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Full Time Masters Degrees in Medicine, Manchester, United Kingdom

We have 51 Full Time Masters Degrees in Medicine, Manchester, United Kingdom

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Our MRes Experimental Cancer Medicine master's course will give nurses, doctors and clinical researchers the skills needed to work in early phase clinical studies. Read more

Our MRes Experimental Cancer Medicine master's course will give nurses, doctors and clinical researchers the skills needed to work in early phase clinical studies.

You will learn how to master experimental cancer through a combination of traditional teaching and hands-on learning, spending a year as a member of the Experimental Cancer Medicine Team at The Christie while also taking four structured taught units.

The taught units will see you learn the details of designing and delivering Phase 1 clinical studies, understanding the pre-clinical data required before a clinical programme can commence, and how to optimise early clinical studies to provide evidence for progressing a promising drug into Phase II/III clinical testing.

Alongside the taught elements, you will be allocated to one or more clinical trials that are being conducted by The Christie experimental cancer medicine team. You will have a named trainer and be exposed to tasks required in the setup, delivery, interpretation and audit of a clinical study.

Nursing and physician students will be expected to participate in patient care, including new and follow-on patient clinics, treatment and care-giving episodes with patients.

For clinical trials coordinators, no direct patient contact is envisaged and duties will involve clinical trial setup, protocol amendments, database setup, data entry, costing and billing for clinical research.

You will be able to choose two aspects of your direct clinical trial research experience to write up for your two research projects in a dissertation format. This will give you the skills and knowledge required to critically report medical, scientific and clinically related sciences for peer review.

Aims

The primary purpose of the MRes in Experimental Cancer Medicine is to provide you with the opportunity to work within a premier UK Phase 1 cancer clinical trials unit and, through a mix of taught and experiential learning, master the discipline of Experimental Cancer Medicine.

Special features

Extensive practical experience

You will spend most of your time gaining hands-on experience within The Christie's Experimental Cancer Medicine Team.

Additional course information

Meet the course team

Dr Natalie Cook is a Senior Clinical Lecturer in Experimental Cancer Medicine at the University and Honorary Consultant in Medical Oncology at The Christie. She completed a PhD at Cambridge, investigating translational therapeutics and biomarker assay design in pancreatic cancer.

Professor Hughes is Chair of Experimental Cancer Medicine at the University and Strategic Director of the Experimental Cancer Medicine team at The Christie. He is a member of the research strategy group for Manchester Cancer Research Centre. He serves on the Biomarker evaluation review panel for CRUK grant applications.

Professor Hughes was previously Global Vice-President for early clinical development at AstraZeneca, overseeing around 100 Phase 0/1/2 clinical studies. He was previously Global Vice-President for early phase clinical oncology, having been involved in over 200 early phase clinical studies.

Dr Matthew Krebs is a Clinical Senior Lecturer in Experimental Cancer Medicine at the University and Honorary Consultant in Medical Oncology at The Christie.

He has a PhD in circulating biomarkers and postdoctoral experience in single cell and ctDNA molecular profiling. He is Principal Investigator on a portfolio of phase 1 clinical trials and has research interests in clinical development of novel drugs for lung cancer and integration of biomarkers with experimental drug development.

Teaching and learning

Our course is structured around a 2:1 split between clinical-based research projects and taught elements respectively.

Taught course units will predominantly use lectures and workshops.

For the research projects, teaching and learning will take place through one-to-one mentoring from a member of the Experimental Cancer Medicine team.

The clinical and academic experience of contributors to this course will provide you with an exceptional teaching and learning experience.

Coursework and assessment

You will be assessed through oral presentations, single best answer exams, written reports and dissertation.

For each research project, you will write a dissertation of 10,000 to 15,000 words. Examples of suitable practical projects include the following.

Research proposal

  • Compilation of a research proposal to research council/charity
  • Writing a protocol and trial costings for sponsor
  • Research and write a successful expression of interest selected by grant funder for full development

Publication-based/dissertation by publication

  • Writing a clinical study report
  • Authoring a peer-review journal review/original article

Service development/professional report/ report based dissertation

  • Public health report/outbreak report/health needs assessment/health impact assessment
  • Proposal for service development/organisational change
  • Audit/evaluate service delivery/policy
  • Implement recommended change from audit report

Adapted systematic review (qualitative data)

  • Compiling the platform of scientific evidence for a new drug indication from literature
  • Review of alternative research methodologies from literature

Full systematic review that includes data collection (quantitative data)

  • Referral patterns for Phase 1 patients

Qualitative or quantitative empirical research

  • Design, conduct, analyse and report an experiment

Qualitative secondary data analysis/analysis of existing quantitative data

  • Compilation, mining and analysis of existing clinical data sets

Quantitative secondary data analysis/analysis of existing qualitative data/theoretical study/narrative review

  • Policy analysis or discourse analysis/content analysis
  • A critical review of policy using framework analysis

Facilities

Teaching will take place within The Christie NHS Foundation Trust , Withington.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This course is relevant to physician, nursing and clinical research students who are considering a career in Phase 1 clinical studies.

The course provides a theoretical and experiential learning experience and offers a foundation for roles within other experimental cancer medicine centres within the UK and EU, as well as careers in academia, the pharmaceutical industry, clinical trials management and medicine.

The MRes is ideal for high-calibre graduates and professionals wishing to undertake directly channelled research training in the clinical and medical oncology field.



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Our Master of Research (MRes) in Translational Medicine provides high-quality research and training skills for students who want to use state-of-the-art biotechnologies to rapidly translate disease research into improved clinical healthcare. Read more
Our Master of Research (MRes) in Translational Medicine provides high-quality research and training skills for students who want to use state-of-the-art biotechnologies to rapidly translate disease research into improved clinical healthcare.

With advances in technology, graduates are now faced with heightened expectations to conduct effective bioscience research.

Employers demand skillsets comprising biological, medical, physical and computational characteristics and this Masters is designed to provide this breadth of training.

The core aim is to train the next generation of scientists able to 'fast-track' biological and scientific data into advanced therapies and diagnostics tools.

Our understanding of the molecular basis of disease and drug mechanisms has improved dramatically in recent years, yet there is a distinct shortage of individuals able to apply this knowledge into effective clinical benefit.

Our MRes in Translational Medicine (Interdisciplinary Molecular Medicine) provides intense training in 'omics' skills and techniques such as genetics, genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics.

The training in metabolomic techniques is novel for a UK course, and teaching on the integration of different omic platforms and data in a systems medicine strategy is unique.

With its extended 35-week research project and broad training in biotechnology for medical healthcare, this MRes provides an excellent platform to progress into PhD research, or for a career in academia or the pharmaceutical or biotechnology industries, or as a clinical academic.

The MRes has substantial interdisciplinary focus; training comprises four taught modules before you undertake an extended 35-week research project within The University of Manchester, Waters or one of the Greater Manchester teaching hospitals.

A wide choice of projects are available, allowing individuals to focus on areas of interest such as the use of gene expression profiling, proteomics, metabolomics, stem cell research, tissue culture or pharmacogenetics in the biology of cancer, cardiovascular disease, infectious diseases, stroke or diabetes.

The MRes lasts for one year full-time, so it provides the ideal opportunity to experience the challenges of multidisciplinary research first-hand before committing to further training.

Over 85% of our graduates secure further research (PhD), pharmaceutical or biotechnology industry, or medical training posts upon completion.

Career opportunities

Our MRes, with its extended 35-week research project and broad training in biotechnology for medical healthcare, provides an excellent platform to progress into PhD research, or for a career in the pharmaceutical or biotechnology Industries or as a clinical academic.
-More than 50% of our graduates progress into PhD research (for example, within the Universities of Manchester, Cambridge, Imperial College London, Newcastle, Glasgow, Liverpool, Bristol).
-Around 15% pursue a career in the pharmaceutical or biotechnology industry in the UK or abroad.
-Approximately 25% are intercalating medics who complete their medical education.
-An estimated 10% pursue an undergraduate medical degree.

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Our MSc History of Science, Technology and Medicine taught master's course focuses on a broad range of mostly 19th and 20th century case studies, from the local to the global. Read more

Our MSc History of Science, Technology and Medicine taught master's course focuses on a broad range of mostly 19th and 20th century case studies, from the local to the global.

We will explore key debates such as:

  • Why does Britain have a National Health Service?
  • Can better science education cure economic problems?
  • How did epidemic disease affect the colonial ambitions of the European powers?
  • Why do we end up depending on unreliable technologies?

Your studies will pay particular attention to the roles of sites, institutions, and schools of thought and practice, and to the changing ways in which scientists and medics have communicated with non-specialist audiences.

You will learn through lectures, seminars and tutorials and gain experience of historical essay-writing, before researching and writing an extensive dissertation on a specialised topic, supervised by experienced researchers.

This MSc focuses on humanities skills, but may be taken successfully by students from any disciplinary background. It works both as an advanced study course for students with undergraduate experience in the history of science, technology and medicine, and as a conversion route for students from other backgrounds, often in the sciences, but also including general history, social policy, and other fields.

The History of Science, Technology and Medicine pathway is appropriate if you have wide-ranging interests across the field, or are interested in the histories of the physical sciences or the life sciences in particular.

If you wish to focus on biomedicine or healthcare, you may prefer the Medical Humanities pathway. If you are particularly interested in contemporary science communication or policy, you should consider the MSc Science Communication course.

Aims

This course aims to:

  • explore the histories of theories, practices, authority claims, institutions and people, spaces and places, and communication in science, technology and medicine, across their social, cultural and political contexts;
  • provide opportunities to study particular topics of historical and contemporary significance in depth, and to support the development of analytical skills in understanding the changing form and function of science, technology and medicine in society;
  • encourage and support the development of transferable writing and presentational skills of the highest standard, and thereby prepare students for further academic study or employment;
  • provide a comprehensive introduction to research methods in the history of science, technology and medicine, including work with libraries, archives, databases, and oral history;
  • enable students to produce a major piece of original research and writing in the form of a dissertation.

Special features

Extensive support

Receive dedicated research support from the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine , the longest-established centre for the integrated study of the field.

Extra opportunities

Take up optional classes and volunteering opportunities shared with the parallel MSc Science Communication course at Manchester, including science policy, science media, museums and public events activities.

Explore Manchester's history

Manchester is the classic 'shock city' of the Industrial Revolution. You can relive the development of industrial society through field trips and visits.

Convenient study options

Benefit from flexible options for full or part-time study.

Teaching and learning

Teaching includes a mixture of lectures and small-group seminar discussions built around readings and other materials. We emphasise the use both of primary sources, and of current research in the field.

Most students will also visit local museums and other sites of interest to work on objects or archives.

All students meet regularly with a mentor from the Centre's PhD community, a designated personal tutor from among the staff, and, from Semester 2, a dissertation supervisor. 

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is mostly based on traditional essay-format coursework submission.

All MSc students undertake a research dissertation (or optionally, for Medical Humanities students, a portfolio of creative work) accounting for 60 of the 180 credits.

Course unit details

You are required to complete 180 credits in the following course units to be awarded this MSc:

Semester 1 course units (credits)

  • Major themes in HSTM (30 credits)
  • Theory and practice in HSTM and Medical Humanities (15)
  • Research and communication skills (15)

Semester 2: two optional course units (30 credits each) from the below list, or one from the below plus 30 credits of course units from an affiliated programme:

  • Shaping the sciences
  • Making modern technology
  • Medicine, science and modernity

plus:

  • Dissertation in the history of science, technology and/or medicine (60)

Course structure (part-time)

Part-time students study alongside full-timers, taking half the same content each semester over two years.

You are required to complete 180 credits in the following course units to be awarded this MSc:

Semester 1: Major themes in HSTM (30 credits).

Semester 2: one optional course unit (30 credits each) from

  • Shaping the sciences
  • Making modern technology
  • Medicine, science and modernity

Semester 3:

  • Theory and practice in HSTM and Medical Humanities (15)
  • Research and communication skills (15)

Semester 4: one further optional course unit (30) from CHSTM as seen above, or 30 credits of course units from an approved affiliated programme.

Plus:

  • Dissertation in HSTM (60 credits) across second year and during the summer

Facilities

All MSc students have use of a shared office in the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, including networked computer terminals and storage space, and use of the dedicated subject library housed in the PhD office nearby.

The Centre is located within a few minutes' walk of the University of Manchester Library , the largest non-deposit library in the UK.

Resources for student research projects within the University include the object collections of theManchester Museum , also nearby on campus, and the John Rylands Library special collections facility in the city centre.

CHSTM also has a close working relationship with other institutions offering research facilities to students, notably the Museum of Science and Industry .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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Our PGCert in Translational Medicine provides high-quality training skills for students who want to use state-of-the-art biotechnologies to rapidly translate disease research into improved clinical healthcare. Read more
Our PGCert in Translational Medicine provides high-quality training skills for students who want to use state-of-the-art biotechnologies to rapidly translate disease research into improved clinical healthcare.

With advances in technology, graduates are now faced with heightened expectations to conduct effective bioscience research.
Employers demand skillsets comprising biological, medical, physical and computational characteristics and this PGCert is designed to provide this breadth of training.

The core aim is to train the next generation of scientists able to 'fast-track' biological and scientific data into advanced therapies and diagnostics tools.

Our understanding of the molecular basis of disease and drug mechanisms has improved dramatically in recent years, yet there is a distinct shortage of individuals able to apply this knowledge into effective clinical benefit.

This course provides intense training in 'omics' skills and techniques such as genetics, genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics.

The training in metabolic techniques is novel for a UK course, and teaching on the integration of different omic platforms and data in a systems medicine strategy is unique.

Teaching and learning

The postgraduate certificate requires the completion of four taught units delivered using a variety of face-to-face, workshop and e-learning approaches. Each unit lasts the equivalent of two weeks and consists of a package of lectures, workshops and tutorials.

Career opportunities

The aim of the PGCert is to give you a thorough knowledge and understanding of the key technologies used in the field of translational medicine.

This will help you to obtain laboratory-based positions or progress your career if you are already employed within academia or the pharmaceutical industry.

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Our MSc in Genomic Medicine is accredited by Health Education England and designed to fulfil the aspirations of the . 100,000 Genome Project. Read more

Our MSc in Genomic Medicine is accredited by Health Education England and designed to fulfil the aspirations of the 100,000 Genome Project to create a world-class NHS workforce that understands and applies genomics for patient care.

This course is ideal whether you are a member of NHS staff or a science graduate. NHS professionals will learn how genomics impact on their area of clinical practice, while science graduates will receive training to help them gain employment in the healthcare sector (eg as a biomedical scientist or in genomic counselling) or pursue a PhD in the field.

We emphasise the practice of genomics and bioinformatics in the NHS and academia as a partnership between multiple stakeholders, including clinical, academic and industrial involvement.

As such, you will learn from clinical experts from the Manchester Centre for Genomic Medicine , The University of Manchester, Liverpool University, Public Health England, AstraZeneca and Qiagen.

Our MSc consists of taught units and a literature review or a bioinformatics-based project. You will be encouraged to use your intellectual curiosity, creativity and critical thinking in the practical application of genomics and bioinformatics.

MRes students will write a literature review and a research proposal (project 1) before going on to complete a six-month practical research project.

Teaching and learning

We take a student-focused and patient-centred approach to teaching and learning.

The course content is delivered using a combination of online and face-to-face methods including lectures, problem and evidence-based learning, workshops and collaborative learning.

The face-to-face elements are designed to help you develop the deeper contextualised specialist knowledge and critical evaluative skills necessary for a questioning and innovative approach to your learning and clinical practice.

You will learn from healthcare professionals and industry partners who are working at the forefront of practice and clinical research and can draw on their scholarship and expertise to help you build your knowledge.

If you choose to study the MRes qualification, the 25-week lab-based research project will provide excellent practical training in a number of research methods and techniques.

Course unit details

The MSc is divided into 15-credit core and optional units. Full-time students will normally do a 60-credit research project, and part-time students a 30-credit literature review.

Course collaborators

We collaborate with the following organisations to deliver this MSc:

What our students say

"So far, I have completed four modules on Bioinformatics, Human Genetics, Pharmacogenomics and Genetic Counselling. I can honestly say that I have thoroughly enjoyed each of these and they have opened my eyes to the potential transformation of healthcare in the NHS through genomic medicine."

Bradley Horn, Genetic Technologist

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service .

CPD opportunities

Several units from this MSc can be taken as standalone courses for continuing professional development (CPD). Please visit the Genomic Medicine (CPD units) page for further information.

Career opportunities

Our course is designed to support and upskill healthcare professionals working in the NHS in areas where genomic medicine is becoming part of clinical practice.

Our science graduates have gone on to apply their new skills in service labs in their home countries, gained employment in the NHS, undertaken further study for genomic counselling, or have continued their research to pursue a PhD in the field.

Accrediting organisations

This course is accredited by Health Education England.



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Manchester Met is part of a city famous for sport and with a long history of medical education. The dense population of professional and amateur sports clubs, organisations and governing bodies enables many medical and physiotherapy professionals to work in the sport and exercise field on a full- or part-time basis. Read more
Manchester Met is part of a city famous for sport and with a long history of medical education. The dense population of professional and amateur sports clubs, organisations and governing bodies enables many medical and physiotherapy professionals to work in the sport and exercise field on a full- or part-time basis.

The University maintains strong collaborations with high profile sporting bodies in the region, City Football Services, Manchester City FC, Manchester United FC, English Institute of Sport, Manchester Institute for Health and Performance (MIHP), Sale Sharks RUFC, Warrington Wolves RLFC and British Water Polo amongst others.

The programme provides education for those already, or who are aspiring to support teams and individuals engaged in physical activity at all levels. It provides high quality specialist education and training in the prevention, diagnosis and management of sport- and exercise-related medical conditions and injury. It offers a wide range of units enabling doctors, physiotherapists and osteopaths to specialise in the field of sport medicine. Alternatively, students may undertake study leading to a PgCert, or PgDip in Sport and Exercise Medicine.

The course content aligns with the Speciality Training Curriculum for SEM (2010) designed by the Joint Royal College of Physicians Training Board and the Sports Physiotherapy Competencies and Standards Framework (2005).

Features and benefits of the course

As part of this exciting new programme, students will also have the opportunity to gain additional professional accreditation, qualification or membership with external professional bodies:
-Membership of the Society of Musculoskeletal Medicine (SOMM).
-Immediate Care in Sport Certificate (Level 3) approved by the Faculty of Pre-hospital Care, Royal College of Surgeons.
-On successful completion of the PEMHET unit (Promoting Excellence in Medical and Healthcare Education and Training) students will collate appropriate evidence to support an application for Fellowship of the Association of Emergency Educators (AoME) or Associate Fellowship of the Higher Education Academy (HEA).

About the Course

Core and optional units on offer will depend on the route chosen by the student through the programme.

MSc Sport and Exercise Medicine requires successful completion of 180 credits, PgDip Sport and Exercise Medicine 120 units and the PgCert Sport and Exercise Medicine 60 credits.

Assessment details

Assessment will be undertaken via a range of assessment methods. A range of inclusive methods will be undertaken to ensure that all learning outcomes are met and that a wide range of learning styles are supported. These will include essays, practical examinations, oral presentations, poster presentations, written and oral exams, case studies, literature reviews, quizzes, portfolios and projects.

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This PGCert will give you the skills and knowledge to become a world-class educator in biology, medicine and healthcare. You will be well equipped to teach or further your research in this area through both our standalone PGCert and the 4 Year International PhD , which includes the PGCert as part of the programme. Read more
This PGCert will give you the skills and knowledge to become a world-class educator in biology, medicine and healthcare.

You will be well equipped to teach or further your research in this area through both our standalone PGCert and the 4 Year International PhD , which includes the PGCert as part of the programme.

Aims

We aim to produce world-class educators who want to train future professionals who will go on to meet the health and social care needs of the most vulnerable people in our society.

Inter-professional learning is central to the ethos of the course and provides the added value of learning alongside colleagues from other disciplines, enriching your student experience. You will benefit from the wisdom and experience of your peers, as well as the expertise offered by healthcare teaching professionals.

If you undertake our 4 Year International PhD , you will undertake a further qualification to support the development of a career in academia.

Teaching and learning

Each unit will use a blended learning approach, with a number of face-to-face teaching sessions, pre-sessional tasks and flip teaching.

Online learning will take place via the Blackboard platform.

Coursework and assessment

There will be formative and summative assessments for each unit. Throughout the course, you will be asked to complete a reflective learning log.

Career opportunities

This course will equip healthcare professionals and PhD students with the knowledge and skills to provide world-class education to the future workforce.

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Our MSc in Neuroimaging for Clinical and Cognitive Neuroscience will provide you with the theoretical and practical skills required to carry out high-quality cognitive brain imaging work in healthy individuals and patient populations. Read more

Our MSc in Neuroimaging for Clinical and Cognitive Neuroscience will provide you with the theoretical and practical skills required to carry out high-quality cognitive brain imaging work in healthy individuals and patient populations.

Our course is aimed at graduates with scientific training in fields as diverse as experimental psychology, cognitive neuroscience, neuroscience, physics, computer science, mathematics, medicine, pharmacology, and engineering who are interested in a career where brain imaging forms a major focus, or where the scientific and technological needs of brain imaging are addressed.

The course aims to provide a unique environment in which students from a variety of scientific backgrounds can work together in a way that reflects their potential future collaborations, and in which they can readily acquire the multidisciplinary skills needed.

You will explore issues relating to the optimisation of fMRI and EEG data acquisition and analysis, with a particular focus on the cross-talk between the physics of the scanning environment, the psychology of the experimental design, and the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of the human brain.

In addition, the course offers an in-depth grounding in cognitive, social, behavioural, and clinical neuroscience theory, and offers the opportunity to be directly involved neuroimaging research.

Graduating students will be ideally placed to make major contributions to research and technological development within the field of brain imaging.

Special features

MSc + PhD studentships

Our MSc can form the first year of Research Council-funded 1+3 postgraduate PhD studentships (such as from the ESRC Northwest Doctoral Training Centre ).

Teaching and learning

Our course is delivered through a series of lectures and practical lab-based classes, as well as informal seminar-style sessions encouraging interaction and discussion.

The research project offers one-to-one supervision within the research environment.

Apart from doing standard background reading and preparation for coursework and examinations, you will be required to work on lab-based skills outside formal teaching times. Dedicated facilities will be available for this.

Coursework and assessment

Assessment will vary between course units, but will comprise a mixture of examinations (including short answer and multiple-choice formats), coursework, lab reports and a final research report.

Course unit details

You will take eight taught course units worth 15 credits each and complete a research project.

Semester 1:

  • Neuroimaging Techniques (including MRI, fMRI, PET, EEG, MEG)
  • Functional Neuroanatomy
  • Image Analysis
  • Experiment Design and Optimisation.

Semester 2:

  • Advanced Image Analysis
  • Cognitive Psychology for Clinical Neuroscience
  • Cognitive and Social Neuroscience
  • Clinical and Behavioural Neuroscience.

Research projects

For the research project, you will join an active neuroimaging research programme from across the University. A wide variety of research options will be made available in the hope that the experience reflects the research environment that you might enter once you have graduated.

All students will be required to carry out a major component of neuroimaging data analysis and interpretation of results as part of the project. Project results will be presented in poster format at a mini-conference towards the end of the course.

Facilities

You will be able to access a range of facilities throughout the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service 

Career opportunities

This MSc will prepare you for a career path in scientific and clinical research and academia, as it provides the ideal platform from which to proceed to doctoral work involving brain imaging.

The course also provides clear career paths in specialist software and hardware industries, and in specialist sections of the pharmaceutical industry.

In addition, our MSc offers a high-level specialisation relevant for students and graduates of medicine.



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Our MSc in Medical Imaging Science covers a multidisciplinary topic of central importance in diagnosis, treatment monitoring and patient management. Read more

Our MSc in Medical Imaging Science covers a multidisciplinary topic of central importance in diagnosis, treatment monitoring and patient management.

It is also a key tool in medical research and it is becoming increasingly possible to relate imaging studies to genetic traits in individuals and populations. Novel imaging biomarkers of disease can enable more rapid and precise diagnosis and inform decision making in drug discovery programmes.

As medical imaging involves knowledge of anatomy, physiology, pathology, physics, mathematics and computation, our course is suitable if you want to expand your disciplinary horizons and pursue a career in an image-related field in clinical medicine, medical research, or technological research or development.

You will cover the basic science and technology behind the principal imaging modalities currently used in medicine and medical research, as well as advanced imaging methods, clinical and research applications, imaging biomarkers and computational methods.

You will learn how advanced imaging techniques are applied in medical research and drug discovery with an emphasis on magnetic resonance (MR) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. You will also receive training in computational and quantitative methods of image analysis or in the interpretation of clinical images from different imaging modalities.

This course comprises both a taught component and a research project, giving you the skills and knowledge required for a career in an image-related field in clinical practice, clinical or scientific research, or technical development.

Aims

We aim to provide you with:

  • with a systematic understanding of the scientific basis of the major medical imaging modalities;
  • a broad understanding of the principal clinical applications of medical imaging and its role in diagnosis, monitoring and therapy;
  • an understanding of the capabilities and limitations of medical imaging for deriving quantitative anatomical and physiological data;
  • knowledge of how advanced imaging techniques are applied in medical research and drug discovery;
  • the experience to plan, implement and complete a research project;
  • generic transferrable skills required in a multidisciplinary scientific or clinical research environment;
  • the knowledge and skills required for a career in an image-related field in clinical practice, clinical research, scientific research or technical development.

Special features

Excellent facilities

Benefit from research-dedicated imaging facilities at several hospital sites and a dedicated molecular imaging centre co-located with the Christie Hospital.

Learn from experts

Manchester has an imaging and image computing research group with a strong international reputation. Our research groups and facilities are staffed by scientists conducting research in novel imaging and image analysis methods, and clinicians who apply these methods in clinical practice.

Flexible learning

Learn when it suits you thanks to options for either full-time or part-time study.

Multidisciplinary learning

Study alongside physicists, engineers, mathematicians, computer scientists, chemists, biologists and clinicians working in hospitals and research-dedicated imaging facilities.

Teaching and learning

As this course aims to produce graduates equipped to pursue either clinically or technically-focused careers in imaging, it is important to provide an adequate knowledge base. For this reason, much of the teaching takes the form of lectures.

However, in most course units, this is supplemented by group discussions and practical exercises. Other than the introductory units, most course units provide you with an understanding of research methods by requiring submission of a critical review of appropriate research literature or clinical material, either as a report or presentation.

Where appropriate, practical imaging exercises are provided, requiring you to cooperate in acquiring images and analysing results.

All units require a considerable component of independent research and study.

Coursework and assessment

Assessment will occur in a variety of forms.

Summative assessment takes the form of written assignments, examinations, oral presentations and online quizzes. Written assignments and presentations, as well as contributing to summative assessment, have a formative role in providing feedback, particularly in the early stages of course units.

Online quizzes provide a useful method of regular testing, ensuring that you engage actively with the taught material. As accumulation of a knowledge base is a key aim of the course, examinations (both open-book and closed-book) form an important element of summative assessment.

In addition, formal assessment of your research and written communication skills is achieved via the dissertation. This is a 10,000 to 15,000-word report, written and organised to appropriate scientific standards, describing the design, execution and results of the research project.

Course unit details

The MSc requires students to pass 180 credits composed of eight course units of 15 credits each and a 60-credit research project.

We provide course units in Human Biology and Introductory Mathematics and Physics to bring students up to the required level in these topics.

Semester 1: Compulsory units

  • Scientific Skills
  • Mathematical Foundations of Imaging
  • Radioisotope Imaging (PET/SPET)
  • Non-radioisotope Imaging (MRI, CT, US)

Semester 2: Compulsory units

  • Advanced MR Imaging
  • Advanced PET Imaging
  • Quantitative Imaging into Practice (Imaging Biomarkers for Healthcare and Research)

Semester 2: Elective units (select one)

  • Imaging in Clinical Diagnosis
  • Medical Image Analysis and Mathematical Computing

Semester 3:

  • Research project

Facilities

You will benefit from research-dedicated imaging facilities at several hospital sites and a dedicated molecular imaging centre co-located with the Christie Hospital.

Each student will have an identified personal tutor who can provide advice and assistance throughout the course. During the research project, you will be in regular contact with your research supervisor.You will also be able to access a range of other library and e-learning facilities throughout the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Graduates will be in an excellent position to pursue careers in image-related fields in healthcare and research. This MSc will also form a sound basis for students who wish to proceed to PhD research in any aspect of medical imaging.

Intercalating medical students may use this qualification as a platform to pursue a clinical career in radiology.

Physical science/engineering graduates may see this as a route to imaging research or development in an academic or commercial environment.



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Our MRes Cardiovascular Health and Disease course is a research-focused master's course focusing on cardiovascular research within a unique multidisciplinary training environment. Read more

Our MRes Cardiovascular Health and Disease course is a research-focused master's course focusing on cardiovascular research within a unique multidisciplinary training environment.

Master of Research (MRes) degree provides preparatory training for academic research, ideal if you want to eventually progress on to a PhD and develop a research career, or if you wish to gain research skills within specialist areas before committing to a PhD. This course is also highly suited to medical students who want to intercalate.

Through this course, you will develop broad biomedical research skills, but with an emphasis on application to cardiovascular science.

It is now widely recognised by employers and research councils that unravelling the basis of cardiovascular disease and developing new therapies is a high-priority area for investment, especially since the economic burden of cardiovascular disease is increasing.

However, it is becoming increasingly clearer that a gap has opened up between the skills possessed by new graduates and the skills normally expected on entry to a research degree or an industrial research career. This MRes has been specifically designed to fill this gap for those who wish to pursue a research career in cardiovascular sciences.

Our course is suitable if you come from a medical or science background and have little or no previous research experience.

Aims

Our course is designed to provide you with:

  • specialist knowledge of the principles of the cardiovascular system in health and disease, with an emphasis on emerging technologies (taught lectures);
  • laboratory skills, research methodology and data analysis (two research projects);
  • critical analysis of scientific and medical literature (literature review);
  • intellectual skills for understanding and interpreting research problems (tutorials);
  • communication of scientific data and concepts (oral presentations and written reports).

Special features

Learn from the experts

The University is home to around 40 principal investigators in cardiovascular sciences, including clinicians and basic scientists with national and international reputations in their respective fields.

Additional course information

Research topic examples:

  • Coronary arterial contractility and endothelial function
  • Sick sinus syndrome and gene therapy
  • Can we un-stiffen arteries?
  • Cellular basis of cardiac arrhythmias
  • Elucidation of the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis
  • The role of mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure
  • Mechanisms of diabetic cardiomyopathy
  • Cell signalling in vascular smooth muscle
  • Cellular dysfunction and EC remodelling in heart disease and ageing
  • Development of a novel therapeutic approach to cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure

Teaching and learning

We have nearly 40 principal investigators in cardiovascular sciences, including clinicians and basic scientists with national and international reputations in their respective fields. There is a wide spectrum of research spanning clinical trials, whole organs, tissues, cells and single molecule studies.

Contributors to this course include:

You will learn through a range of teaching methods, including seminars, workshops and tutorials, as well as through research projects (25 weeks).

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is through a combination of written reports (in journal format), literature review, problem-based learning (PBL) tutorials and oral presentations.

This range of training methods aims to promote a stimulating and dynamic learning environment. The different course units will enable the development of key transferable skills in the critical analysis of research methodologies, data interrogation, communication and time management.

Course unit details

Clinical Masterclass course unit:

The Clinical Masterclass course unit is a 15 credit unit specifically designed for intercalated medical students. The unit consists of a series of seminars, workshops and e-learning.

This unit contributes to personal and professional development in the experience, knowledge and skills training required for effective clinical practice and success, with a strong emphasis on clinical academic research.

Areas covered include:

  • advanced Good Clinical Practice (GCP)
  • research governance and the regulatory framework for research
  • the Human Tissue Act
  • practical clinical ethics
  • patient and public involvement in research
  • diversity/equal opportunities in research/cultural competence
  • research creativity and entrepreneurialism
  • leadership (practitioner, partner and leader roles)

Facilities

Most of our researchers are housed within the Core Technology Facility and AV Hill, purpose-built research centres that have state-of-the-art facilities and equipment. This close contact fosters collaboration and discussion and is an excellent environment for students.

You will also be able to access a range of facilities throughout the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Support Office 

Career opportunities

After this course, many students continue their studies and register for a PhD.

However, the course is also of value if you want to progress in careers in the pharmaceutical industry or clinical research.

The MRes is also ideal for MBChB intercalating students who wish to undertake directly channelled research training in the field of cardiovascular medicine.

Many of the skills and training provided by the MRes are generic and will have wide application to the study of other disciplines.



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Our MRes Medical Sciences course has been designed to bridge the gap between the skills of new medical graduates and those required to embark on a research degree or an industrial research career. Read more

Our MRes Medical Sciences course has been designed to bridge the gap between the skills of new medical graduates and those required to embark on a research degree or an industrial research career.

This course equips students and graduates from the medical and dental sciences with the skills and knowledge you need to pursue a research-based career in academic medicine. We focus on medical research rather than biological science research.

We welcome applications from intercalating medical and dental students who can interrupt their clinical training after Year 3 or 4 to undertake this MRes, as well as applications from other eligible candidates.

Our course has both taught and research components and is suitable for those with little or no previous research experience.

Teaching and learning

The course has both taught and research components. Laboratory experience is gained through taught units, and most students gain additional laboratory experience within their research placement.

Taught units include a research skills unit, tutorials focusing on critical appraisal and research publications, practical skills in biomedicine and a clinical masterclass unit which focuses on clinical research skills such as study design, ethics and academic career pathways.

Your research placement is spent with a single research group over the year, which has the advantage of allowing you to become an integrated part of the team and increases the depth and complexity of your research. The first ten weeks are spent undertaking a literature review and writing a research proposal. This is followed by six months of laboratory time, ending with submission of a final dissertation.

Each student will be allocated a personal supervisor within their research group and also attend a series of one-to-one meetings with the course director or deputy to ensure learning goals are being achieved.

Coursework and assessment

You will be assessed through presentations, written reports and a final report.

Course unit details

The course comprises five compulsory components - four taught components and one research placement:

  • research skills units
  • Clinical Masterclass
  • tutorials
  • practical skills in biomedicine
  • one full-time research placement.

Facilities

You will be able to access a range of facilities throughout the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service .

Career opportunities

Many of our students go on to join the NIHR Clinical Academic Training Pathway .



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Our one-year MSc Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery course is designed for dentists who wish to advance their knowledge of this clinical specialty at postgraduate level. Read more

Our one-year MSc Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery course is designed for dentists who wish to advance their knowledge of this clinical specialty at postgraduate level.

This specialty is concerned with the diagnosis and management of diseases, injuries and defects affecting the mouth, jaws, face and neck.

The specialist clinical component of the course will give you an understanding of the scientific basis of oral and maxillofacial surgery, with particular emphasis on current theories relevant to the diagnosis, treatment planning and clinical management of patients. The course will also emphasise the evidence base supporting clinical surgical practice.

You will observe a wide range of surgery, including facial trauma, implant and reconstructive, cancer and reconstructive, salivary gland and orthognathic surgery, as well as participating in dentoalveolar surgery.

The course also covers the design, data collection, and simple analysis and interpretation of clinical research projects, and culminates in the MSc dissertation. You will learn how to identify, formulate and implement a specific research project in line with the research themes of pain and anxiety control, surgical implantology, or oral cancer and health services research.

Aims

The course aims to provide dental practitioners with the knowledge and skills to undertake minor oral surgery in the context of a wider knowledge of oral and maxillofacial surgery.

Teaching and learning

Our teaching and learning methods are designed to encourage you to take responsibility for your own learning and to integrate work with formal educational activities.

We will provide the core text book for the course. This book, Master Dentistry Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radiology, Pathology and Oral Medicine (ISBN 0443061920), has been authored by University staff Coulthard, Horner, Sloan and Theaker.

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is by essay and SBAs throughout the course and related to the taught units. You will also maintain a clinical surgical logbook and undertake a clinical competency test. There is also an oral examination.

  • Research Methods: Formal assessment takes the form of two tutor marked assignments.
  • Biostatistics: Formal assessment takes the form of two tutor marked assignments.
  • Clinical component: This is assessed by written examination and clinical examination in the form of an oral presentation.
  • Dissertation (10,000-15,000 words).

Course unit details

The Specialist Clinical component consists of the following modules:

  • Surgical Basic Sciences (Basic surgical science, preoperative and postoperative care) and Patient Care (Assessing patients, medical aspects of patient care and control of pain and anxiety)
  • Reflective Oral Surgery Practices
  • Dental Tissues (Infections and inflammation of the teeth and jaws, removal of teeth and surgical implantology)
  • Bone: Disease and Injury (Diseases of bone and the maxillary sinus, oral and maxillofacial injuries)
  • Soft Tissues (Cysts, mucosal disease, premalignancy and malignancy)
  • Salivary Tissue, Pain and TMJ (Salivary gland disease, facial pain and disorders of the temporomandibular joint)

The MSc includes a research project and dissertation.

Dissertation

Examples of dissertations submitted include:

  • A systematic review of randomised controlled clinical trials comparing the adverse effects of articaine and lidocaine as local anaesthetic agents
  • A systematic review of the side effects of inhalation conscious sedation
  • Implant survival with different numbers of dental implants in the mandibular implant over denture: A retrospective cohort study
  • National use of conscious sedation in dentistry
  • Evaluation of pain in paediatric patients undergoing oral surgery

Facilities

You will have access to dedicated postgraduate suites. You will also be able to access a range offacilities throughout the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service .

CPD opportunities

We will invite you to participate in a number of conferences and courses. Some selected seminars will also provide you with CPD hours.

Career opportunities

This course will prepare you for a future career in clinical practice, teaching or research.

Some graduates return to established surgical practice, while others go on to the next step in their training and pursue specialist clinical training and appropriate clinical examinations in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

Graduates may find their advanced knowledge a good foundation for surgical dentistry, oral surgery or oral and maxillofacial surgery practice. Some graduates proceed to undertake higher research degrees such as a PhD.



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Our MSc in Cancer Biology and Radiotherapy Physics is ideal if you wish to pursue a career in cancer research and/or cancer therapy involving ionising radiation. Read more

Our MSc in Cancer Biology and Radiotherapy Physics is ideal if you wish to pursue a career in cancer research and/or cancer therapy involving ionising radiation.

With around 40% of all cancer cure cases involving radiotherapy and the UK soon to have a proton therapy service, the need for multidisciplinary scientists in this field has never been greater.

We aim to develop multidisciplinary scientists to create the necessary skill base that will drive radiotherapy forward in the UK.

This course will enable you to train as a multidisciplinary scientist in this area by covering a variety of subjects in content that is delivered by staff with a range of expertise, including physicists, biologists, engineers, clinicians and oncologists.

Our collaboration with The Christie will allow you to undertake unique research projects in its radiotherapy facilities that cannot be carried out anywhere else in the UK or most of Europe.

Aims

This course aims to help you develop:

  • a sound scientific knowledge of cancer biology and radiotherapy physics;
  • the confidence to apply the scientific principles of radiotherapy to practical situations;
  • the multidisciplinary skills required for world-leading cancer research and treatment delivery;
  • a knowledge of cancer biology that can form a basis for research into existing and future treatment modalities.

Teaching and learning

You will be taught by academics from the University and clinical scientists at The Christie, meaning both fundamental science and its clinical application will be covered equally.

Units are delivered in one-week blocks with a mix of face-to-face content delivery and hands-on practical sessions.

There will be a number of assessed and non-assessed activities to develop your key skills and expand your knowledge base.

There is an also online pre-course element, which will be the beginning of your multidisciplinary scientific journey.

After the taught units, there is an supervised research project that will put into practice the key skills and knowledge acquired in the taught component.

Coursework and assessment

The taught units will be assessed through multiple choice exams and practical assessments.

The research project will be assessed through the submission of a short report and oral presentation.

Course unit details

The taught component, which includes the five core and three optional units, will amount to 120 credits of the 180 credits required for an MSc qualification.

The remaining 60 credits will be obtained through a supervised research project.

Core units

  • The Physics of Radiotherapy
  • The Biology of Cancer
  • Clinical Radiotherapy
  • Radiobiology

Optional units

  • Advanced Radiotherapy
  • Imaging for Radiotherapy
  • Radiotherapy Dosimetry
  • Treatment Planning
  • Biomarkers
  • Computational Methods
  • Accelerators for Medicine

Course collaborators

Much of the course content is delivered through a collaboration with  The Christie .

Facilities

Our collaboration with  The Christie  means you will have access to an MRI image guided radiotherapy linear accelerator and a proton therapy centre incorporating a dedicated research room for your research project.

You will also be able to access a range of library and IT  facilities  throughout the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the  Disability Advisory and Support Service .

CPD opportunities

Individual taught units from this MSc can be offered to industry and healthcare professionals as part of a career and professional development programme. Please contact us for further information.

Career opportunities

This course will help you gain the knowledge and skills to become a leading healthcare scientist in the public or private sector.

It may also be of interest if you are a healthcare worker in the field of radiotherapy who wishes to advance your career.

The master's qualification gained could act as a stepping stone to further academic qualifications or careers involving medical science research.



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Our MSc Medical Virology course covers the medical and molecular aspects of virology, bacteriology and mycology, as well as immunity to infection and epidemiology. Read more

Our MSc Medical Virology course covers the medical and molecular aspects of virology, bacteriology and mycology, as well as immunity to infection and epidemiology.

In the era of AIDS, avian and swine influenza, and other emerging viral infections, the importance of medical virology as a co-discipline with medical microbiology is increasingly being recognised.

You will explore the current issues and concepts in medical virology, and acquire the academic and practical skills necessary to make independent, informed judgements in relation to these issues.

A unique feature of our course is the focus on practical, laboratory-based teaching; you will spend time in the laboratory, learning how to be a virologist.

At the end of our course, you will be prepared for a career in clinical sciences or academic or industrial research.

This course runs alongside our MSc Medical Microbiology course.

Aims

We aim to provide you with an understanding of and expertise in microbiology, with a particular focus on medical virology.

You will develop an understanding of the scientific basis of established and novel medical virology concepts, as well as the specialist knowledge, practical skills and critical awareness required to pursue a career in medical virology.

Special features

IBMS accreditation

This course is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science and meets the requirements for registration with the Science Council as a Chartered Scientist (CSci).

Extensive practical learning

The lab-focused nature of this course means you will gain maximum exposure to both the practical and theoretical aspects of a wide range of clinically relevant pathogens, helping develop practical skills that are valued by potential employers.

Various study options

You can study either full-time or part-time on both the MSc and PGDip routes, enabling you to fit learning around your other commitments if needed.

Teaching and learning

This course is delivered by academics from the University and NHS specialists in infectious disease and medical microbiology.

You will learn via a range of methods, including lectures, seminars, tutorials and comprehensive practical classes.

We use both face-to-face sessions and blended learning methods, with some material delivered and assessed online.

Find out more by visiting the postgraduate teaching and learning page.

Coursework and assessment

You will be assessed via continual assessment and formal theory and practical examinations.

Course unit details

The course consists of 120 credits of taught material and followed by a 60-credit research project (MSc only). Some units are shared with the MSc Medical Microbiology course. The taught units are as follows:

Shared units

  • Principles of Microbiology (15 credits)
  • Research Methods (15 credits)
  • Understanding Infection (15 credits)
  • Microbial Pathogenesis (15 credits)
  • Molecular Diagnostics (15 credits)
  • Global Health and Epidemiology (15 credits)

Course-specific units

  • Clinical Virology 1 (15 credits)
  • Clinical Virology 2 (15 credits)

All MSc students carry out a three-month research project in medical virology.

Full-time (FT) students take the above units and research project in Year 1. Part-time (PT) students can undertake the MSc over two years, one full semester per year.

Facilities

This course is based in Stopford Building on Oxford Road, where you will find state-of-the-art teaching and research laboratories, a student common room and good access to University computing clusters.

You will attend lectures across the University campus.

You will be able to access a range of facilities throughout the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service .

Career opportunities

Our graduates typically find employment in the NHS and related organisations, or as medical microbiologists in industrial and pharmaceutical settings.

In addition, many graduates progress to PhD study and a research or academic career.

The course is also useful if you work or plan to work in developing countries that need expertise in the existing and emerging virological and microbiological challenges facing developing communities.

Accrediting organisations

Our MSc is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS).



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Our MSc/MRes Investigative Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences course brings together the research expertise in vision from The University of Manchester and the clinical expertise of . Read more

Our MSc/MRes Investigative Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences course brings together the research expertise in vision from The University of Manchester and the clinical expertise of Manchester Royal Eye Hospital .

The course is aimed at optometrists, ophthalmologists, orthoptists and nurses from the UK and overseas. It is suitable for:

  • individuals who are considering undertaking a research degree in the vision sciences;
  • those interested in professional development;
  • those interested in conducting research as part of their clinical training;
  • ophthalmologists wishing to expand and extend their training into specialist areas;
  • optometrists considering a career in the hospital eye service.

This course will provide you with a firm grounding in the knowledge needed to pursue a higher degree and to conduct high quality research in ophthalmology, optometry or vision sciences.

It also gives an opportunity for vision-related professionals to advance their knowledge of the scientific foundations of ophthalmology and vision sciences.

Aims

This course aims to provide those working within the ophthalmic professions (ophthalmologists, optometrists, vision scientists, orthoptists and ophthalmic nurses) with an opportunity for professional development.

It will give you a firm grounding in the knowledge, understanding and skills you will need to pursue a higher research degree or to participate in research programmes and meet a need for researchers who can form a bridge between basic research and applied clinical research.

Through the literature review and dissertation, you will develop skills of systematically analysing and interpreting a body of literature, designing and conducting a research project, and analysing and presenting research findings within a written dissertation.

Teaching and learning

In each unit, learning will be based on a series of formal lectures on topics relating to ocular disease and treatments, and a series of more informal tutorials on current research. You will receive copies of presentations and direction to relevant literature for personal study.

Many dissertation projects have led to peer-reviewed publications in ophthalmic literature. Recent titles include the following.

  • Optical coherence tomography measures of the retinal nerve fibre layer.
  • Development of a model cell assay to investigate the cellular processing of ARB mutant bestrophin-1.
  • Risk factors for late presentation of patients with primary open angle glaucoma.
  • Molecular analysis of autosomal recessive retinal dystrophies.
  • In vivo analysis of the wettability of silicon hydrogel contact lenses.
  • Can corneal densitometry be used to assess the treatment outcome after corneal transplantation.
  • A contact lens based technique delivering cultured stem cells onto the human corneal surface.
  • The use of corneal imaging to assessing treatment outcomes of LASIK and LASEK.
  • Addressing the physiological cues needed for trans-differentiation of dental pulp stem cells into limbal stem cells.

The course directors are Prof Tariq Aslam and Dr Chantal Hillarby .

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is via:

  • written examinations in January and May;
  • coursework set during the taught units;
  • a research project dissertation.

Course unit details

The course has two different pathways:

  • MSc: Six taught units (15 credits each) and a dissertation (90 credits).
  • MRes: Four taught units (15 credits each), a literature review (30 credits) and a dissertation (90) credits.

The six units are Macular Degeneration, Paediatric Ophthalmology, Cornea, Contact Lens, Vascular Disease and Glaucoma.

What our students say

IOVS is a great course overall; excellent content and very enjoyable. (Abid Ali, ophthalmology trainee [UK])

I've enjoyed the insight into new and modern treatments and diagnostic techniques. (Isaac Nunoo, optometrist [Ghana])

I love the way the lecturers teach and explain, and the ease with which you can access information.(Chimdi Emma-Duru, optometrist and PhD student [Nigeria])

Facilities

Ophthalmology is housed within the Manchester Royal Eye Hospital, which is located on the CMFT site at the southern end of the University campus. Optometry is housed within the Carys Bannister Building. The two sites are few hundred yards apart.

Most dissertations are conducted within the confines of the University and the Manchester Royal Eye Hospital. Students may, however, embark on work outside these confines (eg an optometric practice or other hospital). This is contingent on the acceptance of the research proposal and the approval of suitable external and internal supervisors by the course director.

You will also have access to a range of library and IT facilities across the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability and Advisory Support Service .

CPD opportunities

We offer a number of CPD courses in ophthalmology and optometry .

Career opportunities

This MSc is aimed at optometrists, ophthalmologists, orthoptists, biological scientists, nurses and those from related backgrounds, and can open up a number of career opportunities.

The course is suitable if you want to further your knowledge of the vision sciences or if you are an optometrist considering professional development or a career in the hospital eye service.

It is also ideal if you want to conduct research as part of your clinical training or pursue an academic career in ophthalmology, optometry and the vision sciences.



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