• Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Anglia Ruskin University Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
Cranfield University Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
Barcelona Technology school Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
United Kingdom
York×
0 miles
Creative Arts & Design×

Full Time MA Degrees in Creative Arts & Design, York, United Kingdom

We have 25 Full Time MA Degrees in Creative Arts & Design, York, United Kingdom

  • Creative Arts & Design×
  • United Kingdom
  • York×
  • MA×
  • Full Time×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 25
Order by 
The MA Fine Arts degree programme will enable you to develop and locate your practice in relation to current bodies of knowledge and practice in the fine arts. Read more
The MA Fine Arts degree programme will enable you to develop and locate your practice in relation to current bodies of knowledge and practice in the fine arts. You will build a strong and increasingly confident practice through awareness and interaction with current contexts of professional practice and research.

Course detail

The curriculum, which also supports awards at Postgraduate Certificate and Postgraduate Diploma levels, is uniquely designed and focused on developing artists’ abilities and capacities for professional, vocational and academic innovation. We emphasise relationships between composition, reflection, practice and dissemination across a dynamic breadth of fine arts disciplines and discourses. Teaching, learning and research on the programme will enable discovery of the variety of ways in which composition, creation and dissemination in fine arts practice has evolved into its present media and forms.

This degree enables students who already have some experience of fine arts practice to expand their artistic horizons, develop their reflective abilities and expand their portfolio as thinking practitioners.

Format

You will follow two strands, consisting of two 40 credit modules is designed to enhance your abilities as a self-reflective practitioner. It recognises the deep interrelationship between reflection, documentation, dissemination and production, in terms of the development of an artist’s work and practice in terms of its function and operation within critical and public domains. You will be introduced to the variety of ways in which composition, creation and dissemination in the production of fine arts practice has evolved into its present media and forms. This will be accompanied by investigation into the potential of strategies concerning documentation as useful modes of reflection and realisation. This module strand will be primarily focused around your own practice, contextualised by examination of various key practitioners, modes or epistemologies.

Modules

- Questions of Practice -

This is a practice-based module that encourages you to think and reflect through development of studio practice and discovery of related questions of practice. It recognises critical and creative reflection on studio practice as an active and essential aspect of working processes. It aims also to guide you in the development and enhancement of your conceptual, intellectual, practical and technical range of abilities, skills and knowledge in relation to models and strategies of making and reflecting upon current fine arts practice.

- Practice in Context -

This module encourages you to develop a nascent body of practice-based work in response to issues of context. Where work in ‘Questions of Practice’ encourages speculative approaches to studio practice, this module asks you to identify and respond to any of a range of historical, social and cultural contexts. This could range from re-examining approaches to site-specific practice, the ‘white cube’ gallery space, or networked, online spaces. The module allows time and opportunity for you to develop and enhance your conceptual, intellectual, practical and technical range of abilities, skills and knowledge in relation to issues and opportunities of making/disseminating practice-based research in fine arts practice.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please see the following link:
https://www.yorksj.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

Other sources of funding

Information on alternative sources of funding can be found here:
https://www.yorksj.ac.uk/student-services/money/funding-my-course/postgraduate-/postgraduate-funding-/

Read less
University of York Department of History of Art
Distance from York: 0 miles
York's taught MA in the History of Art provides a stimulating transition from undergraduate study to postgraduate work. It will train you in advanced methods of art-historical research, raise your level of intellectual engagement, instill an awareness of your own scholarly procedures, and improve your writing skills. Read more
York's taught MA in the History of Art provides a stimulating transition from undergraduate study to postgraduate work. It will train you in advanced methods of art-historical research, raise your level of intellectual engagement, instill an awareness of your own scholarly procedures, and improve your writing skills. The MA exposes you to the latest scholarship in your areas of interest and equips you to pursue independent research at the highest level.

Degree structure

Full-time
Taken full-time, the one-year taught MA consists of:
-Autumn and Spring Terms: A core module focusing on Research Skills and Methods in History of Art.
-Autumn Term: Two taught modules of your choice; an option is always offered on historiographical and theoretical approaches to art history.
-Spring Term: Two further modules of your choice.
-Summer Term and vacation: A dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words.

Part-time
-Taken part-time over two years, you would do one option in each of the Autumn and Spring terms, and work on your dissertation during the Summer terms and summer vacation.

Teaching and assessment
Each option is taught by weekly two-hour seminars and assessement is in the form of a 4,000 word essay. Field-trips to view art and architecture are included in the programme, as appropriate.

The Research Skills and Methods in History of Art module, which is taught on a fortnightly basis across the Autumn and Spring Term, culminates in the production of a dissertation synopsis, on which the module is assessed.

The programme culminates in the production of a 15,000-20,000 dissertation, produced under the supervision of a member of staff. The work accounts for 50% of the final degree mark.

Read less
Focus on your profession with skills in 2D graphics and compositing that are immediately relevant in industry. Read more
Focus on your profession with skills in 2D graphics and compositing that are immediately relevant in industry.

Overview

This course is ideal if you want a solid grounding in the latest postproduction systems and techniques as well as a rich understanding of digital visual effects creation for feature film and broadcast television.

You can choose to focus on production-orientated work and apply for this MA degree. Alternatively you can focus on formal research into the technologies behind postproduction systems and apply for the MSc Postproduction with Visual Effects. We run this course in parallel with our masters in Postproduction with Sound Design which will allow you to work with others as you learn, giving you a well-rounded understanding of the postproduction process.

Through the course you'll build up a rich understanding of postproduction. You'll receive scientific and technical training combined with hands-on experience of visual effects systems, program creation and artistic decision-making. Many of our graduates work in the industry, from film to television companies, and some of our graduates have gone on to research in industry or academia.

Course content

This course aims to help you develop a knowledge of the theories and technologies that are central to professional production and postproduction of visual effects in film and television. You'll be able to develop the practical skills that a professional in the film or television industry needs. This course is also ideal if you want to prepare for further research in postproduction systems.

Your understanding of professional production values and aesthetics will be enhanced through technical analysis and critical evaluation. You'll also work on creative and technical collaborative projects with others studying related courses. This will allow you to develop a range of skills, such as time management, working to objectives and team work which you will find useful in the film and television industries as well as elsewhere.

Most of our students study full-time for one year, but you can also study this course part-time over two years.

You'll study a total of 180 credits. 80 of these will be through taught modules in the first two terms. You'll then go on to take a further 100 credits as part of an extended research project in the third term.

Term 1
1. Digital Production and Postproduction Workflows (20 credits)
2. Languages of Film and Television (10 credits)

Term 2
1. Group Projects (20 credits)
2. Visual Effects Design Lab (10 credits)
3. Conform and Finish (10 credits)
4. The Business of Production and Postproduction (10 credits)

The final term is dedicated to the design and development of individual project work.

Careers

The film and television industry is highly competitive and there is a constant demand for visual effects artists with a solid knowledge of current software and postproduction techniques. There's also demand for artists who possess a firm grasp of story and how technology can enhance the viewing experience.

There's an increasing demand for researchers, in both industry and academia, who have a firm understanding of postproduction tools and how they can be applied to create the next generation of postproduction technologies.

Read less
This MA offers a distinctive combination of analytical and practical methods for the creative investigation of plays and performance texts. Read more
This MA offers a distinctive combination of analytical and practical methods for the creative investigation of plays and performance texts. Its historical range is wide and students should be ready to research and trouble-shoot plays from different eras, whether classical Greek and Roman, medieval, early modern or contemporary.

Traditional formats of discussion groups and seminars are coupled with workshops and problem-solving sessions which address all the negotiations involved in transferring words on the page into a fully realised performance. The main emphasis of the MA is on the interpretation of text through the consideration of acting and directing processes, production conditions, historical context, and institutional and cultural politics. The MA incorporates masterclasses by leading theatre professionals which are part of an integrated visitor programme.

The MA in Theatre: Writing, Directing and Performance is unique in that it is designed to accommodate both students who may wish to pursue further academic study and students who wish to go into the theatre or media industries. We aim to produce graduates with a sophisticated understanding of how plays in performance work, and to develop high-quality researchers and theatre practitioners who understand the practical dynamics of process and production. Applicants may have a range of academic backgrounds and extensive practical experience is not a prerequisite for the course, but students must be willing to enter into the spirit of practical experiment whatever their particular strengths.

Aims

-To promote cutting-edge interdisciplinary thinking and collaboration
-To provide analytical and practical methods for the creative investigation of play and performance texts
-To offer in-depth analysis of the dynamics of the processes of writing, acting and directing
-To provide an understanding of the need to conduct investigation within historical, political, institutional and cultural frames
-To develop high-quality theatre researchers and practitioners

Teaching and assessment

Seminars and workshops
In terms 1 and 2 Directing Early Modern Plays and Case Studies in Writing, Directing and Performance are examined by 2,500 word essays. In Term 1 Writing into Performance is examined by a scriptwriting assignment. In term 2 Directing Modern Plays is examined by a combination of seminar performance and a 3,000 word essay. Storytelling for Theatre, Film and Television is examined by a 3,000 word project in each term. An ambitious programme of masterclasses given by leading practitioners is an important part of the MA.

Screenings
During terms 1 and 2 there will be screenings of relevant film and television material relating to specific performances, plays and productions under discussion.

Dissertation or practical project
In term 3 students prepare for their dissertation or practical project work. Students are assigned dissertation/project supervisors and receive individual supervision through the period of research. Assessment is by 20,000 word dissertation or by a substantial practical project such as a production, performance or piece of creative writing, supported by a 4,000 word essay mapping the project's planning and evolution. All final projects are subject to the approval of the convenors of the MA.

Careers

Because of the innovative emphasis on acquiring a wide range of analytical and practical skills centred around the performance and production of theatre texts, students are highly employable.

An in-depth understanding of narrative structures and their visual, technical, performative and political dimensions is of paramount importance to the entertainment industry and a significant number at the top of these businesses support this programme because it plugs an increasingly serious gap in the skills market. Recent students from the BA and MA Writing and Performance (a forerunner of this MA) have benefited from placements with theatre, film and television companies, and the MA in Theatre: Writing, Directing and Performance builds on that ethos. Placements have been informally arranged subject to student interest and industry availability from year to year.

Past graduates have gone on to study PhDs and also to conservatoires to continue their practical training. Many are now working as screenwriters, playwrights, actors, directors, designers, producers, technicians, literary managers, dramaturges, and literary agents. A significant number of graduates have set up their own theatre companies. Others work in theatre-in-education initiatives, arts funding organisations, youth theatre, journalism, publishing, and dramatherapy. Past students are also employed by major animation companies, and have gained work as script editors and production assistants.

Read less
University of York Department of History of Art
Distance from York: 0 miles
This innovative programme, the first of its kind in the English-speaking world, offers an integrated study of stained glass and its conservation, meeting a perceived need internationally for a qualification in this field. Read more
This innovative programme, the first of its kind in the English-speaking world, offers an integrated study of stained glass and its conservation, meeting a perceived need internationally for a qualification in this field. Our graduates are now leading figures in the discipline in the UK, Germany, Belgium and the USA.

The programme is taught in partnership with the Department of Archaeology.

Aims

Our aim is to offer training for a variety of employment in stained glass conservation, but also in cultural heritage management, arts administration, museums, and the administration of historic buildings.

The programme may also be preparation for higher research degrees.

Curriculum

This is a two-year programme, including four terms of taught courses, with two modules per term, a sixteen-week placement, and a five-month dissertation. Modules are devoted to basic and advanced techniques of glass conservation. Other fields of study include the history, ethics and the philosophy of conservation, international issues in conservation, art and architectural history, archaeology, conservation and the impact of climate change, and heritage and business administration. There will be a free choice of art-historical or archaeological modules in the spring term of the second year. In each taught term a masterclass addressing current issues and new research will be conducted by a visiting lecturer.

Placements

Leading conservation studios, museums and heritage institutions in Britain, Europe and the United States host placements, providing invaluable work experience, and networks for future careers.

Study tour

Every other year, usually in the Easter vacation, students will have the chance to join a European study tour, visiting major stained glass sites, and leading conservation practices.

Read less
Prepare for a career as a high quality sound design professional. This course is ideal if you want a solid grounding in the latest postproduction systems and techniques as well as a rich understanding of digital sound design creation and audio for film, television and interactive media. Read more
Prepare for a career as a high quality sound design professional.

Overview

This course is ideal if you want a solid grounding in the latest postproduction systems and techniques as well as a rich understanding of digital sound design creation and audio for film, television and interactive media.

You can choose to focus on production-orientated work and apply for this MA degree. Alternatively you can focus on formal research into the technologies behind postproduction systems and apply for the MSc Postproduction with Sound Design. We run this course in parallel with our masters in Postproduction with Visual Effects which will allow you to work with others as you learn, giving you a well-rounded understanding of the postproduction process.

Throughout the course you'll receive powerful scientific and technical training combined with hands-on experience of sound design, program creation and artistic decision-making. Many of our graduates work in the industry, from film to television companies, and some of our graduates have gone on to study for PhDs in sound-related areas.

Course content

This course aims to help you develop a knowledge of the theories and technologies that are central to professional production and postproduction of sound in film and television. You'll be able to develop the practical skills that a professional in the film or television industry needs. This course is also ideal if you want to prepare for further research in postproduction systems.

Your understanding of professional production values and aesthetics will be enhanced through technical analysis and critical evaluation. You'll also work on creative and technical collaborative projects with others studying related courses. This will allow you to develop a range of skills, such as time management, working to objectives and team work which you'll find useful in the film and television industries as well as elsewhere.

Most of our students study full-time for one year, but you can also study this course part-time over two years.

You'll study a total of 180 credits. 80 of these will be through taught modules in the first two terms. You'll then go on to take a further 100 credits as part of an extended research project in the third term.

Term 1
1. Digital Production and Postproduction Workflows (20 credits)
2. Languages of Film and Television (10 credits)

Term 2
1. Group Projects (20 credits)
2. Audio Effects Design Lab (10 credits)
3. Spatialized Audio and Surround Sound (10 credits)
4. The Business of Production and Postproduction (10 credits)

The final term is dedicated to the design and development of individual project work.

Careers

The film and television industry is highly competitive and there is a constant demand for sound designers with a solid knowledge of current software and postproduction techniques. There's also demand for sound designers who possess a firm grasp of story and understand how technology can enhance the audio-visual experience.

There's also an increasing demand for researchers, in both industry and academia, who have a firm understanding of postproduction tools and how they can be applied to create the next generation of postproduction technologies.

Read less
The interdisciplinary MA in Film and Literature at the University of York examines the lively and symbiotic traffic between written words and cinematic images (through adaptation, borrowing, versioning, negotiation, appropriation, transmediation, analogy, equivalence, resistance, pastiche, collision). Read more
The interdisciplinary MA in Film and Literature at the University of York examines the lively and symbiotic traffic between written words and cinematic images (through adaptation, borrowing, versioning, negotiation, appropriation, transmediation, analogy, equivalence, resistance, pastiche, collision).

It combines trenchant academic enquiry with passionately committed teaching, recent cinematic releases with early silent cinema, pop culture with high culture, theoretical questions with practical ones, blockbuster with poetry, mainstream with avant-garde, institutional studies with formal aesthetic analysis. And it allows students to determine the particular film/literature balance of the degree according to their own preferences.

Film and Literature both asks what is particular to the narrative codes and presentational conventions of cinema (as opposed to various literary forms) and also pits questions of medium-specificity against shared narrative, interpretive and socio-cultural histories. Through ranging cinematic, literary and theoretical illustration, it examines the ways in which the circulation of ideas between these two influential modes of expression can be more varied, more interesting and sometimes more surreptitious than conventional studies simply of ‘adaptation’ might imply.

Overall, it:
-Enables nuanced and sophisticated case-studies of mainstream literary adaptations for the screen (from classic novels, popular fiction, play texts, Shakespeare, real life news stories and more).
-Innovatively extends academic enquiry into other forms of influence, exchange and response between print and cinematic media (which includes the study of novels, poetry, journalism, reviews, plays, filmscripts, contracts, film censors’ reports and more).
-Roots all films in their broader cultural, historical, industrial, technological and aesthetic contexts.

Assessment

-Four assessed essays of approximately 4,500 words each
-A 14,000-16,000 word dissertation, written in consultation with a supervisor on an agreed topic

Careers

We have an excellent employment record for our postgraduates who are highly prized by top level employers, both in the UK and on the international stage. A combination of outstanding teaching and a supportive collegiate environment enable our students to develop their creativity, intellectual independence and ability to filter complex information and present it persuasively in person and in writing. These are important transferable skills which will always hold their value at the top end of the jobs market.

Read less
This is an intensive and specialised course that will equip you for the challenges of entering a film and television industry that is undergoing unprecedented and rapid change. Read more
This is an intensive and specialised course that will equip you for the challenges of entering a film and television industry that is undergoing unprecedented and rapid change. You'll have the opportunity to develop specialised skills in screen and television work, such as directing, screenwriting, cinematography, editing and other creative skills.

You'll gain practical experience and detailed knowledge of the equipment and facilities typically used in film and television. By the end of your course you will have produced innovative work that you'll complete to the highest professional standards.

Graduates of this course have gone on to roles in British and European film industries, in British television, and in Chinese commercials, film and TV production.

Course content

This is an intensive course that will equip you for the challenges of entering the film and television industry. You'll learn theory and get practical experience in many different areas: from script writing to camera operation and from lighting to directing and much more.

As you progress through the course you'll get the chance to specialise in areas that you find appealing.

Most of our students study full-time for one year, but you can also study this course part-time over two years.

You'll study a total of 180 credits. 90 of these will be through taught modules in the first two terms. You'll then go on to study a further 90 credits as part of an extended research project in the third term.

Term 1
1. Digital Cinematography (10 credits)
2. Digital Production and Postproduction Workflows (20 credits)
3. Languages of Film and Television (10 credits)

Term 2
1. Script Development (20 credits)
2. Directing for Film and Television (10 credits)
3. Group Projects (20 credits)

The final term is dedicated to the design and development of individual piece of work and accompanying report. This module accounts for half of all credits in the course, reflecting that it's the most important and also the most challenging part of the course.

Careers

A large number of graduates from this course have made striking progress in their careers since completing their course. There’s a wide variety of possible career paths open to you after completing this MA, both across industry and academia.

Read less
University of York Department of Music
Distance from York: 0 miles
York was the first university to introduce a Community Music module to its undergraduate course and is now the first to establish a programme at a postgraduate level. Read more
York was the first university to introduce a Community Music module to its undergraduate course and is now the first to establish a programme at a postgraduate level. This MA is intended for students who wish to develop their skills and interests in a range of community settings and it draws upon many department specialisms including developments in education and disability arts, world music, theatre and technology.

About 'Community Music'

The term ‘community music’ covers a wide range of activities.

It covers musicians working outside formal settings like the concert-hall in, for example, schools, prisons or hospitals; it covers the development of music in under-resourced areas and with disadvantaged people, and it covers the development of creative partnerships between people of different skills and cultures.

It is now a growing career option. Many orchestras and arts organisations are seeking to extend their audience base into the community. Many young musicians, in response to changing employment patterns, are developing multi-skilled ‘portfolio’ careers or are simply expressing a personal preference for more participatory forms of work.

Course structure

The MA is based on short course modules, a seminar series and a placement and related dissertation.

The short course modules are offered as a five-day block, two per term, starting on a Wednesday or Thursday and finishing the following week. This five-day structure has proved ideal for mature students and those wishing to fit the course around work commitments. All students are expected to have attended all six short course modules by the end of their course.

Weekly 1½ hour seminars on ‘Issues of Professional Development’ are held during the Autumn and Spring Terms. These seminars carry credits but no marks. Two of these per term will be included in the short course modules, to accommodate part time students. The seminar in week 7, Spring Term will take the form of a course review.

The placement comprises ten days contact with an outside agency by arrangement. The dissertation is 10,000-12,000 words (or an equivalent package including recordings and video). Together they form a research project.

Read less
University of York Department of Music
Distance from York: 0 miles
Our MA in Music taught masters courses gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and professional musicians to concentrate on your own musical interests. Read more
Our MA in Music taught masters courses gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and professional musicians to concentrate on your own musical interests.

Course structure

The MA in Music is taught in Pathways, allowing you to focus your studies on your particular interests. Typically there are around six students working with a particular supervisor on a pathway, and during the year you will concentrate on your own specialist projects. There are no major pieces of work thrust upon you that do not respect the independent nature of your pursuits. Instead, you produce Guided Submissions for the first two terms and an Independent Submission during the summer term and summer vacation.

Choose a pathway

-Composition
-Conducting
-Contemporary Studies
-Electroacoustic Composition
-English Church Music
-Improvised Music and Jazz
-Musicology
-Music Psychology
-Performance Practice
-Piano Studies
-Solo voice ensemble singing

Read less
University of York Department of Music
Distance from York: 0 miles
The MA in Music by Research offers postgraduate opportunities to individuals who prefer to study independently rather than through classroom teaching, working under the close supervision of an expert in their field. Read more
The MA in Music by Research offers postgraduate opportunities to individuals who prefer to study independently rather than through classroom teaching, working under the close supervision of an expert in their field. This is a research degree, not a taught course programme, and applicants will need to have a clearly-focussed research proposal in their given area in order to be considered for admission to the research MA. Supervision and tutorial meetings are held on either a weekly or fortnightly basis throughout the academic year and by arrangement over the summer vacation. There is also an opportunity for all MA by Research students to interact with one another: the MA Research Forum. Meeting on Wednesday mornings, this is a discussion group that engages with common themes, such as issues of writing about music, while offering the opportunity for individual students to present aspects of their research topics to the larger group. Students are also encouraged to attend the weekly Research Seminar series (on Wednesday afternoons) where invited speakers, staff members and PhD students give presentations about their latest work, and there are opportunities to meet other postgraduate researchers.

Degree structure

The MA in Music by Research lasts one year for full-time study or two years for part-time study. Candidates may elect to apply to the MPhil/PhD programme subject to satisfactory completion of the MA by Research, though progression is not automatic. The submission of a final dissertation or portfolio of work is the product of a series of carefully-structured elements produced throughout the duration of the programme in conjunction with supervisory guidance.

Application process

Please include as part of your application a research proposal detailing your proposed topic and how you plan to investigate it. This should include a paragraph explaining the relevance of your research or professional experience to date and another explaining why you think your work has the potential to make a new contribution to your field of interest. In addition, please include a selective resource list (maximum length: one page) of significant items (e.g. scores, analyses, published texts such as articles, books and concert ephemera, internet and audio-visual resources, etc.) that you have consulted in exploring your topic and preparing your proposal.

The Department will assist you in matching your research interests to our supervisory expertise. Please note that acceptance into the MA by Research programme requires approval by your potential supervisor.

Research areas

-Analysis
-Contemporary Studies
-English Church Music
-Electroacoustic Composition
-Jazz and Improvised Music
-Professional Studies
-Instrumental and Vocal Pedagogy
-Opera Studies
-Performance Practice

Read less
On our new MA in Poetry and Poetics you will have the opportunity to read widely and deeply in poetry and ideas about poetry from the classical period to the present day. Read more
On our new MA in Poetry and Poetics you will have the opportunity to read widely and deeply in poetry and ideas about poetry from the classical period to the present day. The language of the course, and of many of the poets studied, will be English, but you will also study poetry from a variety of linguistic cultures, and in a wide range of historical contexts. Seminars on the MA will focus on the intensive - and highly-pleasurable - reading of poems and poets, in dialogue with academic staff who have published on many major authors and periods: classical poetics, medieval literature, renaissance poetry, the Romantics and Victorians, and British, Irish and American contemporary writing. There will also be modules on old English poetry, symbolism, medieval poetic inheritances, the matter of British poetry, and poetry and art. You will develop excellent skills in reading poetry and enhance your knowledge of higher level poetics as well as the intricacies of poetic form.

The MA in Poetry and Poetics at York?

-The curriculum is international, placing issues of translation and cultural exchange at the heart of the study of poetry from classical to post-colonial poetics
-Our approach is cross-cultural as well as trans-historical, involving work between European languages, the UK and the USA
-You will focus on the poem and the poet, with an emphasis on theory and form
-You will be taught by research leaders in a wide variety of literary areas
-The wide foundation in poetry and aesthetics which it offers will equip you well for future careers in the culture industry
-It will also prepare you well for further research in this area

Assessment

-Four assessed essays of approximately 4,500 words each
-A 14,000-16,000 word dissertation, written in consultation with a supervisor on an agreed topic

Careers

We have an excellent employment record for our postgraduates who are highly prized by top level employers, both in the UK and on the international stage. A combination of outstanding teaching and a supportive collegiate environment enable our students to develop their creativity, intellectual independence and ability to filter complex information and present it persuasively in person and in writing. These are important transferable skills which will always hold their value at the top end of the jobs market.

Read less
University of York Department of History of Art
Distance from York: 0 miles
A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. Read more
A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. The pathways have emerged from clusters of excellence and expertise in the Department and relate directly to our Research Schools of Architectural History and Theory, British Art, Medieval Art and Medievalisms, Modern and Contemporary and Sculpture Studies. We therefore have concentrations of staff working in these areas, and related lectures, colloquia and site visits taking place.

The Sculpture Studies pathway

If you select the Sculpture Studies pathway you could choose options which take different approaches to a range of three dimensional objects across different periods, spanning from the Anglo Saxon period to contemporary explorations of the idea of ‘sculpture’, which during the twentieth century underwent a dramatic series of changes, ranging from early twentieth century notions of ‘direct carving’ and ‘truth to materials’ in the work of Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore, to the found, ‘readymade’ objects of the Dadaists and surrealists in Europe, to a wide range of other kinds of three-dimensional objects made from unusual, non-art materials, installation art and other kinds of ‘mixed media’ works from the 1950s in internationally diverse geographic locales.

In order to complete the degree, at least two of your four option modules and your dissertation must be completed in Sculpture Studies. Beyond this, the programme structure provides the flexibility for you to either specialise entirely in Sculpture Studies, or to select up to two of your option modules from art history modules outside the field, or from modules offered by other humanities departments and interdisciplinary centres. Training will be offered in both general and pathway-specific research skills, which will prepare you for the development of a sustained independent research project for your dissertation, on which you will work closely with an academic supervisor who is expert in the field.

Degree Structure

Taken full-time, the one-year MA in History of Art (Sculpture Studies) consists of:
-Autumn and Spring Terms: A core module focusing on Research Skills and Methods in History of Art, including pathway-specific sessions.
-Autumn Term: Two taught modules of your choice; an option is always offered on historiographical and theoretical approaches to art history.
-Spring Term: Two further modules of your choice.
-Summer Term and vacation: A dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words.

Taken part-time over two years, you would do one option in each of the Autumn and Spring terms, and work on your dissertation during the Summer terms and summer vacation.

Each option is taught by weekly two-hour seminars and assessement is in the form of a 4,000 word essay. Field-trips to view art and architecture are included in the programme, as appropriate.

The Research Skills and Methods in History of Art module, which is taught on a fortnightly basis across the Autumn and Spring Term, culminates in the production of a dissertation synopsis, on which the module is assessed.

The programme culminates in the production of a 15,000-20,000 dissertation, produced under the supervision of a member of staff. The work accounts for 50% of the final degree mark.

Read less
University of York Department of Music
Distance from York: 0 miles
The MA in Music Technology by Research is aimed at research-focused graduates with experience in music technology or audio engineering. Read more
The MA in Music Technology by Research is aimed at research-focused graduates with experience in music technology or audio engineering: both high level creators interested in composition, production and contemporary aesthetic approaches to audio, and those who wish to develop tools for other content composers, performers and analysts.

Overview

The Masters by Research course in Music Technology is aimed at meeting the needs of research-focused graduates with experience in music technology or audio engineering. This stream is specifically focused on developing, assessing and applying technology to current problems and questions in music practice and analysis. It is aimed at both high level creators interested in composition, production and contemporary aesthetic approaches to audio, and those who wish to develop tools for other content composers, performers and analysts. The course recognises that technology is applicable to many areas of musical endeavour, from creation to understanding, and may have many different forms of output including compositions, audio processing software, performance systems, studies of existing technologies etc. The Department has excellent facilities to support a wide range of research activities in this area.

Applicants should be able to articulate a clear research plan, stating its context and citing relevant existing work in the area as well as identifying the type(s) of outputs the research will generate.

Course structure

The MA in Music Technology by Research lasts one year for full-time study or two years for part-time study. Candidates may elect to apply to the MPhil/PhD programme subject to satisfactory completion of the MA by Research, though progression is not automatic. The submission of a final dissertation or portfolio of work is the product of a series of carefully-structured elements produced throughout the duration of the programme in conjunction with supervisory guidance.

Submission options

Submission by dissertation: A dissertation of between 30,000 and 40,000 words investigating the candidate's registered topic, accompanied by a comprehensive resource list of relevant materials (including software, production work, internet and audio-visual resources, etc. as relevant).

Submission by portfolio of compositions: A portfolio of between 3 and 5 technologically mediated compositions for any instrument, voice, ensemble, audio media or multi-media, as agreed with the candidate's supervisor and presented to a professional standard. Each composition will be supported by appropriate commentary of around 2,500 words, discussing the work, the process of composition and related details that situate the composition in a research context; a resource list of relevant materials(e.g. scholarly articles addressing relevant technical, aesthetic and/or cultural issues, software, audio productions, internet and audio-visual resources, etc.) will also be included. If the candidate has conducted substantial research that is not evident in the portfolio, the documentation may be longer.

Read less
University of York Department of Music
Distance from York: 0 miles
Our MA in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice. Read more
Our MA in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice.

Course summary

This new programme (which replaces the Production pathway of the Music MA) provides practical, theoretical and analytical study of the creation, perception and reception of audio productions. An interdisciplinary approach is adopted which examines how creative studio practice is informed by perspectives provided by science and engineering (acoustics, psychoacoustics, electroacoustics, signal processing) as well as composition, performance and musicology. Professional competences in various aspects of sound recording practice are developed and assessed, along with the underlying transferable knowledge. This is in addition to a cultural and historical perspective which encourages the understanding of production, with its own notions of style and genre, as an evolving and integral part of music making.

Aims

The MA in Music Production degree is aimed at students wishing to explore the practice and theory of Music Production. This combines a very broad view of the techniques and applications of production for audio media with the subsequent development of more tightly focussed individual skills and scholarship. Music Production might involve anything ranging from the creation of entirely synthetic material using computer-based techniques to the successful capture of acoustic performances, as well as the restoration and reconstruction of existing audio heritage. There are also important philosophies and technologies underlying this discipline that are constantly evolving.

Whether you are an electronic/computer-based composer or an early music specialist who wants to make the very best recordings, this course will provide you with the intellectual and practical skills to realise your goals. This is not a training course in specific pieces of software or hardware. It is a year-long exposure to thinking about and working in Music Production in its many forms. It is an opportunity to develop your own ideas, styles and career in this exciting discipline.

Structure and Ethos

The use of technology for the creation and capture of music is a core part of the Department of Music’s activities. The Department is home to the Music Research Centre: one of the finest facilities for listening to and recording sound in the UK. There is a large-scale neutral listening and performing space built to extremely low noise specifications (PNC15), a linked studio suite containing a dedicated performance space with configurable acoustics and two mix down/control rooms. The department’s main concert hall has a dedicated studio control room along with a suite of editing and programming rooms. This remarkable set of facilities is populated with a wide range of microphones and recording hardware/software. There are extensive computing facilities for practical work and research. Surround sound work is very well supported by multiple sets of 5.1 and full periphonic (i.e. with height) ambisonic reproduction systems.

Throughout the course MA Music Production students are expected to use these facilities to make recordings and other audio artefacts. Running alongside this practical activity are taught modules which provide an understanding and fluency in audio signals and systems and the production chain, listening and analytical skills. In the final six months students produce a self-directed portfolio as well as undertaking a large research project.

Industry and Employment Relevance

The role of producer is widely recognised within the music industry, across all styles and in many different areas of activity. This course will provide you with a versatile skill-set which will be of value for entrepreneurs or for candidates seeking professional appointments, be it with a small independent production house or a broadcaster with global reach. The department is home to professional sound recordists, producers, performers, composers and technology developers and so offers a unique combination of expertise in this field. Rather than a narrow set of competencies which will quickly date, you will graduate with a set of robust skills which will transfer to many different scenarios along with a breadth and depth of understanding of Music Production which will allow you to create meaningful and significant audio content, as well as critically analyse the work of other producers. A significant proportion of our graduates go on to do further research at PhD level.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X