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Full Time Masters Degrees in Law, Manchester, United Kingdom

We have 28 Full Time Masters Degrees in Law, Manchester, United Kingdom

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University of Manchester School of Law
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
The LLM Intellectual Property Law will give you a thorough understanding of the law concerning intellectual property and patents in modern business. Read more

The LLM Intellectual Property Law will give you a thorough understanding of the law concerning intellectual property and patents in modern business.

Our intellectual property (IP) experts will take you through the economic, social and philosophical aspects of IP law development and encourage you to critically analyse the current legal framework. You will gain advanced knowledge in IP law and concomitant policy, and learn about national and international grant, enforcement and defence of intellectual property rights on a multi-jurisdictional basis.

With research expertise in important industry sectors such as life sciences, healthcare, communications and information technology, our teaching staff offer strong links to the wider IP profession. Contentious issues in intellectual property are connected to developments in high-tech sectors as well as the arts and popular culture, so the course has appeal to a wide range of backgrounds and IP-related careers.

Special features

Our award-winning careers service offers you all year round dedicated postgraduate support including employability sessions, and advice for those aspiring to a PhD and career in academia.

Teaching and learning

We use various teaching methods across the course to enable you to participate in debate and hone the analytical and reasoning skills vital to legal and business professionals.

Coursework and assessment

Most course units are assessed by standard methods - either one unseen written examination, or one coursework essay, or a combination of these two methods of assessment. The assessment method of each individual course unit is listed in the course unit description.

This LLM has a compulsory research component, in which students have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). If students choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research paper must be within the area of a semester two course unit that you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve students' legal writing and research skills. For specialised streams, dissertation topic must be within those streams while for general LLM dissertation topics must be within one of the elective units chosen by the student.

Course unit details

You will be doing 180 credits in total, 120 of which will be taught modules and the remainder 60 credits in the form of two research papers (30 credits each) or a dissertation.

The LLM course will typically offer around 30 different course units in any one year, and will always reflect a wide range of subjects across the legal spectrum. There will usually be course units offered on such diverse topics as international trade and corporate law, financial services regulation, European law, international economic law, intellectual property law, human rights law, corporate governance, and law and finance in emerging markets.

Course units are of the value of 15 or 30 credits. You will be required to select course units to a total of 120 credits, and so must choose a minimum of four course units or may be able to choose a maximum of eight course units to make up your course of study. The LLM Intellectual Property Law has three core course units: Trade Mark Law and Policy ; Patent Law and Policy ; and Copyright Law and Policy . These core course units constitute 75 credits of the 120 taught credits required for the course.

The course has a compulsory research component, in which you have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). The taught element of the degree programme will total 120 credits and the research element of the degree programme will total 60 credits i.e. you will study 180 credits for a master's programme. If you choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research within the area of a semester one or a semester two course unit you have taken. If you choose to complete a dissertation this must be within the area of one units you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve your legal writing and research skills.

Scholarships and bursaries

The School is offering a number of awards for students applying for masters study. To find out more please visit our  Master's funding opportunity search page .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This master's course offers training for a professional career in IP law in a range of industries, such as life sciences, healthcare, communications and information technology sectors. It also allows the development of research skills for those wishing to pursue an academic career in IP law.



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University of Manchester School of Law
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
The LLM International Business and Commercial Law offers you the opportunity to develop an advanced understanding of the law governing commerce and finance in today's international market. Read more

The LLM International Business and Commercial Law offers you the opportunity to develop an advanced understanding of the law governing commerce and finance in today's international market.

Multinational companies must regularly overcome a wide range of legal and governance issues in order to do business worldwide. This course will encourage you to explore the legal challenges faced by international business and analyse the fundamental legal framework for dealing with them, looking at areas such as corporate governance, international trade transactions and competition law.

You will also be given the opportunity to explore topical issues, such as the implications of the global financial crisis, corporate social and environmental responsibility, the role of brands in globalisation, global economic governance, and the legal challenges of business operation and foreign investment in a development country context.

Aims

On completion of this LLM course, you should have gained:

  • A thorough knowledge of the legal fundamentals of international commerce and finance;
  • Deeper insight into specific problems and critical issues faced by international business today and the international legal frameworks in dealing with them;
  • An understanding of the legal framework for business and commerce within regional economic blocs, such as the European Union;
  • Familiarity with the relevant academic debates and new developments in law.

Coursework and assessment

Most course units are assessed by standard methods - either one unseen written examination, or one coursework essay, or a combination of these two methods of assessment. The assessment method of each individual course unit is listed in the course unit description on The School of Law website. 

The course has a compulsory research component, in which students have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). If students choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research paper must be within the area of a semester two course unit that you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve students' legal writing and research skills. For specialised streams, dissertation topic must be within those streams while for general LLM dissertation topics must be within one of the modules chosen by the student.

Course unit details

You will be doing 180 credits in total, 120 of which will be taught modules and the remainder 60 credits in the form of two research papers (30 credits each) or a dissertation.

The LLM course will typically offer around 30 different course units in any one year, and will always reflect a wide range of subjects across the legal spectrum. There will usually be course units offered on such diverse topics as international trade and corporate law, financial services regulation, European law, international economic law, intellectual property law, human rights law, corporate governance, and law and finance in emerging markets.

Course units are of the value of 15 or 30 credits. You will be required to select course units to a total of 120 credits, and so must choose a minimum of four course units or may be able to choose a maximum of eight course units to make up your course of study.

The course has a compulsory research component, in which you have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). The taught element of the degree programme will total 120 credits and the research element of the degree programme will total 60 credits i.e. you will study 180 credits for a master's programme. If you choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research within the area of a semester one or a semester two course unit you have taken, with at least one within the area of International Business Law. If you choose to complete a dissertation this must be within the area of one units you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve your legal writing and research skills.

Details of all current course units available in the School of Law can be found on the Faculty of Humanities website 

Scholarships and bursaries

The School is offering a number of awards for students applying for masters study. To find out more please visit our  Master's funding opportunity search page .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This course will prepare you for a career in law with specialisation in international business. It also allows the development of research skills for those wishing to pursue an academic career in international business law.



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University of Manchester School of Law
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
The LLM International Financial Law offers you an opportunity to gain specialist knowledge in one of the most high-profile areas of legal practice today. Read more

The LLM International Financial Law offers you an opportunity to gain specialist knowledge in one of the most high-profile areas of legal practice today.

Global financial services law and regulations are the subject of ongoing legal debate. Our legal specialists have research expertise covering a range of topical global finance issues which they bring into the classroom.

This course will introduce you to the major regulatory and contractual issues in international financial and banking law. You will be encouraged to examine the financial practices of developed and developing countries, and how these relate to broader business law issues across the world.

Coursework and assessment

Most course units are assessed by standard methods - either one unseen written examination, or one coursework essay, or a combination of these two methods of assessment. The assessment method of each individual course unit is listed in the course unit description on The School of Law website.

The course has a compulsory research component, in which students have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). If students choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research paper must be within the area of a semester two course unit that you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve students' legal writing and research skills. For specialised streams, dissertation topic must be within those streams while for general LLM dissertation topics must be within one of the modules chosen by the student.

Course unit details

You will be doing 180 credits in total, 120 of which will be taught modules and the remainder 60 credits in the form of two research papers (30 credits each) or a dissertation.

The LLM course will typically offer around 30 different course units in any one year, and will always reflect a wide range of subjects across the legal spectrum. There will usually be course units offered on such diverse topics as international trade and corporate law, financial services regulation, European law, international economic law, intellectual property law, human rights law, corporate governance, and law and finance in emerging markets.

Course units are of the value of 15 or 30 credits. You will be required to select course units to a total of 120 credits, and so must choose a minimum of four course units or may be able to choose a maximum of eight course units to make up your course of study. This involves taking one core course unit (International Financial Services Regulation ) of 30 credit value, and the remaining 90 credits from an approved list of commercial law options.

The course has a compulsory research component, in which you have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). The taught element of the degree programme will total 120 credits and the research element of the degree programme will total 60 credits i.e. you will study 180 credits for a master's programme. If you choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research within the area of a semester one or a semester two course unit you have taken. If you choose to complete a dissertation this must be within the area of one units you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve your legal writing and research skills.

Scholarships and bursaries

The School is offering a number of awards for students applying for masters study. To find out more please visit our  Master's funding opportunity search page .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This master's degree will enable you to develop the specialist knowledge necessary for a career in legal practice in any developed or developing country with a financial services or business law profile. It is also suitable for those looking to work directly in the financial services industry, especially those interested in compliance issues.



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University of Salford Salford Business School
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
IN BRIEF. Offers the highly prestigious Master’s of Laws qualification. Gives law graduates the opportunity to take taught modules in advanced international commercial law subjects. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Offers the highly prestigious Master’s of Laws qualification
  • Gives law graduates the opportunity to take taught modules in advanced international commercial law subjects
  • Learn in an internationally-orientated environment with access to a global network of like-minded professionals
  • Part-time study option
  • Work/industrial placement opportunity
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

This course provides law graduates with the opportunity for advanced learning in key areas of international commercial law, including: International Sale of Goods, International Intellectual Property Law, International Corporate Law and Governance, and Advanced Contract Law and Negotiation.

Delivery is concentrated on a contextual business bias, and students benefit from the networking and employment prospects offered by a large and dynamic Business School.

At the final stage of study (through the Business Innovation Project) students will be able to choose whether to pursue a traditional research dissertation or a work-based project report based upon employment or a placement experience.You may also choose to take advantage a blended distance learning opportunity, available through our official partner - Robert Kennedy College - in Zurich, Switzerland.

COURSE DETAILS

The programme is block delivered and there are six entry points per year. Students will take the modules below in a sequence dependent on their start date.

  • International Law of the Sale of Goods
  • International Intellectual Property Law
  • International Corporate Law and Governance
  • Advanced Contract Law and Negotiation
  • Business Innovation Project:    
  • Dissertation
  • Live Project
  • Internship
  • Placement

TEACHING

The course is currently delivered in four blocks of three-day intensive study periods, followed by independent study and online support through the University’s virtual learning environment, Blackboard. Each module is taken and assessed over a six week block. 

From September 2017, this delivery format will change. Students will continue to study a single module for a 6 week period. Face to face teaching will be delivered on campus for two half days each week. In addition, you will attend the taught element of the Business Innovation Programme each Wednesday afternoon during the 6 week blocks, with independent study completed in your own time through Blackboard.  Individual student timetables will be provided during induction week.

Teaching is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials, using a wide range of learning activities.

ASSESSMENT

Each taught module is assessed by two pieces of work, each worth 50% of the overall course assessment.

Although each taught module has its own assessment styles, all assessments will be design to enable students to demonstrate their advanced knowledge and skill, and may include:

  • individual or group work
  • research based assignments
  • presentations
  • seen or unseen examinations
  • closed or open-book examinations

EMPLOYABILITY

Both in the UK and overseas the internationally focussed LLM is a ‘gold standard’ qualification for entry into the legal profession, as the focus of specialisation has increasingly shifted to international legal practice.

In the corporate business world, the LLM carries a similar cachet to the Executive MBA, while offering greater specialism in its content.

In many European jurisdictions, the LLM is a compulsory prerequisite for entry into the legal profession.



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University of Manchester School of Law
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
The LLM Law offers you a solid grounding in the fundamental principles of law, combined with the flexibility to explore your own interests with support from research-active teaching staff. Read more

The LLM Law offers you a solid grounding in the fundamental principles of law, combined with the flexibility to explore your own interests with support from research-active teaching staff.

Manchester's unique combination of legal, criminological and ethical specialists collaborating within the School of Law, mean you will benefit from an impressive range of optional subjects and opportunities to explore your own interests while you study with us.

This way of pursuing advanced legal study will suit anyone who would like to maintain a multi-directional legal profile, applicable to a broad range of professional careers.

Special features

Our LLM Law includes a compulsory research element. This will allow you to develop strong research skills, while offering the opportunity to specialise in one of the range of topics you have studied during your degree.

Coursework and assessment

Course units are usually assessed by either one unseen written examination, or one coursework essay, or a combination of these two methods of assessment.

Students must also submit two research papers for the LL.M degree (one research paper submitted in April, and one submitted in September).

Course unit details

You will be doing 180 credits in total, 120 of which will be taught modules and the remainder 60 credits in the form of two research papers (30 credits each) or a dissertation.

The LLM course will typically offer around 30 different course units in any one year, and will always reflect a wide range of subjects across the legal spectrum. There will usually be course units offered on such diverse topics as international trade and corporate law, financial services regulation, European law, international economic law, intellectual property law, human rights law, corporate governance, and law and finance in emerging markets.

Course units are of the value of 15 or 30 credits. You will be required to select course units to a total of 120 credits, and so must choose a minimum of four course units or may be able to choose a maximum of eight course units to make up your course of study.

The course has a compulsory research component, in which you have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). The taught element of the degree programme will total 120 credits and the research element of the degree programme will total 60 credits i.e. you will study 180 credits for a master's programme. If you choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research within the area of a semester one or a semester two course unit you have taken. If you choose to complete a dissertation this must be within the area of one units you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve your legal writing and research skills.

Scholarships and bursaries

The School is offering a number of awards for students applying for masters study. To find out more please visit our  Master's funding opportunity search page .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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University of Manchester School of Law
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
The LLM Public International Law allows you to develop recognised expertise in the main areas of international law. Read more
The LLM Public International Law allows you to develop recognised expertise in the main areas of international law.

You will gain the knowledge and tools necessary to understand and critically apprehend the rules, systems, techniques, practices, dynamics and discourses by virtue of which international law is created and applied.

This master's course draws on Manchester's established reputation in international legal research to offer you a wide range of optional subjects, and the opportunity to customise your curriculum according to your career ambitions, needs and areas of interest.

The course will also afford you the research skills to continue to expand your knowledge of international law and apply them to a range of professional careers.

Aims

The LLM in Public International Law is designed for students who seek to acquire a recognised expertise in the main areas of international law and become generalist international lawyers. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be all-rounders and have knowledge and understanding of the rules, systems, techniques, practices, dynamics and discourses by virtue of which international law is created, thought and applied. The course will also endow students with the necessary research skills to autonomously continue to expand, sharpen and update the knowledge of international law after the completion of the course.

Special features

This course offers the strongest students the opportunity of an internship with a renowned law firm or international organisation.

Teaching and learning

The course is based on small-group, seminar-style teaching by our research-active teaching staff as well as invited external experts.
This master's degree is offered part time to allow those with a professional occupation to follow the course.

Coursework and assessment

Most course units are assessed by standard methods - either one unseen written examination, or one coursework essay, or a combination of these two methods of assessment. The assessment method of each individual course unit is listed in the course unit description on The School of Law website.

Students must also submit two research papers for the LLM degree (one research paper submitted in April, and one submitted in September).

Career opportunities

This LLM is a specialised master's offering you training for a range of legal careers. These include advocacy, civil servant, legal advisor, academia and research, applicable to international organisations or those with strong international links.

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University of Manchester School of Law
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
The LLM Healthcare Ethics and Law aims to provide the highest quality of training in healthcare ethics and healthcare law in a flexible and interdisciplinary way. Read more

The LLM Healthcare Ethics and Law aims to provide the highest quality of training in healthcare ethics and healthcare law in a flexible and interdisciplinary way.

There is an emphasis on the application of bioethical and legal theory to real world scenarios, thus catering to the practical needs of healthcare and legal professionals and those in related fields.

You will study a wide variety of ethical and legal subjects including autonomy, consent, refusal of treatment, confidentiality, the moral status of the foetus, resource allocation, genetic testing, HIV testing, medical malpractice, clinical negligence, organ and tissue transplantation, fertility treatment, genetic manipulation, research ethics, stem cell research and euthanasia. 

Aims

This course will allow you develop an expert knowledge and understanding of bioethical and medico-legal theories, and the skills needed to apply them to real world scenarios in a diverse range of contexts.

You will also develop the ethical and medico-legal knowledge and research skills required for writing a master's level dissertation, and will be well prepared for further research if you so desire.

Teaching and learning

Campus based course

Teaching tends to defy the traditional boundaries associated with lectures and seminars. Generally, each class in a course unit has a duration of 2 or 3 hours per week, and is split roughly equally between a formal, didactic period and a structured discussion period (most often based on the so-called challenge-response model). Nevertheless, each class is considered a seminar or lecture, and attendance of all classes of a course unit for which a student is enrolled is thus compulsory . For course units of 15 credit value there will generally be 15 hours of face-to-face teaching throughout the semester in which the unit is delivered, and twice that amount for 30 credit units.

Coursework and assessment

Assessment of all taught course units (to a total of 120 credits) is by assessed coursework in the form of essays of 4,000 words per 15 credit course unit and up to 7,000 words for the two 30 credit core course units. In addition, students who wish to complete the LLM must submit a 12,000 to 15,000 word dissertation by independent research (60 credits); no dissertation is required for the PGDip or PGCert. Part-time students undertake a supervised dissertation in the summer months of year two. Please note that the part-time students can extend their registration for extra 3 months to submit their dissertations in December of their second year, instead of September (you will be advised of the exact date on the second year of the course).

Those who do not successfully complete the MA you may be considered for the award of the Postgraduate Diploma.

Those who do not successfully complete the Postgraduate Diploma may be considered for the award of the Postgraduate Certificate.

The awards of the MA or Postgraduate Diploma are classified according to Pass/Merit/Distinction. The Postgraduate Certificate is awarded unclassified.

Course unit details

Students will be required to complete 180 credits: 120 credits comprised of taught course units (each of 15 or 30 credits value), and an independent research element of the course worth 60 credits by way of a Masters dissertation of between 12,000 and 15,000 words, which is undertaken over the summer months of the course. The dissertation should be predominantly law-based.

On the full time course, the 120 taught credits can be split in one of two ways: (1) 60 credits in each of the two semesters; or (2) 75 credits in semester one and 45 credits in semester two. 

Students registered on the LLM Healthcare Ethics and Law would need to select a majority of their optional courses from the law list (Mental Health Law and Policy; Medicine, Law and Society; Children, Medicine and the Law). Global Health Law and Bioethics can count as an ethics or law course.

Scholarships and bursaries

The School is offering a number of awards for students applying for masters study. To find out more please visit our  Master's funding opportunity search page .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Successful graduates are able to progress within a wide variety of roles in both Medical, Legal and Ethical fields. Graduates from previous years have, for example, proceeded to specialise in Medico-Legal practice and academic careers, and the degrees have enhanced the careers of health care professionals.



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University of Manchester School of Law
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
The Postgraduate Diploma in Healthcare Ethics and Law course aims to provide the highest quality of training in healthcare ethics and healthcare law in a flexible and interdisciplinary way. Read more

The Postgraduate Diploma in Healthcare Ethics and Law course aims to provide the highest quality of training in healthcare ethics and healthcare law in a flexible and interdisciplinary way.

There is an emphasis on the application of bioethical and legal theory to real world scenarios, thus catering to the practical needs of health care and legal professionals and those in related fields. Students gain an expert knowledge and understanding of bioethical and medico-legal theories, and the skills needed to apply them to real world scenarios in a diverse range of contexts.

You will cover a wide variety of ethical and legal subjects including autonomy, consent, refusal of treatment, confidentiality, the moral status of the foetus, resource allocation, genetic testing, HIV testing, medical malpractice, clinical negligence, organ and tissue transplantation, fertility treatment, genetic manipulation, research ethics, stem cell research and euthanasia.

Aims

The Postgraduate Diploma in Healthcare Ethics and Law course aims to

  • provide the highest quality of training in healthcare ethics and health care law with an interdisciplinary approach;
  • provide an emphasis on the application of moral and legal theory to real world scenarios, thus catering to the practical needs of healthcare and legal professionals;
  • offer students the opportunity to gain a comprehensive knowledge and firm understanding of ethical and medico-legal theories;
  • offer students the opportunity to gain the skills needed to apply theory to real world scenarios in a diverse range of contexts.

Teaching and learning

Teaching tends to defy the traditional boundaries associated with lectures and seminars. Generally, each class in a course unit has a duration of 2 or 3 hours per week, and is split roughly equally between a formal, didactic period and a structured discussion period (most often based on the so-called challenge-response model). Nevertheless, each class is considered a seminar or lecture, and attendance of all classes of a course unit for which a student is enrolled is thus compulsory . For course units of 15 credit value there will generally be 15 hours of face-to-face teaching throughout the semester in which the unit is delivered, and twice that amount for 30 credit units.

Coursework and assessment

Assessment of all taught course units (to a total of 120 credits) is by assessed coursework in the form of essays of 4,000 words per 15 credit course unit and up to 7,000 words for the three 30 credit Core course units.

Course unit details

Students will be required to complete 120 credits comprised of taught course units (each of 15 or 30 credits value).

The Core course units are:

  • Philosophical Bioethics (30 credits)
  • Medico-Legal Problems (30 credits)
  • International Issues in Healthcare Ethics and Law (30 credits)

Students must choose optional course units to a total value of 30 credits from the following list:

Law-based

  • Medicine, Law and Society (15 credits)
  • Mental Health Law and Policy (15 credits)

Ethics-based

  • Research Ethics (15 credits)
  • Ethics Genetics and Genomics (15 credits)

Scholarships and bursaries

The School is offering a number of awards for students applying for masters study. To find out more please visit our  Master's funding opportunity search page .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Successful graduates are able to progress within a wide variety of roles in both Medical, Legal and Ethical fields. Graduates from previous years have, for example, proceeded to specialise in Medico-Legal practice and academic careers, and the degrees have enhanced the careers of health care professionals.



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This online distance learning LLM (Master of Laws) degree provides an in depth understanding of the development and application of international business, trade and commercial laws. Read more

This online distance learning LLM (Master of Laws) degree provides an in depth understanding of the development and application of international business, trade and commercial laws.

Global trade and commerce is constantly evolving and adapting to new technologies, products and market conditions. Nation states’ laws and regulations must comply with international rules to allow trade to be carried out competitively across national boundaries in order to achieve strengthened markets and provide for strong economies.

This internationally recognised postgraduate law degree will appeal to those who are looking to develop an in-depth understanding of and expertise in key areas of international trade, corporate and commercial laws. It may be particularly relevant for practising legal professionals or those employed in finance or business who wish to deepen their knowledge and understanding of this increasingly relevant area of the law for legal practice. 

The degree also seeks to inform students of the implications for trading and commerce in the post-Brexit world, as well as looking at the practical dimensions of the continually developing law to companies, traders and state bodies. It will provide you with an in-depth understanding of the development and application of international business, trade and commercial laws.

This internationally recognised postgraduate law degree will appeal to those who are looking to develop in-depth understanding of and expertise in key areas of international trade, coporate and commercial laws.

It may be particularly relevant for practising legal professionals, or those employed in finance or business who wish to deepen their knowledge and understanding of this increasingly relevant area of the law for legal practice. 

You will be taught exclusively online by highly qualified lecturing staff dedicated to their subjects and research areas. Using a full suite of study tools, you will learn through a series of online seminars supported by introductory pod-casting, online workshops, and virtual meetings with tutors.

Features and Benefits

Benefits of online learning

  • This highly flexible mode of study allows you to study either inside or outside the UK, while you work, and to achieve your career aspirations without taking a break from your employment. It also enables those with family or other responsibilities to gain a valuable qualification in their own time.
  • All you need is a computer and an internet connection.
  • Achieve a Masters degree from the UK at a lower cost.
  • Achieve an LLM in 1 years, or 2 years part-time.

Expert researchers and teaching staff

Manchester Law School’s teaching team of over 80 staff consists of academic specialists and legal practising professionals with strong working links to the Northern Circuit of the Bar.

The LLM teaching team have close links with professional legal practice, civic society, think-tanks, business and policy-makers. They include recognised researchers who have been important in developing new research across many developing areas of the law.



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University of Manchester School of Law
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
The MSc Healthcare Ethics and Law is designed to complement your degree by enabling you to study in depth the moral and legal issues that you possibly already face as a medical student, and will certainly be a factor of your future career. Read more

The MSc Healthcare Ethics and Law is designed to complement your degree by enabling you to study in depth the moral and legal issues that you possibly already face as a medical student, and will certainly be a factor of your future career.

This course emphasises the application of bioethical and legal theory to real world scenarios, allowing you to gain expert knowledge and the skills needed to apply it in a diverse range of contexts.

You will, through carefully-designed lectures, discussions, and papers from visiting speakers, be introduced to the full range of ethico-legal controversies as they apply to medicine, and be encouraged to use the conceptual tools you will acquire to formulate solutions to those controversies and contribute to ongoing debates.

Aims

By the end of this course you will be able to apply the concepts you have learned to real-world situations, both familiar and unforeseen; be able to identify the ethically and legally problematic aspects of practice; and be able to suggest ways to minimise, solve, or avoid those problems. You will also, through the dissertation element of the course, have refined the ability to make and sustain a prolonged and sophisticated argument on a topic of interest.

Teaching and learning

Teaching will be mainly by means of interactive lecture. Each module will be taught in 2-hour teaching blocks; these are run as a hybrid of traditional lecture and discussion. Students will be encouraged to play an active role in these lectures. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to attend weekly papers on current research and developments in the field given by either members of staff or a visiting speaker.

Students will be expected to complete 6 taught modules and a dissertation. All taught modules are to be assessed by an essay of 4,000 words (for course units to the value of 15 credits) or assignments totalling 7,000 words (for course units to the value of 30 credits); the dissertation will be of 12,000-15000 words. This dissertation will represent a major piece of independent research and students will be able during semester 2 to present their own papers to the rest of their cohort based on their dissertation as it progresses.

Coursework and assessment

All taught modules will be assessed by written coursework , which allows for extended argument and analysis. Some semester one modules require two pieces of work; for these, the deadlines will be in November and January. The deadline for semester one courses assessed by one piece of coursework will be January. The semester 2 deadline will be in May/June. Assessment by coursework alone will allow for extended analysis and argument. 

The dissertation will be submitted in August (just prior to resuming your medical studies). 

Course unit details

Students registered on the MSc are required to sit six taught course units. Two of the assessed taught units are compulsory; the remaining four will be chosen from a range of optional modules (although the range of available units will vary according to staff availability).

Optional units will have a value of 15 credits. Subject to alteration, we would expect these to cover such topics (amongst others) as Global Health, Law, and Bioethics; Children, Medicine and the Law; Medicine, Law and Society; Mental Health Law and Policy; Research Ethics; and Ethics   and Genetics.

You will also be required to complete a dissertation of 12,000-15,000 words on a topic of your choice. This gives an opportunity to define and defend a precise and sophisticated position. It is not unknown for intercalating students to use their dissertations as the basis for papers that appear in international peer-reviewed journals.

Scholarships and bursaries

The School is offering a number of awards for students applying for masters study. To find out more please visit our  Master's funding opportunity search page .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

By studying ethics and law you can expect to find yourself better equipped to solve ethico-legal dilemmas that you will meet on the ward or - more importantly, perhaps - simply to spot them.

Increasingly, too, medical researchers have to demonstrate compliance with certain ethical demands, and so an intercalated degree in ethics and law will be useful when it comes to planning research. Finally, studying with us should reflect interests and concerns that most people have anyway, whether they know it or not. On completion of the course, you will have a comprehensive understanding of the mechanics of medical ethics and medical law and a full conceptual toolkit that can be applied to both disciplines.



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University of Manchester School of Law
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
The MA Security and International Law offers the benefits of a specialised master's without the requirement of an undergraduate law degree. Read more
The MA Security and International Law offers the benefits of a specialised master's without the requirement of an undergraduate law degree.

You will gain advanced knowledge in the main areas of international security and the UN system, and the tools necessary to understand the issues surrounding armed conflicts, terrorism, modern warfare, and the security of international transactions and intellectual property.
This master's course draws on Manchester's established reputation in international legal research to offer you a wide range of optional subjects, and the opportunity to customise your curriculum according to your career ambitions, needs and areas of interest.

The course will also afford you the research skills to continue to advance your knowledge of contemporary securities in international law and apply them to a range of professional careers.

Aims

The MA in Security and International Law is designed for students who seek to acquire a recognised expertise in the main areas of security and international law and become generalist in international security and the UN system. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be all-rounders and have knowledge and understanding of the rules, systems, techniques, practices, dynamics and discourses by virtue of which international security discourse develops. The course will also endow students with the necessary research skills to autonomously continue to expand, sharpen and update the knowledge of international organisation and the UN system after the completion of the course.

Special features

This course offers the strongest students the opportunity of an internship with a renowned law firm or international organisation.

Teaching and learning

The course is based on small-group, seminar-style teaching by our research-active teaching staff as well as invited external experts.
This master's degree is offered part time to allow those with a professional occupation to follow the course.

Coursework and assessment

Most course units are assessed by standard methods - either one unseen written examination, or one coursework essay, or a combination of these two methods of assessment. The assessment method of each individual course unit is listed in the course unit description on The School of Law website.

Students must also submit two research papers for the LL.M degree (one research paper submitted in April, and one submitted in September).

Career opportunities

This is a specialised master's offering you training for a range of legal careers in government agencies, the armed forces, international organisations, NGOs, law firms and multinational corporations.

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University of Manchester School of Law
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
The MA in Healthcare Ethics & Law course aims to provide the highest quality of training in health care ethics and health care law in a flexible and interdisciplinary way. Read more

The MA in Healthcare Ethics & Law course aims to provide the highest quality of training in health care ethics and health care law in a flexible and interdisciplinary way. There is an emphasis on the application of bioethical and legal theory to real world scenarios, thus catering to the practical needs of health care and legal professionals and those in related fields. Students gain an expert knowledge and understanding of bioethical and medico-legal theories, and the skills needed to apply them to real world scenarios in a diverse range of contexts. They will also develop the ethical and medico-legal knowledge and research skills required for writing a Masters-level dissertation, and will be well prepared for further research if they so desire.

You study a wide variety of ethical and legal subjects including autonomy, consent, refusal of treatment, confidentiality, the moral status of the foetus, resource allocation, genetic testing, HIV testing, medical malpractice, clinical negligence, organ and tissue transplantation, fertility treatment, genetic manipulation, research ethics, stem cell research and euthanasia.

Teaching and learning

Teaching tends to defy the traditional boundaries associated with lectures and seminars. Generally, each class in a course unit has a duration of 2 or 3 hours per week, and is split roughly equally between a formal, didactic period and a structured discussion period (most often based on the so-called challenge-response model). Nevertheless, each class is considered a seminar or lecture, and attendance of all classes of a course unit for which a student is enrolled is thus compulsory . For course units of 15 credit value there will generally be 15 hours of face-to-face teaching throughout the semester in which the unit is delivered, and twice that amount for 30 credit units.

Coursework and assessment

Assessment of all taught course units (to a total of 120 credits) is by assessed coursework in the form of essays of 4,000 words per 15 credit course unit and up to 7,000 words for the two 30 credit core course units. In addition, students who wish to complete the MA must submit a 12,000 to 15,000 word dissertation by independent research (60 credits); no dissertation is required for the PGDip or PGCert. Part-time students undertake a supervised dissertation in the summer months of year two. Please note that the part-time students can extend their registration for extra 3 months to submit their dissertations in December of their second year, instead of September (you will be advised of the exact date on the second year of the course).

Those who do not successfully complete the MA you may be considered for the award of the Postgraduate Diploma. 

Those who do not successfully complete the Postgraduate Diploma may be considered for the award of the Postgraduate Certificate.

The awards of the MA or Postgraduate Diploma are classified according to Pass/Merit/Distinction. The Postgraduate Certificate is awarded unclassified.

Course unit details

Students will be required to complete 180 credits: 120 credits comprised of taught course units (each of 15 or 30 credits value), and an independent research element of the course worth 60 credits by way of a Masters dissertation of between 12,000 and 15,000 words, which is undertaken over the summer months of the course. The dissertation should be predominantly law-based.

On the full time course, the 120 taught credits can be split in one of two ways: (1) 60 credits in each of the two semesters; or (2) 75 credits in semester one and 45 credits in semester two.

Students registered on the MA in Healthcare Ethics and Law would need to select a majority of their optional courses from the 'ethics' list (Ethics, Genetics and Genomics; Research Ethics). Global Health Law and Bioethics can count as an ethics or law course.

Details of all current course units available in the School of Law can be found on the Faculty of Humanities website.

Scholarships and bursaries

The School is offering a number of awards for students applying for masters study. To find out more please visit our  Master's funding opportunity search page .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Successful graduates are able to progress within a wide variety of roles in both medical, legal and ethical fields. Graduates from previous years have, for example, proceeded to specialise in medico-legal practice and academic careers, and the degrees have enhanced the careers of healthcare professionals.



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Fast-track your legal career with our Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) conversion course. Designed for students who want the challenges and rewards of a legal career, but don't have an undergraduate degree in law, or for those who have significant work experience, but no formal qualifications. Read more

Fast-track your legal career with our Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) conversion course. Designed for students who want the challenges and rewards of a legal career, but don't have an undergraduate degree in law, or for those who have significant work experience, but no formal qualifications.

Many employers are attracted to GDL students in an increasingly competitive legal job market, as you offer additional skills and experience to their organisation.

This course will provide you with a thorough grounding in core legal subjects. Offering high levels of face-to-face teaching contact in lectures and workshops, and an open door policy for academic or pastoral advice, the environment is supportive and friendly. We also offer a Careers and Employability adviser to help you take the steps into a fulfilling legal career.

Features and benefits of the course

Mooting opportunities

Mooting at Manchester Law School is part of a specialised unit on the GDL course, and we have become a leading centre for mooting and advocacy in the UK. The mooting society at the law school is extremely active, organising regular mooting sessions and debates supported by a team of expert tutors. Our Mooting teams have competed at and the highest level from 2013-16 and have enjoyed regular national competition success.

Award-winning Faculty environment

Manchester Law School is an inspiring and highly professional environment in which to study, housing modern lecture theatres, study zones, legal libraries and a mock courtroom. You will benefit from an award-winning Faculty building, including spacious study and IT zones, laptop counters, cafes and coffee shops, and free WiFi. Highly modern facilities are available to you on our thriving campus at the heart of the UK’s second city.

Top quality teaching by professionals

You will be taught by experienced professionals and will receive the best possible teaching and direct access to the profession. You’ll benefit from tutors who have a real passion for their subjects.

Placement options

There are opportunities for GDL students to take part in pro bono (voluntary) work experience in a wide range of areas. Manchester Law School is continually adding to our portfolio of pro bono partners, to extend and improve the opportunities for GDL students to experience legal work first-hand.



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University of Salford Salford Business School
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
IN BRIEF. Offers the highly prestigious Master’s of Laws qualification. Available to law and non-law graduates. Learn in an internationally-orientated environment with access to a global network of like-minded professionals. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Offers the highly prestigious Master’s of Laws qualification
  • Available to law and non-law graduates
  • Learn in an internationally-orientated environment with access to a global network of like-minded professionals
  • Part-time study option
  • Work/industrial placement opportunity
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

This course provides graduates in law or any other relevant discipline with the opportunity for advanced learning in certain key areas of international business law, in academic conjunction with the advanced study of strategic management and marketing modules, which complement and contextualise the legal areas.

The course is delivered with a strongly contextual business bias and students benefit from the networking and employment prospects offered by a large and dynamic Business School

At the final stage of study (Business Innovation Project) students will be able to choose whether to pursue a purely law- based focus or an interdisciplinary law and management focus.

TEACHING

Teaching includes a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials that make use of a range of learning activities.

Various approaches are offered to meet the needs of both full and part-time students.

Substantial use is made of distance learning through the University’s virtual learning environment, Blackboard, and many academic journals and texts are available in both paper and electronic formats. Tutorials are a chance to reflect on lecture materials and benefit from discussion and group work.

The dissertation element offers you a further opportunity to apply your knowledge and skills in a more flexible environment.

The course is currently delivered in four blocks of three-day intensive study periods, followed by independent study and online support through the University’s virtual learning environment, Blackboard. Each module is taken and assessed over a six week block. 

From September 2017, this delivery format will change. Students will continue to study a single module for a 6 week period. Face to face teaching will be delivered on campus for two half days each week. In addition, you will attend the taught element of the Business Innovation Programme each Wednesday afternoon during the 6 week blocks, with independent study completed in your own time through Blackboard.  Individual student timetables will be provided during induction week.

ASSESSMENT

Each taught module is assessed by two pieces of work, each worth 50% of the overall course assessment.

Although each taught module has its own assessment styles, all assessments will be design to enable students to demonstrate their advanced knowledge and skill, and may include:

  • Individual or group work
  • Research based assignments
  • Rresentations
  • Seen or unseen examinations
  • Closed or open-book examinations

EMPLOYABILITY

Both in the UK and overseas the internationally focussed LLM is a ‘gold standard’ qualification for entry into the legal profession, as the focus of specialisation has increasingly shifted to international legal practice.

In the corporate business world, the LLM carries a similar cachet to the Executive MBA, while offering greater specialism in its content.

In many European jurisdictions, the LLM is a compulsory prerequisite for entry into the legal profession.




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University of Manchester School of Law
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
The LLM Security and International Law allows you to develop advanced knowledge on the regulatory frameworks necessary to secure international relations and transactions between States, non-state entities, multinational companies as well as individuals. Read more
The LLM Security and International Law allows you to develop advanced knowledge on the regulatory frameworks necessary to secure international relations and transactions between States, non-state entities, multinational companies as well as individuals.

The course is premised on the idea regulating security at an international level requires not only the regulation of the use of force and methods of warfare but also that of international investments, international financial transactions and intellectual property. This offers a unique opportunity for you to gain expertise which are relevant and applicable in today's changing global landscape.

This master's course draws on Manchester's established reputation in international legal research to offer you a wide range of optional subjects, and the opportunity to customise your curriculum according to your career ambitions, needs and areas of interest.

Aims

The LLM in Security and International Law gives the students the tools to understand, apprehend and analyse legal issues arising in connection with traditional as well as transnational armed conflicts, terrorism, modern warfare, security of international investments and transactions, and security of intellectual property.

Special features

This course offers the strongest students the opportunity of an internship with a renowned law firm or international organisation.

Teaching and learning

The course is based on small-group, seminar-style teaching by our research-active teaching staff as well as invited external experts.
This master's degree is offered part time to allow those with a professional occupation to follow the course.

Coursework and assessment

Most course units are assessed by standard methods - either one unseen written examination, or one coursework essay, or a combination of these two methods of assessment. The assessment method of each individual course unit is listed in the course unit description on The School of Law website.

Students must also submit two research papers for the LL.M degree (one research paper submitted in April, and one submitted in September).

Career opportunities

This specialised LLM offers unparalleled expertise on legal issues of international security. This will appeal to government agencies, international organisations, nongovernmental organisations law firms, multinational corporations as well as the army.

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