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Full Time Masters Degrees in Creative Arts & Design, Manchester, United Kingdom

We have 47 Full Time Masters Degrees in Creative Arts & Design, Manchester, United Kingdom

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University of Salford School of Arts and Media
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
IN BRIEF. Enhance your skills through creative thinking, research, visualisation, interactivity, social and multi-media. Placements, Residencies and exhibition opportunities with key arts and design organisations. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Enhance your skills through creative thinking, research, visualisation, interactivity, social and multi-media.
  • Placements, Residencies and exhibition opportunities with key arts and design organisations.
  • Open to applicants from a range of backgrounds, including education and industry.
  • Part-time study option.
  • International students can apply.

COURSE SUMMARY

This programme is open for September 2018 entry only.

This course is designed for students to refine their subject specific practice through creative industry experience. You will tackle issues central to contemporary design practice – such as design authorship and social engagement – through a process of analysis, experimentation and the implementation of creative ideas. During your time with us, you will be encouraged to engage creatively with contemporary visual communication issues to enable you to graduate as a professional designer.

During your time with us, you will be encouraged to undertake independent contextual and theoretical research that will improve your capacity for independent enquiry, creativity and professional practice. The course places an emphasis on problem setting rather than problem solving, through the development of self-initiated projects and briefs.

There are plenty of opportunities to get involved in live projects as we work closely with key cultural organisations within the North West. These include; The Center for Chinese Contemporary Art, Hotbed Press, Islington Mill, Castlefield Gallery, International 3, Salford Museum & Art Gallery, Artworks, Mark Devereux Projects,Textbook Studios, Dr Me and Magma Books.

COURSE DETAILS

This course embraces a range and diversity of practices and aims to:

  • Provide the skills needed to professionalise careers through embedded creative placements and live projects with industry and community organisations.
  • Develop creative, critical, analytical and intellectual competencies appropriate to Masters level degree study, which is informed by current industry practice.
  • Develop advanced understanding of research methods in the context of contemporary art & design practice and to understand how the boundaries of knowledge are advanced through research
  • Enhance the students’ knowledge and understanding of professional, contextual and collaborative frameworks appropriate to their experiences and objectives by establishing intellectual debate to enable the articulation and dissemination of their propositions.
  • Critically explore at an advanced level, knowledge and understand of specific contemporary issues and the application of creative problem solving in the field of communication design facilitating the student’s development as professionals within the creative industries.

MA Communication Design with Industry Experience is for students interested in observing practical and contextual issues within communication design. This could be as an individual artistic pursuit, generating a body of practice, through research and experimentation that seeks to address contemporary issues relative to a self initiated appreciation of the subject area, or as a method of engaging with professional and live projects that enable the student to produce a large body of critically aware outcomes that facilitate the transition further professional development.

COURSE STRUCTURE

The programme structure consists of 5 modules, 4 of which are delivered within a collaborative framework allowing all students across the Masters in Art & Design programs (Contemporary Fine Art, Socially Engaged Arts Practice and Design for Communication) opportunities to engage with your peers whilst working through individual assignments focused around each programme. The remaining one module is tailored to the specific programme learning outcomes.

For the full-time study option:

Semester 1 - October to February

Semester 2 - February to June

Semester 3 - June to September

You will take five core modules and will study one day a week. Full-time students will have concentrated module delivery in both the morning and afternoon.

TEACHING

This course uses a range of teaching and learning settings including lectures, seminars/workshops, tutorials, situated learning (e.g. ‘live’ projects) and independent learning. The combination of these aims is to develop an environment that allows students to progressively take ownership and direction of their learning so that they may develop as independent, life-long learners. The process of Masters level study, relating to an individual and independent arts practice, is one of dense critical self-reflection; this is achieved by including self-directed projects where students have the opportunity to negotiate their learning and assessment requirements.

Indicative to the course are:

  • formal lectures
  • seminar presentations
  • workshops
  • critical analysis and independent learning

Award specific learning activities include exercises; team and peer-based learning, studio practice and critical seminar-events, site visits, visiting professionals, work placements, online activities and critical debates

ASSESSMENT

Assessment methods used on the course include:

  • Practical projects (60%)
  • Reflective writing and essays (30%)
  • Group presentations/ exhibitions (10%)

You will be assessed throughout the course on:

  • Body of work and contextual research: e.g studio/portfolio/exhibition/publication/etc.
  • Reflective journals: log or sketch-book/statement/critical writing/seminar or other presentation*  

All submissions are comprised of a body of arts practice: ‘studio’ plus a contextual and critical research portfolio, and reflective logs/journals. As the ‘thesis’ is embedded in the practice there is no requirement for a separate, written dissertation - although you may elect to do so, if appropriate, by negotiation with final award Course Team.  

*You can negotiate the format of your submissions, in response to the needs and priorities within your practice, and in line with contemporary professional practice habits.

EMPLOYABILITY

We encourage students to pursue an international profile and presence as soon as possible in support of their professional reputation. Opportunities during the programme offer industry experience and encourage students to make professional links with the art and design networks in the region.

Art and design alumni are actively employed in various sectors of design practice both in the UK and overseas, including Brazil, China and Taiwan. Previous graduates have also progressed into research, while several graduates are now employed as lecturers in the field of education in schools and universities



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University of Salford School of Arts and Media
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
IN BRIEF. Develop your knowledge and skills relating to current debates and practices. Access to your own studio space and workshop support. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Develop your knowledge and skills relating to current debates and practices
  • Access to your own studio space and workshop support.
  • You'll be offered placements, residencies and exhibition opportunities with key arts organisations.
  • Part-time study option
  • Work/industrial placement opportunity
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

This programme is open for September 2018 entry only.

This course is designed for students to refine their subject specific practice through creative industry experience, studio based experimentation, contextual research and critical dialogue to enable them to graduate as professional artists within the wider context of contemporary arts networks.  

During your time with us, you will be encouraged to undertake independent contextual and theoretical research that will improve your capacity for independent enquiry, creativity and professional practice. 

There are plenty of opportunities to get involved in group exhibitions, residencies and live projects as we work closely with key cultural organisations within the North West. These include; The Center for Chinese Contemporary Art, Hotbed Press, Islington Mill, Castlefield Gallery, International 3, Salford Museum & Art Gallery, Artworks, Mark Devereux Projects and HOME.

COURSE DETAILS

This course embraces a range and diversity of practices and aims to:

  • Provide the skills needed to professionalise careers through embedded creative placements and live projects with industry and community organisations.
  • Develop creative, critical, analytical and intellectual competencies appropriate to Masters level degree study, which is informed by current industry practice.
  • Develop advanced understanding of research methods in the context of contemporary art & design practice and to understand how the boundaries of knowledge are advanced through research.
  • Enhance your knowledge and understanding of professional, contextual and collaborative frameworks appropriate to their experiences and objectives by establishing intellectual debate to enable the articulation and dissemination of their propositions.
  • Assist you at an advanced level in developing, extending and applying complex strategies and approaches to the development of a professional studio practice, embedding the knowledge and skills required to establish you as an arts practitioners within the wider context of contemporary arts networks.

Contemporary Arts Practice is for committed artists who wish to develop their personal creative practice towards a higher, professional level. It actively encourages the pursuit of individual agendas for study and for personal choice of media/disciplines selected from the range of practices within the field.  

You will contextualise your work via rigorous analysis of relevant cultural discourses and reflective studio-based practice. Running alongside this, is the notion of embedding this practice within the creative industries through public exhibition as well as responses to opportunities provided by our industry partners. Studio production is emphasised as a key driver for practice development and there is a challenging seminar programme and a comprehensive schedule of visiting or visits to artists/art professionals and venues.

COURSE STRUCTURE

The programme structure consists of five modules, four of which are delivered within a collaborative framework allowing all students across the Masters in Art & Design programmes (Contemporary Fine Art, Socially Engaged Arts Practice and Design for Communication) opportunities to engage with your peers whilst working through individual assignments focused around each programme. The remaining one module is tailored to the specific programme learning outcomes.

For the full-time study option:Semester 1 - September to February

Semester 2 - February to June

Semester 3 - June to September

You will take five core modules and will study one day a week. Full-time students will have concentrated module delivery in both the morning and afternoon.

TEACHING

This course uses a range of teaching and learning settings including lectures, seminars/workshops, tutorials, situated learning (e.g. ‘live’ projects) and independent learning. The combination of these aims is to develop an environment that allows students to progressively take ownership and direction of their learning so that they may develop as independent, life-long learners. The process of Masters level study, relating to an individual and independent arts practice, is one of dense critical self-reflection; this is achieved by including self-directed projects where students have the opportunity to negotiate their learning and assessment requirements.

Indicative to the course are:

  • formal lectures
  • seminar presentations
  • workshops
  • critical analysis and independent learning

Award specific learning activities include exercises; team and peer-based learning, studio practice and critical seminar-events, site visits, visiting professionals, work placements, online activities and critical debates.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment methods used on the course include:

  • Practical projects (60%)
  • Reflective writing and essays (30%)
  • Group presentations/ exhibitions (10%)

You will be assessed throughout the course on:

  • Body of work and contextual research: e.g studio/portfolio/exhibition/publication/etc.
  • Reflective journals: log or sketch-book/statement/critical writing/seminar or other presentation*  

All submissions are comprised of a body of arts practice: ‘studio’ plus a contextual and critical research portfolio, and reflective logs/journals. As the ‘thesis’ is embedded in the practice there is no requirement for a separate, written dissertation - although you may elect to do so, if appropriate, by negotiation with final award Course Team. 

*You can negotiate the format of your submissions, in response to the needs and priorities within your practice, and in line with contemporary professional practice habits.

EMPLOYABILITY

Our graduates have exhibited successfully in a range of venues and biennales. Many graduates establish themselves within the local creative economy and develop a studio presence in the region and beyond.  

We encourage students to pursue an international profile and presence as soon as possible in support of their professional reputation. Opportunities via MediaCityUK will facilitate internationalisation of practice on individual terms.

Many of our students succeed through related professions in: education, community development, healthcare environments or enterprise. Some graduates prefer to apply their creative practice to commissioning, consultancy or other professional outcomes.

FACILITIES

This programme is based at New Adelphi on the main campus. The facilities include:

  • 2D & 3D Printing Facilities
  • 3D workshop
  • Fibre Workshop
  • Photography studio which includes a lighting set-up
  • Computer suites
  • Gallery Spaces

You will be inducted into the workshops, which covers how to use all the machinery, by trained workshop technicians.



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Hyper Island Postgraduate Courses
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
Hyper Island's MA in Experience Design has been designed in response to demand from the industry. There is currently a gap between what schools teach and what a designer needs to know. Read more
Hyper Island's MA in Experience Design has been designed in response to demand from the industry. There is currently a gap between what schools teach and what a designer needs to know. How to build products, services, and systems in the real world, that give a great experience.

The role of a designer is shifting. A product today is rarely just physical and consumers expectations are higher than ever. The challenge for designers is to design and deliver meaningful experiences, both online and offline.

The MA in Digital Experience Design will develop your technical, creative and strategic skills as an experience designer to lead the change within this evolving industry.

You will explore experience design and related fields such as service design and interaction design, understanding human behavior, rigorous research, digital technologies and prototyping, project management, business acumen and how to build and lead an effective team.

You will leave us primed for roles across human-centred design such as Experience Designer, Information Architect, Interaction Designer and Service Designer. Within these roles, graduates will be able to design and develop high quality experiences, products and services. You will be able to work across disciplinary, cultural, and geographical boundaries to design innovative solutions to meet user and business needs. Above all, you will be able to operate strategically as an agent of change and have the knowledge, skills, and competence to work at the forefront of this fast-paced industry.

The MA Digital Experience Design represents an alternative option in industry-led learning here in the UK. At Hyper Island, you will be immersed in collaborative and high-energy learning environments that mirror the modern workplace dynamics. We value both professional and personal development and we seek to help you achieve that by supporting you with new methods, tools, and knowledge to develop your abilities. It is a post-graduate Master of Arts degree awarded by Teesside University.

Hyper Island partners with leading companies such as ustwo, Dare, IDEO, Plan, Tobias & Tobias, Google, MTV, Oxfam, Sony Games and Greenpeace, giving you access to the world’s most successful and innovative thinkers.

Following successful completion of the school-based part of the programme (24 weeks), you will progress to an industry research project (18 weeks). This is your chance to put your learning to work in an independent research or professional context and helps you to take the next step in your career. This can take place anywhere in the world.

Hyper Island will help you design your project and apply it within your career domain. To successfully graduate with a Master's degree, you will present the findings from your project using reports, videos and prototypes as appropriate to your chosen problem to examiners from industry, Teesside University and Hyper Island.

What you learn on the programme:

- Digital strategy
- Business modelling
- Working with agile/lean processes
- Emerging and established technologies for creating experiences
- Human-centred design processes
- Idea generation, selection, and development
- Behavioural psychology
- Participatory research tools
- Building balanced teams to meet project requirements
- Global and remote collaboration
- Leadership and group dynamics

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University of Salford School of Arts and Media
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
IN BRIEF. Develop cutting-edge practices and approaches to contemporary performance-making in an interdisciplinary, laboratory environment, with a focus on creative exploration. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Develop cutting-edge practices and approaches to contemporary performance-making in an interdisciplinary, laboratory environment, with a focus on creative exploration
  • Make and research in world-class performance-making facilities at MediaCityUK and the New Adelphi Arts Centre
  • Immerse yourself in the vibrant arts and performance scene in Salford and Manchester.
  • Part-time study option
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

The MA Contemporary Performance Practice is a practical, interdisciplinary course that will introduce you to a range of approaches and concepts, which are vital to the making of live performance in and in response to the world today. It will equip you with the skills and knowledge to function in contemporary  performance environments, as a performer, maker, collaborative practitioner and researcher.

Drawing upon the excellent facilities for making live performance at New Adelphi and MediaCityUK, this course also provides the entrepreneurial and employability skills you need to function as a practitioner in the wider creative industries.

This course will also allow you to extend and develop skill sets through interdisciplinary exchange and collaboration, mirroring working environments within the creative industries. You will develop the ability to think dynamically, act originally, collaborate and function effectively in creative workplaces,  integrating theoretical concepts, creative practice and real world skills. 

You will also, through the core modules and final project, develop your own contemporary performance practice, culminating in the presentation of a significant piece of work, which you can then go on to use in professional contexts.

COURSE DETAILS

MA Contemporary Performance Practice offers you the opportunity to develop and refine your current practices, learn about new skills and approaches and engage with the issues most relevant to making performance in the world now. 

Through the course you will:

  • Collaborate creatively to explore, experiment and create new performance work
  • Engage with key approaches and aspects of making contemporary performance, such as the use and influence of digital technologies, the role and positioning of the audience and the ways in which your practice can engage with both local and global issues
  • Explore the theories, frameworks and practices in the field and how these are developing and responding to the contemporary world

TEACHING

From the outset, you will work in an interdisciplinary fashion. Your induction will include a creative collaborative project, that will acclimatise you to the ways of working on the programme and other students.

Programme modules are delivered through practical workshops, keynote lectures, seminars, and artist-led residencies. Seminars and student-centred symposia initiate independent work, and foster and facilitate collaborative partnerships and small group work. Adaptability of graduates is considered a core vocational outcome that reflects the hybridity of global culture and is an essential strategy for learning on the programme.

The programme fosters an intensive laboratory research culture intended to explore practice, deconstruct ideas, identify needs and skillsets and apply acquired knowledge to the construction of new modes of practice. At the core of this culture is the encouragement to consistently triangulate theory and reflection with personal practice. Philosophically the programme embraces diversity, innovation and accessibility through these student-centred approaches.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment is via a balanced combination of formative and summative opportunities for each module, which promotes and responds to a fluid and processual development of your practice. Formal opportunities to write are combined with oral presentations, a range of performance outcomes and online portfolios.

You will be assessed through:

  • Practical performances, combined with vivas/oral presentations (65%)
  • Written assignments (critical, reflective, analytical) (35%)

FACILITIES

Digital Performance Lab at MediaCity UK.

Theatre, studio and specialist rehearsal spaces and acting studios at New Adelphi.

CAREER PROSPECTS

Graduates will be able to work in a range of environments from the cultural sector to future media, interactive design and production, small scale touring, venue based and independent production, theatre-making, performing and writing, community arts practices and applied theatre-making with defined sectors.

People who work in the field of contemporary performance are able to work across a wide range of applied areas of creative design and application. This ranges from traditional arts settings to the fields of interactive design, new media production and, as the use of digitally driven interfaces increases, into more commercially driven areas of work. Contemporary performance experts can have a broad set of skills from devising and composition, to technical design, production management, programming, script-development, video editing and post-production skills. 

Potential employers include arts venues and organisations, educational providers and film companies. Skills employed in the making of contemporary performance, such as independent and collaborative problem solving, gathering and synthesis of elements, understanding and integration of the needs of a range of stakeholders, can be used to address many areas of creative practice. Graduates will also be equipped through the programme to pursue careers as individual, self-employed practitioners working across forms and disciplines.

LINKS WITH INDUSTRY

The programme has links with the following organisations and begins each year with a creative intensive, led by a key contemporary performance practitioner:

  • The Lowry Arts Centre
  • HOME
  • Z Arts
  • Blast Theory
  • Imitating the Dog
  • Station House Opera
  • Rimini Protokoll

FURTHER STUDY

Graduates of this programme will be well prepared, through its mix of theoretical and practical research, to pursue practice based MPhils/PhDs, which will build on and develop further practices established within the MA.



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University of Salford School of Arts and Media
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
IN BRIEF. Develop your knowledge and skills relating to current debates and practices. You will develop your arts practice within a socially engaged and collaborative context. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Develop your knowledge and skills relating to current debates and practices
  • You will develop your arts practice within a socially engaged and collaborative context
  • Undertake placements, residencies and live project opportunities with communities, arts and public sector organisations.
  • Part-time study option
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

This programme is open for September 2018 entry only.

Socially Engaged Arts Practice focuses on building relationships between artists, members of communities and organisations by working alongside those communities in ways that inform the artist’s practice. Through such practice, communities and individuals can be supported to articulate their own concerns and priorities. Students on the programme may work with a community in a specific area or identify a community of users from public places such as schools, hospitals, museums/galleries or sites of commercial interest to collaborate with.

COURSE DETAILS

This course embraces a range and diversity of practices and aims to:

  • Provide the skills needed to professionalise careers through embedded creative placements and live projects with industry and community organisations.
  • Develop creative, critical, analytical and intellectual competencies appropriate to Masters level degree study, which is informed by current industry practice.
  • Develop advanced understanding of research methods in the context of contemporary art & design practice and to understand how the boundaries of knowledge are advanced through research
  • Enhance your knowledge and understanding of professional, contextual and collaborative frameworks appropriate to their experiences and objectives by establishing intellectual debate to enable the articulation and dissemination of their propositions.
  • Assist students at an advanced level in developing, extending and applying complex strategies and process based activities within collaborative, community based, and informal educational contexts, enabling detailed discourse and the creation of a contextual framework from which to practice.

Socially Engaged Arts Practice focuses on building relationships between artists, members of communities and organisations working alongside those communities in ways that inform the artist’s practice. Through such practice, communities and individuals can be supported to articulate their own concerns and priorities. Students on the programme may identify with a specific community in a specific area or identify a community of users from public places such as a school, hospital, museum/ gallery or sites of commercial interest.

COURSE STRUCTURE

The programme structure consists of 5 modules, 4 of which are delivered within a collaborative framework allowing all students across the Masters in Art & Design programs (Contemporary Fine Art, Socially Engaged Arts Practice and Design for Communication) opportunities to engage with your peers whilst working through individual assignments focused around each programme. The remaining 1 module is tailored to the specific programme learning outcomes.

For the full-time study option:Semester 1 - October to February

Semester 2 - February to June

Semester 3 - June to September

You will take five core modules and will study one day a week. Full-time students will have concentrated module delivery in both the morning and afternoon.

TEACHING

This course uses a range of teaching and learning settings including lectures, seminars/workshops, tutorials, situated learning (e.g. ‘live’ projects) and independent learning. The combination of these aims is to develop an environment that allows students to progressively take ownership and direction of their learning so that they may develop as independent, life-long learners. The process of Masters level study, relating to an individual and independent arts practice, is one of dense critical self-reflection; this is achieved by including self-directed projects where students have the opportunity to negotiate their learning and assessment requirements.

Indicative to the course are:

  • formal lectures  
  • seminar presentations  
  • workshops  
  • critical analysis and independent learning.  

Award specific learning activities include exercises; team and peer-based learning, studio practice and critical seminar-events, site visits, visiting professionals, work placements, online activities and critical debates.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment methods used on the course include:

  • Practical projects (60%)
  • Reflective writing and essays (30%)
  • Group presentations/ exhibitions (10%)

You will be assessed throughout the course on:

  • Body of work and contextual research: e.g action research/publication/exhibition etc.
  • Reflective journals: log or sketch-book/statement/critical writing/seminar or other presentation*

All submissions are comprised of a body of practice plus a contextual and critical research portfolio, and reflective logs/journals and case studies. As the ‘thesis’ is embedded in the action research there is no requirement for a separate, written dissertation - although you may elect to do so, if appropriate, by negotiation with final award Course Team.  

*You can negotiate the format of your submissions, in response to the needs and priorities within your practice, and in line with contemporary professional practice habits.

EMPLOYABILITY

Some teachers on leaving the course step out of formal education and become freelance practitioners working in galleries, prisons, youth centres, hospitals and schools.  They are supported in establishing business practices and marketing their activities.  

Artists leave the course as professional freelancers working in a variety of formal and non-formal workshop or residency settings.  The mix of freelancers and employed teaching staff enrolled on the course brings a wide range of peer employment opportunities. Current students are working in primary and secondary schools, prison education, hospitals, galleries, further and higher education, youth clubs and residential and care homes.

The School co-ordinates a range of enterprise projects and initiatives that can benefit graduating students, in order to assist their career opportunities or routes into self-employment.

FACILITIES

This programme is based at Peel on the main campus. Students working on site have access to their own studio space. They have access to facilities in New Adelphi Building. 

These include:

  • 2D & 3D Printing Facilities
  • 3D workshop
  • Fibre Workshop
  • Photography studio which includes a lighting set-up
  • Computer suites
  • Gallery Spaces

You will be inducted into the workshops, which covers how to use all the machinery, by trained workshop technicians.



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This innovative course focuses on the development of a significant experimental animation production that synthesises research undertaken in areas such as drawing, live-action, drawing on film, under camera manipulation, stop-frame animation, pixilation and sound as art. Read more

This innovative course focuses on the development of a significant experimental animation production that synthesises research undertaken in areas such as drawing, live-action, drawing on film, under camera manipulation, stop-frame animation, pixilation and sound as art. A strong independent research base will underpin individual practice.

Challenging the parameters of film and video production, and identifying new approaches to the notion of art films will be encouraged, as will incorporating experimentation in production and post-production stages.

Features

Animation is part of the Department of Media at Manchester School of Art which has an established community of interdisciplinary staff, and research students with expertise in fields that include Animation, Filmmaking, Photography, Media Theory and Multimedia Digital practices.

The Department promotes a blending of arts practices responsive to current cultural and digital industries demands; inspiring students to engage with real world scenarios through creative and imaginative responses.

It has developed a framework that fosters interesting and diverse approaches to engage with external partners within the city, the region, nationally and internationally. Recent partners include HOME, BBC (Media City), CITV, Manchester City and Regional Art Galleries, Open Eye Photography Gallery, Red Eye Photography Network, International Anthony Burgess Foundation and international partnerships in China, India, Brazil, Russia and Europe.

Core to all of the teaching and research in the Media department is the continuing exploration of new modes of expression through digital technologies and support students in developing a robust and individual creative practice that has relevance to a diverse range of cultural industries.

Course Content

The MA Animation is made up of four units totalling 180 credits.

The programme is designed to help you acclimatise to the challenges of MA level research and practice, enabling you to identify and describe a clear direction for your postgraduate design study.

You will be encouraged to develop design propositions that encompass key design issues and have complexity and ambition, taking full consideration of the relative contextual drivers.

You will also be encouraged and supported to extend your experience in the professional sphere, either through a practical project, research context, exchange, work experience, or other negotiated professional set of interactions with an external partner, groups of students and creative industry.

Towards the end of the programme you will undertake a major project to consolidate your past research and practice into fully realised collections, pieces, proposals, business plans, or exhibitions – whatever means is appropriate to the work. ou will also have developed a strategy for the continuation of your practice located and contextualised to the profession or discipline.

If you choose to progress to MFA Animation award you will study a further two units of 60 credits each.

This route is focused on the continuation of your practice aligned to the research and selection of appropriate public or professional venues and platforms to disseminate a significant body of work. You will be required to produce work for a public audience in the most relevant and appropriate form along with any implicit publicity and dissemination material.



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University of Salford School of Arts and Media
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
IN BRIEF. Study at our MediaCityUK campus in our custom built, industry standard animation suite. Combine elective modules to suit your specialism. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Study at our MediaCityUK campus in our custom built, industry standard animation suite
  • Combine elective modules to suit your specialism
  • Benefit from the expertise of industry practitioners who are directly involved in course delivery
  • Based at MediaCityUK
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

This course is a fantastic opportunity to develop your skills and understanding of animation production, 3D-animation systems and related technologies.

During your time with us, you will have the opportunity to put what you have learnt into practice by collaborating on projects with other MA students studying across related disciplines.

TEACHING

The teaching of this course is comprised of seminars, workshops in storytelling and production practice, study of broadcast and editorial guidelines, independent research, collaborative project work and film screenings.

The aim is to support your learning with an effective blend of theory and creative practice and to encourage ownership of your learning through self-directed projects.

ASSESSMENT

The vocational nature of the course lends itself to coursework assessment. This typically includes the design and production of animation or graphic products requiring technical and creative skills. Technical reports and case studies form the assessment of underpinning modules.

Methods of assessment depend on the module and elective pathway you are taking.

They include:

  • Creative projects portfolios and productions
  • Live briefs
  • Critical reflections
  • Presentations
  • Essay

Each module has its own assessment package and this is structured appropriately to reflect the module content. Practical-based modules are assessed by project and a reflective critical evaluation.

CAREER PROSPECTS

Graduates from the programme have gone on to work in animation production at companies including Framestore, London, and Weearemi, Manchester. The programme has strong links with industry leaders, including the BBC, ITV, and regional and national media companies.

LINKS WITH INDUSTRY

To develop your skills and employability, there are opportunities on our Media Production courses to work on live briefs and gain valuable work experience. Previous students have worked with:

  • CBBC
  • Framestore
  • BBC Writersroom
  • BBC Natural History Unit
  • Nine Lives Media production company
  • Sumners Post Production Facility House
  • BBC Fast Train, BBC Academy, BBC Red Nose Day and BBC Turn Up the Talent
  • Sheffield Documentary Festival, Salford Media Festival, One World Media Festival

Plus the following prominent speakers have delivered guest lectures:

  • Sir David Attenborough
  • Joe Godwin (Director of BBC Childrens)
  • Steve Hewlett (Media commentator / Guardian Columnist)
  • Tony Palmer (Documentary filmmaker)
  • Jackie Priddle (Aardman Animation Producer)
  • BBC Stepping Out and Audience Research Team


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The MA in Film Studies at the University of Manchester is a flexible programme of study, providing students with opportunities to study areas of film theory, history and culture, as well as aspects of applied practice. Read more

The MA in Film Studies at the University of Manchester is a flexible programme of study, providing students with opportunities to study areas of film theory, history and culture, as well as aspects of applied practice. It caters for students wishing to enhance their artistic and professional careers as well as those seeking to prepare for doctoral study. The course provides opportunities for students who are relatively new to the subject area to establish a foundation in the discipline as well as those who wish to pursue further study. It prepares students for doctoral study and/or employment in film, screen media and creative industries, as well as those who wish to employ their knowledge of screen media and practice in educational, social and community settings.

The course thus builds on extensive links between the University of Manchester and professional contexts and communities in Manchester and the North West. It encourages the research and practice of film in academic and creative contexts, in particular with engagement in non-traditional and/or community sites, combining artistic and academic exploration with a focus on social responsibility, critique and transformation.

Programme Director: Dr Felicia Chan (  )

Teaching and learning

The MA Film Studies programme offers a solid foundation in theoretical and critical film studies, built on staff expertise and specialisms from form and theory to historical and cultural approaches to national cinemas to the politics of identity, gender and sexuality, and film music as well as practice, for students who may wish to pursue the discipline at postgraduate level for personal or professional development. It also offers opportunities for research and practice in aspects of and approaches to applied Film Studies, for students who may be interested in pursuing more practice-based and socially engaged research, for example, using film production and audio-visual methodologies for research, knowledge exchange and community engagement. This involves acquiring practical skills in addition to theoretical knowledge, such as documentary film-making, sound design, film curation and programming, that could be applied to education, community and activist contexts, as well as work placement opportunities.

Following a mandatory first semester of two core modules, students are free to construct their MA programme from a diverse range of options, including established study options within School of Arts, Languages and Cultures, a directed reading or practice option (enabling you to pursue a specific area of research with the careful supervision of specialist staff), and a work placement option. Study options vary from year to year depending on staff availability.

Students are taught in seminars, small group tutorials, workshops and surgeries, offering opportunities for lively and engaged discussions. One-to-one supervision is offered on all dissertations. Assessment is primarily by written assignment, also there will also be opportunities for those interested in practice as research.

Coursework and assessment

Written coursework in each taught 30 credit taught module is constituted by a 6,000 word essay, or its equivalent, constituted by a combination of various kinds of written work, including essays, log books, evaluation reports, project critiques and practice analysis. The dissertation is constituted by a 15,000 word project on a topic chosen in consultation with the dissertation supervisor.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This Masters degree teaches and develops a range of transferable skills, and thus enables students to keep open a wide range of career options. Previous MA students have continued to take up PhD study with us, and many of these have gone on to academic and teaching careers in further and higher education institutions. Others have gone on to work for the BBC, in independent television production companies, festivals, film education and other areas of the film and screen media industry.



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The Arts & Humanities Graduate School through the Manchester School of Art’s Research Centre, offers research degrees in the practices, professions, histories and theories of art and design and cognate disciplines. Read more
The Arts & Humanities Graduate School through the Manchester School of Art’s Research Centre, offers research degrees in the practices, professions, histories and theories of art and design and cognate disciplines. These can be studied on a full and part-time basis at Masters and PhD Level.

The Graduate School brings together the three different postgraduate research degree programmes in Manchester School of Art, Humanities Languages and Social Science and the Manchester Fashion Institute. By developing our strengths the merger presents a very real opportunity to signal the significance of public and outward facing research and the importance of multidisciplinary, collaborative, applied and practice-based research methods alongside traditional disciplinary approaches. The Graduate School boasts over one hundred nationally and internationally recognized theorists, practitioners and professionals from disciplines across the full range of the Art, Craft, Design, Media, Architecture, Humanities and the Applied Social Sciences.

Research projects are usually proposed by applicants although some funded scholarships are attached to external partners. Projects are linked with the research hubs and groups focused around recognized areas of research excellence in Manchester School of Art Research Centre. The Manchester School of Art pioneered the practice-led research degrees and today we provide a nationally and internationally recognized environment for postgraduate research. We have long-standing relationships with galleries, museums, and the creative industries in the North West region and beyond.

MA by Research

Study undertaken at masters level runs for a year (full-time) and explores aspects of knowledge at the forefront of an academic or professional discipline. Students are expected to demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge, and to gain understanding of how the boundaries of knowledge are advanced through research. They will be able to deal with complex issues systematically and creatively.

A MA by Research thesis will not normally exceed 30,000 words (excluding ancillary matter such as footnotes). When the submission is accompanied by material in other than written form, the written component should normally be within 10,000 – 15,000 words.

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Art Gallery and Museum Studies (AGMS) has been taught at The University of Manchester for more than 40 years. It is one of the longest established MA degree courses in museum studies in the country, and our alumni have reached senior positions in museums and galleries throughout the UK and overseas. Read more

Art Gallery and Museum Studies (AGMS) has been taught at The University of Manchester for more than 40 years. It is one of the longest established MA degree courses in museum studies in the country, and our alumni have reached senior positions in museums and galleries throughout the UK and overseas.

Today, the AGMS course is continually being reviewed and developed in response to new research, emerging critical approaches and shifts in museum practice. Manchester's traditional focus on the art gallery remains, but is now balanced by course units which address history, theory and practice in a range of institutions.

Throughout the degree, you will examine diverse issues related to museum theory and practice, visit numerous museums, galleries and cultural organisations, and have many opportunities to discuss ideas and issues with professionals and academics in the field. The AGMS course combines both guided and independent study, and includes seminars, guest lectures and site visits.

Special features

Work Placement (Semesters 1 and 2)

One of the most popular aspects of the AGMS is the work placement that you undertake in a museum or gallery. Each placement involves a minimum of 20 days work on a specific project, such as exhibition development, collections management, or education programme. Many students find this such a positive experience that they carry on working in their museum when the work placement has finished, and each year a few students are offered jobs by their placement hosts. Work placements start in Semester 1 (November/December) and finish in Semester 2 (June).

You can take the work placement either as 15-credit or 30-credit course.

During the MA, students have opportunities to design and participate in live projects with cultural organisations in Manchester. These include curating a collection, developing exhibitions, producing cultural events and working on creative collaborative projects.

Teaching and learning

Most teaching takes place in small interactive seminar groups, involving, as appropriate, directed-reading, fieldwork in museums and galleries, staff and student presentations, discussion, debate, problem-solving and group-work.

Most courses run one day/week over 12 weeks and there are variations in the number of class hours per teaching day depending on the course/week (i.e. 2-5 hours). As a general rule, a 30 credit course includes 300 learning hours, which can be roughly divided as follows: a third in classes or class-related work; a third in independent study; and a third in preparation of assignments.

Students undertake also a collections management group project (as part of the 'Managing Collections and Exhibitions' and an exhibition group project (as part of the 'Professional Practice Project' course) in collaboration with a museum, gallery or related cultural organisation in Manchester or the North West of England.

Postgraduate life in the Centre for Museology

Both the Centre for Museology and the School of Arts, Histories and Cultures host a varied programme of activities and events for postgraduate students, including occasional master classes and workshops, as well as our regular calendar of:

  • Museology research seminars
  • 'Showcase' seminars at the Manchester Museum
  • Institute for Cultural Practices events
  • Research forum for PhD students

Full-time or part-time?

The AGMS MA is available as a 1 year Full-time or a 2 year Part-time course. We particularly welcome part-time students and there are many advantages in combining study with work practice, whether you already have a museum post, or are just setting out on your career. Each year, a number of mid-career professionals take the MA degree on a part-time basis and find that the University provides a valuable space for reflection as well as for further learning. Part time students have classes one day per week (usually Tuesday or Thursday; although in Semester 2 it might be a different day depending on the option course you choose). On this one should also add our Thursday 5pm research, professional practice and academic skills workshops. You should also count time for library work/fieldwork that may require you coming to Manchester and although sometimes this can be done on the day of teaching, often one needs to come in a second day (and if you do this on Thursdays then you can combine it with the 5pm workshops). When the work placement kicks off (about November/December in Year 1 or Year 2) you should also count one more day/week (on average) at the Work Placement institution (which, if appropriate or relevant, can be the organisation where you currently work; but undertaking a project different to your day-to-day work) - this is of course if you decide to take the Work Placement module.



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Application closing date. August 10, 2018.  . The only course of its kind offered by a Russell Group University, our MA in Screenwriting is an intensive one-year training programme designed to professionalise writers and present a genuine gateway into the film and television industries. Read more

Application closing date: August 10, 2018.  

The only course of its kind offered by a Russell Group University, our MA in Screenwriting is an intensive one-year training programme designed to professionalise writers and present a genuine gateway into the film and television industries. Over the course of the year, students will work with leading industry practitioners to develop their screenwriting, pitching and story-breaking skills. By the end of the programme, each student will have developed a full length feature film screenplay, a pilot TV episode and two short films. Like all courses at the Centre for New Writing, this programme is taught by practitioners and as such it is vocationally-oriented and industry-focused. Students will have access to individual career guidance and training in how to navigate entry-level work in both the television and film industries.

The course includes regular speakers from the industry which last year included Beth Pattinson BBC Films ( Brooklyn, We Need to Talk About Kevin, Philomena ), Chris Chibnall (writer and creator of Broadchurch) and Pete Czernin, producer of In Bruges and Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (1 and 2).  

The course runs across two twelve week long semesters, during which students will attend weekly writing workshops in which they will study the very best of contemporary screenwriting, including shows such as Breaking Bad, True Detective, The Killing, Broadchurch, This is England, Rev, Transparency and The Sopranos. They will also cover British and American examples of charismatic film screenwriting from Goodfellas to The King's Speech via Alien .

In the second semester there will be a London industry day based at BAFTA with talks from agents, producers, and writers as well as a meeting with the BFI.

Students will study story design, visual story-telling and character arcs in both long-running television series and feature films. They will develop the tools to be able to analyse and critique screenwriting craft, and learn how to disseminate their own work. There will be weekly film screenings, and students will have access to an excellent lending library of films to watch at home. Through the duration of the course students will develop a broad and eclectic knowledge of cinema and television.

We intend to keep learning as specific to individual study as possible and study groups will be intentionally small in scale. The course capacity is limited to twelve students each year and you will be taught through a mixture of screenings, lectures and group discussion. Our `writers' room' ethos ensures an environment that encourages collaboration, sharing and creative risk-taking.

Importantly, each summer, we offer students a two week `hands-on' industry placement at a renowned film or TV production company either in London or the North West. Current partners include Film4 ( Room. Ex_Machina, The Lobster) , Wildgaze (Brooklyn) , Number 9 Films (Carol) , Left Bank (The Crown), Warp (This is England) , Red Productions ( Happy Valley, Scott and Bailey ), and Hammer Films ( The Woman in Black , Let Me In ). These placements are an excellent opportunity for students to make useful contacts, and to develop a practical and direct understanding of the professional context within which screenwriters ply their trade.

Coursework and assessment

To complete the MA, students are required to take 180 credits in total. They will take two semesters of courses consisting of workshops/tutorials and seminars. There are 60 credits in the first semester and 30 in the second with 90 for the dissertation.

  • All writing workshops meet for three hours per week.
  • Workshops will help students add to their portfolio by including adaptations, scenes, draft scripts, script reports, and genre presentations. 
  • Each workshop is assessed by a portfolio which will include pitches, treatments, scenes, draft scripts, script reports and notes on how to progress a draft.
  • Seminars also meet for three hours per week.
  • Students will also be offered two individual half- to one-hour tutorials per semester in order to discuss the progress of their writing.

Over the summer students complete a 'dissertation' which consists of a final revised version of a full-length screenplay. This is worth 60 credits.

Course unit details

In both semesters all students take a weekly writing workshop and a parallel seminar on craft. Both are 3 hours long. All teaching takes place on Monday or Tuesday.

Career opportunities

This programme is designed to train its graduates to work in the UK film and television industries. Some will work as professional screenwriters, others may take up other, related, positions.



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University of Salford School of Arts and Media
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
IN BRIEF. Taught by professional practitioners at all stages of your study. Compete for a variety of prizes including the Kirklees Composition Competition. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Taught by professional practitioners at all stages of your study
  • Compete for a variety of prizes including the Kirklees Composition Competition
  • Gain a breadth of professional musical experience
  • Part-time study option
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

Our postgraduate degrees in music stand apart from similar courses due to the breadth of musical genres that they will expose you to. From rock and pop, to classical, jazz, electronic and other world styles, each genre is given equal precedence, and you will have a great opportunity to learn from each  tradition.

During your time with us, you will also have the opportunity to collaborate on projects with other students and you will learn from academics who are all practicing professional musicians at national and international levels.

On this exciting and challenging music course, you will have the opportunity to follow one of four specialist pathways:

  • Composition (C)    
  • Performance (P)    
  • Critical Musicology (CM)    
  • Interactive Music and Advanced Studio Production (IMASP).    

If you are keen to broaden your musical knowledge, you can also combine your specialist pathway with other pathways.

COURSE STRUCTURE

This course begins with a shared 30-credit plenary module, you would then take another module dependent upon your specialist pathway. Semester 2 allows you to choose one 30-credit option outside of your chosen pathway alongside another 30-credit module from your specialist pathway. Semester 3 sees you working on a single 60-credit module; your Negotiated Final Project.

TEACHING

The course is delivered by way of lectures, seminars, masterclasses, supervision tutorials/instrumental lessons

ASSESSMENT

  • Examination
  • Coursework folio

EMPLOYABILITY

After completing the MA in Music people will find their professional skills to be considerably enhanced. We have found that this has enhanced career prospects in Music Education (Teachers/Lecturers), Arts Administration and as freelance Performers and Composers.

FURTHER STUDY

PGR options in Composition, Performance, Technology and Musicology

FACILITIES

MUSIC TECHNOLOGY FACILITIES

The Music Directorate houses 5 fully equipped professional recording studios with access to a variety of recording/performance spaces. We have created a creative and educational environment which aims to mirror contemporary professional studio practise. Our general philosophy is to facilitate the use of both analogue and digital recording platforms, software and hardware signal processing. All studios centre around a large format mixing desk which can feed hard disk recording systems and 24 track analogue tape machines. All studios make use of professional level outboard and software plugins as well as comprehensive balanced patch bays, giving students the opportunity to fully explore traditional signal routing, a skill vital to ones progression into professional practice.

REHEARSAL FACILITIES

The Music Directorate houses six 'amplified rehearsal rooms', each containing a vocal PA system, stage piano / keyboard, drum kit and back-line amplifiers for guitars, bass and keyboards / electronics. The equipment is sourced from a wide range of manufacturers such as Sonor, Sabian, Roland, Mackie, Yamaha, Line 6, Fender and many more. All of the equipment is maintained by our team of both full time and evening / weekend rehearsal suite supervisors.

We also encourage students to use their own equipment for rehearsals. To facilitate this we have an instrument storage facility where students can leave their equipment to avoid having to constantly transport it between lectures, seminars and accommodation. Students are free to store instruments, amplifiers, drum kit accessories on a short/mid term basis.

'The Band Room' is a large double height space with a modifiable acoustic characteristic. It is mainly used for large acoustic ensemble rehearsals, catering for our Big Band, Brass Bands, Adelphi Contemporary Music Group and Wind Band. It is also used for performance master classes and small concerts (capacity approx 80 - 100) with a two tier stage and 5kw PA system.

Specialist rooms for drum / percussion tuition and bass guitar tuition are located in this area. When these facilities are not in use by teaching staff the rooms can be booked for individual student practice. 

In addition to the facilities housed in the University we have a partnership with 'Blueprint Recording and Rehearsal Studios' (http://www.blueprint-studios.com). This world class facility is located just 10 minutes walk from the Adelphi campus and caters for any overspill from our own rehearsal rooms. Many students take 'block bookings' at Blueprint whilst working towards ensemble musicianship performance exams.

We also have a range of equipment for loan to students to enable them to put on their own events both inside and outside the University. This includes PA systems, amplifiers and drum kits.



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The MA in Creative Writing offers aspiring fiction writers and poets a one-year apprenticeship (or two years part-time) during which time they will study literary technique through reading and discussing the work of other contemporary writers in seminars, and will have the opportunity to develop their own work via regular workshops and individual tutorials. Read more

The MA in Creative Writing offers aspiring fiction writers and poets a one-year apprenticeship (or two years part-time) during which time they will study literary technique through reading and discussing the work of other contemporary writers in seminars, and will have the opportunity to develop their own work via regular workshops and individual tutorials.

Writers may choose to work on writing a novel and/or short stories and/or poems.

All students will have the opportunity to attend weekly workshops and masterclasses taught by Professor Jeanette Winterson.

More information about this programme can be found on the Centre for New Writing website .

Please note that both the full and part-time options are taught between 9am to 5pm. We do not offer evening classes. 

Coursework and assessment

Students take 60 credits worth of courses in semester one and 60 credits worth of courses in semester two. To complete the MA, students are required to take 180 credits in total;

  • All poetry and fiction writing workshops meet for two hours per week, and are worth 30 credits. Students will also be offered three individual half-hour tutorials per semester in order to discuss the progress of their writing. Each workshop is assessed by a portfolio of poetry or fiction.
  • Seminars also meet for two hours per week and are also worth 30 credits. They will usually be assessed by one 6,000 word essay or the equivalent.
  • Over the summer students complete a 15,000 word 'dissertation' which consists of a group of poems, a selection or short stories, or an extract from a novel. This is worth 60 credits.

Course unit details

In semester one, students may choose to take two workshops - one in fiction writing and one in poetry -- or they may take one workshop and one seminar - typical seminars will be 'The Art of Short Fiction' and 'Poetics'.

In semester two students wishing to focus on poetry writing will take a poetry workshop and a seminar on Contemporary Poetry; students wishing to focus on fiction writing will take a fiction writing workshop and a seminar in Contemporary Fiction.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Some of our students will go on (sometimes several years after completing their studies) to become published writers but most will not. The primary purpose of the Creative Writing MA in Manchester is therefore not to produce published writers but to help writers fulfil their potential and to help them understand and enjoy the literary traditions within which they are working. Graduates may go on to work in publishing, journalism, Arts administration, or (perhaps via a PhD programme) into university teaching.



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This course offers intensive training for composers and provides excellent preparation for doctoral work or a career in the professional world. Read more

This course offers intensive training for composers and provides excellent preparation for doctoral work or a career in the professional world. With a strong focus on practical music making and supported by an outstanding programme of workshops and performances by professional musicians, it offers an invaluable opportunity for composers to hone their skills and develop their personal voice.

What makes us distinctive?

  • Links to ensembles as an integral part of the course.
  • Interaction with the music profession, including the BBC Philharmonic and Manchester Camerata.
  • Opportunities to develop professional skills, for example through collaborating, rehearsing and networking with professional musicians; learning to arrange/orchestrate; undertaking outreach opportunities; and collaborating in the creation of performances.
  • Flexibility to develop your own compositional and research interests.
  • Close ties with electroacoustic composers in NOVARS, and the flexibility to combine electroacoustic course units with those for instrumental and vocal composition.
  • Integration into the active research culture of the University of Manchester, through research seminars, performance workshops and concerts.

In addition to the submission of a final Portfolio of Compositions , all instrumental and vocal composition students take the core course unit Composition Project and the further compulsory taught course unit, Compositional Etudes. Optional course units normally include Contemporary Music Studies , Advanced Orchestration , Fixed Media and Interactive Music , Aesthetics and Analysis of Organised Sound , Historical or Contemporary Performance (subject to audition). For further information about the content of individual course units, see Course Unit Details below.

SALC Placement offers students the opportunity to spend a minimum of 20 days over a period of up to 12 weeks with an arts and cultural organisation, business or service provider. Placements will be established in Semester 1 to take place early in semester 2; they will be supervised by a work-based mentor and overseen by an academic staff member. The placement may take the form of an investigation of a specific business idea, development strategy or management proposition to resolve a problem or particular issue, and will result in a placement report, proposal or essay.

Aims

This programme aims to:

  • Enable students to develop compositional techniques and professional skills appropriate to their creative needs.
  • Enable students to work with both student and professional performers toward the performance of recently composed prices.
  • Develop awareness of aesthetic, analytical and technical issues relating to contemporary Western art music.
  • Encourage students to discuss with clarity and conviction issues relating to contemporary music.
  • Enable students to compose several works worthy of public performance.
  • Equip students with skills appropriate to the development of further postgraduate study on MPhil and PhD programmes.

Special features

Our close links with in-house and Manchester-based ensembles allow us to guarantee that every student taking the MusM Composition programme will have their music performed and/or workshopped by professional ensembles, including the Quatuor Danel, Psappha, Trio Atem and the Manchester Camerata.

  • The Quatuor Danel enjoys a huge international reputation and their repertoire seemingly knows no limits. From early Haydn through Beethoven and Schubert, to neglected masterpieces from the Soviet Union, to white-knuckle rides through Ligeti, Xenakis and Lachenmann and premieres of new works by Manchester composers, our intrepid String Quartet-in-Residence regularly scales the summits of chamber music. Their visits to Manchester form a backbone of the university's concert series.
  • Psappha is one of this country's leading contemporary music ensembles, specialising in the performance of music by living composers and that of the 20th and 21st centuries . The ensemble has an extensive repertoire and a reputation for technical assurance and interpretive flair. Psappha has commissioned and premiered works by a wide range of composers, achieving particular notoriety for their performances of music by Peter Maxwell Davies.

In addition, MusM students frequently have their work performed by   the University of Manchester's new music ensemble.

Teaching and learning

The MusM degree consists of 180 credits in total, made up of four 30-credit taught course units and a 60-credit portfolio. Full-time students take two course units per semester; part-time students take one. Most course units are delivered via regular seminars and/or tutorials, supported where appropriate by practical workshops. The composition portfolio is supported by one-to-one supervision and is submitted at the beginning of September. (Part-time students may submit in either September or December following their second year of study.)

Each student meets regularly with their supervisor (for full-time students usually on a weekly basis during term-time, less frequently during vacations), allowing for in-depth exploration of ideas and intensive support for the various course units offered. Other members of the academic staff are also available for individual consultation during designated office hours.

Alongside their taught units, students have access to a range of non-assessed seminars, workshops and training sessions offered by the Graduate School of the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures. All postgraduate students are expected to undertake their own programme of self-directed learning and skills acquisition. This may also involve wider reading, language work, computer training and attendance at research seminars in other parts of the university.

Coursework and assessment

There are no formal examinations. Taught course units - all of which must be satisfactorily completed - are assessed by submission of compositions, coursework essays or other tasks, normally submitted at the end of each semester (January and May). The Composition Portfolio is created over the entire duration of study and is submitted at the end of the academic year (after the summer vacation). All work is double-marked internally and moderated by the External Examiner.



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University of Manchester School of Materials
Distance from Manchester: 0 miles
The International Fashion Retailing masters course is an exciting and innovative course which aims to equip the global fashion-retail managers of the future with skills in e-business, technology and international business strategy. Read more

The International Fashion Retailing masters course is an exciting and innovative course which aims to equip the global fashion-retail managers of the future with skills in e-business, technology and international business strategy. With two pathways to choose from - Fashion Consumer and Business Process Improvement - this course is suitable for students from most academic backgrounds and equips graduates with the necessary management skills vital for a career in the fast-paced world of international fashion retailing.

Managerial know-how: The course will teach you how to be adaptive and to have the managerial and specific know-how to innovate and create attractive products for an increasingly competitive global environment. You will become competent in strategic problem-solving and supply-chain management, and develop your self-learning and time-management skills.

The Course: The complete MSc course is made up of taught course units and a research dissertation project. The taught course units, assessed by a combination of coursework and examination, cover a wide range of industry-relevant subject areas:

Common units

  • International Fashion Retailing
  • Fabric Structures
  • Research Methods

Fashion Consumer units

  • Strategic Marketing
  • Fashion Consumer Behaviour
  • Contemporary Retailing

Business Process Improvement units

  • Innovation Methods
  • External Environment
  • Retail Marketing

Multichannel Marketing units

  • E-Fashion Retailing
  • Multi-channel Marketing
  • Contemporary Retailing

Your dissertation is a chance to apply what you have learned to a focused five-month research project. Your choice of topic will be determined in consultation with your personal tutor and will develop further skills that can be applied to the real world.

Coursework and assessment

The first two semesters are spent following a programme of lectures and tutorials, which are continually assessed through written assignments. You take examinations in January and May and following a satisfactory assessment you commence a research project culminating in the submission of a dissertation in mid-September.

Course unit details

Typical course units include: International Business Strategy; International Supply Chain Management; Manufacturing Processes; Advanced Materials for Fashion; Consumer Behaviour; Research Methods; International Fashion Retailing; E-Business and E-Tailing.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

The employment prospects for graduates from this programme are excellent. Recent graduates have been employed by IBM, Marks and Spencer, Oasis, Mercedes Benz, Next, Charnos, National Westminster Bank, Shell, Milliken and Harrods.



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