines why banks and financial markets are inherently vulnerable to crises, and analyses the role of policy makers and institutions. The roles of monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, corporate governance and ratings agencies in mitigating or exacerbating crises are considered.

International Financial Management: In this module the financial management of multinational companies and the influence of macroeconomic, fiscal, currency and political environments on business and financial decision-making are examined in an international and global context.

Optional modules

Islamic Finance: This course provides an insight into topical issues relating to Islamic financial instruments and related risk management issues.

Corporate Risk Management: This module provides an analysis of pure risk and its management.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

Financial Analysis: This module analyses the techniques that are used to evaluate a company’s financial position and performance.

Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management: This module evaluates the development of investment strategies for bonds, equities and derivatives that are designed to achieve optimal risk-return outcomes, and examines the measurement and evaluation of the performance of a portfolio of investments.

Islamic Banking: This module provides an insight into the key features of Islamic banking business.

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Bangor University School of Electronic Engineering
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
This course aims to give suitable graduates an in-depth understanding of the technology, and the drivers for the technology, in the area of Broadband and mobile communications. Read more
This course aims to give suitable graduates an in-depth understanding of the technology, and the drivers for the technology, in the area of Broadband and mobile communications. The course will also provide exposure to current research activity in the field.

Upon completing of the course, students will have a detailed understanding of the current practices and directions in this topic, and will be able to apply them to the task of continuing the roll-out of advanced communication services across the globe.

Course Topics
Data networks and communications, project foundations and management tools, broadband communication systems, technologies for Internet systems, introduction to distributed systems mobile systems, project and dissertation.

Taught Modules:

Data Networks and Communications: This module will provide an in-depth understanding of how real communication networks are structured and the protocols that make them work. It will give the students an ability to explain in detail the process followed to provide an end-to-end connection.

Modelling and Design: focuses on the simulation and design of electronic devices using an advanced software package – COMSOL. This powerful commercial software package is extremely adaptable and can be used to simulate and design a very wide range of physical systems.

Masters Mini Project: focuses on applying the skills and techniques already studied to a mini project, the theme of which will form the basis of the research project later in the year.

Broadband Communication Systems: This module aims to provide students with an in-depth understanding of current and emerging broadband communications techniques employed in local, access and backbone networks. Particular emphasis will be focused on the following aspects: 1) Fundamental concepts, 2) Operating principles and practice of widely implemented communications systems; 3) Hot research and development topics, and 4) Opportunities and challenges for future deployment of broadband communications systems.

Mobile Communication Systems: This module will provide an in-depth understanding of current and emerging mobile communication systems, with a particular emphasis on the common aspects of all such systems.

RF and Optical MEMS: This module aims to introduce the use and benefits of miniaturisation in RF and optical technologies. The module will investigate improvements in component characteristics, and manufacturing processes. Applications of RF and optical nano and microsystems will be discussed using examples.

Advanced Sensor Systems: This course aims to provide students with an understanding of more complex sensor systems and a view of current developments in specific areas of sensor development. Applications of these systems and their main producers and users are also discussed.

Masters Project Preparation: To place computing and engineering within a business context so that students relate the technical aspects of their work to its commercial and social dimensions and are able to prepare project plans which take into account the constraints and limitations imposed by non-technical factors.

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Bangor University Bangor Business School
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
Description. Read more
Description

The ever-changing nature of business firms and the markets in which they operate, has made it increasingly important for corporate managers have a clear understanding of the theory and practice relating to strategic management and the interrelationships between the firm, its employees and its markets, and the implications for corporate financial strategy. Familiarity with the most recent developments in risk appraisal, valuation, marketing, human resource management (HRM), organisational behaviour and strategic management are essential requirements for all those involved directly in business, or in financing business activities, or those who wish to gain a deeper understanding of these important areas.

Issues you will study as part of your MSc or MA Business and Finance degree programme include:

How can organisations ensure their own survival in a rapidly changing competitive environment?
What are the key strategic management problems facing organisations?
Are organisations as complex as they seem?
How can you analyse the strategy process, evaluate the strategic choices that may be made and place a value on the strategic options that are available?
How would you recognise effective approaches to HRM?
What are the costs and benefits of the alternatives?
Do contemporary employment practices lessen conflicts and tensions in the employment relationship?
Which factors are most likely to influence the evaluation and implementation of investment projects?
How can we calculate a suitable cost of capital to appraise the capital investment decision?
What are the relationships between risk and return governing investment? Can market risk be priced accurately?
Can credit risk be priced accurately?
What are the key principles of international portfolio management in a world of fast and unpredictable movements in exchange rates?
Can futures, options, derivatives and swaps be used to manage the risks involved?
How can financial forecasts be used in business valuation, and what techniques should be used to improve trend analysis and interfirm comparison?
With these needs in mind, the MSc and MA Business and Finance programmes at Bangor are designed to develop participants' existing skills through a scheme of specialist advanced study. An important objective is to provide participants not only with an insight into organisational behaviour and strategic choices in HRM and marketing, but also with an understanding of theoretical developments relating to corporate finance and the capital markets, and competence in the techniques required to assess the consequences for business management. These programmes provide a coherent theoretical framework for the various subject areas, but the emphasis throughout is on advanced practical application of busniess management and financial techniques in a real-world setting.

The availability of parallel MSc and MA degrees in Business and Finance allows you to choose between registering for a more technical MSc degree (including a compulsory element in Financial Econometrics), and a less technical MA degree (for which Financial Econometrics is optional). The MSc degree may be more suitable for applicants with some previous background in mathematics, statistics or econometrics, while the MA degree is more suitable for applicants who prefer to adopt a predominantly non-quantitative approach to their studies. However, both degrees include a compulsory module in Research Methods, which includes coverage of both quantitative and non-quantitative research techniques. Provided you are registered for the correct modules for your chosen degree, it is normally possible to transfer between the MSc and MA degrees during the first few weeks following your initial registration.

The MSc and MA degrees in Business and Finance are scheduled for a duration of 12 months. Each degree programme consists of two parts.

Part 1 is a wholly taught component, contributing 120 credits. Part 1 is taught during the two semesters which make up the academic year. Teaching during semester 1 normally runs from late-September to December, with examinations in January. Teaching during semester 2 normally runs from late-January to early-May, with examinations in May and June.

Part 2 is a supervised dissertation of around 10,000 words, contributing 60 credits. The dissertation provides you with the opportunity to critically review, and possibly (but not necessarily) produce an original contribution to, the literature in any part of the taught syllabus. Part 2 is completed during the summer months, from June to September. You are expected to submit your dissertation by the end of September in the calendar year following your initial registration for your MSc or MA degree programme.

Continuous assessment is an integral part of all of our taught modules. The weightings attaching to coursework and other forms of continuous assessment vary from module to module, from a minimum of 25% to a maximum of 50%.

ESRC Recognition
The MA Business and Finance is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as the first year of a 1+3 PhD training programme.

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Bangor University Bangor Business School
Distance from Bangor: 0 miles
This joint Masters degree is designed for graduates wishing to start, or further develop, careers in Consumer Psychology and Business. Read more
This joint Masters degree is designed for graduates wishing to start, or further develop, careers in Consumer Psychology and Business. The programme is delivered by schools which enjoy an international reputation in their field.

The marriage of both disciplines is a natural one, as understanding behaviour and specifically consumer behaviour in the world of business can be crucial to the success of businesses.

Today’s successful businesses and organisations need highly trained people who can help them understand their consumers and understand issues such as: What makes them choose one product over another? Do brand names and advertising really affect our thinking? Will the internet change the face of urban and suburban shopping areas?

In the first semester, Business and Consumer Psychology studies will be in equal proportions; however in Semester 2 there will be a greater focus on business, and the dissertation is undertaken in a business-related subject. It is also possible to undertake a Consumer Psychology and Business Masters degree that will involve a dissertation in Consumer Psychology. Please click here for further details.

Candidates may choose between the MA or MSc routes, which are differentiated by the nature of the dissertation. The MSc dissertation will involve undertaking empirical research, whilst the MA dissertation will involve an extended literature review.
Course Structure

The MSc and MA degrees in Business with Consumer Psychology are scheduled for a duration of 12 months. Each degree programme consists of two parts.

Part 1:

Is a wholly taught component, contributing 120 credits. All taught modules carry a credit weighting of 15 credits. Part 1 is taught during the two semesters which make up the academic year. Teaching during semester 1 normally runs from late-September to December, with examinations in January. Teaching during Semester 2 normally runs from late-January to early-May, with examinations in May and June.

Part 2:

Consists of a supervised Dissertation of around 10,000 words completed during the summer months, from late May to September. You are expected to submit your Dissertation by September in the calendar year following your initial registration for your postgraduate degree.

Compulsory Modules:

Consumer Psychology: This module is an introduction to consumer science as it is currently practiced in the marketplace and to relevant research in academia.
Nudges and Behaviour Change: Module details are currently not available.
Marketing Strategy: This module critically evaluates the contributions of various schools of thought in marketing, and examines the relevant analytical models and management practices, with emphasis on the strategic importance of marketing to all organisations.
Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches.
Applied Consumer Psychology: This module’s aim is to provide practical research experience in consumer psychology and involves hands-on work with viable commercial enterprises. Students are partnered with local companies and are required to design and conduct a practical consumer research project, typically involving field work.

Optional modules (choose 3):

European Business: This module examines the opportunities and constraints faced by businesses that operate on a pan-European basis. Emphasis is placed on the multi-dimensional characteristics of an economic and social space that is subject to a unique system of supra-national governance
New Venture Creation: This module examines the advantages and disadvantages of the various routes to business start-up, including new venture creation, or establishing a business based on your own expertise, experience and ideas; buying an established busi9ness; purchasing a franchise; and succession through a family firm, an increasingly common way of becoming involved in entrepreneurial activity.
Contemporary Issues in Management: This module develops several theories and concepts in contemporary management theory and practice. It provides a detailed and critical analysis of management, further developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.
Finance for Managers: This module is designed for those who aim to achieve a basic understanding of financial management and control, and who require an understanding of finance in order to manage an organisation effectively. Financial planning and control are central themes, as well as the appraisal techniques of investment projects.
Enterprise by design: module information currently unavailable.
Marketing Communication: This module critically evaluates the contributions of various schools of thought in marketing, and examines the relevant analytical models and management practices, with emphasis on the strategic importance of marketing to all organisations.
Entrepreneurial Marketing: This module explores relationship marketing theory and practice in a range of global environments and business contexts. Theoretical approaches, integrated with relationship marketing models and analytical tools will be used to develop managerial understanding and competence.

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